Cerebral Veins: Veins draining the cerebrum.Intracranial Thrombosis: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in a blood vessel within the SKULL. Intracranial thrombosis can lead to thrombotic occlusions and BRAIN INFARCTION. The majority of the thrombotic occlusions are associated with ATHEROSCLEROSIS.Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CRANIAL SINUSES, large endothelium-lined venous channels situated within the SKULL. Intracranial sinuses, also called cranial venous sinuses, include the superior sagittal, cavernous, lateral, petrous sinuses, and many others. Cranial sinus thrombosis can lead to severe HEADACHE; SEIZURE; and other neurological defects.Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the SUPERIOR SAGITTAL SINUS or the inferior sagittal sinus. Sagittal sinus thrombosis can result from infections, hematological disorders, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; and NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES. Clinical features are primarily related to the increased intracranial pressure causing HEADACHE; NAUSEA; and VOMITING. Severe cases can evolve to SEIZURES or COMA.Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CAVERNOUS SINUS of the brain. Infections of the paranasal sinuses and adjacent structures, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, and THROMBOPHILIA are associated conditions. Clinical manifestations include dysfunction of cranial nerves III, IV, V, and VI, marked periorbital swelling, chemosis, fever, and visual loss. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p711)Venous Thrombosis: The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.Cranial Sinuses: Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of DURA MATER, the endosteal and the meningeal layers. They are devoid of valves and are parts of the venous system of dura mater. Major cranial sinuses include a postero-superior group (such as superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and occipital) and an antero-inferior group (such as cavernous, petrosal, and basilar plexus).Lateral Sinus Thrombosis: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the LATERAL SINUSES. This condition is often associated with ear infections (OTITIS MEDIA or MASTOIDITIS) without antibiotic treatment. In developed nations, lateral sinus thrombosis can result from CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; BRAIN NEOPLASMS; NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES; THROMBOPHILIA; and other conditions. Clinical features include HEADACHE; VERTIGO; and increased intracranial pressure.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Dura Mater: The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.Cavernous Sinus: An irregularly shaped venous space in the dura mater at either side of the sphenoid bone.Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Phlebography: Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.Portal Vein: A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.Thrombophlebitis: Inflammation of a vein associated with a blood clot (THROMBUS).Superior Sagittal Sinus: The long large endothelium-lined venous channel on the top outer surface of the brain. It receives blood from a vein in the nasal cavity, runs backwards, and gradually increases in size as blood drains from veins of the brain and the DURA MATER. Near the lower back of the CRANIUM, the superior sagittal sinus deviates to one side (usually the right) and continues on as one of the TRANSVERSE SINUSES.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Femoral Vein: The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis: Embolism or thrombosis involving blood vessels which supply intracranial structures. Emboli may originate from extracranial or intracranial sources. Thrombosis may occur in arterial or venous structures.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Meningeal Arteries: Arteries which supply the dura mater.Iliac Vein: A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava.Intracranial Hypertension: Increased pressure within the cranial vault. This may result from several conditions, including HYDROCEPHALUS; BRAIN EDEMA; intracranial masses; severe systemic HYPERTENSION; PSEUDOTUMOR CEREBRI; and other disorders.Coronary Thrombosis: Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis: DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS of an upper extremity vein (e.g., AXILLARY VEIN; SUBCLAVIAN VEIN; and JUGULAR VEINS). It is associated with mechanical factors (Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis, Primary) secondary to other anatomic factors (Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis, Secondary). Symptoms may include sudden onset of pain, warmth, redness, blueness, and swelling in the arm.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Sphenoid Sinus: One of the paired air spaces located in the body of the SPHENOID BONE behind the ETHMOID BONE in the middle of the skull. Sphenoid sinus communicates with the posterosuperior part of NASAL CAVITY on the same side.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Mesenteric Veins: Veins which return blood from the intestines; the inferior mesenteric vein empties into the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein joins the splenic vein to form the portal vein.Cerebral Infarction: The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).Cerebrovascular Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.Heparin: A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.Carotid Artery Thrombosis: Blood clot formation in any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES. This may produce CAROTID STENOSIS or occlusion of the vessel, leading to TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBRAL INFARCTION; or AMAUROSIS FUGAX.Renal Veins: Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.Jugular Veins: Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.Mastoiditis: Inflammation of the honeycomb-like MASTOID BONE in the skull just behind the ear. It is usually a complication of OTITIS MEDIA.Thrombectomy: Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material from a blood vessel at the point of its formation. Removal of a clot arising from a distant site is called EMBOLECTOMY.Popliteal Vein: The vein formed by the union of the anterior and posterior tibial veins; it courses through the popliteal space and becomes the femoral vein.Subclavian Vein: The continuation of the axillary vein which follows the subclavian artery and then joins the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.Splenic Vein: Vein formed by the union (at the hilus of the spleen) of several small veins from the stomach, pancreas, spleen and mesentery.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Fibrinolytic Agents: Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.Pulmonary Embolism: Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.Saphenous Vein: The vein which drains the foot and leg.Varicose Veins: Enlarged and tortuous VEINS.Maxillary Sinus: The air space located in the body of the MAXILLARY BONE near each cheek. Each maxillary sinus communicates with the middle passage (meatus) of the NASAL CAVITY on the same side.Pseudotumor Cerebri: A condition marked by raised intracranial pressure and characterized clinically by HEADACHES; NAUSEA; PAPILLEDEMA, peripheral constriction of the visual fields, transient visual obscurations, and pulsatile TINNITUS. OBESITY is frequently associated with this condition, which primarily affects women between 20 and 44 years of age. Chronic PAPILLEDEMA may lead to optic nerve injury (see OPTIC NERVE DISEASES) and visual loss (see BLINDNESS).Papilledema: Swelling of the OPTIC DISK, usually in association with increased intracranial pressure, characterized by hyperemia, blurring of the disk margins, microhemorrhages, blind spot enlargement, and engorgement of retinal veins. Chronic papilledema may cause OPTIC ATROPHY and visual loss. (Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p175)Central Nervous System Vascular Malformations: Congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities involving ARTERIES; VEINS; or venous sinuses in the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and MENINGES.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cerebral Hemorrhage: Bleeding into one or both CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES including the BASAL GANGLIA and the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is often associated with HYPERTENSION and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Thrombolytic Therapy: Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.Paranasal Sinuses: Air-filled spaces located within the bones around the NASAL CAVITY. They are extensions of the nasal cavity and lined by the ciliated NASAL MUCOSA. Each sinus is named for the cranial bone in which it is located, such as the ETHMOID SINUS; the FRONTAL SINUS; the MAXILLARY SINUS; and the SPHENOID SINUS.Thrombophilia: A disorder of HEMOSTASIS in which there is a tendency for the occurrence of THROMBOSIS.Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight: Heparin fractions with a molecular weight usually between 4000 and 6000 kD. These low-molecular-weight fractions are effective antithrombotic agents. Their administration reduces the risk of hemorrhage, they have a longer half-life, and their platelet interactions are reduced in comparison to unfractionated heparin. They also provide an effective prophylaxis against postoperative major pulmonary embolism.Vena Cava, Inferior: The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products: Soluble protein fragments formed by the proteolytic action of plasmin on fibrin or fibrinogen. FDP and their complexes profoundly impair the hemostatic process and are a major cause of hemorrhage in intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis.Transverse Sinuses: The two large endothelium-lined venous channels that begin at the internal occipital protuberance at the back and lower part of the CRANIUM and travels laterally and forward ending in the internal jugular vein (JUGULAR VEINS). One of the transverse sinuses, usually the right one, is the continuation of the SUPERIOR SAGITTAL SINUS. The other transverse sinus is the continuation of the straight sinus.Sinus of Valsalva: The dilatation of the aortic wall behind each of the cusps of the aortic valve.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Mastoid: The posterior part of the temporal bone. It is a projection of the petrous bone.Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Axillary Vein: The venous trunk of the upper limb; a continuation of the basilar and brachial veins running from the lower border of the teres major muscle to the outer border of the first rib where it becomes the subclavian vein.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Sphenoid Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the SPHENOID SINUS. Isolated sphenoid sinusitis is uncommon. It usually occurs in conjunction with other paranasal sinusitis.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Carotid Sinus: The dilated portion of the common carotid artery at its bifurcation into external and internal carotids. It contains baroreceptors which, when stimulated, cause slowing of the heart, vasodilatation, and a fall in blood pressure.Postthrombotic Syndrome: A condition caused by one or more episodes of DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS, usually the blood clots are lodged in the legs. Clinical features include EDEMA; PAIN; aching; heaviness; and MUSCLE CRAMP in the leg. When severe leg swelling leads to skin breakdown, it is called venous STASIS ULCER.Factor V: Heat- and storage-labile plasma glycoprotein which accelerates the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin in blood coagulation. Factor V accomplishes this by forming a complex with factor Xa, phospholipid, and calcium (prothrombinase complex). Deficiency of factor V leads to Owren's disease.Frontal Sinus: One of the paired, but seldom symmetrical, air spaces located between the inner and outer compact layers of the FRONTAL BONE in the forehead.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Budd-Chiari Syndrome: A condition in which the hepatic venous outflow is obstructed anywhere from the small HEPATIC VEINS to the junction of the INFERIOR VENA CAVA and the RIGHT ATRIUM. Usually the blockage is extrahepatic and caused by blood clots (THROMBUS) or fibrous webs. Parenchymal FIBROSIS is uncommon.Venous Thromboembolism: Obstruction of a vein or VEINS (embolism) by a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the blood stream.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Blood Coagulation Disorders: Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of abnormalities in blood coagulation due to a variety of factors such as COAGULATION PROTEIN DISORDERS; BLOOD PLATELET DISORDERS; BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS or nutritional conditions.Putaminal Hemorrhage: Intracranial bleeding into the PUTAMEN, a BASAL GANGLIA nucleus. This is associated with HYPERTENSION and lipohyalinosis of small blood vessels in the putamen. Clinical manifestations vary with the size of hemorrhage, but include HEMIPARESIS; HEADACHE; and alterations of consciousness.Streptococcus constellatus: A species of gram-positive bacteria in the STREPTOCOCCUS MILLERI GROUP. It is commonly found in the oropharnyx flora and has a proclivity for abscess formation in the upper body and respiratory tract.Protein S Deficiency: An autosomal dominant disorder showing decreased levels of plasma protein S antigen or activity, associated with venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. PROTEIN S is a vitamin K-dependent plasma protein that inhibits blood clotting by serving as a cofactor for activated PROTEIN C (also a vitamin K-dependent protein), and the clinical manifestations of its deficiency are virtually identical to those of protein C deficiency. Treatment with heparin for acute thrombotic processes is usually followed by maintenance administration of coumarin drugs for the prevention of recurrent thrombosis. (From Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 12th ed, p1511; Wintrobe's Clinical Hematology, 9th ed, p1523)Paranasal Sinus Diseases: Diseases affecting or involving the PARANASAL SINUSES and generally manifesting as inflammation, abscesses, cysts, or tumors.Thromboembolism: Obstruction of a blood vessel (embolism) by a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the blood stream.Eye Manifestations: Ocular disorders attendant upon non-ocular disease or injury.Cerebral Palsy: A heterogeneous group of nonprogressive motor disorders caused by chronic brain injuries that originate in the prenatal period, perinatal period, or first few years of life. The four major subtypes are spastic, athetoid, ataxic, and mixed cerebral palsy, with spastic forms being the most common. The motor disorder may range from difficulties with fine motor control to severe spasticity (see MUSCLE SPASTICITY) in all limbs. Spastic diplegia (Little disease) is the most common subtype, and is characterized by spasticity that is more prominent in the legs than in the arms. Pathologically, this condition may be associated with LEUKOMALACIA, PERIVENTRICULAR. (From Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Aug;40(8):520-7)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial: A non-invasive technique using ultrasound for the measurement of cerebrovascular hemodynamics, particularly cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebral collateral flow. With a high-intensity, low-frequency pulse probe, the intracranial arteries may be studied transtemporally, transorbitally, or from below the foramen magnum.Orbital Diseases: Diseases of the bony orbit and contents except the eyeball.Coronary Sinus: A short vein that collects about two thirds of the venous blood from the MYOCARDIUM and drains into the RIGHT ATRIUM. Coronary sinus, normally located between the LEFT ATRIUM and LEFT VENTRICLE on the posterior surface of the heart, can serve as an anatomical reference for cardiac procedures.Pulmonary Veins: The veins that return the oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.Warfarin: An anticoagulant that acts by inhibiting the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors. Warfarin is indicated for the prophylaxis and/or treatment of venous thrombosis and its extension, pulmonary embolism, and atrial fibrillation with embolization. It is also used as an adjunct in the prophylaxis of systemic embolism after myocardial infarction. Warfarin is also used as a rodenticide.Battered Child Syndrome: A clinical condition resulting from repeated physical and psychological injuries inflicted on a child by the parents or caregivers.Middle Cerebral Artery: The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.Vena Cava Filters: Mechanical devices inserted in the inferior vena cava that prevent the migration of blood clots from deep venous thrombosis of the leg.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Contraceptives, Oral: Compounds, usually hormonal, taken orally in order to block ovulation and prevent the occurrence of pregnancy. The hormones are generally estrogen or progesterone or both.Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator: A proteolytic enzyme that converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN where the preferential cleavage is between ARGININE and VALINE. It was isolated originally from human URINE, but is found in most tissues of most VERTEBRATES.Mesenteric Vascular Occlusion: Obstruction of the flow in the SPLANCHNIC CIRCULATION by ATHEROSCLEROSIS; EMBOLISM; THROMBOSIS; STENOSIS; TRAUMA; and compression or intrinsic pressure from adjacent tumors. Rare causes are drugs, intestinal parasites, and vascular immunoinflammatory diseases such as PERIARTERITIS NODOSA and THROMBOANGIITIS OBLITERANS. (From Juergens et al., Peripheral Vascular Diseases, 5th ed, pp295-6)Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Postphlebitic Syndrome: A condition characterized by a chronically swollen limb, often a leg with stasis dermatitis and ulcerations. This syndrome can appear soon after phlebitis or years later. Postphlebitic syndrome is the result of damaged or incompetent venous valves in the limbs. Distended, tortuous VARICOSE VEINS are usually present. Leg pain may occur after long period of standing.Subarachnoid Space: The space between the arachnoid membrane and PIA MATER, filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID. It contains large blood vessels that supply the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Intracranial Pressure: Pressure within the cranial cavity. It is influenced by brain mass, the circulatory system, CSF dynamics, and skull rigidity.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Angiography, Digital Subtraction: A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.Stockings, Compression: Tight coverings for the foot and leg that are worn to aid circulation in the legs, and prevent the formation of EDEMA and DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS. PNEUMATIC COMPRESSION STOCKINGS serve a similar purpose especially for bedridden patients, and following surgery.Plethysmography, Impedance: Recording changes in electrical impedance between electrodes placed on opposite sides of a part of the body, as a measure of volume changes in the path of the current. (Stedman, 25th ed)Prothrombin: A plasma protein that is the inactive precursor of thrombin. It is converted to thrombin by a prothrombin activator complex consisting of factor Xa, factor V, phospholipid, and calcium ions. Deficiency of prothrombin leads to hypoprothrombinemia.Blood Coagulation: The process of the interaction of BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS that results in an insoluble FIBRIN clot.Activated Protein C Resistance: A hemostatic disorder characterized by a poor anticoagulant response to activated protein C (APC). The activated form of Factor V (Factor Va) is more slowly degraded by activated protein C. Factor V Leiden mutation (R506Q) is the most common cause of APC resistance.Leg: The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.Intermittent Pneumatic Compression Devices: Instruments that generate intermittent forces, uniformed or graduated, to facilitate the emptying of VEINS. These devices are used to reduce limb EDEMA and prevent venous THROMBOEMBOLISM, such as deep vein thrombosis in the legs.Hemostasis: The process which spontaneously arrests the flow of BLOOD from vessels carrying blood under pressure. It is accomplished by contraction of the vessels, adhesion and aggregation of formed blood elements (eg. ERYTHROCYTE AGGREGATION), and the process of BLOOD COAGULATION.
Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, thrombosis of the veins of the brain, usually causes a headache that reflects raised ... Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (unexplained low cerebrospinal fluid pressure) Stroke (headache occurs in about 25% of ... The most important causes are subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, and cervical artery dissection[ ... Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis Cervical artery dissection Hypertensive emergency (severely raised blood pressure) ...
"Prognosis of cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis: results of the International Study on Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus ... "Intracranial venous thrombosis - Patient UK". UCH Institute for Child Health. "Clinical guideline Cerebral Venous Sinus ... In cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, blood clots usually form both in the veins of the brain and the venous sinuses. The ... Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is the presence of acute thrombosis (a blood clot) in the dural venous sinuses, which ...
Venous sinus thrombosis is the most frequent vascular manifestation in NBD followed by cortical cerebral veins thrombosis. On ... vascular complications such as cerebral venous thrombosis primarily occurs. Other distinct characteristics include intracranial ... The main clinical characteristic is the cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). If one experiences CVT, a clot in one of the blood ... Tunc R, Saip S, Siva A, Yazici H. Cerebral venous thrombosis is associated with major vessel disease in Behçet's syndrome. Ann ...
Paralysis allows the cerebral veins to drain more easily, but can mask signs of seizures, and the drugs can have other harmful ... increase in venous pressure can be due to venous sinus thrombosis, heart failure, or obstruction of superior mediastinal or ... An increase in pressure, most commonly due to head injury leading to intracranial hematoma or cerebral edema, can crush brain ... Idiopathic or unknown cause (idiopathic intracranial hypertension) craniosynostosis Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), the ...
Renal vein thrombosis. *upper limb / torso *Mondor's disease. *Paget-Schroetter disease. *head *Cerebral venous sinus ... Intracranial aneurysm, also known as brain aneurysm, is a cerebrovascular disorder in which weakness in the wall of a cerebral ... Cerebral bypass surgery[edit]. Cerebral bypass surgery was developed in the 1960s in Switzerland by Gazi Yasargil, M.D. When a ... Some individuals with a ruptured cerebral aneurysm die from the initial bleeding. Other individuals with cerebral aneurysm ...
... also known as Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension), cerebral venous sinus thrombosis or intracerebral hemorrhage Respiratory ... central retinal vein occlusion, cavernous sinus thrombosis Local lesion: optic neuritis, Ischemic optic neuropathy, methanol ... Hyperammonemia, elevated level of ammonia in blood (including cerebral edema/intracranial pressure) Guillain-Barré syndrome, ... An MRA and MRV may also be ordered to rule out the possibility of stenosis or thrombosis of the arterial or venous systems. The ...
Coutinho, J; de Bruijn, SF; Deveber, G; Stam, J (2011). "Anticoagulation for cerebral sinus thrombosis". Cochrane Database Syst ... paranasal sinuses allows retrograde spread of infection to the cavernous sinus via the superior and inferior ophthalmic veins. ... If there is evidence of complications such as intracranial suppuration, 6-8 weeks of total therapy may be warranted. All ... "Cavernous sinus thrombosis - NHS Choices". www.nhs.uk. NHS Choices. Retrieved 27 May 2016. "Cavernous sinus thrombosis: ...
... and thrombosis of the lateral sinus, superior sagittal sinus, internal jugular vein, or of the Great Cerebral Vein of Galen ... The complications that are usually associated with vein of Galen malformations are usually intracranial hemorrhages. Over half ... The vein of Galen can be visualized using ultrasound or Doppler. A malformed Great Cerebral Vein will be noticeably enlarged. ... Dilation of the great cerebral vein of Galen is a secondary result of the force of arterial blood either directly from an ...
Stam J (April 2005). "Thrombosis of the cerebral veins and sinuses". The New England Journal of Medicine. 352 (17): 1791-8. ... Intracranial hemorrhage is the accumulation of blood anywhere within the skull vault. A distinction is made between intra-axial ... The following are some common outcomes: Cerebral Palsy (often Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy/Hemiplegia) Epilepsy Vision Loss ... There are four reasons why this might happen: Thrombosis (obstruction of a blood vessel by a blood clot forming locally) ...
Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, cavernous sinus thrombosis and jugular vein thrombosis: thrombosis of the veins of the brain ... Budd-Chiari syndrome (thrombosis of the hepatic vein). *Thrombosis of the splanchnic venous system: *Mesenteric vein thrombosis ... A venous thrombosis is a thrombosis in a vein, caused by a thrombus (blood clot). A common type of venous thrombosis is a deep ... Renal vein thrombosis (thrombosis of the veins of the kidneys. Parodoxical embolism[edit]. Systemic embolism of venous origin ...
1.1.6 Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. *1.1.7 Jugular vein thrombosis. *1.1.8 Cavernous sinus thrombosis ... Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis[edit]. Main article: Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST ... Renal vein thrombosis[edit]. Main article: Renal vein thrombosis. Renal vein thrombosis is the obstruction of the renal vein by ... Portal vein thrombosis[edit]. Main article: Portal vein thrombosis. Portal vein thrombosis affects the hepatic portal vein, ...
Renal vein thrombosis. *upper limb / torso *Mondor's disease. *Paget-Schroetter disease. *head *Cerebral venous sinus ... A common type of venous thrombosis is a deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which is a blood clot in the deep veins of the leg. If the ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ... Portal vein thrombosis. References[edit]. *^ Saha P, Humphries J, Modarai B, et al. (2011). "Leukocytes and the natural history ...
... occurring in response to thrombosis and collateral revascularization of a venous sinus. Cerebral angiography is the diagnostic ... High pressure in sinus results in both anterograde drainage and retrograde drainage via subarachnoid veins. Type III: dural ... 10-15% of intracranial AV malformations are DAVFs. There is a higher preponderance in females (61-66%), and typically patients ... Treatment can be as simple as clipping the draining vein at the site of the dural sinus. If treatment involves embolization, it ...
Aseptic thrombi can also form in the dural venous sinuses and/or the cerebral veins draining into them. Most patients present ... Lanska D J, Kryscio R J (2000) Risk factors for peripartum and postpartum stroke and intracranial venous thrombosis. Stroke 31 ... Kalbag R M, Woolf A L (1967) Cerebral Venous Thrombosis, with Special Reference to Primary Aseptic Thrombosis. Oxford, Oxford ... Srinavasan K (1988) Puerperal cerebral venous and arterial thrombosis. Seminars in Neurology 8:222-225. Brockington I F (2006) ...
... as well as the formation of blood clots in the veins (cerebral venous thrombosis), may all lead to weakness, loss of sensation ... The three forms of cerebral edema all lead to increased intracranial pressure; together with the lowered blood pressure often ... or infections of the nasopharynx or the nasal sinuses that have formed a tract with the subarachnoid space (see above); ... this would allow the optimization of the cerebral perfusion pressure and various treatments to decrease the intracranial ...
... performed in most cases to exclude the possibility of venous sinus stenosis/obstruction or cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. A ... or obstruction of the veins that drain blood from the brain. The first theory, that of increased production of cerebrospinal ... Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition characterized by increased intracranial pressure (pressure around the ... "Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension". National Eye Institute. April 2014. Retrieved 8 November 2017. "Idiopathic Intracranial ...
... cerebral venous sinus thrombosis; stroke saat kehamilan, stroke akibat penggunaan hormon pasca menopause, penggunaan senyawa ... Intra-cranial stenting yang diterapkan pada gejala penyumbatan intracranial arterial stenosis, boleh dikatakan sukses ... Cortical vein thrombosis-dehydration. Puerperium. Infection. Neoplasma dan sejenisnya. *Displasia fibromuskular. *Sindrom ... cerebral venous thrombosis, dan spinal cord stroke.[9] ICH lebih lanjut terbagi menjadi parenchymal hemorrhage, hemorrhagic ...
Cerebral aneurysms, also known as intracranial or brain aneurysms, occur most commonly in the anterior cerebral artery, which ... Once the dye is injected into a vein, it travels to the cerebral arteries, and images are created using a CT scan. These images ... Aneurysms can also be a nidus for clot formation (thrombosis) and embolization. The word is from Greek: ἀνεύρυσμα, aneurysma, " ... aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva, and aneurysms following cardiac surgery. The aorta, namely aortic aneurysms including thoracic ...
Renal vein thrombosis. *upper limb / torso *Mondor's disease. *Paget-Schroetter disease. *head *Cerebral venous sinus ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ...
Renal vein thrombosis. *upper limb / torso *Mondor's disease. *Paget-Schroetter disease. *head *Cerebral venous sinus ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ... thrombosis. These changes create an exaggerated layered appearance (onion skinning).[11] ...
Renal vein thrombosis. *upper limb / torso *Mondor's disease. *Paget-Schroetter disease. *head *Cerebral venous sinus ... causing increased intracranial pressure and cerebral edema, with increased risk of intracranial bleeding. ... Some examples of neurological damage include hypertensive encephalopathy, cerebral vascular accident/cerebral infarction, ... is a manifestation of the dysfunction of cerebral autoregulation.[7] Cerebral autoregulation is the ability of the blood ...
Renal vein thrombosis. *upper limb / torso *Mondor's disease. *Paget-Schroetter disease. *head *Cerebral venous sinus ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ... "Thrombosis and Haemostasis. 101 (2): 271-78. doi:10.1160/th08-09-0575. PMID 19190809. Retrieved 19 June 2009.. ...
Renal vein thrombosis. *upper limb / torso *Mondor's disease. *Paget-Schroetter disease. *head *Cerebral venous sinus ... and intracranial (the part inside the skull).[1] ... The gold standard is cerebral angiography (with or without ... Fisher CM, Ojemann RG, Roberson GH (February 1978). "Spontaneous dissection of cervico-cerebral arteries". Can J Neurol Sci. 5 ... Dissecting aneurysms of the vertebral artery constitute 4% of all cerebral aneurysms, and are hence a relatively rare but ...
Renal vein thrombosis. *upper limb / torso *Mondor's disease. *Paget-Schroetter disease. *head *Cerebral venous sinus ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ... Adjacent to the pituitary lies a part of the skull base known as the cavernous sinus. This contains a number of nerves that ... The cavernous sinus also contains the carotid artery, which supplies blood to the brain; occasionally, compression of the ...
Renal vein thrombosis. *upper limb / torso *Mondor's disease. *Paget-Schroetter disease. *head *Cerebral venous sinus ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ... Associated superficial varicose veins or "ankle flare", a collection of small, dark, engorged superficial veins [5] ... causing the pressure in veins to increase.[6][7][8][9] The body needs the pressure gradient between arteries and veins in order ...
The great cerebral vein is one of the large blood vessels in the skull draining the cerebrum of the brain. It is also known as the "vein of Galen", named for its discoverer, the Greek physician Galen. However, it is not the only vein with this eponym.[clarification needed] The great cerebral vein is considered as one of the deep cerebral veins. Other deep cerebral veins are the internal cerebral veins, formed by the union of the superior thalamostriate vein and the superior choroid vein at the interventricular foramina. The internal cerebral veins can be seen on the superior surfaces of the caudate nuclei and thalami just under the corpus callosum. The veins at the anterior poles of the thalami merge posterior to the pineal ...
The emissary veins connect the extracranial venous system with the intracranial venous sinuses. They connect the veins outside the cranium to the venous sinuses inside the cranium. They drain from the scalp, through the skull, into the larger meningeal veins and dural venous sinuses. They are common in children. Emissary veins have an important role in selective cooling of the head. They also serve as routes where infections are carried into the cranial cavity from the extracranial veins to the intracranial veins. There are several types of emissary veins including posterior condyloid, mastoid, occipital and parietal emissary vein. There are also emissary veins passing through the foramen ovale, jugular foramen, foramen lacerum, and hypoglossal canal. Because the emissary ...
... (CVST) is the presence of acute thrombosis (a blood clot) in the dural venous sinuses, which drain blood from the brain. Symptoms may include headache, abnormal vision, any of the symptoms of stroke such as weakness of the face and limbs on one side of the body, and seizures. The diagnosis is usually by computed tomography (CT/CAT scan) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) employing radiocontrast to demonstrate obstruction of the venous sinuses by thrombus. Treatment is with anticoagulants (medication that suppresses blood clotting), and rarely thrombolysis (enzymatic destruction of the blood clot). Given that there is usually an underlying cause for the disease, tests may be performed to look for these. The disease may be complicated by raised intracranial pressure, which may warrant surgical intervention such as the placement of a shunt. Nine in ten people with sinus ...
Commencing at the foramen cecum, through which it receives emissary veins from the nasal cavity, it runs from anterior to posterior, grooving the inner surface of the frontal, the adjacent margins of the two parietal lobes, and the superior division of the cruciate eminence of the occipital lobe. Near the internal occipital protuberance, it drains into the confluence of sinuses and deviates to either side (usually the right). At this point it is continued as the corresponding transverse sinus. The superior sagittal sinus is usually divided into three parts: anterior (foramen cecum to bregma), middle (bregma to lambda), posterior (lambda to confluence).[1] It is triangular in section, narrow in front, and gradually increases in size as it passes backward. Its inner surface presents the openings of the superior cerebral veins, which run, for the most part, obliquely forward, and open chiefly at the back part ...
... (CCSVI or CCVI) is a term developed by Italian researcher Paolo Zamboni in 2008 to describe compromised flow of blood in the veins draining the central nervous system. Zamboni hypothesized that it played a role in the cause or development of multiple sclerosis (MS). Zamboni also devised a procedure which was termed by the media as "liberation procedure" or "liberation therapy", involving venoplasty (or stenting) of certain veins in an attempt to improve blood flow. Within the medical community, both the procedure and CCSVI have been met with skepticism. Zamboni's first published research was neither blinded nor did it have a comparison group. Zamboni also did not disclose his financial ties to Esaote, the manufacturer of the ultrasound specifically used in CCSVI diagnosis. The "liberation procedure" has been criticized for possibly resulting in serious complications and deaths while its benefits have not been proven. The United States Food and Drug ...
Behind either condyle of the lateral parts of occipital bone is a depression, the condyloid fossa (or condylar fossa), which receives the posterior margin of the superior facet of the atlas when the head is bent backward; the floor of this fossa is sometimes perforated by the condyloid canal, through which an emissary vein passes from the transverse sinus. ...
... (born 25 March 1957, Ferrara, Italy) is an Italian doctor who claims to have found in an unblinded preliminary study that in over 90% of the participants with multiple sclerosis there were problems in veins draining their brain, like stenosis or defective valves. He also noticed high level of accumulation of iron deposits in the brain, supposedly due to restricted outflow of blood. According to Zamboni some symptoms of multiple sclerosis in his own wife as well as 73% of his patients abated after an endovascular procedure to open these veins. Zamboni named this condition chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI). The theory was controversial. The National Multiple Sclerosis Society had said that, while "there is not yet enough evidence to conclude that obstruction of veins causes MS," that "[Zamboni's] hypothesis on CCSVI and its corrective treatment is a path that must be more fully explored and one that we are supporting with research ...
... is a form of energy medicine originally developed by Lloyd Arthur Meeker (1907 - 1954) and his colleagues. Meeker taught and practiced Attunement as a central feature of his spiritual teaching and ministry, Emissaries of Divine Light. Attunement is taught as a personal spiritual practice and as a healing modality offered through the hands. Emissaries of Divine Light believe that Attunement is a pivotal factor in the conscious evolution of humanity. Like Qigong, Reiki and Therapeutic touch Attunement is a putative practice as defined by the United States National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), lacking published scientific study of its effectiveness. Attunement practitioners and clients rely on personal and anecdotal experience to promote it. Lloyd Arthur Meeker shared the first Attunement with Rudolph Plagge in Wichita, Kansas, in 1929, and developed the teaching and practice of Attunement with colleagues until his death in 1954. From September 14 to 16, 1932, ...
On a slope of Mount Maenalus in Arcadia is an olive grove that grows around a marble tomb and the ruin of an old villa. There, one gigantic tree resembles a frighteningly distorted man, and the roots of the tree have shifted the blocks of the tomb. The narrator explains that the beekeeper who lives next door told him a story about the tree: Two renowned sculptors, Kalos and Musides, lived in the colonnaded villa, which was "resplendent" in its day. Both men created works that were widely known and celebrated. They were devoted friends, but different in disposition: Musides enjoyed the nightlife, while Kalos preferred the quiet of the olive grove. It was there he was said to receive his inspiration. One day, emissaries from "the Tyrant of Syracuse" ask the sculptors each to create a statue of Tyché (Greek: τύχη, lit. 'fortune; fate'). The statue, they are told, must be "of great size and cunning workmanship", since it is to be "a wonder of nations and a goal of travellers." The most ...
Oreksini ili hipokretini su pobuđivački neuropeptidni hormoni koje su simultano otkrile dve grupe istraživača u mozgu pacova.[1][2]. Dva srodana peptida (Oreksin-A i B, ili hipokretin-1 i -2), sa aproksimativno 50% identičnim sekvencama, nastaju presecanjem jednog prekurzornog proteina. Oreksin-A/hipokretin-1 ima 33 aminokiselina i dva intra-lančana disulfidna mosta, dok je oreksin-B/hipokretin-2 linearni peptid sa 28 aminokiselina. Studije su pokazale da oreksin A/hipokretin-1 možda ima veći biološki značaj od oreksina B/hipokretina-2. Mada se ovi peptidi proizvode u veoma maloj populaciji ćelija u lateralnom i posteriornom hipotalamusu, oni imaju uticaj na ceo mozak. Oreksin peptidi se vezuju za dva G-protein spregnuta oreksinska receptora, OX1 i OX2. Oreksin-A se vezuje za oba, OX1 i OX2, sa aproksimativno jednakim afinitetom, dok se oreksin-B vezuje uglavnom za OX2 i pet puta je manje potentan na OX1.[3]. ...
U koordinacionoj hemiji, EDTA4- je član familije liganda poliamino karboksilnih kiselina. EDTA4- obično vezuje metalne katjone putem dva amina i četiri karboksilata. Mnogi od rezultujućih koordinacionih jedinjenja imaju oktaedralnu geometriju. Ti oktaedralni kompleksi su hiralni. Pokazano je da se anjon [Co(EDTA)]− može razdvojiti u enantiomere.[9] Mnogi kompleksi EDTA4- poprimaju kompleksnije strukture usled (i) formiranja dodatnih veza sa vodom, i.e. sedam-koordinatni kompleksi, ili (ii) zamene jednog karboksilata vodom.[10] EDTA formira posebno jake komplekse sa Mn(II), Cu(II), Fe(III), Pb (II) i Co(III).[11]. Nekoliko osobina EDTA kompleksa je relevantno za njihove primene. Zbog njihove visoke gustine veza na jednom atom ovi ligandi imaju visok afinitet za metalne katjone:. ...
The great cerebral vein is one of the large blood vessels in the skull draining the cerebrum of the brain. It is also known as the "vein of Galen", named for its discoverer, the Greek physician Galen. However, it is not the only vein with this eponym.[clarification needed] The great cerebral vein is considered as one of the deep cerebral veins. Other deep cerebral veins are the internal cerebral veins, formed by the union of the superior thalamostriate vein and the superior choroid vein at the interventricular foramina. The internal cerebral veins can be seen on the superior surfaces of the caudate nuclei and thalami just under the corpus callosum. The veins at the anterior poles of the thalami merge posterior to the pineal ...
... (INN, marketed under the trade name Sermion) is an ergot derivative used to treat senile dementia and other disorders with vascular origins. It decreases vascular resistance and increases arterial blood flow in the brain, improving the utilization of oxygen and glucose by brain cells. It has similar vasoactive properties in other areas of the body, particularly the lungs. It is used for vascular disorders such as cerebral thrombosis and atherosclerosis, arterial blockages in the limbs, Raynaud's disease, vascular migraines, and retinopathy. Nicergoline has been registered in over fifty countries and has been used for more than three decades for the treatment of cognitive, affective, and behavioral disorders of older people. Nicerogline is used in the following cases: Acute and chronic cerebral metabolic-vascular disorders (cerebral arteriosclerosis, thrombosis and ...
"Prognosis of cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis: results of the International Study on Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus ... "Intracranial venous thrombosis - Patient UK". UCH Institute for Child Health. "Clinical guideline Cerebral Venous Sinus ... In cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, blood clots usually form both in the veins of the brain and the venous sinuses. The ... Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is the presence of acute thrombosis (a blood clot) in the dural venous sinuses, which ...
Intracranial complications of sinusitis are rare but life threatening. We present a case of a 17-year-old woman with sinusitis ... Sinus thrombectomy for purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis utilizing a novel combination of the Trevo stent retriever and ... Sinus thrombectomy for purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis utilizing a novel combination of the Trevo stent retriever and ... This is the first report using the Trevo stent retriever for sinus thrombosis. It is important to keep these rare complications ...
Nguyen on cure cavernous sinus thrombosis: This is a situation where a large series of veins at the base of the skull, just ... Cerebral vein thromb: It is formation of blood clots in cerebral veins/venous sinuses in brain. It could cause altered mental ... even in the presence of intracranial hemorrhage. ...Read more ... to know about cerebral vein thrombosis venous sinus thrombosis ... Cavernous sinus clot: Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a blood clot in the cavernous sinus, usu from infection. Symptoms of ...
Definition: increase in cerebrospinal fluid and of intracranial pressure following thrombosis of the cerebral veins or sinuses ...
Thrombosis of the venous channels in the brain is an uncommon cause of cerebral infarction relative to arterial disease, but it ... Long-Term Prognosis of Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus Thrombosis. results of the venoport study. Cerebrovasc Dis. 2002. 13(4): ... Cerebral venous thrombosis in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Headache. 2008 Nov-Dec. 48(10):1511-9. [Medline]. [Full ... Increased risk of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with third- generation oral contraceptives. Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis ...
... of the total cerebral blood volume [6]; therefore, interrupting the flow of blood through one of the large intracranial... ... The blood contained within the intracranial sinuses and veins comprises 70% ... Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Sinus Thrombosis Superior Sagittal Sinus Cerebral Venous Thrombosis Dural Sinus ... The blood contained within the intracranial sinuses and veins comprises 70% of the total cerebral blood volume [6]; therefore, ...
Magnetic Resonance Angiography revealed superior sagittal sinus and right transverse sinus thrombosis. Despite supportive ... measures and anticoagulation, the patient died because of uncontrolled increase in intracranial pressure. Conclusion: The ... possibility of cerebral vein thrombosis should be considered in all women with brain dysfunction during the puerperium. ... Cerebral vein thrombosis, is an emergent condition presenting with a variety of symptoms ranging from isolated headache to ...
Sagittal sinus pronunciation, Sagittal sinus translation, English dictionary definition of Sagittal sinus. sinus n. 1. A ... Cerebral vein thrombosis associated with MTHFR A1289C mutation gene in a young postpartum woman ... Brain MRI demonstrates a mass with intracranial T1 hyperintensity/T2 hypointensity and extracranial heterogenous T1 ... the sigmoid sinus was affected in 6.5% and cavernous sinus thrombosis was detected in 4.9%.. Cerebral Sinus Venous Thrombosis: ...
Prognosis of cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis: results of the International Study on Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus ... Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and cerebral dural sinus thrombosis. Am J Med 1994;97:200-01. ... such as cortical venous thrombosis, thrombosis of the cavernous sinus, and thrombosis of the deep cerebral veins. ... straight sinus, transverse and sigmoid sinuses, internal cerebral veins, vein of Galen, anastomotic veins of Labbé, and basal ...
... recanalize occluded sinuses and cerebral veins, and prevent complications of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. ... The role of anticoagulation as an adjuvant to antibiotic therapy remains controversial, as risk of intracranial bleeding and ... 2011 Scientific Statement recommends imaging of the cerebral sinus system in patients with suspected cerebral sinus thrombosis ... The cavernous sinus receives drainage from cortical and deep cerebral veins and also from the sinus systems of the meninges, ...
... she was readmitted because of a cerebral sinus vein thrombosis and severe thrombocytopenia. Intracranial bleeding and brain ... LMWHs are mainly used for preventing blood clots, for treating deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, and for treating ... Intracranial bleeding prevented continuous and effective anticoagulation. PLT transfusions were given, although they are ... and smaller risk of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis, a potential side effect of heparin. However, heparin is ...
Management of thrombosis of the dural sinus and cerebral veins (CVT) includes treatment of the underlying condition, ... Prognosis of cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis: results of the International Study on Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus ... Edris F, Kerner CM, Feyles V, et al.: Successful management of an extensive intracranial sinus thrombosis in a patient ... Stam J: Thrombosis of the cerebral veins and sinuses. N Engl J Med 2005, 352:1791-1798.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ...
... and cerebral vein and sinus thrombosis. I have additional knowledge in intracranial injury, venous embolism, spinal stenosis, ... Thrombosis Health Data Hematology Blood Protein Surgery Oncology Trauma Surgeon Professional Ethics Vascular Trauma Leukemia ... I also treat the following conditions: amyloid angiopathy, Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD), cerebral vasculitis, carotid and ... deep venous thrombosis, pediatric cardiac surgery, and pediatric critical care. I have over provided consultations, deposition ...
22). Other venous thromboses include deep vein thromboses and/or pulmonary emboli and cerebral venous sinus thromboses (Fig. 23 ... reconstruction of an MRI intracranial venogram (b) demonstrates complete non-opacification of the right transverse sinus. This ... Splanchnic vein thrombosis includes Budd-Chiari syndrome (Fig. 20), portal vein thrombosis (Fig. 21), or distal mesenteric ... of MPN-associated splanchnic vein thrombosis studies reported a prevalence of underlying MPN in splanchnic vein thrombosis of ...
... and cerebral vein and sinus thrombosis. I have additional knowledge in intracranial injury, venous embolism, spinal stenosis, ... My research interests include developing novel endovascular techniques for the treatment of cerebral aneurysms and ischemic ... I also treat the following conditions: amyloid angiopathy, Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD), cerebral vasculitis, carotid and ... I perform microsurgical and endovascular procedures for the treatment of cerebral aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs ...
Cerebral Venous Thrombosis, Intracranial Venous Sinus Thrombosis, Grand Mal Convulsion, Cerebral Infarction, Deep Vein ... Pulmonary Embolism, Deep Vein Thrombosis This Pulmonary Embolism Prednisone Tab side effect was reported by a pharmacist from ... Anxiety, Pain, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Emotional Distress, Mental Disorder, Pulmonary Embolism This Pulmonary Embolism problem ... Pulmonary Embolism, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Emotional Distress, Dyspnoea, Muscular Weakness, Hypoxia, Pain In Extremity, Anxiety ...
Mycotic Aneurysm Major Sinus and Cerebral Vein Thrombosis Post-Therapy Imaging in Aneurysm Patients Extracranial-Intracranial ... Stenosis Transplant Renal Vein Thrombosis Arteriovenous Fistula After Renal Biopsy Tumor Infiltration into the Renal Vein 7 ... Arteries Gastrointestinal Bleeding Portal Hypertension Mesenteric and Portal Vein Thrombosis Budd-Chiari Syndrome Thrombosis of ... Von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome Intracranial Vasculitis Moya-Moya Disease Ischemic Stroke in Children Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy ...
... from the International Study on Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus Thrombosis: age ,37, male, mental status disorder, coma, ... intracranial hemorrhage, deep CVT, CNS infection, and malignancy. To assign a weighted index (WI), the natural logarithm of the ... Development and Validation of a Predictive Outcome Score of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis J Neurol Sci. 2009 Jan 15;276(1-2):66-8. ... Background and purpose: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare disease with a variable outcome. The aim of this study was ...
Thrombosis of the cerebral veins and sinuses. N Engl J Med 2005;352:1791-98 ... Complicated Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis With Intracranial Hemorrhage and Mastoiditis. Nedaa Skeik, Madeline M. Stark, ... was mainly related to missed cortical vein thrombosis. This included a single case of chronic isolated cortical vein thrombosis ... In addition, 1 patient with extensive dural sinus and cortical vein thrombosis was included who had solely undergone ...
F erebral venous thrombosis results from thrombosis of cortical and deep veins and/or intracranial venous sinuses. The spectrum ... D eep cerebral venous thrombosis represents a subset of cerebral venous thrombosis that is associated with a significantly ... Isolated straight sinus and deep cerebral venous thrombosis: successful treatment with local infusion of urokinase Case report ... Pathophysiologically, thrombosis of cerebral dural venous sinuses leads to obstructed venous drainage, resulting in increased ...
Nonpyogenic thrombosis of cerebral vein Nonpyogenic thrombosis of intracranial venous sinus Code Type-1 Excludes: Type-1 ... The ICD code I676 is used to code Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is the presence of ... Nonpyogenic thrombosis of intracranial venous system BILLABLE Billable Code Billable codes are sufficient justification for ... I67.6 is a billable ICD code used to specify a diagnosis of nonpyogenic thrombosis of intracranial venous system. A billable ...
Septic thrombophlebitis of intracranial or intraspinal venous sinuses and veins. *Septic thrombosis of intracranial or ... Septic thrombophlebitis of intracranial or intraspinal venous sinuses and veins. *Septic thrombosis of intracranial or ... Septic embolism of intracranial or intraspinal venous sinuses and veins. *Septic endophlebitis of intracranial or intraspinal ... Septic embolism of intracranial or intraspinal venous sinuses and veins. *Septic endophlebitis of intracranial or intraspinal ...
... venous sinus thrombosis) is an elusive diagnosis because of its nonspecific presentation and its numerous predisposing causes ( ... or the basal ganglia and thalami from internal cerebral vein thrombosis in which the internal cerebral veins appear hyperdense ... Presentations include isolated headache, intracranial hypertension syndrome, seizures, a focal lobar syndrome, and ... Cerebral venous thrombosis (venous sinus thrombosis) is caused by clots in the dural venous sinuses and accounts for 0.5% to 1 ...
However cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) is very rare. Here we report a seven-year-old child with steroid-dependent ... developed multiple cerebral sinovenous thrombosis, presenting with headache, left sixth nerve palsy, and papilledema. The ... MRI depicts direct signs of thrombosis of one or more venous sinuses, thrombosis of cortical veins, and focal parenchymal ... Z. K. Xia, X. He, Z. M. Fan et al., "Nephrotic syndrome complicated with intracranial venous thrombosis treated with urokinase ...
... and MRI showed mastoiditis and cerebral vein thrombosis with complete occlusion of the left transverse and sigmoid sinus and ... Dural puncture from spinal anesthesia can cause herniation in the presence of intracranial mass effect, while an epidural ... Intractable Cerebral Vein Thrombosis during Pregnancy. Abstract Number: 139. Abstract Type: Case Report/Case Series ... Introduction: Cerebral vein thrombosis (CVT) occurs in 12/100,000 deliveries, with a mortality rate of up to 10% (1). Diagnosis ...
  • This is a situation where a large series of veins at the base of the skull, just behind the eyes clot off and block blood flow out of the brain. (healthtap.com)
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