Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Cerebrovascular Disorders: A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Cerebral Infarction: The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).Brain Ischemia: Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.Cerebrovascular Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.Cerebral Palsy: A heterogeneous group of nonprogressive motor disorders caused by chronic brain injuries that originate in the prenatal period, perinatal period, or first few years of life. The four major subtypes are spastic, athetoid, ataxic, and mixed cerebral palsy, with spastic forms being the most common. The motor disorder may range from difficulties with fine motor control to severe spasticity (see MUSCLE SPASTICITY) in all limbs. Spastic diplegia (Little disease) is the most common subtype, and is characterized by spasticity that is more prominent in the legs than in the arms. Pathologically, this condition may be associated with LEUKOMALACIA, PERIVENTRICULAR. (From Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Aug;40(8):520-7)Middle Cerebral Artery: The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.Cerebral Hemorrhage: Bleeding into one or both CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES including the BASAL GANGLIA and the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is often associated with HYPERTENSION and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery: NECROSIS occurring in the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY distribution system which brings blood to the entire lateral aspects of each CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE. Clinical signs include impaired cognition; APHASIA; AGRAPHIA; weak and numbness in the face and arms, contralaterally or bilaterally depending on the infarction.Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Ischemic Attack, Transient: Brief reversible episodes of focal, nonconvulsive ischemic dysfunction of the brain having a duration of less than 24 hours, and usually less than one hour, caused by transient thrombotic or embolic blood vessel occlusion or stenosis. Events may be classified by arterial distribution, temporal pattern, or etiology (e.g., embolic vs. thrombotic). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp814-6)Malaria, Cerebral: A condition characterized by somnolence or coma in the presence of an acute infection with PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM (and rarely other Plasmodium species). Initial clinical manifestations include HEADACHES; SEIZURES; and alterations of mentation followed by a rapid progression to COMA. Pathologic features include cerebral capillaries filled with parasitized erythrocytes and multiple small foci of cortical and subcortical necrosis. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p136)Cerebral Veins: Veins draining the cerebrum.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Brain Infarction: Tissue NECROSIS in any area of the brain, including the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Brain infarction is the result of a cascade of events initiated by inadequate blood flow through the brain that is followed by HYPOXIA and HYPOGLYCEMIA in brain tissue. Damage may be temporary, permanent, selective or pan-necrosis.Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis: Embolism or thrombosis involving blood vessels which supply intracranial structures. Emboli may originate from extracranial or intracranial sources. Thrombosis may occur in arterial or venous structures.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Fibrinolytic Agents: Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.Brain Edema: Increased intracellular or extracellular fluid in brain tissue. Cytotoxic brain edema (swelling due to increased intracellular fluid) is indicative of a disturbance in cell metabolism, and is commonly associated with hypoxic or ischemic injuries (see HYPOXIA, BRAIN). An increase in extracellular fluid may be caused by increased brain capillary permeability (vasogenic edema), an osmotic gradient, local blockages in interstitial fluid pathways, or by obstruction of CSF flow (e.g., obstructive HYDROCEPHALUS). (From Childs Nerv Syst 1992 Sep; 8(6):301-6)Anterior Cerebral Artery: Artery formed by the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL). Branches of the anterior cerebral artery supply the CAUDATE NUCLEUS; INTERNAL CAPSULE; PUTAMEN; SEPTAL NUCLEI; GYRUS CINGULI; and surfaces of the FRONTAL LOBE and PARIETAL LOBE.Tissue Plasminogen Activator: A proteolytic enzyme in the serine protease family found in many tissues which converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. It has fibrin-binding activity and is immunologically different from UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR. The primary sequence, composed of 527 amino acids, is identical in both the naturally occurring and synthetic proteases.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Posterior Cerebral Artery: Artery formed by the bifurcation of the BASILAR ARTERY. Branches of the posterior cerebral artery supply portions of the OCCIPITAL LOBE; PARIETAL LOBE; inferior temporal gyrus, brainstem, and CHOROID PLEXUS.Stroke, Lacunar: Stroke caused by lacunar infarction or other small vessel diseases of the brain. It features hemiparesis (see PARESIS), hemisensory, or hemisensory motor loss.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Hemiplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function on one side of the body. This condition is usually caused by BRAIN DISEASES that are localized to the cerebral hemisphere opposite to the side of weakness. Less frequently, BRAIN STEM lesions; cervical SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and other conditions may manifest as hemiplegia. The term hemiparesis (see PARESIS) refers to mild to moderate weakness involving one side of the body.Neuroprotective Agents: Drugs intended to prevent damage to the brain or spinal cord from ischemia, stroke, convulsions, or trauma. Some must be administered before the event, but others may be effective for some time after. They act by a variety of mechanisms, but often directly or indirectly minimize the damage produced by endogenous excitatory amino acids.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: A heterogeneous group of sporadic or familial disorders characterized by AMYLOID deposits in the walls of small and medium sized blood vessels of CEREBRAL CORTEX and MENINGES. Clinical features include multiple, small lobar CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; cerebral ischemia (BRAIN ISCHEMIA); and CEREBRAL INFARCTION. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is unrelated to generalized AMYLOIDOSIS. Amyloidogenic peptides in this condition are nearly always the same ones found in ALZHEIMER DISEASE. (from Kumar: Robbins and Cotran: Pathologic Basis of Disease, 7th ed., 2005)Intracranial Hemorrhages: Bleeding within the SKULL, including hemorrhages in the brain and the three membranes of MENINGES. The escape of blood often leads to the formation of HEMATOMA in the cranial epidural, subdural, and subarachnoid spaces.Intracranial Thrombosis: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in a blood vessel within the SKULL. Intracranial thrombosis can lead to thrombotic occlusions and BRAIN INFARCTION. The majority of the thrombotic occlusions are associated with ATHEROSCLEROSIS.Cerebral Ventricles: Four CSF-filled (see CEREBROSPINAL FLUID) cavities within the cerebral hemispheres (LATERAL VENTRICLES), in the midline (THIRD VENTRICLE) and within the PONS and MEDULLA OBLONGATA (FOURTH VENTRICLE).Cerebral Revascularization: Microsurgical revascularization to improve intracranial circulation. It usually involves joining the extracranial circulation to the intracranial circulation but may include extracranial revascularization (e.g., subclavian-vertebral artery bypass, subclavian-external carotid artery bypass). It is performed by joining two arteries (direct anastomosis or use of graft) or by free autologous transplantation of highly vascularized tissue to the surface of the brain.Paresis: A general term referring to a mild to moderate degree of muscular weakness, occasionally used as a synonym for PARALYSIS (severe or complete loss of motor function). In the older literature, paresis often referred specifically to paretic neurosyphilis (see NEUROSYPHILIS). "General paresis" and "general paralysis" may still carry that connotation. Bilateral lower extremity paresis is referred to as PARAPARESIS.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Thrombolytic Therapy: Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Reperfusion: Restoration of blood supply to tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. It is primarily a procedure for treating infarction or other ischemia, by enabling viable ischemic tissue to recover, thus limiting further necrosis. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing REPERFUSION INJURY.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Brain Diseases: Pathologic conditions affecting the BRAIN, which is composed of the intracranial components of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. This includes (but is not limited to) the CEREBRAL CORTEX; intracranial white matter; BASAL GANGLIA; THALAMUS; HYPOTHALAMUS; BRAIN STEM; and CEREBELLUM.Dominance, Cerebral: Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Neurologic Examination: Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Cerebrum: Derived from TELENCEPHALON, cerebrum is composed of a right and a left hemisphere. Each contains an outer cerebral cortex and a subcortical basal ganglia. The cerebrum includes all parts within the skull except the MEDULLA OBLONGATA, the PONS, and the CEREBELLUM. Cerebral functions include sensorimotor, emotional, and intellectual activities.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Intracranial Pressure: Pressure within the cranial cavity. It is influenced by brain mass, the circulatory system, CSF dynamics, and skull rigidity.Heat Stroke: A condition caused by the failure of body to dissipate heat in an excessively hot environment or during PHYSICAL EXERTION in a hot environment. Contrast to HEAT EXHAUSTION, the body temperature in heat stroke patient is dangerously high with red, hot skin accompanied by DELUSIONS; CONVULSIONS; or COMA. It can be a life-threatening emergency and is most common in infants and the elderly.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Blood-Brain Barrier: Specialized non-fenestrated tightly-joined ENDOTHELIAL CELLS with TIGHT JUNCTIONS that form a transport barrier for certain substances between the cerebral capillaries and the BRAIN tissue.Hypoxia, Brain: A reduction in brain oxygen supply due to ANOXEMIA (a reduced amount of oxygen being carried in the blood by HEMOGLOBIN), or to a restriction of the blood supply to the brain, or both. Severe hypoxia is referred to as anoxia, and is a relatively common cause of injury to the central nervous system. Prolonged brain anoxia may lead to BRAIN DEATH or a PERSISTENT VEGETATIVE STATE. Histologically, this condition is characterized by neuronal loss which is most prominent in the HIPPOCAMPUS; GLOBUS PALLIDUS; CEREBELLUM; and inferior olives.Vasospasm, Intracranial: Constriction of arteries in the SKULL due to sudden, sharp, and often persistent smooth muscle contraction in blood vessels. Intracranial vasospasm results in reduced vessel lumen caliber, restricted blood flow to the brain, and BRAIN ISCHEMIA that may lead to hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HYPOXIA-ISCHEMIA, BRAIN).Endarterectomy, Carotid: The excision of the thickened, atheromatous tunica intima of a carotid artery.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Basilar Artery: The artery formed by the union of the right and left vertebral arteries; it runs from the lower to the upper border of the pons, where it bifurcates into the two posterior cerebral arteries.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Intracranial Embolism: Blocking of a blood vessel in the SKULL by an EMBOLUS which can be a blood clot (THROMBUS) or other undissolved material in the blood stream. Most emboli are of cardiac origin and are associated with HEART DISEASES. Other non-cardiac sources of emboli are usually associated with VASCULAR DISEASES.Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A diagnostic technique that incorporates the measurement of molecular diffusion (such as water or metabolites) for tissue assessment by MRI. The degree of molecular movement can be measured by changes of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with time, as reflected by tissue microstructure. Diffusion MRI has been used to study BRAIN ISCHEMIA and tumor response to treatment.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Blood Volume: Volume of circulating BLOOD. It is the sum of the PLASMA VOLUME and ERYTHROCYTE VOLUME.Atrial Fibrillation: Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.
  • Heat stroke onset is closely related to three environmental factors: high temperature, high humidity, and a windless environment. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Cerebral amyloid angiopathy occurs sporadically in the elderly population or in familiar forms of Alzheimer's disease, and it is characterized by insoluble deposition of β-amyloid peptides within vessels of the central nervous system. (termedia.pl)
  • Cerebral microinfarct and white matter disease in CAA have been more often observed in the posterior circulation territory, however the restricted lateralization reported in our case has not been seen. (heighpubs.org)
  • Objective: Evaluate p38 MAPKα antagonism to promote neurologic recovery when administered outside the neuroprotection window in the rat stroke t-MCAO model. (neurology.org)
  • To evaluate the effect of Intracarotid Sodium Nitroprusside (ICSNP) in MCAO rat model of ischemic stroke (I/R model) fifth post ischemic stroke day. (jcdr.net)
  • This study demonstrated that hADSC intervention with MCAO mice could apparently ameliorate stroke symptoms by direct cell replacement, enhanced immnunosuppression and increasing the viability of endogenous neurons. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Researchers supported by the NINDS are investigating the roles of mishaps early in brain development, including genetic defects, which are sometimes responsible for the brain malformations and abnormalities that result in cerebral palsy. (nih.gov)
  • Scientists are also looking at traumatic events in newborn babies' brains, such as bleeding, epileptic seizures, and breathing and circulation problems, which can cause the abnormal release of chemicals that trigger the kind of damage that causes cerebral palsy. (nih.gov)
  • NINDS-supported researchers also hope to find ways to prevent white matter disease, the most common cause of cerebral palsy. (nih.gov)
  • The term cerebral palsy refers to a group of neurological disorders that appear in infancy or early childhood and permanently affect body movement, muscle coordination, and balance. (nih.gov)
  • The majority of children with cerebral palsy are born with it, although it may not be detected until months or years later. (nih.gov)
  • The early signs of cerebral palsy usually appear before a child reaches 3 years of age. (nih.gov)
  • Just returned from Amsterdam, and Budapest training European doctors and treating patients with neurological disorders, Dr. Jason Hao will discuss his research and the effectiveness of using Neuro Acupuncture in treating stroke, autism, cerebral palsy and many other neurological disorders. (voiceamerica.com)
  • The association of cerebral palsy with other disabilities in children with perinatal stroke has not been well-studied. (nih.gov)
  • Seventy-six children (68%) had cerebral palsy, which was hemiplegic in 66 and tri- or quadriplegic in 10. (nih.gov)
  • Fifty-five (72%) children with cerebral palsy had at least one other disability: 45 (59%) had a cognitive/speech impairment (moderate-severe in 20), and 36 (47%) had epilepsy (moderate-severe in 11). (nih.gov)
  • In children with neonatal presentation, cerebral palsy was associated with epilepsy (P = 0.0076) and cognitive impairment (P = 0.0001). (nih.gov)
  • These associations could not be tested in children with delayed presentation because almost all children in this group had cerebral palsy. (nih.gov)
  • In another analysis with multivariate logistic regression for children with cerebral palsy, children who had both neonatal presentation and history of cesarean-section delivery were more likely to have epilepsy (P = 0.001). (nih.gov)
  • You asked for them - Hemiplegia Awareness Shirts, Pediatric Stroke Awareness Shirts, Cerebral Palsy Awareness Shirts, and Kandu Shirts - and CHASA is going to deliver! (chasa.org)
  • You might even set up your own Hemiplegia, Pediatric Stroke, or Cerebral Palsy Awareness event in 2013. (chasa.org)
  • The Hemiplegia Awareness Shirts, Pediatric Stroke Awareness Shirts, Cerebral Palsy Awareness Shirts will be GRAY , similar to the shirts featured on the three children in the photo. (chasa.org)
  • He is a pioneer in brain repair, working with not only stroke patients, but also those with cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, Parkinsons disease, autism, migraine headaches, and Alzheimers disease. (extremehealthradio.com)
  • We expect these assays to open new possibilities to investigate the cellular and molecular reasons why cerebral palsy and other movement disorders like stroke and spinal cord injury are associated with muscle contractures and unequal muscle tissue development. (sralab.org)
  • They will also provide indispensable in vitro tissue assays to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers for drug development and testing, in cerebral palsy and other muscle conditions. (sralab.org)
  • Also, it is not impossible to imagine that engineered muscle tissue could be used in the future to support surgical procedures and their outcomes after muscle-tendon repair in patients with cerebral palsy and other muscle conditions. (sralab.org)
  • A thorough and prompt history-taking and physical examination are important for all patients presenting with transient neurological symptoms to confirm the diagnosis of the cerebral ischemic syndrome. (cmaj.ca)
  • Every year, an estimated 30,000 people in the United States experience a ruptured cerebral aneurysm according to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. (gwhospital.com)
  • Although stroke occurs mainly in the aged population, most animal models for experimental stroke in vivo almost universally rely on young-adult rodents for the evaluation of neuropathological, neurological, or behavioral outcomes after stroke due to their greater availability, lower cost, and fewer health problems. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The primary endpoint is a composite of neurological injury (incidence of transient ischemic attack and/or stroke) and Kidney Disease Improving Global Out. (medworm.com)
  • The most troubling issue with cerebral atrophy is the potential for it to affect brain function, as the location of lost brain cells will potentially lead to neurological side effects. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • Monoclonal antibody to the ICAM-1 adhesion site reduces neurological damage in a rabbit cerebral embolism stroke model. (curehunter.com)
  • The first data on cerebral embolic protection devices demonstrated in small populations a reduction in number and volume of new ischemic brain lesions on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a trend toward less neurological impairment compared with unprotected procedures (10-16) . (onlinejacc.org)
  • Several studies in preclinical stroke models have shown that brain damage after stroke not only leads to neuron loss but also to a dramatic decrease of brain plasticity [ 3 ] and new therapeutic strategies should focus not only on replenishing lost neurons and promoting endogenous neurogenesis but also on enhancing other related processes, such as gliagenesis, oligodendrogenesis, remyelination, synaptic plasticity, axonal sprouting, and angiogenesis in order to improve neurological function. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs) are paired vessels, usually arising from the top of the basilar artery and curving laterally, posteriorly, and superiorly around the midbrain. (medscape.com)
  • In addition, the PCAs, via the posterior communicating arteries (PCOM), may become important sources of collateral circulation for the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. (medscape.com)
  • Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characterized histopathologically by amyloid fibrils in the small to middle-sized blood vessels usually the arteries of the brain. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • A large blood vessel (e.g., carotid, middle cerebral, and basilar arteries) can take longer to become occluded than a smaller vessel (e.g., lenticulostriate, basilar penetrating, and medullary arteries), and there may be warning signs. (strokecenter.org)
  • TIA frequently precedes ischemic stroke, particularly in the territory of the carotid arteries. (cmaj.ca)
  • Disease severity was evaluated by atherosclerosis score, as determined by the number of steno-occlusions of cerebral arteries and the degree thereof. (biomedsearch.com)
  • A stroke is usually caused by a blockage in one of the arteries that carries blood to the brain. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Using isolated cerebral arteries expressing a Ca 2+ biosensor in endothelial cells, we show that 4-hydroxynonenal and hypoxia increased TRPA1 activity, detected as TRPA1 sparklets. (elifesciences.org)
  • Hypoxia caused dilation of cerebral arteries, which was disrupted by antioxidants, TRPA1 blockade and by endothelial cell-specific Trpa1 deletion ( Trpa1 ecKO mice). (elifesciences.org)
  • Most strokes happen when the blood supply to part of the brain is cut off due to blood clots or clumps of fat blocking blood vessels called arteries. (elifesciences.org)
  • The Congress was attended by the president of the Neurosonology Research Group of the World Federation of Neurology (prof. Kurt Niederkorn - Austria) and the president of the European Society of Neurosonology and Cerebral Hemodynamics (prof. Kladio Baracchini - Italy). (eso-stroke.org)
  • Finally, performance of the NIH stroke scale assessment exam is very useful in documenting the severity of stroke, estimating risk of bleeding, and tracking stroke recovery and/or progression, and it facilitates communication with neurology subspecialists. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Ischemic strokes occur when blood cannot flow to cerebral structures. (medscape.com)
  • Older adults with ischemic stroke have impaired cerebral vasoregulation, rendering cerebral blood flow dependent on blood pressure. (physionet.org)
  • Autonomic blood pressure control is impaired after stroke. (physionet.org)
  • Heart rate, blood and BFV in the middle cerebral artery measured by Doppler ultrasound during 5 min sitting and after 1 and 3 minutes of standing using Labview at 500 Hz. (physionet.org)
  • Background- The prevalence of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) detected on cerebral MRI is associated with hypertension, but it is not known whether blood pressure lowering can arrest their progression. (ahajournals.org)
  • We report here the results of an MRI substudy of PROGRESS (Perindopril Protection Against Recurrent Stroke Study), a randomized trial of blood pressure lowering in subjects with cerebrovascular disease. (ahajournals.org)
  • 8 To test this hypothesis, we conducted the first MRI-based assessment of WMHs in a substudy of a randomized trial of blood pressure lowering in patients with a history of cerebrovascular disease, the Perindopril Protection Against Recurrent Stroke Study (PROGRESS). (ahajournals.org)
  • 4,5 In contrast, angiotensin modifying drugs, such as captopril and perindopril (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors) and losartan (angiotensin receptor antagonist) did not seem to alter CBF or middle cerebral artery blood velocity. (ahajournals.org)
  • for example, venodilators may both increase cerebral blood volume and reduce central venous pressure, thereby maintaining ICP. (ahajournals.org)
  • 15 Similarly, GTN did not change the middle cerebral artery blood velocity and pulsatility index, these being indirect measures of CBF. (ahajournals.org)
  • The ImpACT-24B (Implant for Augmentation of Cerebral Blood Flow Trial, Effectiveness and Safety in a 24-Hour Window) trial involved 1,000 patients at 73 centers in 18 countries, including the United States. (mdedge.com)
  • Effects of Chlorella regularis (dried cell powder)-cultured axenically under heterotrophic conditions, and provided as a dietary supplement-and its fractions on the blood pressure, cerebral stroke lesions, and life-span of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP/Izm) were investigated. (go.jp)
  • suggesting a specialized role for these channels in cerebral blood flow regulation. (elifesciences.org)
  • Cerebral ischemic stroke induced reduction in the number of Tregs in the peripheral blood were significantly aggravated in mice with pre-existing colon cancer. (ovid.com)
  • Offline analysis of hemodynamic data disclosed relatively large periodic oscillations of both cerebral blood flow velocity and BP related to the CSR breathing pattern. (le.ac.uk)
  • Various blood pressure parameters such as mean 24-hour blood pressure, awake/sleep blood pressure, and morning surge were compared between cerebral microbleeds (+) vs. (-) groups. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Most ambulatory blood pressure parameters except morning surge were significantly higher in those who had cerebral microbleeds. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Cerebral microbleeds are independently associated with reverse dipping on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in hypertensive stroke patients. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We conducted this study to evaluate the association between the nocturnal dipping pattern of blood pressure and the prevalence of CMB in the patients with both hypertension and ischemic stroke. (biomedcentral.com)
  • It could be due to the high blood pressure get an endoscopy done to evaluate the cause of the bleed and measures to control the blood pressure should be done.If the cause for stroke also was a beed they would not have put her on antiplatelet measures and so the cause of the bleeding could be trauma during naso gastric tube insertion or misplacement later on. (healthcaremagic.com)
  • Additionally, the presence of lung infection in these mice with severe strokes extended past 2 days, suggestive of long-term immune impairment. (nih.gov)
  • Here, we investigated the effects of inflammatory responses as underlying mediators of cardiac dysfunction after stroke in adult mice. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Adult (eight-to-nine months) male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to photothrombotic stroke. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Mice with colon cancer exhibited prominently deterioration in their performance in sensorimotor functions after stroke compared with mice without cancer. (ovid.com)