Narrow channel in the MESENCEPHALON that connects the third and fourth CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.
A small bony canal linking the vestibule of the inner ear to the posterior part of the internal surface of the petrous TEMPORAL BONE. It transmits the endolymphatic duct and two small blood vessels.
Excessive accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid within the cranium which may be associated with dilation of cerebral ventricles, INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; HEADACHE; lethargy; URINARY INCONTINENCE; and ATAXIA.
A watery fluid that is continuously produced in the CHOROID PLEXUS and circulates around the surface of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and in the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.
A fine channel that passes through the TEMPORAL BONE near the SCALA TYMPANI (the basilar turn of the cochlea). The cochlear aqueduct connects the PERILYMPH-filled bony labyrinth to the SUBARACHNOID SPACE.
The blind pouch at the end of the endolymphatic duct. It is a storage reservoir for excess ENDOLYMPH, formed by the blood vessels in the membranous labyrinth.
The part of the membranous labyrinth that traverses the bony vestibular aqueduct and emerges through the bone of posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) where it expands into a blind pouch called the endolymphatic sac.
Radiography of the ventricular system of the brain after injection of air or other contrast medium directly into the cerebral ventricles. It is used also for x-ray computed tomography of the cerebral ventricles.
Radiographic visualization of the cerebral ventricles by injection of air or other gas.

Spontaneous ventriculostomy: report of three cases revealed by flow-sensitive phase-contrast cine MR imaging. (1/81)

Spontaneous ventriculostomy is a rare condition that occurs with the spontaneous rupture of a ventricle, resulting in a communication between the ventricular system and the subarachnoid space. Three cases of spontaneous ventriculostomy through the floor of the third ventricle that occurred in cases of chronic obstructive hydrocephalus are presented. The communication was identified via flow-sensitive phase-contrast cine MR imaging. Spontaneous ventriculostomy is probably a result of a rupture of the normally thin membrane that forms the floor of the third ventricle and, with long-standing obstructive hydrocephalus, creates an internal drainage pathway that spontaneously compensates for the hydrocephalus.  (+info)

Endoscopic aqueductal plasty via the fourth ventricle through the cerebellar hemisphere under navigating system guidance--technical note. (2/81)

A 1-year 8-month-old boy presented with isolated fourth ventricle after ventriculoperitoneal shunting for hydrocephalus associated with ventricular and subarachnoid hemorrhage. The therapeutic endoscope was inserted through the thin left cerebellar hemisphere. Endoscopic aqueductal plasty was performed via the enlarged fourth ventricle under guidance from a navigating system. Endoscopic aqueductal plasty via the fourth ventricle under navigating system guidance is a useful procedure enabling less invasive surgery for isolated fourth ventricle associated with slit-like ventricle after shunt placement.  (+info)

Secondary amenorrhea caused by hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis : report of two cases. (3/81)

Amenorrhea is rarely presented as a manifestation of endocrinological disturbances in patients of chronic hydrocephalus. We describe two cases of secondary amenorrhea caused by hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis. Two female patients of age 30 and 20 yr presented with amenorrhea and increasing headache. Magnetic resonance images revealed marked, noncommunicating hydrocephalus without any tumorous lesion. In one patient, emergent extraventricular drainage was necessary because of progressive neurological deterioration. Each patient underwent surgical intervention for the hydrocephalus-ventriculoperitoneal shunt and endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Both resumed normal menstruation continuing so far with further normal menstrual bleeding. These two cases and others reported in the literature indicated that the surgical intervention for hydrocephalus resolves amenorrhea in all the cases of amenorrhea due to hydrocephalus. The suspected role of the surgery is the correction of increased intracranial pressure, which is an important pathogenetic factor in the development of amenorrhea.  (+info)

Sylvian aqueduct syndrome as a sign of acute obstructive hydrocephalus in children. (4/81)

Eight cases of obstructive hydrocephalus manifesting palsy of upward gaze and other features of the Sylvian aqueduct syndrome are reported. During the crisis of intracranial hypertension, all of them developed upward gaze palsy and variable abnormalities of the convergence mechanism such as paralysis, spasm, and convergence nystagmus. The frequent apparent blindness was probably related to gaze paralysis, since visual evoked responses were present. All these ocular abnormalities disappeared after shunting. Periaqueductal dysfunction on the basis of raised intracranial pressure is postulated as the possible mechanism for the above ocular manifestations. The 'setting sun' sign is frequently seen in infants and children with hydrocephalus and has been considered in the past to result from displacement of eyeballs by pressure from the orbital roof plate. Our observations would suggest periaqueductal dysfunction rather than the mechanical displacement as the possible mechanism for this sign.  (+info)

Tight Sylvian cisterns associated with hyperdense areas mimicking subarachnoid hemorrhage on computed tomography--four case reports. (5/81)

Four patients with supratentorial mass lesions (two chronic subdural hematomas, one acute epidural hematoma, and one acute subdural hematoma) showed hyperdense sylvian cisterns on computed tomography (CT). Association of subarachnoid hemorrhage was suspected initially, but was excluded by intraoperative observation or postoperative lumbar puncture. CT showed disappearance of the hyperdense areas just after evacuation of the mass lesions. The hyperdense areas are probably a result of the partial volume phenomenon or concentrations of calcium deposits rather than abnormally high hematocrit levels, which were not found in these patients.  (+info)

Unusual arachnoid cyst of the quadrigeminal cistern in an adult presenting with apneic spells and normal pressure hydrocephalus--case report. (6/81)

A 67-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with symptoms of normal pressure hydrocephalus, lower cranial nerve pareses, and pyramidal and cerebellar signs associated with respiratory disturbances. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 4.7 x 5.4 cm quadrigeminal arachnoid cyst causing severe compression of the tectum and entire brain stem, aqueduct, and cerebellum, associated with moderate dilation of the third and lateral ventricles. Emergency surgery was undertaken due to sudden loss of consciousness and impaired breathing. The cyst was totally removed by midline suboccipital craniotomy in the prone position. Postoperatively, her symptoms improved except for the ataxia and impaired breathing. She was monitored cautiously for over 15 days. CT at discharge on the 18th postoperative day revealed decreased cyst size to 3.9 x 4.1 cm. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of the arachnoid cyst of the quadrigeminal cistern. The patient died of respiratory problems on the 5th day after discharge. Quadrigeminal arachnoid cysts may compress the brain stem and cause severe respiratory disturbances, which can be fatal due to apneic spells. Patients should be monitored continuously in the preoperative and postoperative period until the restoration of autonomous ventilation is achieved.  (+info)

Vasopressin release by nicotine: the site of action. (7/81)

1. In cats anaesthetized with chloralose the release of neurohypophysial hormones was examined after injection of nicotine into the cerebral ventricles or cisterna magna or its topical application through perspex rings to the ventral surface of the brain stem. The release was measured by assaying the hormones in samples of venous blood. 2. Injected into a lateral or the third cerebral ventricle, nicotine (0.5 to 1 mg) produced release of vasopressin without oxytocin. When the aqueduct was cannulated, preventing access to the fourth ventricle and to the subarachnoid space, this release did not occur. 3. Vasopressin was also released without oxytocin when nicotine (0.25 to 2 mg) was injected into the subarachnoid space through the cisterna magna. With this route of administration the nicotine did not enter any part of the ventricular system. 4. Applied through paired perspex rings placed across the ventral surface of the brain stem, nicotine again produced release of vasopressin without ocytocin. The amount of nicotine placed in each ring was usually 80 mug, but a release was obtained with 10 mug and in one experiment with as little as 5 mug. 5. The bilateral region on the ventral surface of the brain stem where nicotine acts when producing release of vasopressin lies lateral to the pyramids and in a longitudinal direction, 6 to 9 mm caudal to the trapezoid bodies. 6. The vasopressin release by nicotine injected intraventricularly or intracisternally, or applied topically to the ventral surface of the brain stem was not due to absorption of nicotine into the blood stream, nor to blood pressure effects. 7. It is concluded that nicotine acts on the ventral surface of the brain stem probably by activating the central projection to the supra-optic and possibly also the paraventricular nuclei of afferent pathways in the sinus and vagus nerves which control the release of vasopressin in response to changes in blood volume or distribution.  (+info)

Effect of endoscopic third ventriculostomy on neuropsychological outcome in late onset idiopathic aqueduct stenosis: a prospective study. (8/81)

OBJECTIVE: To undertake a prospective study of the long term neuropsychological outcome in patients with late onset idiopathic aqueduct stenosis (LIAS) after endoscopic third ventriculostomy. METHODS: Six patients with LIAS were evaluated pre- and postoperatively using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and standardised psychometric testing procedures. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy was done using standard surgical techniques. The mean long term follow up was 81.2 weeks. RESULTS: Preoperatively, all patients had cognitive impairment, four of them showing deficits in several cognitive domains. After endoscopic third ventriculostomy, all patients improved clinically and had ventricular size reduction on MRI. Postoperative neuropsychological testing showed that five patients achieved normal or near normal cognitive functions, and one improved moderately. CONCLUSIONS: Endoscopic third ventriculostomy caused a substantial improvement in the neuropsychological deficit of LIAS patients. This was also true for patients with enlarged ventricles that might be diagnosed radiologically as "arrested hydrocephalus."  (+info)

The cerebral aqueduct, also known as the aqueduct of Sylvius, is a narrow canal that connects the third and fourth ventricles (cavities) of the brain. It allows for the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the third ventricle to the fourth ventricle. The cerebral aqueduct is a critical component of the ventricular system of the brain, and any obstruction or abnormality in this region can result in an accumulation of CSF and increased pressure within the brain, which can lead to serious neurological symptoms and conditions such as hydrocephalus.

The vestibular aqueduct is a bony canal that runs from the inner ear to the brain. It contains a membranous duct, called the endolymphatic duct, which is filled with a fluid called endolymph. The vestibular aqueduct plays a role in the maintenance of balance and hearing by regulating the pressure and composition of the endolymph. Abnormalities or damage to the vestibular aqueduct can lead to conditions such as endolymphatic hydrops, which can cause symptoms like vertigo, dizziness, and hearing loss.

Hydrocephalus is a medical condition characterized by an abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the brain, leading to an increase in intracranial pressure and potentially causing damage to the brain tissues. This excessive buildup of CSF can result from either overproduction or impaired absorption of the fluid, which typically causes the ventricles (fluid-filled spaces) inside the brain to expand and put pressure on surrounding brain structures.

The condition can be congenital, present at birth due to genetic factors or abnormalities during fetal development, or acquired later in life as a result of injuries, infections, tumors, or other disorders affecting the brain's ability to regulate CSF flow and absorption. Symptoms may vary depending on age, severity, and duration but often include headaches, vomiting, balance problems, vision issues, cognitive impairment, and changes in behavior or personality.

Treatment for hydrocephalus typically involves surgically implanting a shunt system that diverts the excess CSF from the brain to another part of the body where it can be absorbed, such as the abdominal cavity. In some cases, endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) might be an alternative treatment option, creating a new pathway for CSF flow within the brain. Regular follow-ups with neurosurgeons and other healthcare professionals are essential to monitor the condition and make any necessary adjustments to the treatment plan.

Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a clear, colorless fluid that surrounds and protects the brain and spinal cord. It acts as a shock absorber for the central nervous system and provides nutrients to the brain while removing waste products. CSF is produced by specialized cells called ependymal cells in the choroid plexus of the ventricles (fluid-filled spaces) inside the brain. From there, it circulates through the ventricular system and around the outside of the brain and spinal cord before being absorbed back into the bloodstream. CSF analysis is an important diagnostic tool for various neurological conditions, including infections, inflammation, and cancer.

The cochlear aqueduct is a small canal that runs from the inner ear to the brain. It contains a fluid called perilymph, which helps to protect and cushion the structures of the inner ear. The cochlear aqueduct also serves as a passageway for the endolymphatic duct and sac, which are involved in the regulation of the inner ear's fluid balance.

Anomalies or abnormalities of the cochlear aqueduct can lead to hearing problems, balance disorders, and other symptoms. For example, a large or dilated cochlear aqueduct may be associated with an increased risk of meningitis, a serious infection of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. In some cases, surgical closure of the cochlear aqueduct may be necessary to prevent recurrent meningitis or other complications.

The endolymphatic sac is a small, fluid-filled structure that is part of the inner ear. It is located near the vestibular aqueduct and is responsible for maintaining the balance of fluids in the inner ear. The endolymphatic sac also plays a role in the resorption of endolymph, which is the fluid that fills the membranous labyrinth of the inner ear. Disorders of the endolymphatic sac can lead to conditions such as Meniere's disease, which is characterized by vertigo, hearing loss, and tinnitus.

The endolymphatic duct is a narrow canal in the inner ear that is part of the membranous labyrinth. It connects the utricle and saccule (two sensory structures in the vestibular system responsible for detecting changes in head position and movement) to the endolymphatic sac (a dilated portion of the duct that helps regulate the volume and pressure of endolymph, a fluid found within the membranous labyrinth).

The endolymphatic duct plays a crucial role in maintaining the balance and homeostasis of the inner ear by allowing the absorption and circulation of endolymph. Disorders or abnormalities in this region can lead to various vestibular and hearing dysfunctions, such as Meniere's disease, endolymphatic hydrops, and other inner ear disorders.

Cerebral ventriculography is a medical imaging technique that involves the injection of a contrast material into the cerebral ventricles, which are fluid-filled spaces within the brain. The purpose of this procedure is to produce detailed images of the ventricular system and the surrounding structures in order to diagnose and evaluate various neurological conditions, such as hydrocephalus (excessive accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the ventricles), tumors, or other abnormalities that may be causing obstruction or compression of the ventricular system.

The procedure typically involves inserting a thin, flexible tube called a catheter into the lateral ventricle of the brain through a small hole drilled in the skull. The contrast material is then injected through the catheter and X-ray images are taken as the contrast material flows through the ventricular system. These images can help to identify any abnormalities or blockages that may be present.

Cerebral ventriculography has largely been replaced by non-invasive imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which provide similar information without the need for invasive procedures. However, cerebral ventriculography may still be used in certain cases where these other methods are not sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis.

Pneumoencephalography is a diagnostic procedure that is rarely used today, due to the development of less invasive techniques. It involves the introduction of air or another gas into the ventricular system or subarachnoid space of the brain, followed by X-ray imaging to visualize the structures and any abnormalities within the intracranial cavity.

The primary purpose of this procedure was to diagnose conditions affecting the brain's ventricles, such as hydrocephalus, tumors, or inflammation. The introduction of air into the cranium allowed for better visualization of these structures and any potential abnormalities. However, due to its invasive nature, risks associated with the procedure, and the availability of non-invasive imaging techniques like CT and MRI scans, pneumoencephalography has fallen out of favor in modern medicine.

... Cerebral peduncle, optic chasm, cerebral aqueduct. Inferior view. Deep dissection. Cerebral ... The cerebral aqueduct (aque ductus mesencephali, mesencephalic duct, sylvian aqueduct or aqueduct of Sylvius) is a narrow 15 mm ... The cerebral aqueduct, as other parts of the ventricular system of the brain, develops from the central canal of the neural ... The cerebral aqueduct is surrounded by an enclosing area of gray matter called the periaqueductal gray, or central gray. It was ...
Cerebral peduncle, optic chasm, cerebral aqueduct. Inferior view. Deep dissection. Cerebral peduncle, optic chasm, cerebral ... aqueduct. Inferior view. Deep dissection. Cerebrum.Inferior view.Deep dissection. Cerebrum.Inferior view.Deep dissection. ...
"Cerebral aqueduct", Wikipedia, 2019-10-12, retrieved 2019-10-29. Martinez-Lopez, Jesus E.; Moreno-Bravo, Juan A.; Madrigal, M. ...
... is continuous with the cerebral aqueduct; its base is represented by an imaginary line at the level of the upper ends of the ...
Human brain frontal (coronal) section Red nucleus Cerebral peduncle, optic chasm, cerebral aqueduct. Inferior view. Deep ... because of the well-developed cerebral cortex, the corticospinal tract has taken over the role of the rubrospinal. List of ...
It is medial, and close to the periaqueductal gray matter around the cerebral aqueduct. It is found between the spinal cord ( ...
The tegmentum which forms the floor of the midbrain, is ventral to the cerebral aqueduct. Several nuclei, tracts, and the ... The midbrain consists of: Periaqueductal gray: The area of gray matter around the cerebral aqueduct contains various neurons ... comprises the paired structure of the superior and inferior colliculi and is the dorsal covering of the cerebral aqueduct. The ... The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is composed of paired cerebral peduncles. These transmit axons of upper motor neurons. ...
It is located in the posterior part of the third ventricle, overlying the cerebral aqueduct. In severe cases of hydrocephalus ...
Pineal tumors also can cause compression of the cerebral aqueduct, resulting in a noncommunicating hydrocephalus. Other ... In humans, functional cerebral dominance is accompanied by subtle anatomical asymmetry. One function of the pineal gland is to ... He could not establish any functional role of the pineal gland and regarded it as a structural support for the cerebral veins. ... Gross PM, Weindl A (December 1987). "Peering through the windows of the brain". Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism. ...
It is situated (sources vary) near/within the periaqueductal gray, lateral to the cerebral aqueduct. The mesencephalic nucleus ...
... which is a result from compression of the cerebral aqueduct. The cerebral aqueduct is a narrow channel in the midbrain, which ...
The fibers from the two third nerve nuclei located laterally on either side of the cerebral aqueduct then pass through the red ... The third nerve nucleus is located ventral to the cerebral aqueduct, on the pre-aqueductal grey matter. ... It passes between the superior cerebellar (below) and posterior cerebral arteries (above), and then pierces the dura mater ...
It is present throughout the ventricular system except for the cerebral aqueduct, and the frontal and occipital horns of the ... From here, CSF passes through the interventricular foramina to the third ventricle, then the cerebral aqueduct to the fourth ... CSF also serves a vital function in the cerebral autoregulation of cerebral blood flow. CSF occupies the subarachnoid space ( ... which forms Reissner's fiber within CSF assisting movement through the cerebral aqueduct. It is present in early intrauterine ...
The periaqueductal gray is the gray matter located around the cerebral aqueduct within the tegmentum of the midbrain. It ...
Also noticed were hemorrhages in the gray matter around the third and fourth ventricles and the cerebral aqueduct. Brain ...
It forms the floor of the midbrain that surrounds below the cerebral aqueduct as well as the floor of the fourth ventricle ... The midbrain tegmentum extends from the substantia nigra to the cerebral aqueduct in a horizontal section of the midbrain. ...
A single duct, the cerebral aqueduct between the pons and the cerebellum, connects the third ventricle to the fourth ventricle ... Beneath the cortex is the cerebral white matter. The largest part of the cerebral cortex is the neocortex, which has six ... The tube flexes as it grows, forming the crescent-shaped cerebral hemispheres at the head. The cerebral hemispheres first ... The development of cerebral organoids has opened ways for studying the growth of the brain, and of the cortex, and for ...
The fourth ventricle extends from the cerebral aqueduct (aqueduct of Sylvius) to the obex, and is filled with cerebrospinal ... A sulcus - the median sulcus - extends the length of the ventricle (from the cerebral aqueduct of the midbrain to the central ... CSF entering the fourth ventricle through the cerebral aqueduct can exit to the subarachnoid space of the spinal cord through ...
... cerebral aqueduct, and upper and lower parts of the fourth ventricle in adulthood originated from these structures. The ...
If narrowing of the cerebral aqueduct occurs, many neurological symptoms may exist, including headaches, vertigo, nausea, ...
The cerebral aqueduct between the third and fourth ventricles is very small, as are the foramina, which means that they can be ... The narrowness of the cerebral aqueduct and foramina means that they can become blocked, for example, by blood following a ... and then the fourth ventricle via the cerebral aqueduct in the midbrain. From the fourth ventricle it can pass into the central ... then through the mesencephalic aqueduct (aqueduct of Sylvius) into the fourth ventricle. The majority of CSF exits from the ...
... cerebral aqueduct, fourth ventricle) are also located deep within the cerebral white matter. Men have more white matter than ... Cerebral and spinal white matter do not contain dendrites, neural cell bodies, or shorter axons,[citation needed] which can ... The total number of long range fibers within a cerebral hemisphere is 2% of the total number of cortico-cortical fibers (across ... "Cerebral Blood Flow, Blood Volume and Oxygen Utilization". Brain. 113: 27-47. doi:10.1093/brain/113.1.27. PMID 2302536. Marner ...
In true DWM, this will find a flow from the cerebral aqueduct to the posterior fossa and no flow between the cisterna magna and ... Hydrocephalus, if it occurs, is due to the cyst pressing on the cerebellum and compressing the cerebral aqueduct or fourth ... cerebral aqueduct or corpus callosum. Cardiac-gated phase-contrast MRI can observe the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during ... due to conflicting studies on whether the cerebral aqueduct is affected by the malformation. However, a CP shunt almost always ...
... cerebral aqueduct). The metencephalon becomes, among other things, the pons and the cerebellum, the myelencephalon forms the ... The cerebrum of cerebral hemispheres make up the largest visual portion of the human brain. Various structures combine to form ... Functionally, the cerebral cortex is involved in planning and carrying out of everyday tasks. The hippocampus is involved in ... The tectum, pretectum, cerebral peduncle and other structures develop out of the mesencephalon, and its cavity grows into the ...
... near the entrance of the cerebral aqueduct. The name of the SCO comes from its location beneath the posterior commissure, a ... It is suggested that this is related to immunological blockage of SCO secretions and Sylvian's aqueduct malformation and ... Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism. 15 (4): 681-6. doi:10.1038/jcbfm.1995.85. PMID 7790418. Meiniel A (March 2001 ...
Research has implicated the rostral midbrain in the vicinity of the cerebral aqueduct of the third ventricle as the most likely ...
The cerebral aqueduct may be blocked at the time of birth or may become blocked later in life because of a tumor growing in the ... It is presumed that the cochlea aqueduct is responsible for the decrease in hearing thresholds. The cochlea aqueduct has been ... stenosis of the cerebral aqueduct or obstruction of the interventricular foramina secondary to tumors, hemorrhages, infections ... The aqueduct of Sylvius, normally narrow, may be obstructed by a number of genetic or acquired lesions (e.g., atresia, ...
... does not expand and remains the same at the level of the midbrain superior to the fourth ventricle forms the cerebral aqueduct ... The lateral ventricles are the two largest ventricles of the brain and contain cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Each cerebral ... or sometimes by the lobe of the cerebral cortex into which they extend. Though somewhat flat, the lateral ventricles have a ...
... Cerebrum.Inferior view.Deep dissection Cerebral peduncle, optic chasm, cerebral aqueduct. ... Similarly, cerebral aneurysms, a swelling of blood vessel(s), can also affect the nerve. Trauma can cause serious injury to the ...
... secretory organ located on the ventral surface of the posterior commissure near the anterior entrance of the cerebral aqueduct ... This fiber is thought to contribute to the maintenance of the patency of the Sylvian aqueduct. While the function of the ... It receives a large supply of blood from branches of the posterior choroidal arteries that derive from cerebral arteries in the ... Gross PM, Weindl A (1987). "Peering through the windows of the brain (Review)". Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism. ...
Cerebral aqueduct Cerebral aqueduct Cerebral peduncle, optic chasm, cerebral aqueduct. Inferior view. Deep dissection. Cerebral ... The cerebral aqueduct (aque ductus mesencephali, mesencephalic duct, sylvian aqueduct or aqueduct of Sylvius) is a narrow 15 mm ... The cerebral aqueduct, as other parts of the ventricular system of the brain, develops from the central canal of the neural ... The cerebral aqueduct is surrounded by an enclosing area of gray matter called the periaqueductal gray, or central gray. It was ...
lexvo:term/eng/cerebral%20aqueduct. lvont:nearlySameAs. http://purl.org/vocabularies/princeton/wn30/synset-cerebral_aqueduct- ... This Lexvo.org page describes the entity referred to by the URI http://lexvo.org/id/wordnet/30/noun/cerebral_aqueduct_1_08_00. ...
Agenesis and non-canalization of the cerebral aqueduct resulted in increased pressure of CSF, which led to rupture of the ... Agenesis and non-canalization of the cerebral aqueduct resulted in increased pressure of CSF, which led to rupture of the ... Agenesis and non-canalization of the cerebral aqueduct resulted in increased pressure of CSF, which led to rupture of the ... Agenesis and non-canalization of the cerebral aqueduct resulted in increased pressure of CSF, which led to rupture of the ...
... tuber cinereum and cerebral aqueduct; p , 0.05). The mean thickness of the right frontal lobe parenchyma was 35 ± 3 mm, the ... and larger mean angular exposure area on the longitudinal plane for the cerebral aqueduct (transforniceal-transchoroidal 62° ± ... tuber cinereum and cerebral aqueduct) were compared. Additionally, the thickness of the right frontal lobe parenchyma, ... medial portions of the cerebral peduncle and tegmentum bases), cerebral aqueduct, and posterior commissure (Fig. 8). ...
... tuber cinereum and cerebral aqueduct; p , 0.05). The mean thickness of the right frontal lobe parenchyma was 35 ± 3 mm, the ... and larger mean angular exposure area on the longitudinal plane for the cerebral aqueduct (transforniceal-transchoroidal 62° ± ... tuber cinereum and cerebral aqueduct) were compared. Additionally, the thickness of the right frontal lobe parenchyma, ... medial portions of the cerebral peduncle and tegmentum bases), cerebral aqueduct, and posterior commissure (Fig. 8). ...
The cerebral aqueduct is frequently elongated and narrowed; however, no significant descent of the latter structure or the ... Tonsillar herniation should be primary and not secondary to an intracranial mass lesion (eg, brain tumor, cerebral edema) to ...
cerebral aqueduct. AR. auditory cortex core, R field. AS. arcuate sulcus. AV. anteroventral nucleus of thalamus. ... Cerebral Cortex, 1991, 1:1), Jones et al. (J Comp Neurol, 1978, 181:291), Mesulam and Mufson (Cerebral Cortex Volume 4, 1985, p ... Gyri and sulci of the cerebral hemisphere are named according to Von Bonin and Bailey (The Neocortex of Macaca Mulatta, 1947). ... The delineation of areas of the cerebral cortex derives from many sources that deal with the various regions of the cortex, ...
... which is a result from compression of the cerebral aqueduct. The cerebral aqueduct is a narrow channel in the midbrain, which ...
Cerebral aqueduct 3 . Medial geniculate body 4 . Cerebral peduncle 5 . Optic tract ... Exploration of those parts of the brain supplied by the posterior cerebral artery. Looping fibers from stratum zonale of ... Exploration of those parts of the brain supplied by the posterior cerebral artery. ...
106 Cerebral Aqueduct/Periaqueductal Lesion. Nancy J. Fischbein, MD. 112 4th Ventricle Mass, Child ...
A computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated complete obstruction of the cerebral aqueduct and the onset of acute hydrocephalus ... In the literature, the most common clinical presentation is cerebral aqueduct occlusion and consequent hydrocephalous. ... glândula pineal - tumor cerebral - tratamento cirúrgico - recorrência local Introduction. The pineal region is the site for the ... Moreover, Nowicka et al[65] evidenced cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) dissemination of PTPR to the subependymal region of the ...
The ventricular system is composed of 2 lateral ventricles, the third ventricle, the cerebral aqueduct, and the fourth ... A Case of Unexplained Cerebral Sinus Thrombosis in a 22-Year-Old Obese Caucasian Woman ...
The brain operates with assistance from the cerebral cortex, the cerebellum, and the substantia nigra. The substantia nigra is ... These regions are the tegmentum, the tectum, the cerebral aqueduct, and the cerebral peduncles. ... The cerebral aqueduct runs from the third ventricle to the fourth ventricle, as it is part of the ventricular system. The ... The cerebral aqueduct contains the nuclei of two pairs of cranial nerves, the oculomotor nuclei and the trochlear nuclei. The ...
cerebral aqueduct. *cerebral cortex. *cerebral hemisphere. *cerebral sinuses. *cerebrospinal fluid. *cerebrum. *cervical ...
Does Phase-Contrast Imaging through the Cerebral Aqueduct Predict the Outcome of Lumbar CSF Drainage or Shunt Surgery in ... Does Phase-Contrast Imaging through the Cerebral Aqueduct Predict the Outcome of Lumbar CSF Drainage or Shunt Surgery in ... Our group has been using the finding of hyperdynamic CSF flow through the aqueduct as a predictor of shunt-responsive NPH for , ...
Aq, aqueduct; CC, corpus callosum; Cer Ctx, cerebral cortex; Hb, habenular nuclei; Rn, raphe nucleus; Pag, periaqueductal gray ... In thalamus, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus the suspected case (A) and the BSE controls (C and E) showed mainly granular PrP ...
Posterior hippocampus. This was rated on the anterior-most slice through the cerebral aqueduct, in parallel with the anterior ... one experienced cerebral anoxia in the context of suspected encephalitis, one had anoxia during status epilepticus, and one ...
GROSS: NERVOUS: Brain: Cerebral Aqueduct Astrocytoma: Gross fixed tissue gelatinous lesion in region aqueduct Dr Garcia tumors ...
... is useful in patients with non-communicating obstructive hydrocephalus at or below the level of the cerebral aqueduct (of ... a web across the aqueduct causing aqueduct stenosis will only be visible on dedicated high-resolution MRI images). ... In other patients where the obstruction is incomplete or gradual (e.g. aqueduct stenosis), there may be almost no symptoms ... Features of long-standing non-communicating obstructive hydrocephalus (at the level of the aqueduct of Sylvius or below) ...
tela choroidea of midbrain cerebral aqueduct tela choroidea of telencephalic ventricle tela choroidea of third ventricle ...
tela choroidea of midbrain cerebral aqueduct tela choroidea of telencephalic ventricle tela choroidea of third ventricle ...
Cerebral Aqueduct. The cerebral aqueduct, or the aqueduct of Sylvius, forms the connection between the third and fourth ... The flow of CSF continues on from the third ventricle to the fourth via the cerebral aqueduct which also goes by another ... So far you know that CSF flows from the lateral ventricles, into the third ventricle, passing through the cerebral aqueduct and ... It can be found in all ventricles except the cerebral aqueduct and resides specifically within the innermost layer of the ...
... near the cerebral aqueduct, which connects the third and fourth ventricles. The re- sulting buildup of fluid in the ventricles ... The central canal is a small central channel that runs the length of the spinal cord; the cerebral ventricles are the four ... see Banerjee & Bhat, 2007). This barrier is a consequence of the special structure of cerebral blood vessels. In the rest of ... Some large molecules that are crit- ical for normal brain function (e.g., glucose) are actively transported through cerebral ...
... shows an enhancing lesion in the right cerebral hemisphere that compresses and displaces the aqueduct and fourth ventricle to ... shows an enhancing lesion in the right cerebral hemisphere that compresses and displaces the aqueduct and fourth ventricle to ... Coronal T1-weighted MRI shows an enhancing lesion in the right cerebellar hemisphere compressing and displacing the aqueduct ... Coronal T1-weighted MRI shows an enhancing lesion in the right cerebellar hemisphere compressing and displacing the aqueduct ...
Journal of cerebral blood flow and metabolism : official journal of the International Society of Cerebral Blood Flow and ... Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism. 40, 10, p. 1975-1986 12 p.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article ...
Cerebral Ventricles (1) * Cerebral Aqueduct (0) * Choroid Plexus (0) * Ependyma (0) * Fourth Ventricle (0) ...
Relationships of Cerebral Perfusion With Gait Speed Across Systolic Blood Pressure Levels and Age: A Cohort Study. Windham, B. ... Changes in Cardiovascular Health Across Midlife and Late-Life and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Markers of Cerebral Vascular ... Amyloid-Related Imaging Abnormalities and Other MRI Findings in a Cognitively Unimpaired Population With and Without Cerebral ... Cerebral Cortex. 33, 11, p. 7026-7043 18 p.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article › peer-review ...
... cerebral aqueduct; Cb, cerebellum; cp, cerebral peduncle; DG, dentate gyrus; DTg, dorsomedial tegmental region; fmj, forceps ... cerebral peduncle; D3V, third ventricle; f, fornix; fi, fimbria; fr, fasciculus retroflexus; ic, inner capsule; LV, lateral ... cerebral peduncle; f, fornix; fr, fasciculus retroflexus; LH, lateral hypothalamus; Me, medial amygdala; ml, medial lemniscus; ...
... the cerebral aqueduct. ...
  • The delineation of areas of the cerebral cortex derives from many sources that deal with the various regions of the cortex, including: Amaral et al. (brainmaps.org)
  • The brain operates with assistance from the cerebral cortex, the cerebellum, and the substantia nigra. (databasefootball.com)
  • The midbrain is located above the hindbrain, the cerebral cortex, and situated near the center of the brain overall. (databasefootball.com)
  • In thalamus, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus the suspected case (A) and the BSE controls (C and E) showed mainly granular PrP Sc deposits with comparable distribution. (cdc.gov)
  • The cerebral cortex receives its convoluted appearance from a network of gyri (rounded ridges on the surface of the cortex) and sulci (furrows separating the gyri ). (amboss.com)
  • In mammals, and especially primates, the massive expansion of the cerebral cortex reduces the tectum ("superior colliculus") to a much smaller fraction of the whole brain. (absoluteastronomy.com)
  • It forms the back portion of each cerebral hemisphere and is separated from the cerebellum by a shelf-like extension, called the tentorium cerebelli. (innerbody.com)
  • Found in the midbrain , below the cerebrum and cerebellum , and above the brainstem, the PAG is a vertically oriented area that surrounds the cerebral aqueduct. (thehealthboard.com)
  • Cerebral aqueduct Cerebral aqueduct Cerebral peduncle, optic chasm, cerebral aqueduct. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cerebral aqueduct acts like a canal that passes through the midbrain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cerebral aqueduct is a narrow channel in the midbrain, which connects the third and fourth ventricles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gyri and sulci of the cerebral hemisphere are named according to Von Bonin and Bailey ( The Neocortex of Macaca Mulatta , 1947). (brainmaps.org)
  • It connects the third ventricle with the fourth ventricle so that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) moves between the cerebral ventricles and the canal connecting these ventricles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Incomplete development along with non-canalization of the cerebral aqueduct resulted in blockage of CSF flow through the ventricles that manifest as internal hydrocephalus. (manipal.edu)
  • The ventricular system is composed of 2 lateral ventricles, the third ventricle, the cerebral aqueduct, and the fourth ventricle. (medscape.com)
  • In other patients where the obstruction is incomplete or gradual (e.g. aqueduct stenosis ), there may be almost no symptoms despite massive dilatation of the ventricles. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Within the cerebrum (the largest portion of the brain) and the brainstem (the structure that connects the brain to the spinal cord) are structures known as cerebral ventricles. (brainmadesimple.com)
  • It can be found in all ventricles except the cerebral aqueduct and resides specifically within the innermost layer of the meninges, a membranous lining that envelopes and protects the central nervous system. (brainmadesimple.com)
  • 2) Common findings on brain imaging include enlarged ventricles, widened cortical sulci, and cerebral , cerebellar, or brain stem atrophy. (bdword.com)
  • The lateral ventricles communicate with the third ventricle through interventricular foramens, and the third ventricle communicates with the fourth ventricle through the cerebral aqueduct (see the image below). (medscape.com)
  • The cerebral aqueduct (aque ductus mesencephali, mesencephalic duct, sylvian aqueduct or aqueduct of Sylvius) is a narrow 15 mm conduit for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that connects the third ventricle to the fourth ventricle of the ventricular system of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cerebral aqueduct is the ventricular system's smallest ventricle, but it plays an important role in continuing the flow of the cerebrospinal fluid. (databasefootball.com)
  • Markenroth Bloch K, Töger J, Ståhlberg F. Investigation of cerebrospinal fluid flow in the cerebral aqueduct using high-resolution phase contrast measurements at 7T MRI, Acta Radiologica:online, p.0284185117740762 (2017). (lu.se)
  • Agenesis and non-canalization of the cerebral aqueduct resulted in increased pressure of CSF, which led to rupture of the aqueduct complicated by leakage and accumulation of CSF in brain substance forming a cavity containing CSF parallel and lateral to the unopened part of the cerebral aqueduct. (manipal.edu)
  • There are four distinct ventricular spaces: the lateral ventricle, the third ventricle, the cerebral aqueduct, and the fourth ventricle. (brainmadesimple.com)
  • The anterior choroidal arteries (branch of internal carotid artery) and lateral posterior choroidal arteries (branch of the posterior cerebral artery) form the choroid plexus. (medscape.com)
  • The cerebral aqueduct, as other parts of the ventricular system of the brain, develops from the central canal of the neural tube, and it originates from the portion of the neural tube that is present in the developing mesencephalon, hence the name "mesencephalic duct. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cerebral aqueduct runs from the third ventricle to the fourth ventricle, as it is part of the ventricular system. (databasefootball.com)
  • CSF enters through the cerebral aqueduct, which opens into the fourth ventricle at its rostral end. (mattstillwell.net)
  • The fourth ventricle is a cavity of hindbrain connected to the third ventricle by a narrow cerebral aqueduct. (mattstillwell.net)
  • The cerebral aqueduct contains the nuclei of two pairs of cranial nerves , the oculomotor nuclei and the trochlear nuclei. (databasefootball.com)
  • 8) Increases in intrathoracic pressure cause obstruction in cerebral venous outflow, leading to vascular congestion. (bdword.com)
  • The working area, microsurgical exposure area, and angular exposure on the longitudinal and transversal planes of 2 anatomical targets (tuber cinereum and cerebral aqueduct) were compared. (thejns.org)
  • The cerebral aqueduct was first named after Franciscus Sylvius. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aqueductal stenosis, a narrowing of the cerebral aqueduct, obstructs the flow of CSF and has been associated with non-communicating hydrocephalus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both CT and MRI (and ultrasound in the neonatal period) can demonstrate most of the features, although the underlying cause may be more or less easily discernible (e.g. a web across the aqueduct causing aqueduct stenosis will only be visible on dedicated high-resolution MRI images). (radiopaedia.org)
  • The cerebral aqueduct is surrounded by an enclosing area of gray matter called the periaqueductal gray, or central gray. (wikipedia.org)
  • Right cerebral aqueduct is surrounded by the periaqueductal gray and is found in between the tegmentum and the tectum. (databasefootball.com)
  • Venous supply from the choroidal veins drain into the cerebral veins. (medscape.com)
  • The cavity of the mesencephalon forms the cerebral aqueduct. (medscape.com)
  • The present work was undertaken to reveal the mechanism of cerebral aqueduct agenesis found to result in hydrocephalus following intrauterine exposure to model teratogen, cyclophosphamide, in murine fetuses. (manipal.edu)
  • This symptom however occurs secondary to hydrocephalus, which is a result from compression of the cerebral aqueduct. (wikipedia.org)
  • [ 1 ] During early development, the septum pellucidum is formed by the thinned walls of the 2 cerebral hemispheres and contains a fluid-filled cavity, named the cavum, which may persist. (medscape.com)
  • These regions are the tegmentum, the tectum, the cerebral aqueduct, and the cerebral peduncles. (databasefootball.com)
  • Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism. (wustl.edu)
  • Background: Reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF) plays an essential role in the cognitive impairment and dementia in obesity. (iospress.com)
  • 6) Others such as acute dissection of the carotid or vertebral artery, subarachnoid haemorrhage, cranial arteritis, and occasionally cerebral tumours may produce migrainous symptoms. (bdword.com)
  • on the alternate movements that they are the beginning to the superior constrictors of the cerebral aqueduct. (chdouglas.com)
  • During the scanning process, a few images are obtained, because both versions will show a layer-by-layer section of the cerebral tissue. (mediball.hu)
  • Incomplete development and failure of canalization of the cerebral aqueduct were detected when serial sections of brain in coronal and transverse planes were studied under the microscope. (manipal.edu)
  • Cyclophosphamide induced inhibition of mitosis and cell differentiation of ependymal cells reflecting a decreased % viable cell count and cell proliferation assay along with augmentation of apoptosis of brain cells quantified as increased % DNA fragmentation count, which were identified as the contributing factors underlying the agenesis and incomplete development of the cerebral aqueduct. (manipal.edu)
  • While an inflammatory condition is at the root cause of this condition, the secondary closure of the aqueduct can be caused by overdrainage of the spinal fluid by a shunt. (mattstillwell.net)
  • 9) Not necessarily physical action, but cerebral and emotional action. (bdword.com)
  • The study also suggests that cell survival, proliferation, migration or differentiation of ependymal cells might have been affected, and we speculate that CSF may have an inducing role in the development and canalization of the cerebral aqueduct. (manipal.edu)