Impairment of the ability to coordinate the movements required for normal ambulation (WALKING) which may result from impairments of motor function or sensory feedback. This condition may be associated with BRAIN DISEASES (including CEREBELLAR DISEASES and BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES); SPINAL CORD DISEASES; or PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES.
Incoordination of voluntary movements that occur as a manifestation of CEREBELLAR DISEASES. Characteristic features include a tendency for limb movements to overshoot or undershoot a target (dysmetria), a tremor that occurs during attempted movements (intention TREMOR), impaired force and rhythm of diadochokinesis (rapidly alternating movements), and GAIT ATAXIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p90)
Diseases that affect the structure or function of the cerebellum. Cardinal manifestations of cerebellar dysfunction include dysmetria, GAIT ATAXIA, and MUSCLE HYPOTONIA.
Impairment of the ability to perform smoothly coordinated voluntary movements. This condition may affect the limbs, trunk, eyes, pharynx, larynx, and other structures. Ataxia may result from impaired sensory or motor function. Sensory ataxia may result from posterior column injury or PERIPHERAL NERVE DISEASES. Motor ataxia may be associated with CEREBELLAR DISEASES; CEREBRAL CORTEX diseases; THALAMIC DISEASES; BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES; injury to the RED NUCLEUS; and other conditions.
Manner or style of walking.
The part of brain that lies behind the BRAIN STEM in the posterior base of skull (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR). It is also known as the "little brain" with convolutions similar to those of CEREBRAL CORTEX, inner white matter, and deep cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain balance, and learn motor skills.
A group of dominantly inherited, predominately late-onset, cerebellar ataxias which have been divided into multiple subtypes based on clinical features and genetic mapping. Progressive ataxia is a central feature of these conditions, and in certain subtypes POLYNEUROPATHY; DYSARTHRIA; visual loss; and other disorders may develop. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1997, Ch65, pp 12-17; J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 1998 Jun;57(6):531-43)
An autosomal recessive disease, usually of childhood onset, characterized pathologically by degeneration of the spinocerebellar tracts, posterior columns, and to a lesser extent the corticospinal tracts. Clinical manifestations include GAIT ATAXIA, pes cavus, speech impairment, lateral curvature of spine, rhythmic head tremor, kyphoscoliosis, congestive heart failure (secondary to a cardiomyopathy), and lower extremity weakness. Most forms of this condition are associated with a mutation in a gene on chromosome 9, at band q13, which codes for the mitochondrial protein frataxin. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1081; N Engl J Med 1996 Oct 17;335(16):1169-75) The severity of Friedreich ataxia associated with expansion of GAA repeats in the first intron of the frataxin gene correlates with the number of trinucleotide repeats. (From Durr et al, N Engl J Med 1996 Oct 17;335(16):1169-75)
A heterogenous group of degenerative syndromes marked by progressive cerebellar dysfunction either in isolation or combined with other neurologic manifestations. Sporadic and inherited subtypes occur. Inheritance patterns include autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked.
Primary or metastatic neoplasms of the CEREBELLUM. Tumors in this location frequently present with ATAXIA or signs of INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION due to obstruction of the fourth ventricle. Common primary cerebellar tumors include fibrillary ASTROCYTOMA and cerebellar HEMANGIOBLASTOMA. The cerebellum is a relatively common site for tumor metastases from the lung, breast, and other distant organs. (From Okazaki & Scheithauer, Atlas of Neuropathology, 1988, p86 and p141)
Disorders that feature impairment of eye movements as a primary manifestation of disease. These conditions may be divided into infranuclear, nuclear, and supranuclear disorders. Diseases of the eye muscles or oculomotor cranial nerves (III, IV, and VI) are considered infranuclear. Nuclear disorders are caused by disease of the oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens nuclei in the BRAIN STEM. Supranuclear disorders are produced by dysfunction of higher order sensory and motor systems that control eye movements, including neural networks in the CEREBRAL CORTEX; BASAL GANGLIA; CEREBELLUM; and BRAIN STEM. Ocular torticollis refers to a head tilt that is caused by an ocular misalignment. Opsoclonus refers to rapid, conjugate oscillations of the eyes in multiple directions, which may occur as a parainfectious or paraneoplastic condition (e.g., OPSOCLONUS-MYOCLONUS SYNDROME). (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p240)
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
An autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by choreoathetosis beginning in childhood, progressive CEREBELLAR ATAXIA; TELANGIECTASIS of CONJUNCTIVA and SKIN; DYSARTHRIA; B- and T-cell immunodeficiency, and RADIOSENSITIVITY to IONIZING RADIATION. Affected individuals are prone to recurrent sinobronchopulmonary infections, lymphoreticular neoplasms, and other malignancies. Serum ALPHA-FETOPROTEINS are usually elevated. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p688) The gene for this disorder (ATM) encodes a cell cycle checkpoint protein kinase and has been mapped to chromosome 11 (11q22-q23).
Four clusters of neurons located deep within the WHITE MATTER of the CEREBELLUM, which are the nucleus dentatus, nucleus emboliformis, nucleus globosus, and nucleus fastigii.
Cognitive disorders characterized by an impaired ability to perceive the nature of objects or concepts through use of the sense organs. These include spatial neglect syndromes, where an individual does not attend to visual, auditory, or sensory stimuli presented from one side of the body.
Gait abnormalities that are a manifestation of nervous system dysfunction. These conditions may be caused by a wide variety of disorders which affect motor control, sensory feedback, and muscle strength including: CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or MUSCULAR DISEASES.
Cyclical movement of a body part that can represent either a physiologic process or a manifestation of disease. Intention or action tremor, a common manifestation of CEREBELLAR DISEASES, is aggravated by movement. In contrast, resting tremor is maximal when there is no attempt at voluntary movement, and occurs as a relatively frequent manifestation of PARKINSON DISEASE.
A group of PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASES which activate critical signaling cascades in double strand breaks, APOPTOSIS, and GENOTOXIC STRESS such as ionizing ultraviolet A light, thereby acting as a DNA damage sensor. These proteins play a role in a wide range of signaling mechanisms in cell cycle control.
Brief closing of the eyelids by involuntary normal periodic closing, as a protective measure, or by voluntary action.
A condition characterized genotypically by mutation of the distal end of the long arm of the X chromosome (at gene loci FRAXA or FRAXE) and phenotypically by cognitive impairment, hyperactivity, SEIZURES, language delay, and enlargement of the ears, head, and testes. INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY occurs in nearly all males and roughly 50% of females with the full mutation of FRAXA. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p226)
Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.
The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.
A RNA-binding protein that is found predominately in the CYTOPLASM. It helps regulate GENETIC TRANSLATION in NEURONS and is absent or under-expressed in FRAGILE X SYNDROME.
Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.
Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.
A dominantly-inherited ATAXIA first described in people of Azorean and Portuguese descent, and subsequently identified in Brazil, Japan, China, and Australia. This disorder is classified as one of the SPINOCEREBELLAR ATAXIAS (Type 3) and has been associated with a mutation of the MJD1 gene on chromosome 14. Clinical features include progressive ataxia, DYSARTHRIA, postural instability, nystagmus, eyelid retraction, and facial FASCICULATIONS. DYSTONIA is prominent in younger patients (referred to as Type I Machado-Joseph Disease). Type II features ataxia and ocular signs; Type III features MUSCULAR ATROPHY and a sensorimotor neuropathy; and Type IV features extrapyramidal signs combined with a sensorimotor neuropathy. (From Clin Neurosci 1995;3(1):17-22; Ann Neurol 1998 Mar;43(3):288-96)
Autosomal dominant neurocutaneous syndrome classically characterized by MENTAL RETARDATION; EPILEPSY; and skin lesions (e.g., adenoma sebaceum and hypomelanotic macules). There is, however, considerable heterogeneity in the neurologic manifestations. It is also associated with cortical tuber and HAMARTOMAS formation throughout the body, especially the heart, kidneys, and eyes. Mutations in two loci TSC1 and TSC2 that encode hamartin and tuberin, respectively, are associated with the disease.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.
Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.
Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE only in the homozygous state.
The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.
A group of inherited and sporadic disorders which share progressive ataxia in combination with atrophy of the CEREBELLUM; PONS; and inferior olivary nuclei. Additional clinical features may include MUSCLE RIGIDITY; NYSTAGMUS, PATHOLOGIC; RETINAL DEGENERATION; MUSCLE SPASTICITY; DEMENTIA; URINARY INCONTINENCE; and OPHTHALMOPLEGIA. The familial form has an earlier onset (second decade) and may feature spinal cord atrophy. The sporadic form tends to present in the fifth or sixth decade, and is considered a clinical subtype of MULTIPLE SYSTEM ATROPHY. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1085)
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
A condition marked by progressive CEREBELLAR ATAXIA combined with MYOCLONUS usually presenting in the third decade of life or later. Additional clinical features may include generalized and focal SEIZURES, spasticity, and DYSKINESIAS. Autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant patterns of inheritance have been reported. Pathologically, the dentate nucleus and brachium conjunctivum of the CEREBELLUM are atrophic, with variable involvement of the spinal cord, cerebellar cortex, and basal ganglia. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1991, Ch37, pp60-1)
A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)
Microsatellite repeats consisting of three nucleotides dispersed in the euchromatic arms of chromosomes.
A condition characterized by persistent spasms (SPASM) involving multiple muscles, primarily in the lower limbs and trunk. The illness tends to occur in the fourth to sixth decade of life, presenting with intermittent spasms that become continuous. Minor sensory stimuli, such as noise and light touch, precipitate severe spasms. Spasms do not occur during sleep and only rarely involve cranial muscles. Respiration may become impaired in advanced cases. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1492; Neurology 1998 Jul;51(1):85-93)
Recurrent narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery following surgical procedures performed to alleviate a prior obstruction.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
An increased number of contiguous trinucleotide repeats in the DNA sequence from one generation to the next. The presence of these regions is associated with diseases such as FRAGILE X SYNDROME and MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY. Some CHROMOSOME FRAGILE SITES are composed of sequences where trinucleotide repeat expansion occurs.
An abnormal response to a stimulus applied to the sensory components of the nervous system. This may take the form of increased, decreased, or absent reflexes.
The output neurons of the cerebellar cortex.
The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.
Proteins that specifically bind to IRON.
The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.
A characteristic symptom complex.
Involuntary movements of the eye that are divided into two types, jerk and pendular. Jerk nystagmus has a slow phase in one direction followed by a corrective fast phase in the opposite direction, and is usually caused by central or peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Pendular nystagmus features oscillations that are of equal velocity in both directions and this condition is often associated with visual loss early in life. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p272)
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE both in the homozygous and the heterozygous state.
The veins and arteries of the HEART.
A syndrome complex composed of three conditions which represent clinical variants of the same disease process: STRIATONIGRAL DEGENERATION; SHY-DRAGER SYNDROME; and the sporadic form of OLIVOPONTOCEREBELLAR ATROPHIES. Clinical features include autonomic, cerebellar, and basal ganglia dysfunction. Pathologic examination reveals atrophy of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, pons, and medulla, with prominent loss of autonomic neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1076; Baillieres Clin Neurol 1997 Apr;6(1):187-204; Med Clin North Am 1999 Mar;83(2):381-92)
A sedative and mild hypnotic with potentially toxic effects.
Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.
Alterations or deviations from normal shape or size which result in a disfigurement of the foot.
An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.
Simple protein, one of the prolamines, derived from the gluten of wheat, rye, etc. May be separated into 4 discrete electrophoretic fractions. It is the toxic factor associated with CELIAC DISEASE.
Disorders of speech articulation caused by imperfect coordination of pharynx, larynx, tongue, or face muscles. This may result from CRANIAL NERVE DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; CEREBELLAR DISEASES; BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES; BRAIN STEM diseases; or diseases of the corticobulbar tracts (see PYRAMIDAL TRACTS). The cortical language centers are intact in this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p489)
Decrease in the size of a cell, tissue, organ, or multiple organs, associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as abnormal cellular changes, ischemia, malnutrition, or hormonal changes.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Impaired ambulation not attributed to sensory impairment or motor weakness. FRONTAL LOBE disorders; BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES (e.g., PARKINSONIAN DISORDERS); DEMENTIA, MULTI-INFARCT; ALZHEIMER DISEASE; and other conditions may be associated with gait apraxia.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Cerebellar tremor may be accompanied by other manifestations of ataxia, including dysarthria (speech problems), nystagmus ( ... of the affected limbs and problems with gait and balance. Clinical characteristics may be similar to those seen in patients ... In classic cerebellar tremor, a lesion on one side of the brain produces a tremor in that same side of the body that worsens ... Cerebellar tremor is caused by lesions in or damage to the cerebellum resulting from stroke, tumor, or disease such as multiple ...
One common symptom of multiple sclerosis is ataxia, a lack of coordinated muscle movement caused by cerebellar lesions ... gait problems (abnormality in walking), and postural tremor or titubation (to-and-fro movements of the neck and trunk). A ... and the resting tremor characteristic of Parkinson's disease. Intention tremor became known as part of Charcot's triad[citation ... postural tremor may also accompany intention tremors. It is very difficult to treat an intention tremor. The tremor may ...
An Essay on the Shaking Palsy described the characteristic resting tremor, abnormal posture and gait, paralysis and diminished ... cerebellar ataxia, and specific MRI findings. Progressive supranuclear palsy - levodopa resistance, restrictive vertical gaze, ... In addition to motor symptoms, PD is accompanied by a diverse range of symptoms. A number of drugs have been used to treat some ... Anticholinergics and surgery (lesioning of the corticospinal pathway or some of the basal ganglia structures) were the only ...
... and finally to clinical observations in secondary dystonia patients with various types of cerebellar lesions. It is proposed ... Ataxia is observed for lower ouabain concentrations, dystonia is observed at higher ouabain concentrations. A mutation in the ... Dystonia is classified by: Clinical characteristics such as age of onset, body distribution, nature of the symptoms, and ... Swallowing can become difficult and accompanied by painful cramping.[citation needed] Electrical sensors (EMG) inserted into ...
Studies of clinically undefinable ataxia generally had higher proportion of late onset gait ataxia, mild upper limb symptoms, ... 1998). "Clinical, radiological, neurophysiological, and neuropathological characteristics of gluten ataxia". Lancet. 352 (9140 ... Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) may be the only symptom for CD, detected in subclinical CD and is accompanied by a decrease in ... Aphthous stomatitis is a common mouth lesion found with celiac disease. Chronic urticaria has been seen in a few cases of CD. ...
People with gluten ataxia usually present gait abnormality or incoordination and tremor of the upper limbs. Gaze-evoked ... Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias". Cerebellum (Review). 15 (2): 213-32. doi:10.1007/s12311-015-0664-x. PMC 4591117 ... "Gluten ataxia in perspective: epidemiology, genetic susceptibility and clinical characteristics". Brain. 126 (Pt 3): 685-91. ... and many people with coeliac may have minor mucosal lesions, without atrophy of the intestinal villi.[25] ...
At the point of maximal disability, the ataxia was accompanied by appendicular cerebellar signs (n=4), dysarthria (n=3), ... The lesions have characteristic enhancement without marked surrounding T2 weighted MRI hyperintensity, and are most marked in ... Subacute gait ataxia marked the clinical onset of the disease in three of the five cases. Case No 4 first presented with a ... Marked cerebellar atrophy accompanies or follows disease activity, as measured by clinical and MRI parameters, and this may ...
Wernickes Encephalopathy - ophthalmoplegia (paralysis of muscles within the eye), horizontal nystagmus, and cerebellar ataxia ... accompanied by sensory loss and urinary retention is characteristic of:. causes? ... gait disturbance (wide based, magnetic "feet stuck to the floor") followed by impaired cognition and urinary inciontinence ... Dominant parietal lobe lesions (usually LEFT) = speech, language, difficulty w/ performing simple math, inability to name ...
Cerebellar tremor may be accompanied by other manifestations of ataxia, including dysarthria (speech problems), nystagmus ( ... of the affected limbs and problems with gait and balance. Clinical characteristics may be similar to those seen in patients ... In classic cerebellar tremor, a lesion on one side of the brain produces a tremor in that same side of the body that worsens ... Cerebellar tremor is caused by lesions in or damage to the cerebellum resulting from stroke, tumor, or disease such as multiple ...
Gait abnormality. Scissor gait · Cerebellar ataxia · Festinating gait · Propulsive gait · Stomping gait · Spastic gait · ... Cerebellar tremor may be accompanied by other manifestations of ataxia, including dysarthria (speech problems), nystagmus ( ... In classic cerebellar tremor, a lesion on one side of the brain produces a tremor in that same side of the body that worsens ... of the affected limbs and problems with gait and balance. Clinical characteristics may be similar to those seen in patients ...
Cerebellar tremor may be accompanied by other manifestations of ataxia, including dysarthria (speech problems), nystagmus ( ... In classic cerebellar tremor, a lesion on one side of the brain produces a tremor in that same side of the body that worsens ... Essential tremor may be accompanied by mild gait disturbance. Tremor frequency may decrease as the person ages, but the ... The characteristics of this kind of tremor may vary but generally include sudden onset and remission, increased incidence with ...
... cerebellar tremor, and psychogenic tremor, and presents a detailed diagnostic approach to tremor. Although new technologies ... Cerebellar tremor. Intention tremor (same side of body as the lesion); abnormal heel-to-shin testing, rapid alternating hand ... Intention tremor (same side of body as the lesion); abnormal heel-to-shin testing, rapid alternating hand movements; gait ... Classification and Characteristics of Tremor. Type of tremor. Frequency. Amplitude. Occurrence. Examples. ...
Cerebellar tremor may be accompanied by dysarthria (speech problems), nystagmus (rapid involuntary movements of the eyes), gait ... In classic cerebellar tremor, a lesion on one side of the brain produces a tremor in that same side of the body that worsens ... of the affected limbs and problems with gait and balance. Clinical characteristics may be similar to those seen in individuals ... Resulting sensory loss may be seen as a tremor or ataxia (inability to coordinate voluntary muscle movement) ...
The ataxia affects gait predominantly. The patient has a wide-based gait and slow, short-spaced steps, and in severe cases the ... Alcoholic cerebellar degeneration causes similar ataxia. However, these disorders can usually be differentiated from WKS on the ... Next to nystagmus, the most frequent ocular abnormality is a weakness or paralysis of eye abduction accompanied by double ... An equivalent type of memory loss may also follow frontal lobe lesion, temporal lobe epilepsy, and concussive head injury. ...
... lesions (c1), cavum septum pellucidum-cavum vergae variation (c2), and cerebellar atrophy in Patient II.11 (c3); cerebellar ... Subsequently, she has gradually developed a gait ataxia and required the assistance of a walker and then she became unable to ... arachnoid cysts were accompanied by a deletion in chromosome 16 in the same family [11]. Jadeja and Grewal presented an unusual ... Nerve conduction studies of Patients II.1 and II.11 shared these characteristics; however, the motor nerve studies of our index ...
Myoclonus generally becomes prominent, and may be accompanied by seizures, extrapyramidal signs, cerebellar ataxia, and ... It generally presents as a subcortical dementia associated with gait ataxia and seizures. Brain MRI reveals diffuse cerebral ... Neurological manifestations include tremor, dystonia, chorea, ataxia, dysarthria, a characteristic grimacing facial expression ... Cognitive impairment correlates with total lesion load and degree of atrophy of the corpus callosum on MRI,52 and probably ...
One common symptom of multiple sclerosis is ataxia, a lack of coordinated muscle movement caused by cerebellar lesions ... gait problems (abnormality in walking), and postural tremor or titubation (to-and-fro movements of the neck and trunk). A ... and the resting tremor characteristic of Parkinsons disease. Intention tremor became known as part of Charcots triad[citation ... postural tremor may also accompany intention tremors. It is very difficult to treat an intention tremor. The tremor may ...
Cerebellar wide-based gait may be observed in acrylamide poisoning (Myers and Macun, 1991). ... Tremor at rest is characteristic of intoxication by metallic mercury (Clarkson et al., 2003) and chlordecone (Taylor et al., ... The severity and progression of the lesion can also be monitored (Aminoff and Albers, 2012). Electrophysiologic approaches are ... Neurologic examination is usually normal, but ataxia and nystagmus are sometimes encountered. When the PNS is affected, symptom ...
Features of upper motor lesion, cerebellar ataxia, nocturnal stridor, and slurred speech etc. occur with tremor. Tremor is ... Gait is slow and shuffling without swinging of arms (Globus pallidus lesion). Steps becomes short in walking. Dragging of feet ... The main characteristic features of Parkinsons disease are insufficient formation and activity of dopamine, due to the death ... Several non-motor symptoms are usually accompany Parkinsons disease. The number of symptoms and their intensity vary with ...
A Simple Composite Phenotype Scoring System for Evaluating Mouse Models of Cerebellar Ataxia ... These lesions alter nerve conduction and induce the disabling neurological deficits that vary with the location of the ... Measures include hind limb clasping, ledge test, gait and kyphosis. Each measure is recorded on a scale of 0-3, with a combined ... We use the Listeria monocytogenes EGD strain15 that, when cultured on blood agar, exhibits a characteristic halo zone around ...
... in cerebellar lesions.4 Questions relevant for the discussion of cervical vertigo are: What is the functional relevance of neck ... would be a sensation of lightheadedness or floating unsteadiness and slight ataxia of stance and gait, perhaps more on head ... In summary, vertigo can be accompanied by cervical pain, associated with head injury, whiplash injury, or cervical spine ... 57 If the firing characteristics (symmetric or asymmetric) of the cervical somatosensors change due to neck pain, a sensory ...
2012 , Pubmed ID: 22759321 The purpose of this paper is to report a patient with otherwise unexplained cerebellar ataxia with ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has frequently failed to detect cerebellar damage in the form of inflammatory lesions in ... such as gait ataxia, poor coordination of the hands, and intention tremor are usually the result of dysfunctionality in the ... The block of TASK and TREK channels was accompanied by a reduction of the muscarinic effect on I (SO). Current-clamp recordings ...
... gait explanation free. What is gait? Meaning of gait medical term. What does gait mean? ... Looking for online definition of gait in the Medical Dictionary? ... Bruns ataxia. *calcaneal gait. *cerebellar gait. *cerebellar ... Table 1: Gait patterns. Gait pattern. Characteristics. Apropulsive gait. Typical of someone who pronates excessively during the ... stuttering gait one characterized by hesitancy that resembles stuttering.. tabetic gait an ataxic gait that accompanies tabes ...
Ataxia means walking with an unsteady gait caused by the failure of muscular coordination or irregularity of muscular action. ... Ataxia is often accompanied by difficulty speaking (dysarthria), drooling; and an impaired ability to coordinate certain eye ... Also known as Pierre Maries disease or hereditary cerebellar ataxia, it often begins during the third or fourth decade. An ... ataxia). Affected individuals may also develop abnormalities of certain reflexes; characteristic foot deformities; increasing ...
... intermittent double-step gait explanation free. What is intermittent double-step gait? Meaning of intermittent double-step gait ... Looking for online definition of intermittent double-step gait in the Medical Dictionary? ... Bruns ataxia. *calcaneal gait. *cerebellar gait. *cerebellar lesions. *Charcot gait. *choreic gait ... Table 1: Gait patterns. Gait pattern. Characteristics. Apropulsive gait. Typical of someone who pronates excessively during the ...
Tremor-ataxia with central hypomyelination (TACH);Leukodystrophy with oligodontia (LO); and Hypomyelination with cerebellar ... White matter lesions in leukodystrophies tend to be more symmetric and confluent then in MS which may help distinguish the two ... The MRI demonstrate a complex but characteristic pattern of abnormal signal intensity in the subcortical white matter ... Diffuse white matter abnormalities on MRI are accompanied by anterior temporal cysts. ...
Lesions were located in the pons (11/13), medulla oblongata (8/14), mesencephalon (cerebral peduncles; 2/14), and cerebellar ... 16/21 (76.2 %) brainstem attacks were accompanied by acute myelitis and/or ON. ... or cerebellar lesions (1/14). MRI or laboratory signs of blood-brain barrier damage were present in 5/12. Cerebrospinal fluid ... more frequently supratentorial brain lesions, worse EDSS at last follow-up). Brainstem involvement is present in around one ...
Patient 3 might possibly develop a GAD-antibody associated cerebellar ataxia that, beyond SPS, is the most frequent ... so far the patient has not developed a gait or limb ataxia. Another explanation of the patients recurrent vomiting could be an ... The rigidity is accompanied by intermittent muscular cramps and spasms, potentially painful and disabling, which are often ... EMG testing showed a left peroneal nerve lesion, probably due to significant weight reduction, and CMUA at rest. Laboratory ...
Ataxia is most often caused by disease activity in the cerebellum. Ataxia can affect any limb, the trunk or a persons gait. ... can be related to cerebellar lesions, which can occur in multiple sclerosis. ... Muscle tone - A characteristic of a muscle that describes its resistance to stretching. Abnormal muscle tone can be defined as ... Euphoria - Unrealistic cheerfulness and optimism, accompanied by a lessening of critical thinking; generally considered to be a ...
1, parts A and B), hyperintense lesions in middle cerebellar peduncles, and similar intensities in the tectum and tegmentum of ... she demonstrated gait ataxia and impaired finger to nose test prominently on the right side. For the better evaluation, brain ... In WE, characteristic radiologic findings on brain MRI consist of symmetric signal changes in the thalami, mamillary bodies, ... described a case of acute WE arising following allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation accompanying with ...
... defects of the visual field and cerebellar signs (ataxia, gait, dysmetria, abnormal Romberg test, etc.) [5, 19, 20], and ... followed by brainstem lesions or cerebellar lesions [30]. Central causes are identified when dizziness is combined with ... is often characteristic of a peripheral origin [5, 19, 20]. If the emergency physician cannot treat the dizziness successfully ... since hypovolaemia can accompany dizziness. It should include a Schellong test and a bedside test for peripheral vestibular ...
This author discusses gait abnormalities in patients with diabetes, reviews the influence of ground reactive forces and ... Observing the gait of patients with diabetes can reveal valuable information that can help avert complications. ... provides a practical guide to analyzing gait in this patient population. ... cerebellar ataxia, choreic disorders (found in Huntingtons disease) and waddling.5 I have noticed in my patients that an ...
... and limb ataxia. inner ear. Hereditary cerebellar ataxia syndromes of various types have been identi- Vertebrobasilar ... Acute labyrinthine lesions typically pres- accompanied by neck pain, new onset of severe headache, inability to ent with ... or vertical nystagmus and ipsilateral extremity and gait ataxia. A cerebel- CLINICAL TOPICS IN OTONEUROLOGY 7 in practice lar ... Depressive thoughts can be identified by their characteristic "if only" verbal structure, e.g., "If only the doctor could find ...
Brainstem and cerebellar tumors induce cranial nerve palsies, ataxia, incoordination, nystagmus, pyramidal signs, and sensory ... Although often described as characteristic of tumor headaches, the following clincial features are not commonly present:. * ... The remainder of brain neoplasms are caused by metastatic lesions.. In adults, two thirds of primary brain tumors arise from ... Because the brain dwells in the limited volume of the cranial vault, growth of intracranial tumors with accompanying edema may ...
... pyramidal and cerebellar gait dysfunction), vision, or bowel and bladder function. Of the remaining domains, sensory deficits ... Serial scans were evaluated for the presence of new T2 or T1 gadolinium-enhancing lesions according to criteria for lesion ... it was difficult to determine whether gait impairment was predominantly related to ataxia, pyramidal, or sensory involvement. ... Characteristics of Participants. Between September 1, 2004, and June 30, 2010, a total of 332 children were enrolled, and 283 ...
Aphasia characterizes dominant hemisphere lesions, while neglect accompanies nondominant hemisphere lesions.. *Anterior ... Dysarthria or ataxia may be present. Aphasia, neglect, or visual loss are not characteristic of lacunar syndromes. ... Vertebral (or posterior inferior cerebellar): Truncal ataxia, dysarthria, dysphagia, ipsilateral sensory loss on the face, and ... Motor control, strength, balance, coordination, and gait should be evaluated. Examination of cortical function includes testing ...
  • The presence of cognitive impairment, new characteristic features of MRI lesions, significant axonal injury in biopsy specimens and subsequent development of profound local and, in some cases, additional diffuse cerebral atrophy, are novel findings. (bmj.com)
  • See also cerebellar atrophy. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Thiamine deficiency contributes to a number of conditions spanning from mild neurological and psychiatric symptoms (confusion, reduced memory, and sleep disturbances) to severe encephalopathy, ataxia, congestive heart failure, muscle atrophy, and even death. (frontiersin.org)
  • Brain MRI may demonstrate atrophy of the cerebellar vermis [ Vighetto et al 1988 , Mantuano et al 2010 ]. (nih.gov)
  • Cortical cerebellar atrophy (CCA) and multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C) are the two major forms of adult-onset sporadic ataxia. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Cerebellar and pontine atrophy is visible with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in individuals who develop cerebellar ataxia. (cdc.gov)
  • Magnetic resonance imaging usually shows marked atrophy of the cerebellum and pontine which is sometimes accompanied by Hot Cross Bun sign that is common in cerebellar type of multiple system atrophy. (cdc.gov)
  • Myoclonus can originate from the muscles responsible for cerebellar atrophy (1) FRDA (3) AVED (3) Abetalipoproteinemia (6) Refsum disease should be treated with IV trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. (cide.edu)
  • 4) no cerebellar atrophy. (tremorjournal.org)
  • The main findings in NR examinations are cortical cerebellar atrophy (known as "pure" cerebellar degeneration), spinal atrophy, or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. (tremorjournal.org)
  • A pathognomonic pattern characteristic of inclusion body myositis is atrophy and weakness of the flexor forearm (e.g., wrist and finger flexors) and quadriceps muscles that is often asymmetric. (doctorlib.info)
  • Early onset ataxia with optic atrophy are a heterogeneous group of disorders which can occur in combination with Friedreich ataxia, X-linked ataxia, leucodystrophies ALD, KLD, sialidosis, MELAS, biotin deficiency or demyelinating disease. (neuroweb.us)
  • Cerebellar cortical atrophy was present in 16 of 17 and cerebral atrophy in 17 of 17. (ajnr.org)
  • We recently encountered an unusual case of primary cerebellar germinoma, presenting with progressive ataxia and cranial nerve palsy, characterized by gradually enlarging low-intensity lesions visible with both T2*-weighted imaging (T2*WI), which were the key to the diagnosis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Here, we report a rare case of cerebellar germinoma presenting with progressive ataxia and cranial nerve palsy, characterized by gradually enlarging multiple low-intensity lesions visible with both T2*-weighted imaging (T2*WI) and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI). (biomedcentral.com)
  • As with lesions of the spinal cord, localization of the level of the lesion is determined by noting which of the cranial nerve functions are affected. (britannica.com)
  • 2 The clinical symptoms of BNS may be very diverse, and include headaches, cognitive deficits, paresis, cranial nerve involvement, gait disorders, and psychiatric symptoms. (haematologica.org)
  • This article describes clinical signs and symptoms of six tremor syndromes, including physiologic tremor, essential tremor, Parkinson's disease, toxic and drug-induced tremor, cerebellar tremor, and psychogenic tremor, and presents a detailed diagnostic approach to tremor. (aafp.org)
  • Here, we describe the clinical features of several members of the same family diagnosed with Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) and cerebral lesions, demyelinating neuropathy, and late-age onset without a significant cardiac involvement and presenting with similar symptoms, although genetic testing was negative for the GAA repeat expansion in one patient of the family. (hindawi.com)
  • citation needed] Intention tremors can be a first sign of multiple sclerosis, since loss or deterioration of motor function and sensitivity are often one of the first symptoms of cerebellar lesions. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is recognized by the constellation of symptoms including ataxia, confusional state, and diplopia. (tums.pub)
  • There are signs and symptoms characteristic of vascular lesions in the various arterial territories of the brain. (aapmr.org)
  • There are often symptoms reflecting dysfunction of other posterior fossa structures, such as vertigo, ataxia, dysphagia, nausea - vomiting, and abnormal eye movements. (medicowesome.com)
  • The long tract abnormalities, vertigo, ataxia, and similar symptoms and findings that are otherwise characteristic of intrinsic brainstem disease are lacking. (medicowesome.com)
  • Symptoms typically appear during adolescence or adulthood, and are not usually accompanied by hydrocephalus. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Other motor symptoms should not accompany the tremor. (breaktheicetv.com)
  • Diagnosis of this subtype requires the presence of typical symptoms and imaging results that show lesions in different places in your brain and/or spinal cord that developed at different times. (livewisems.org)
  • This subtype is diagnosed in people who have no symptoms that suggest MS but in whom imaging performed for another reason just happened to identify lesions that suggest MS. (livewisems.org)
  • We investigated macro- and microstructural changes of the infratentorial brain based on phylogenetic origins and their correlation with symptoms in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6. (ajnr.org)
  • We found characteristic macro- and microstructural changes, depending on phylogenetic regions of the infratentorial brain, that strongly correlated with clinical symptoms in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6. (ajnr.org)
  • The nature and pattern of the symptoms and physical signs of neurological disease allow inferences to be drawn about the sites of the lesions causing them. (britannica.com)
  • In the medical interview, a questionnaire on the characteristics of chest pain and additional symptoms was given. (go.jp)
  • These are not characteristic of any subtype of SCA, but together with other information (specifically ethnicity, and extracerebellar motor and nonmotor symptoms and signs, including systemic findings), these studies can guide the genetic diagnosis. (tremorjournal.org)
  • VBI may produce vertigo alone as an early symptom, but it will eventually be accompanied by other posterior circulation symptoms. (vestib.com)
  • These symptoms are accompanied by progressive cognitive and behavioral difficulties, including memory loss, executive function deficits, anxiety, and reclusive behavior. (ajnr.org)
  • Cerebellar tremor is caused by lesions in or damage to the cerebellum resulting from stroke, tumor, or disease such as multiple sclerosis or some inherited degenerative disorder. (wikidoc.org)
  • One common way for the cerebellum to become damaged is through the development of cerebellar lesions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common site for cerebellar lesions that lead to intention tremors has been reported to be the superior cerebellar peduncle, through which all fibers carrying information to the midbrain pass, and the dentate nucleus, which is also responsible for linking the cerebellum to the rest of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because of this tight association with damage to the cerebellum, intention tremors are often referred to as cerebellar tremors. (wikipedia.org)
  • cerebellar ataxia ataxia due to disease of the cerebellum. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Ataxia is most often caused by disease activity in the cerebellum. (ucsfbenioffchildrens.org)
  • Hemorrhagic strokes are most often caused by hypertension, with lesions typically located in the basal ganglia, thalamus, pons, and cerebellum. (aapmr.org)
  • At surgery, however, the exact point from which the tumor arose could not always be determined due to the size of the lesion, its impingement upon the cerebellum, its spread out from the lateral recesses, and extension down over the cervical cord. (thejns.org)
  • The most extreme form consists of the herniation of structures of the lower cerebellum, the cerebellar tonsils, and brain stem through the foramen magnum, in such a way that parts of the brain enter the spinal canal, thickening and compressing it. (biomedcentral.com)
  • T2*WI imaging revealed expanded and extended spotty lesions in the cerebellum and brainstem, which had not enhanced with contrast agent previously. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Cerebellar tremor may be accompanied by other manifestations of ataxia , including dysarthria (speech problems), nystagmus (rapid, involuntary rolling of the eyes), gait problems and postural tremor of the trunk and neck. (wikidoc.org)
  • Next to nystagmus, the most frequent ocular abnormality is a weakness or paralysis of eye abduction accompanied by double vision and internal strabismus. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • This is so, even in certain pathological conditions when trunk rotation is capable of inducing strong nystagmus-for example, bilateral absence of vestibular function, 3 or occasionally, in cerebellar lesions. (bmj.com)
  • Between attacks, individuals may initially be asymptomatic but commonly develop interictal findings that can include nystagmus, pursuit and saccade alterations, and ataxia. (nih.gov)
  • Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS) classically, but not always, presents with the clinical triad of confusion, ataxia, and nystagmus. (medscape.com)
  • An autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I that is characterized by papulosquamous, ichthyosiform plaques on the limbs appearing shortly after birth and later manifestations including progressive ataxia, dysarthria , nystagmus and decreased reflexes. (cdc.gov)
  • Progressive ataxia, dysarthria, decreased reflexes, and nystagmus are further clinical signs of the disease that occur after the onset of skin manifestations, generally from the third to fifth decade of life. (cdc.gov)
  • Downbeat and gaze-evoked nystagmus and hypermetric saccades are characteristic ocular motor findings in ataxic disorders due to cerebellar dysfunction. (e-jmd.org)
  • Wernicke's encephalopathy(WE),characterized by nystagmus and ophthalmoplegia,unsteadiness of stance and gait and mental-status changes,is an acute or subacute metabolic encephalopathy of the central nervous system resulting from Vitamin B1(VitB1)deficiency. (bvsalud.org)
  • Abnormalities of hormone producing (endocrine) glands may be accompanied by incomplete sexual development in both males and females. (rarediseases.org)
  • This author discusses gait abnormalities in patients with diabetes, reviews the influence of ground reactive forces and provides a practical guide to analyzing gait in this patient population. (podiatrytoday.com)
  • 10 Otherwise, most gait analysis studies I reviewed had surprisingly little to say regarding sagittal plane abnormalities in patients with diabetes. (podiatrytoday.com)
  • However, it is most likely that gait abnormalities occur across the spectrum of diabetes and increase with disease severity. (podiatrytoday.com)
  • Cerebellar abnormalities resulting​ from dysfunction of the cerebellar connections in the brainstem, usually are accompanied by other brainstem signs. (medicowesome.com)
  • Produce characteristic patterns of clinical abnormalities, with motor and sensory deficits in a certain distribution. (medicowesome.com)
  • The pattern of weakness is typically more localizing than sensory abnormalities in lesions of the cervical spinal cord, while demonstration of a sensory level on the trunk is more helpful in localizing lesions of the thoracic cord. (medicowesome.com)
  • Therefore, lesions involving the vestibular nuclei can present abnormalities of cVEMPs and medullary lesions involving the descending MLF or the spinal accessory nucleus impair cVEMPs. (dizziness-and-balance.com)
  • Progressive cerebellar ataxia, hyperreflexia, peripheral neuropathy and cardiac conduction abnormalities are also common findings. (neuroweb.us)
  • In addition to weakness below the level of the lesion, patients with spinal cord lesions also have paresthesias, numbness, tingling, and sensory loss with a discrete sensory level, usually on the trunk. (medicowesome.com)
  • He had no weakness or ataxia of extremities, and his sensation was intact. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A UMN ('pyramidal') lesion above the decussation causes weakness of the contralateral limbs, i.e. a hemiparesis. (medassignments.com)
  • Paraparesis means weakness of both lower limbs and is characteristically diagnostic of a spinal cord lesion. (medassignments.com)
  • Weakness localized to one contralaterallimb (monoplegia) or part of a limb is characteristic of an isolated lesion of the motor cortex. (medassignments.com)
  • Clinicians should suspect AFM in children with acute flaccid limb weakness, especially during August-November and when accompanied by neck or back pain and a recent history of febrile respiratory illness. (cdc.gov)
  • Pathogens are rarely recovered weakness accompanied by predominantly gray matter lesions from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AFM patients, but entero- in the spinal cord. (cdc.gov)
  • For example, injury to the cord at mid-thoracic levels spares the arms, which are innervated by fibres originating from higher segments, but it causes characteristic signs (abnormal posture, spastic tone, weakness, increased deep reflexes, and abnormal plantar reflexes) of damage to motor neurons originating below that level-as well as the loss of bladder and bowel control. (britannica.com)
  • Steadily progressive hemiparesis (weakness on one side), gait (walking) impairment, or aphasia (inability to speak) implicate a mass lesion that may be a tumor or even a nonneoplastic mass, such as an abscess. (burlesqueaustralia.com)
  • Facial weakness (difficulty with eye closure and impaired smile) and scapular winging ( Fig. 48-3 ) are characteristic of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD). (doctorlib.info)
  • Essential tremor may be accompanied by mild gait disturbance. (bionity.com)
  • Cerebellar tremor (also known as "intention tremor") is a slow, broad tremor of the extremities that occurs at the end of a purposeful movement, such as trying to press a button or touching a finger to the tip of one's nose. (wikidoc.org)
  • In classic cerebellar tremor, a lesion on one side of the brain produces a tremor in that same side of the body that worsens with directed movement. (wikidoc.org)
  • Cerebellar damage can also produce a "wing-beating" type of tremor called rubral or Holmes' tremor - a combination of rest, action, and postural tremors. (wikidoc.org)
  • The characteristics of this kind of tremor may vary but generally include sudden onset and remission, increased incidence with stress, change in tremor direction and/or body part affected, and greatly decreased or disappearing tremor activity when the patient is distracted. (wikidoc.org)
  • What are the characteristics of tremor? (medicinenet.com)
  • Isometric tremor occurs during a voluntary muscle contraction that is not accompanied by any movement. (medicinenet.com)
  • Our purpose was to characterize the findings of MR imaging of the brain of adult male fragile X premutation carriers with a recently identified disorder characterized by ataxia, tremor, rigidity, and cognitive dysfunction. (ajnr.org)
  • Among these male carriers, all older than 50 years, progressive intention tremor and ataxia have developed. (ajnr.org)
  • Dysarthria or ataxia may be present. (aapmr.org)
  • Vertebral (or posterior inferior cerebellar): Truncal ataxia, dysarthria, dysphagia, ipsilateral sensory loss on the face, and contralateral sensory loss below the neck. (aapmr.org)
  • A 38-year-old woman who had not been diagnosed with SLE presented with dysarthria and gait disturbance after influenza vaccination. (bvsalud.org)
  • an inherited disease of cattle in which hind limb ataxia commences at 6 months to 3 years of age and worsens over 1 to 2 more years to the point of recumbency. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Two years previously, he began experiencing double vision, ptosis of the right eyelid, and left upper limb ataxia, which gradually worsened. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A series of cases with corticosteroid responsive perivascular brainstem and cerebellar inflammation have recently been reported and given the name chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS). (bmj.com)
  • 16/21 (76.2 %) brainstem attacks were accompanied by acute myelitis and/or ON. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Brainstem involvement was associated with a more aggressive general disease course (higher relapse rate, more myelitis attacks, more frequently supratentorial brain lesions, worse EDSS at last follow-up). (biomedcentral.com)
  • It is extremely rare to see cerebrospinal fluid dissemination of intraventricular meningioma, particularly with the development of acute, progressive brainstem/cerebellar dysfunction with an absence of mass formation in the corresponding anatomical sites. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Because the patient initially developed peripheral facial nerve palsy and a mild unsteadiness of gait, and neuroimaging and laboratory findings were nonspecific or unremarkable, we suspected that he might have an immune-mediated disease such as brainstem encephalitis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This is not true of lesions of the dorsal columns, which carry fibres originating from the same side of the body and cross in the brainstem . (britannica.com)
  • However they are described, dizziness and vertigo may be disturbing and even incapacitating, particularly when accompanied by nausea and vomiting. (merckmanuals.com)
  • It is characterized by the combination of initial vertigo with subjective postural and gait instability and the fear of impending death (Psora). (ning.com)
  • Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) is characterized by paroxysmal attacks of ataxia, vertigo, and nausea typically lasting minutes to days in duration. (nih.gov)
  • In fact, a Swedish study found that approximately 1/4 of cases of isolated acute vertigo could be attributed to caudal cerebellar infarction. (vestib.com)
  • helicopod gait a gait in which the feet describe half circles, as in some conversion disorders. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 1 A wide base of gait is also present in children beginning to walk and along with some older adult gait patterns such as caution, cerebellar ataxia, choreic disorders (found in Huntington's disease) and waddling. (podiatrytoday.com)
  • Cerebral Palsy is a group of permanent, but not unchanging, disorders of movement and/or posture and of motor function, which are due to a non-progressive interference, lesion, or abnormality of the developing/immature brain [1] . (physio-pedia.com)
  • Therefore, it is assumed that the category of CCA in the Japanese national registry include heterogeneous cerebellar ataxic disorders. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Lower-level gait disorders are abnormal in virtually all having a TENS unit therapy can be given to bromocriptine and/or dantrolene for antidotal therapy. (cide.edu)
  • These disorders cause characteristic patterns of discolored skin and also involve the brain, eyes, nails, and hair. (owujoxyfuj.tk)
  • frontal ataxia disturbance of equilibrium associated with tumor of the frontal lobe. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Confusion is the most common presenting symptom, followed by ataxia and visual problems. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • The common predisposing factors are cerebral trauma, degenerative lesions and brain tumor (glioma) at the basal ganglia. (hpathy.com)
  • The authors have produced numerous books and videos on cerebral palsy, spina bifida, gait analysis, clubfoot, the use of ultrasonography in orthopedic management, and historical aspects of medicine. (docplayer.net)
  • Such patients often shows cerebellar and cerebral vasculitis. (cide.edu)
  • However, this is the first case of anti-DPPX-encephalitis in the context of a connective tissue disease combined with cerebral arteriopathy along with brain parenchymal lesions that we interpreted as a secondary, CTD-associated cerebral vasculitis. (openaccesspub.org)
  • MR imaging studies of the brain of 17 male patients were characterized for signal intensity and for size of ventricles, cerebral and cerebellar sulci, and brain stem. (ajnr.org)
  • For several decades, the eponyms Arnold and Chiari have been used as synonyms to define conditions with ectopia of the cerebellar tonsils below the level of the posterior edge of the foramen magnum. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Unilateral occipital headache may occur in patients with an acute infarction involving the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. (reliasmedia.com)
  • Reflecting this tendency, the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale total score showed strong correlations in fractional volume in the right flocculonodular lobe and the bilateral deep structures and in mean diffusivity in the bilateral posterior lobes ( r = 0.73 to ±0.87). (ajnr.org)
  • Likewise, upward herniation caused by a posterior fossa tumor can lead to superior cerebellar artery ischemia and may cause unilateral ataxia to become more severe or bilateral. (burlesqueaustralia.com)
  • Amyloid angiopathy is the second most common cause, with lesions more often in cortical locations. (aapmr.org)
  • The disorder is characterized by progressively impaired coordination of voluntary movements (ataxia), the development of reddish lesions of the skin and mucous membranes due to permanent widening of groups of blood vessels (telangiectasia), and impaired functioning of the immune system (i.e., cellular and humoral immunodeficiency), resulting in increased susceptibility to upper and lower respiratory infections (sinopulmonary infections). (rarediseases.org)
  • sensory ataxia ataxia due to loss of proprioception (joint position sense), resulting in poorly judged movements and becoming aggravated when the eyes are closed. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Ataxia - The unsteadiness and lack of coordination that results from the brain's failure to regulate the body's posture and the strength and direction of limb movements. (ucsfbenioffchildrens.org)
  • In 1881, Carl Wernicke first described an illness that consisted of paralysis of eye movements, ataxia, and mental confusion, in 3 patients. (medscape.com)
  • What are the clinical signs of cerebellar hemorrhage? (brainscape.com)
  • Because clinical information was not available for all of these 133 cases, however, small differences in totals will be noted in the accompanying statistics. (thejns.org)
  • Clinical characteristics. (nih.gov)
  • There are no formal clinical diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of episodic ataxia type 2. (nih.gov)
  • Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) should be suspected in individuals with the following clinical, neuroimaging, EMG, and family history findings. (nih.gov)
  • We studied 319 participants with SCA 1, 2, 3, and 6 and repeatedly measured clinical severity using the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) for 2 years. (tremorjournal.org)
  • However, the presence of ataxia on clinical exam is disputed. (breaktheicetv.com)
  • To refine this category in more detail, we here used a clinical-based term, "idiopathic cerebellar ataxia (IDCA)", and proposed its diagnostic criteria. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Analysis of the clinical and electrophysiological characteristics of multifocal motor neuropathy]. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • This report describes the clinical characteristics of AFM patients during 2018, the most recent peak year. (cdc.gov)
  • Patients with confirmed AFM met the clinical criterion and had magnetic resonance imaging indicating spinal cord lesions largely restricted to gray matter and spanning one or more vertebral segments. (cdc.gov)
  • Diagnosis is based on characteristic clinical findings (skin lesions occurring shortly after birth and adult-onset slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia), and on the molecular genetic testing . (cdc.gov)
  • These conditions can be differentiated from other diseases of the motor unit (e.g., lower motor neuron or neuromuscular junction pathologies) by characteristic clinical and laboratory findings. (doctorlib.info)
  • Brown-Sequard Syndrome - is an incomplete spinal cord lesion characterized by a clinical picture reflecting hemisection of the spinal cord, often in the cervical cord region. (owujoxyfuj.tk)
  • WE is an acute severe thiamine deficiency with a classic triad of confusion, ataxia, and ophthalmoplegia. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Baek et al[10], described a case of acute WE arising following allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation accompanying with prolonged administration of total parenteral nutrition. (tums.pub)
  • An acute lesion of one pyramidal tract causes a flaccid paralysis (and areflexia). (medassignments.com)
  • Fig. 1: Brain MRIs demonstrating hyperintense lesions in middle cerebellar peduncles on axial T2 weighted brain MRI (Part A), similar intensities in the tectum and tegmentum of midbrain on the left side (Part B), intense enhancement of mammillary bodies on the T1 weighted MRI with contrast (Part C), and hyperintense lesions in the medial portions of thalami in diffusion weighted MRI (Part D). (tums.pub)
  • Fourteen of 17 had similar signal intensity alterations in the middle cerebellar peduncles. (ajnr.org)
  • Observing the gait of patients with diabetes can reveal valuable information that can help avert complications. (podiatrytoday.com)
  • If one considers observational or advanced gait analysis for podiatry patients with diabetes mellitus, there is no consensus for an approach and evidence-based guidelines are lacking. (podiatrytoday.com)
  • Gait analysis studies for patients with diabetes vary on their inclusion criteria, the definition of neuropathy, walking surface, data collection methods and sensor technologies. (podiatrytoday.com)
  • 5 I have noticed in my patients that an increased base of gait is sometimes accompanied by cautious gait changes like abducted legs and arms, very slow walking, or careful turning. (podiatrytoday.com)
  • Researchers have also reported additional gait parameters in patients with diabetes. (podiatrytoday.com)
  • Although research has not firmly established causal relationships for gait changes in patients with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy remains suspect number one. (podiatrytoday.com)
  • Kanji and colleagues have suggested that large fiber neuropathy, which affects gait with the loss of pain sensation and proprioception, occurs often in the insensate foot and many patients are unaware of this condition. (podiatrytoday.com)
  • Study outcomes comparing patients with and without diabetes are not clear regarding which gait alterations are specific to peripheral neuropathy and which also affect those without neuropathy. (podiatrytoday.com)
  • Respiratory depression: Increased risk in elderly, debilitated patients, those suffering from conditions accompanied by hypoxia, hypercapnia, or upper airway obstruction. (nih.gov)
  • The structural lesions associated with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome are more likely to manifest in patients with malnutrition. (medscape.com)
  • MR images of 9 patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 and 9 age- and sex-matched controls were obtained. (ajnr.org)
  • Some patients are unable to walk while those that do have a clumsy, spastic gait. (arizona.edu)
  • Fifteen of 17 patients showed symmetrically decreased T1 and increased T2 signal intensity in cerebellar white matter lateral, superior, and inferior to the dentate nuclei. (ajnr.org)
  • In those with AT, progressive ataxia typically develops during infancy and may initially be characterized by abnormal swaying of the head and trunk. (rarediseases.org)
  • Nuclear magnetic spectroscopy may demonstrate abnormal cerebellar intracellular pH levels (in those not treated with acetazolamide) [ Bain et al 1992 ] and low cerebellar creatine [ Harno et al 2005 ]. (nih.gov)
  • Or abnormal arousal from sleep, impairment of the lesion. (cide.edu)
  • In WE, characteristic radiologic findings on brain MRI consist of symmetric signal changes in the thalami, mamillary bodies, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area[12]. (tums.pub)
  • Although some tumors exhibit a characteristic appearance, do not make an unequivocal diagnosis based solely on radiologic findings. (medscape.com)
  • MR imaging findings in symptomatic male fragile X premutation carriers are characteristic of this disorder. (ajnr.org)
  • Deficits in postural control manifest as ataxia and falls. (healio.com)
  • An 81-year-old man was admitted because of double vision, right facial nerve palsy and truncal ataxia. (biomedcentral.com)
  • On neurological examination, he had double vision, despite no obvious limitation of extraocular muscles, peripheral facial nerve palsy on the right side, slurred speech, and truncal ataxia. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Early vertical saccadic palsy is characteristic of progressive supranuclear palsy-Richardson's syndrome. (e-jmd.org)
  • The contributions of vascular risk factors to spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) are not known. (tremorjournal.org)
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia type six (SCA6) is a rare, late-onset, autosomal dominant disease. (ajnr.org)
  • The additional features of pyramidal, extrapyramidal, cerebellar, or peripheral nerve involvement are key diagnostic clues in this group (table 3) and help to direct investigations. (bmj.com)
  • Depending on the location of cerebellar damage, these tremors can be either unilateral or bilateral. (wikipedia.org)
  • Characteristic of unilateral hemispheric pathology is a "hemi" deficit. (medicowesome.com)
  • The level of a unilateral lesion of the corticospinal tracts may be determined by the accompanying features. (medassignments.com)
  • If this problem is the result of a unilateral disorder, it is likely that the lesion is in the ______ hemisphere. (brainaacn.org)
  • ataxia characterized by defects in rate, range, force and direction of movement of limbs. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • He was complicated with WE at the late stage of diagnosis,mainly manifested as the convulsion of limbs,ataxia,and delirium. (bvsalud.org)
  • Called also progressive sensory ataxia of Charolais cattle. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A 30-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of slowly progressive dizziness and mild ataxia. (biomedcentral.com)
  • It is a myelin disorder with eosinophilic plaques in the cerebellar medula and peduncles. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Aphasia characterizes dominant hemisphere lesions, while neglect accompanies nondominant hemisphere lesions. (aapmr.org)
  • Aphasia, neglect, or visual loss are not characteristic of lacunar syndromes. (aapmr.org)
  • We employed regression models to study the effects of vascular risk factors on ataxia onset and progression after adjusting for age, sex, and pathological CAG repeats. (tremorjournal.org)
  • Higher CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc scores were not associated with either earlier onset or faster progression of ataxia. (tremorjournal.org)
  • Vascular risks are not common in SCAs and are not associated with earlier onset or faster ataxia progression. (tremorjournal.org)
  • Both sensations may be accompanied by nausea and vomiting or difficulty with balance, gait, or both. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Clearly, vestibular lesions or experimental vestibular activation (for example, a caloric test) produce powerful illusions of self motion. (bmj.com)
  • ataxic gait an unsteady, uncoordinated walk, with a wide base and the feet thrown out, coming down first on the heel and then on the toes with a double tap. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder and the most common hereditary ataxia. (hindawi.com)
  • Video demonstrates a bilateral, asymmetric, tonic seizure with semiology characteristic of frontal lobe (mesial) activation in a 32-year-old man with a normal MRI, no interictal discharges on scalp EEG, and a nonlocalizable scalp ictal EEG pattern. (lww.com)
  • spastic gait a walk in which the legs are held together and move in a stiff manner, the toes seeming to drag and catch. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Kinds of hereditary ataxia include ataxia-telangiectasia syndrome and Friedreich's ataxia . (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Muscle strength and sensory and gait and reflexes. (medicpdf.com)
  • The rigidity is accompanied by intermittent muscular cramps and spasms, potentially painful and disabling, which are often triggered by external stimuli (e.g., unexpected noise or tactile stimulation) or emotional stress. (hindawi.com)
  • This lesion may produce signs of an upper motor-neuron lesion and dorsal column-type sensory loss at all levels below the medulla. (britannica.com)
  • In a severe lesion (e.g. an infarct of the internal capsule causing hemiplegia) this response can be elicited from a wide area of the affected limb. (medassignments.com)
  • The remaining six pigs developed neurological signs and histopathology revealed severe spongiform changes accompanied by astrogliosis and microgliosis throughout the central nervous system. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Poor or absent speech is characteristic and intellectual disability may be severe. (arizona.edu)
  • this is highly typical of all vascular lesions. (vestib.com)
  • However, cerebellar involvement has rarely been reported. (bvsalud.org)
  • A pontine lesion is rarely confined to the corticospinal tract alone. (medassignments.com)
  • 1) Diazepam 6 mg two or more rarely, bilateral anterior lesions. (cide.edu)
  • The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a group of autosomal dominant degenerative diseases characterized by cerebellar ataxia. (tremorjournal.org)
  • It is due to paralysis of the anterior tibial and fibular muscles, and is seen in lesions of the lower motor neuron, such as multiple neuritis, lesions of the anterior motor horn cells, and lesions of the cauda equina. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a small, low-intensity spot in the left cerebellar peduncle on the T2*WI and SWI without enhancement. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Disease forms which do not meet these criteria are referred to as atypical Friedreich ataxia. (hindawi.com)
  • The main characteristic features of Parkinson's disease are insufficient formation and activity of dopamine, due to the death of neurons in certain nuclei of the basal ganglia, especially in the substantia nigra. (hpathy.com)