Bread: Baked food product made of flour or meal that is moistened, kneaded, and sometimes fermented. A major food since prehistoric times, it has been made in various forms using a variety of ingredients and methods.Cereals: Seeds from grasses (POACEAE) which are important in the diet.Food: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.Secale cereale: A hardy grain crop, rye, grown in northern climates. It is the most frequent host to ergot (CLAVICEPS), the toxic fungus. Its hybrid with TRITICUM is TRITICALE, another grain.Food Supply: The production and movement of food items from point of origin to use or consumption.Triticum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.Food Analysis: Measurement and evaluation of the components of substances to be taken as FOOD.Flour: Ground up seed of WHEAT.Food Preferences: The selection of one food over another.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Food, Fortified: Any food that has been supplemented with essential nutrients either in quantities that are greater than those present normally, or which are not present in the food normally. Fortified food includes also food to which various nutrients have been added to compensate for those removed by refinement or processing. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Food Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a food or its container or wrapper. The concept includes ingredients, NUTRITIONAL VALUE, directions, warnings, and other relevant information.Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.Food Industry: The industry concerned with processing, preparing, preserving, distributing, and serving of foods and beverages.Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Health Food: A non-medical term defined by the lay public as a food that has little or no preservatives, which has not undergone major processing, enrichment or refinement and which may be grown without pesticides. (from Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Dietary Fiber: The remnants of plant cell walls that are resistant to digestion by the alimentary enzymes of man. It comprises various polysaccharides and lignins.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Avena sativa: A plant species of the family POACEAE that is widely cultivated for its edible seeds.Food Hypersensitivity: Gastrointestinal disturbances, skin eruptions, or shock due to allergic reactions to allergens in food.Fast Foods: Prepared food that is ready to eat or partially prepared food that has a final preparation time of a few minutes or less.Food Safety: Activities involved in ensuring the safety of FOOD including avoidance of bacterial and other contamination.Food Deprivation: The withholding of food in a structured experimental situation.Food Additives: Substances which are of little or no nutritive value, but are used in the processing or storage of foods or animal feed, especially in the developed countries; includes ANTIOXIDANTS; FOOD PRESERVATIVES; FOOD COLORING AGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS (both plain and LOCAL); VEHICLES; EXCIPIENTS and other similarly used substances. Many of the same substances are PHARMACEUTIC AIDS when added to pharmaceuticals rather than to foods.Hordeum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The EDIBLE GRAIN, barley, is widely used as food.Food, Genetically Modified: Food derived from genetically modified organisms (ORGANISMS, GENETICALLY MODIFIED).Food Chain: The sequence of transfers of matter and energy from organism to organism in the form of FOOD. Food chains intertwine locally into a food web because most organisms consume more than one type of animal or plant. PLANTS, which convert SOLAR ENERGY to food by PHOTOSYNTHESIS, are the primary food source. In a predator chain, a plant-eating animal is eaten by a larger animal. In a parasite chain, a smaller organism consumes part of a larger host and may itself be parasitized by smaller organisms. In a saprophytic chain, microorganisms live on dead organic matter.Food Services: Functions, equipment, and facilities concerned with the preparation and distribution of ready-to-eat food.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Legislation, Food: Laws and regulations concerned with industrial processing and marketing of foods.Food Preservation: Procedures or techniques used to keep food from spoiling.Energy Intake: Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.Nutritive Value: An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.Infant Food: Food processed and manufactured for the nutritional health of children in their first year of life.Dietary Carbohydrates: Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Food, Preserved: Food that has been prepared and stored in a way to prevent spoilage.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Food Coloring Agents: Natural or synthetic dyes used as coloring agents in processed foods.Glycemic Index: A numerical system of measuring the rate of BLOOD GLUCOSE generation from a particular food item as compared to a reference item, such as glucose = 100. Foods with higher glycemic index numbers create greater blood sugar swings.Starch: Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Biological Availability: The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.Oryza sativa: Annual cereal grass of the family POACEAE and its edible starchy grain, rice, which is the staple food of roughly one-half of the world's population.Diet Surveys: Systematic collections of factual data pertaining to the diet of a human population within a given geographic area.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Glutens: Prolamins in the endosperm of SEEDS from the Triticeae tribe which includes species of WHEAT; BARLEY; and RYE.Satiety Response: Behavioral response associated with the achieving of gratification.Food, Formulated: Food and dietary formulations including elemental (chemically defined formula) diets, synthetic and semisynthetic diets, space diets, weight-reduction formulas, tube-feeding diets, complete liquid diets, and supplemental liquid and solid diets.Soy Foods: Foods made from SOYBEANS. Health benefits are ascribed to the high levels of DIETARY PROTEINS and ISOFLAVONES.Hunger: The desire for FOOD generated by a sensation arising from the lack of food in the STOMACH.Cooking: The art or practice of preparing food. It includes the preparation of special foods for diets in various diseases.Postprandial Period: The time frame after a meal or FOOD INTAKE.Phytic Acid: Complexing agent for removal of traces of heavy metal ions. It acts also as a hypocalcemic agent.Brachypodium: A plant genus in the family POACEAE. Brachypodium distachyon is a model species for functional genomics studies.Functional Food: Components of the usual diet that may provide health benefits beyond basic nutrients. Examples of functional foods include soy, nuts, chocolate, and cranberries (From NCCAM Backgrounder, March 2004, p3).Fagopyrum: A plant genus of the family POLYGONACEAE that is used as an EDIBLE GRAIN. Although the seeds are used as cereal, the plant is not one of the cereal grasses (POACEAE).Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Satiation: Full gratification of a need or desire followed by a state of relative insensitivity to that particular need or desire.Diet Records: Records of nutrient intake over a specific period of time, usually kept by the patient.Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Nutrition Policy: Guidelines and objectives pertaining to food supply and nutrition including recommendations for healthy diet.Panicum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The seed is one of the EDIBLE GRAINS used in millet cereals and in feed for birds and livestock (ANIMAL FEED). It contains diosgenin (SAPONINS).Chromosomes, Plant: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.Food Inspection: Examination of foods to assure wholesome and clean products free from unsafe microbes or chemical contamination, natural or added deleterious substances, and decomposition during production, processing, packaging, etc.Lactobacillales: An order of gram-positive bacteria in the class Bacilli, that have the ability to ferment sugars to lactic acid. They are widespread in nature and commonly used to produce fermented foods.Food-Processing Industry: The productive enterprises concerned with food processing.Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.
  • Recommendations for riboflavin, as well as other nutrients, are provided in the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) developed by the Food and Nutrition Board at the Institute of Medicine. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Food, once eaten, is broken down by digestion into nutrients. (fao.org)
  • When a person has diarrhoea the food passes through the gut so quickly that it is not properly digested and fewer nutrients are absorbed. (fao.org)
  • Whatever they do not finish try and make up for it by giving them different foods that provide the same nutrients. (hubpages.com)
  • It is also a problem for people who participate in fad diets like veganism, which, if followed incorrectly, can leave out some important minerals and nutrients normally found in animal-based foods. (getridofthings.com)
  • Some foods and the vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients found in them may raise or lower cancer risk. (cancer.net)
  • Researchers have studied how certain foods, nutrients, and patterns of eating are related to cancer risk. (cancer.net)
  • Those at higher risk of vitamin B12 deficiency include people who follow a vegan diet (B12 is found in animal-based foods), adults older than 50 (who often don't produce enough of the stomach enzyme needed to effectively absorb B12) and anyone with a digestive problem that impairs absorption of nutrients (e.g., celiac disease, Crohn's). (eatingwell.com)
  • Of course, it's always best to obtain our nutrients by eating a rainbow of all-natural whole foods. (mcall.com)
  • Taking prenatal vitamins and eating healthy foods can help give you all the nutrients you and your baby need during pregnancy. (marchofdimes.org)
  • Your body uses vitamins, minerals and other nutrients in food to help it stay strong and healthy. (marchofdimes.org)
  • These foods are rich sources of the nutrients essential for rebuilding tissues: protein, zinc, iron, and vitamins A and C. (livestrong.com)
  • In general, the best foods are healthy foods packed with the nutrients that your kids need, including foods that are high in fiber, low in fat , and good sources of protein, calcium, vitamin D , and iron, etc. (keepkidshealthy.com)
  • But there are certain types of good mood foods that can help you feel better because they contain the nutrients that help remove harmful toxins from your body. (goldsgym.com)
  • These nutrients are nicknamed "brain food" because they help grow neural tissues and create sharper connections in your central nervous system, with benefits such as improving memory. (goldsgym.com)
  • Keep in mind: You want to always get the nutrients you need from food first, because your body knows what to do with them," Cheng says. (goldsgym.com)
  • The following nutrients and the foods that contain them hold particular promise in promoting optimal bone health. (todaysdietitian.com)
  • So, people who do not eat meat can boost absorption rates by eating foods that contain vitamin C at the same time. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Food safety -or, the lack of it-was given significant publicity by author Upton Sinclair , a journalist, whose book, The Jungle , published in 1905, focused his attention on the meat packing industry in Chicago. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The 1906 Food and Drug Act, and the 1906 Meat Inspection Act were enacted to create a government inspection program not only in the meat industry, but also throughout the food industry. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Slowly increase the fat content of the food by using more fats and oils, as well as eating fatty foods - oilseeds such as groundnuts, soy and sesame, avocados and fatty meat. (fao.org)
  • Iron is found in red meat, sea food , and fortified bread and cereals. (thebody.com)
  • Since about 75 percent of the salt we eat has already been added to the various processed foods in our diet, this means not just holding back on the use of the salt shaker, but also cutting down on fast foods and other processed foods, as well as high sodium seasonings like soy sauce, bouillon cubes, meat tenderizer, tamari sauce and Worcestershire sauce. (healthychildren.org)
  • Since the body absorbs the most iron from meat, people who don't eat much or any meat should pair iron-rich plant-based with foods high in Vitamin C to maximize their iron absorption. (goshenhealth.com)
  • The iron in meat is easier to absorb than the iron in plant foods. (seattlechildrens.org)
  • By 2008, resources became readily available to provide information to people on special diets-including information such as what food or drinks might not be a good mix with certain food or liquids while taking a certain medication. (encyclopedia.com)
  • A bloated stomach typically happens when the digestive system has difficulty digesting certain foods and drinks. (express.co.uk)
  • The best way to get the daily requirement of essential vitamins is to eat a balanced diet that contains a variety of foods. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Food fortification is the process by which vitamins and minerals are added to foods. (cdc.gov)
  • It relies on healthy intestinal cells and beneficial bacteria, which help manufacture vitamins, absorb minerals, and digest food. (beaut.ie)
  • No one food can magically heal your cuts and scars, but a diet filled with nutritious foods, including plenty of protein, vitamins A and C, iron and zinc, is integral to the healing process. (livestrong.com)
  • However, re-examination of the Aboriginal people previously tested showed significant improvement in the blood levels of those vitamins added to the bread. (mja.com.au)
  • 6 At the same time, blood levels of vitamins not added to the bread remained unchanged or worsened. (mja.com.au)
  • If you struggle to digest food and suffer from a bloated stomach, there is a certain group of vitamins you could take to help boost the digestion process and relieve symptoms. (express.co.uk)
  • Expectant mothers should be alert to the risks of excessive intake of Vitamin B6, as it's frequently found in variously suggested multivitamins and prenatal vitamins as well as in various fortified foods. (americanpregnancy.org)
  • When you were pregnant, you probably took prenatal vitamins and were conscious about eating nutritious foods to support a healthy pregnancy. (cafemom.com)
  • Fiber-rich foods lower the risk of developing chronic conditions, including heart disease heart disease , cancer cancer , and type 2 diabetes diabetes ," says Hillary Wright, MEd, RD, director of nutrition nutrition services at the Domar Center for Complementary Healthcare in Boston. (webmd.com)
  • Fiber is also filling, and it's found in foods that are relatively low in calories, so it's central to weight control . (webmd.com)
  • go for cereals with five or more grams of dietary fiber per serving. (webmd.com)
  • A new research suggests that people who get dietary fiber from many sources benefit more than those who limit their intake to a single food or low-fiber diets. (medindia.net)
  • Instead of focusing at only plant-based sources, people should strive for a mix of fiber sources, including fiber that has been added to food in the manufacturing process. (medindia.net)
  • High-fiber foods prevent overeating and is also the key to maintaining a healthy weight. (medindia.net)
  • When you consider that a high fiber food has 5g per serving and one that is a good source of fiber only has 2.5g per serving, then it might be hard for some kids to reach recommended levels each day. (keepkidshealthy.com)
  • And compare food labels, looking for foods with high amounts of fiber. (keepkidshealthy.com)
  • Leading Fiber Food Applications in the U.S. (packagedfacts.com)
  • Typically, gluten-free foods - especially processed gluten-free foods, do not contain as much fiber as grain-based foods. (thelist.com)
  • But there's no question that higher intake of fiber from all food sources is beneficial," says Dr. Joanne Slavin, a nutrition scientist at the University of Minnesota. (nih.gov)
  • High-fiber foods generally make you feel fuller for longer. (nih.gov)
  • That's why the Nutrition Facts Panels on some foods list 2 categories of fiber: soluble and insoluble. (nih.gov)
  • Fortified/functional packaged food struggled in 2016 as it faced maturity, whilst the sluggish economy in the country slowed spending. (just-food.com)
  • Euromonitor International's Fortified/Functional Packaged Food in Finland report tracks the developments of health-associated product types and the healthy-option positioning of competing brands across different food sectors. (just-food.com)
  • In fortified/functional packaged food, probiotics is the most common packaged food. (just-food.com)
  • When a person does not eat enough food, or the food eaten is poorly absorbed, the body draws on its reserve stores of energy from body fat and protein from muscle. (fao.org)
  • Eating healthy, protein-rich foods and fresh fruits can help you minimize morning sickness and some other pesky pregnancy annoyances like heartburn and constipation. (early-pregnancy-tests.com)
  • Vitamin B6, otherwise known as pyridoxine, allows the body to use and store energy from protein and carbohydrates and food. (express.co.uk)
  • When you're juggling the nutritional needs for each member of your family - from toddlers to teens, plus mom and dad - knowing how to balance nutritious foods and healthy portions makes feeding your family much easier. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Consuming a wide variety of nutritious foods during pregnancy is important to ensure that the nutritional requirements of both mother and baby are met. (health.gov.au)
  • Similarly, financial and language difficulties may affect access to education and employment opportunities which then affects income, health and nutrition literacy, and access to nutritious foods. (health.gov.au)