Polysaccharides composed of repeating glucose units. They can consist of branched or unbranched chains in any linkages.
Seeds from grasses (POACEAE) which are important in the diet.
A general term for single-celled rounded fungi that reproduce by budding. Brewers' and bakers' yeasts are SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE; therapeutic dried yeast is YEAST, DRIED.
Any compound that contains a constituent sugar, in which the hydroxyl group attached to the first carbon is substituted by an alcoholic, phenolic, or other group. They are named specifically for the sugar contained, such as glucoside (glucose), pentoside (pentose), fructoside (fructose), etc. Upon hydrolysis, a sugar and nonsugar component (aglycone) are formed. (From Dorland, 28th ed; From Miall's Dictionary of Chemistry, 5th ed)
Glucose polymers consisting of a backbone of beta(1->3)-linked beta-D-glucopyranosyl units with beta(1->6) linked side chains of various lengths. They are a major component of the CELL WALL of organisms and of soluble DIETARY FIBER.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Carbohydrates consisting of between two (DISACCHARIDES) and ten MONOSACCHARIDES connected by either an alpha- or beta-glycosidic link. They are found throughout nature in both the free and bound form.
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a carbohydrate.
The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.
Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The sequence of carbohydrates within POLYSACCHARIDES; GLYCOPROTEINS; and GLYCOLIPIDS.
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
Oligosaccharides containing two monosaccharide units linked by a glycosidic bond.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.
The characteristic three-dimensional shape of a molecule.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of glucose from a nucleoside diphosphate glucose to an acceptor molecule which is frequently another carbohydrate. EC 2.4.1.-.
Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
An interleukin-1 subtype that is synthesized as an inactive membrane-bound pro-protein. Proteolytic processing of the precursor form by CASPASE 1 results in release of the active form of interleukin-1beta from the membrane.
A polysaccharide-producing species of STREPTOCOCCUS isolated from human dental plaque.
Proteins found in any species of fungus.
The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.
An endocellulase with specificity for the hydrolysis of 1,3-beta-D-glucosidic linkages in 1,3-beta-D-glucans including laminarin, paramylon, and pachyman.
Adenosine molecules which can be substituted in any position, but are lacking one hydroxyl group in the ribose part of the molecule.
A thin protein film on the surface of DENTAL ENAMEL. It is widely believed to result from the selective adsorption of precursor proteins present in SALIVA onto tooth surfaces, and to reduce microbial adherence to the TEETH.
The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
An exocellulase with specificity for a variety of beta-D-glycoside substrates. It catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal non-reducing residues in beta-D-glucosides with release of GLUCOSE.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.
A low-energy attractive force between hydrogen and another element. It plays a major role in determining the properties of water, proteins, and other compounds.
An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.
A purine nucleoside that has guanine linked by its N9 nitrogen to the C1 carbon of ribose. It is a component of ribonucleic acid and its nucleotides play important roles in metabolism. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
A disaccharide consisting of two glucose units in beta (1-4) glycosidic linkage. Obtained from the partial hydrolysis of cellulose.
An endocellulase with specificity for the hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-glucosidic linkages in CELLULOSE, lichenin, and cereal beta-glucans.
Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of glycosyl groups to an acceptor. Most often another carbohydrate molecule acts as an acceptor, but inorganic phosphate can also act as an acceptor, such as in the case of PHOSPHORYLASES. Some of the enzymes in this group also catalyze hydrolysis, which can be regarded as transfer of a glycosyl group from the donor to water. Subclasses include the HEXOSYLTRANSFERASES; PENTOSYLTRANSFERASES; SIALYLTRANSFERASES; and those transferring other glycosyl groups. EC 2.4.
The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
An 11-kDa protein associated with the outer membrane of many cells including lymphocytes. It is the small subunit of the MHC class I molecule. Association with beta 2-microglobulin is generally required for the transport of class I heavy chains from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. Beta 2-microglobulin is present in small amounts in serum, csf, and urine of normal people, and to a much greater degree in the urine and plasma of patients with tubular proteinemia, renal failure, or kidney transplants.
Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.
A polysaccharide with glucose units linked as in CELLOBIOSE. It is the chief constituent of plant fibers, cotton being the purest natural form of the substance. As a raw material, it forms the basis for many derivatives used in chromatography, ion exchange materials, explosives manufacturing, and pharmaceutical preparations.
A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The EDIBLE GRAIN, barley, is widely used as food.
The region of an enzyme that interacts with its substrate to cause the enzymatic reaction.
A basic science concerned with the composition, structure, and properties of matter; and the reactions that occur between substances and the associated energy exchange.
The composition, conformation, and properties of atoms and molecules, and their reaction and interaction processes.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
The functional hereditary units of FUNGI.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
A plant species of the family POACEAE that is widely cultivated for its edible seeds.
A purine nucleoside that has hypoxanthine linked by the N9 nitrogen to the C1 carbon of ribose. It is an intermediate in the degradation of purines and purine nucleosides to uric acid and in pathways of purine salvage. It also occurs in the anticodon of certain transfer RNA molecules. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The dry cells of any suitable strain of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE or CANDIDA. It can be obtained as a by-product from the brewing of beer or by growing on media not suitable for beer production. Dried yeast serves as a source of protein and VITAMIN B COMPLEX.
A mass spectrometry technique used for analysis of nonvolatile compounds such as proteins and macromolecules. The technique involves preparing electrically charged droplets from analyte molecules dissolved in solvent. The electrically charged droplets enter a vacuum chamber where the solvent is evaporated. Evaporation of solvent reduces the droplet size, thereby increasing the coulombic repulsion within the droplet. As the charged droplets get smaller, the excess charge within them causes them to disintegrate and release analyte molecules. The volatilized analyte molecules are then analyzed by mass spectrometry.
A highly branched glucan in starch.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A group of carbon-oxygen lyases. These enzymes catalyze the breakage of a carbon-oxygen bond in polysaccharides leading to an unsaturated product and the elimination of an alcohol. EC 4.2.2.
A hardy grain crop, rye, grown in northern climates. It is the most frequent host to ergot (CLAVICEPS), the toxic fungus. Its hybrid with TRITICUM is TRITICALE, another grain.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of fungi.
The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.
Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.
The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
An integrin beta subunit of approximately 85-kDa in size which has been found in INTEGRIN ALPHAIIB-containing and INTEGRIN ALPHAV-containing heterodimers. Integrin beta3 occurs as three alternatively spliced isoforms, designated beta3A-C.
One of two major pharmacologically defined classes of adrenergic receptors. The beta adrenergic receptors play an important role in regulating CARDIAC MUSCLE contraction, SMOOTH MUSCLE relaxation, and GLYCOGENOLYSIS.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
The remnants of plant cell walls that are resistant to digestion by the alimentary enzymes of man. It comprises various polysaccharides and lignins.
Chemical groups containing the covalent disulfide bonds -S-S-. The sulfur atoms can be bound to inorganic or organic moieties.
A genus of ascomycetous fungi of the family Schizosaccharomycetaceae, order Schizosaccharomycetales.
An unbranched glucan in starch.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
Pairing of purine and pyrimidine bases by HYDROGEN BONDING in double-stranded DNA or RNA.
The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.
Annual cereal grass of the family POACEAE and its edible starchy grain, rice, which is the staple food of roughly one-half of the world's population.
Polymers made up of a few (2-20) nucleotides. In molecular genetics, they refer to a short sequence synthesized to match a region where a mutation is known to occur, and then used as a probe (OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES). (Dorland, 28th ed)
Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.
The largest class of organic compounds, including STARCH; GLYCOGEN; CELLULOSE; POLYSACCHARIDES; and simple MONOSACCHARIDES. Carbohydrates are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen in a ratio of Cn(H2O)n.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
A basic enzyme that is present in saliva, tears, egg white, and many animal fluids. It functions as an antibacterial agent. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-linkages between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in peptidoglycan and between N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in chitodextrin. EC 3.2.1.17.
1,4-alpha-D-Glucan-1,4-alpha-D-glucan 4-alpha-D-glucosyltransferase/dextrin 6 alpha-D-glucanohydrolase. An enzyme system having both 4-alpha-glucanotransferase (EC 2.4.1.25) and amylo-1,6-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.33) activities. As a transferase it transfers a segment of a 1,4-alpha-D-glucan to a new 4-position in an acceptor, which may be glucose or another 1,4-alpha-D-glucan. As a glucosidase it catalyzes the endohydrolysis of 1,6-alpha-D-glucoside linkages at points of branching in chains of 1,4-linked alpha-D-glucose residues. Amylo-1,6-glucosidase activity is deficient in glycogen storage disease type III.
An enzyme that hydrolyzes 1,6-alpha-glucosidic branch linkages in glycogen, amylopectin, and their beta-limit dextrins. It is distinguished from pullulanase (EC 3.2.1.41) by its inability to attack pullulan and by the feeble action of alpha-limit dextrins. It is distinguished from amylopectin 6-glucanohydrolase (EC 3.2.1.69) by its action on glycogen. With EC 3.2.1.69, it produces the activity called "debranching enzyme". EC 3.2.1.68.
An exocellulase with specificity for 1,3-beta-D-glucasidic linkages. It catalyzes hydrolysis of beta-D-glucose units from the non-reducing ends of 1,3-beta-D-glucans, releasing GLUCOSE.
The chemical or biochemical addition of carbohydrate or glycosyl groups to other chemicals, especially peptides or proteins. Glycosyl transferases are used in this biochemical reaction.
An order of fungi in the phylum Ascomycota that multiply by budding. They include the telomorphic ascomycetous yeasts which are found in a very wide range of habitats.
Screening techniques first developed in yeast to identify genes encoding interacting proteins. Variations are used to evaluate interplay between proteins and other molecules. Two-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for protein-protein interactions, one-hybrid for DNA-protein interactions, three-hybrid interactions for RNA-protein interactions or ligand-based interactions. Reverse n-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for mutations or other small molecules that dissociate known interactions.
A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.
A factor synthesized in a wide variety of tissues. It acts synergistically with TGF-alpha in inducing phenotypic transformation and can also act as a negative autocrine growth factor. TGF-beta has a potential role in embryonal development, cellular differentiation, hormone secretion, and immune function. TGF-beta is found mostly as homodimer forms of separate gene products TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2 or TGF-beta3. Heterodimers composed of TGF-beta1 and 2 (TGF-beta1.2) or of TGF-beta2 and 3 (TGF-beta2.3) have been isolated. The TGF-beta proteins are synthesized as precursor proteins.
Proteins obtained from the species Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.
The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Cyclic GLUCANS consisting of six (6) glucopyranose units linked by 1,4-glycosidic bonds.
A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.
A mass spectrometry technique using two (MS/MS) or more mass analyzers. With two in tandem, the precursor ions are mass-selected by a first mass analyzer, and focused into a collision region where they are then fragmented into product ions which are then characterized by a second mass analyzer. A variety of techniques are used to separate the compounds, ionize them, and introduce them to the first mass analyzer. For example, for in GC-MS/MS, GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY is involved in separating relatively small compounds by GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY prior to injecting them into an ionization chamber for the mass selection.
Ribonucleic acid in fungi having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
A unicellular budding fungus which is the principal pathogenic species causing CANDIDIASIS (moniliasis).
Baked food product made of flour or meal that is moistened, kneaded, and sometimes fermented. A major food since prehistoric times, it has been made in various forms using a variety of ingredients and methods.
A thick-rooted perennial (Cichorium intybus) native to Europe but widely grown for its young leaves used as salad greens and for its roots, dried and ground-roasted, used to flavor or adulterate coffee. (From Webster, 3d ed)
The space between the inner and outer membranes of a cell that is shared with the cell wall.
Polysaccharides found in bacteria and in capsules thereof.
Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
A genus of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria whose organisms occur in pairs or chains. No endospores are produced. Many species exist as commensals or parasites on man or animals with some being highly pathogenic. A few species are saprophytes and occur in the natural environment.
Polysaccharide isolated from the edible mushroom LENTINULA EDODES. The exact composition is unknown.
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
Any food that has been supplemented with essential nutrients either in quantities that are greater than those present normally, or which are not present in the food normally. Fortified food includes also food to which various nutrients have been added to compensate for those removed by refinement or processing. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Usually 12,13-epoxytrichothecenes, produced by Fusaria, Stachybotrys, Trichoderma and other fungi, and some higher plants. They may contaminate food or feed grains, induce emesis and hemorrhage in lungs and brain, and damage bone marrow due to protein and DNA synthesis inhibition.
A large and heterogenous group of fungi whose common characteristic is the absence of a sexual state. Many of the pathogenic fungi in humans belong to this group.
A group of glucose polymers made by certain bacteria. Dextrans are used therapeutically as plasma volume expanders and anticoagulants. They are also commonly used in biological experimentation and in industry for a wide variety of purposes.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
A nonreducing disaccharide composed of GLUCOSE and FRUCTOSE linked via their anomeric carbons. It is obtained commercially from SUGARCANE, sugar beet (BETA VULGARIS), and other plants and used extensively as a food and a sweetener.
A linear polysaccharide of beta-1->4 linked units of ACETYLGLUCOSAMINE. It is the second most abundant biopolymer on earth, found especially in INSECTS and FUNGI. When deacetylated it is called CHITOSAN.
An integrin found in FIBROBLASTS; PLATELETS; MONOCYTES, and LYMPHOCYTES. Integrin alpha5beta1 is the classical receptor for FIBRONECTIN, but it also functions as a receptor for LAMININ and several other EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
The complete gene complement contained in a set of chromosomes in a fungus.
A mass spectrometric technique that is used for the analysis of a wide range of biomolecules, such as glycoalkaloids, glycoproteins, polysaccharides, and peptides. Positive and negative fast atom bombardment spectra are recorded on a mass spectrometer fitted with an atom gun with xenon as the customary beam. The mass spectra obtained contain molecular weight recognition as well as sequence information.
Also known as CD104 antigen, this protein is distinguished from other beta integrins by its relatively long cytoplasmic domain (approximately 1000 amino acids vs. approximately 50). Five alternatively spliced isoforms have been described.
An adhesion procedure for orthodontic attachments, such as plastic DENTAL CROWNS. This process usually includes the application of an adhesive material (DENTAL CEMENTS) and letting it harden in-place by light or chemical curing.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
Complexing agent for removal of traces of heavy metal ions. It acts also as a hypocalcemic agent.
A disaccharide consisting of two glucose units in an alpha (1-6) glycosidic linkage.
A mitosporic Hypocreales fungal genus, various species of which are important parasitic pathogens of plants and a variety of vertebrates. Teleomorphs include GIBBERELLA.
Chromosomes in which fragments of exogenous DNA ranging in length up to several hundred kilobase pairs have been cloned into yeast through ligation to vector sequences. These artificial chromosomes are used extensively in molecular biology for the construction of comprehensive genomic libraries of higher organisms.
Integrin beta chains combine with integrin alpha chains to form heterodimeric cell surface receptors. Integrins have traditionally been classified into functional groups based on the identity of one of three beta chains present in the heterodimer. The beta chain is necessary and sufficient for integrin-dependent signaling. Its short cytoplasmic tail contains sequences critical for inside-out signaling.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
This intrgrin is a key component of HEMIDESMOSOMES and is required for their formation and maintenance in epithelial cells. Integrin alpha6beta4 is also found on thymocytes, fibroblasts, and Schwann cells, where it functions as a laminin receptor (RECEPTORS, LAMININ) and is involved in wound healing, cell migration, and tumor invasiveness.
Toxic compounds produced by FUNGI.
A 44-kDa highly glycosylated plasma protein that binds phospholipids including CARDIOLIPIN; APOLIPOPROTEIN E RECEPTOR; membrane phospholipids, and other anionic phospholipid-containing moieties. It plays a role in coagulation and apoptotic processes. Formerly known as apolipoprotein H, it is an autoantigen in patients with ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODIES.
Medical practice or discipline that is based on the knowledge, cultures, and beliefs of the people in EAST ASIA.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The seed is one of the EDIBLE GRAINS used in millet cereals and in feed for birds and livestock (ANIMAL FEED). It contains diosgenin (SAPONINS).
A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria isolated from the human tooth surface. Strains have been shown to be cariogenic in experimental animals and may be associated with human dental caries.
Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.
Integrin alpha4beta1 is a FIBRONECTIN and VCAM-1 receptor present on LYMPHOCYTES; MONOCYTES; EOSINOPHILS; NK CELLS and thymocytes. It is involved in both cell-cell and cell- EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX adhesion and plays a role in INFLAMMATION, hematopoietic cell homing and immune function, and has been implicated in skeletal MYOGENESIS; NEURAL CREST migration and proliferation, lymphocyte maturation and morphogenesis of the PLACENTA and HEART.
The mineral component of bones and teeth; it has been used therapeutically as a prosthetic aid and in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
Structures within the nucleus of fungal cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.
A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
A subclass of beta-adrenergic receptors (RECEPTORS, ADRENERGIC, BETA). The adrenergic beta-2 receptors are more sensitive to EPINEPHRINE than to NOREPINEPHRINE and have a high affinity for the agonist TERBUTALINE. They are widespread, with clinically important roles in SKELETAL MUSCLE; LIVER; and vascular, bronchial, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary SMOOTH MUSCLE.
(S-(E))-3,4,5,6,8,10-Hexahydro-14,16-dihydroxy-3-methyl-1H-2-benzoxacyclotetradecin-1,7(8H)-dione. One of a group of compounds known under the general designation of resorcylic acid lactones. Cis, trans, dextro and levo forms have been isolated from the fungus Gibberella zeae (formerly Fusarium graminearum). They have estrogenic activity, cause toxicity in livestock as feed contaminant, and have been used as anabolic or estrogen substitutes.
An integrin found on fibroblasts, platelets, endothelial and epithelial cells, and lymphocytes where it functions as a receptor for COLLAGEN and LAMININ. Although originally referred to as the collagen receptor, it is one of several receptors for collagen. Ligand binding to integrin alpha2beta1 triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling, including activation of p38 MAP kinase.
A plant genus in the family POACEAE. Brachypodium distachyon is a model species for functional genomics studies.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A thiol-containing non-essential amino acid that is oxidized to form CYSTINE.
A beta-D-glucan obtained from the Aphyllophoral fungus Schizophyllum commune. It is used as an immunoadjuvant in the treatment of neoplasms, especially tumors found in the stomach.
A key intermediate in carbohydrate metabolism. Serves as a precursor of glycogen, can be metabolized into UDPgalactose and UDPglucuronic acid which can then be incorporated into polysaccharides as galactose and glucuronic acid. Also serves as a precursor of sucrose lipopolysaccharides, and glycosphingolipids.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Dental cements composed either of polymethyl methacrylate or dimethacrylate, produced by mixing an acrylic monomer liquid with acrylic polymers and mineral fillers. The cement is insoluble in water and is thus resistant to fluids in the mouth, but is also irritating to the dental pulp. It is used chiefly as a luting agent for fabricated and temporary restorations. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p159)
A mitosporic fungal genus occasionally causing human diseases such as pulmonary infections, mycotic keratitis, endocarditis, and opportunistic infections. Its teleomorph is BYSSOCHLAMYS.
Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.
Protein factors released from one species of YEAST that are selectively toxic to another species of yeast.
A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Measurement and evaluation of the components of substances to be taken as FOOD.
Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.
The internal resistance of a material to moving some parts of it parallel to a fixed plane, in contrast to stretching (TENSILE STRENGTH) or compression (COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH). Ionic crystals are brittle because, when subjected to shear, ions of the same charge are brought next to each other, which causes repulsion.
A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.
A family of transmembrane glycoproteins (MEMBRANE GLYCOPROTEINS) consisting of noncovalent heterodimers. They interact with a wide variety of ligands including EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS; COMPLEMENT, and other cells, while their intracellular domains interact with the CYTOSKELETON. The integrins consist of at least three identified families: the cytoadhesin receptors(RECEPTORS, CYTOADHESIN), the leukocyte adhesion receptors (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE ADHESION), and the VERY LATE ANTIGEN RECEPTORS. Each family contains a common beta-subunit (INTEGRIN BETA CHAINS) combined with one or more distinct alpha-subunits (INTEGRIN ALPHA CHAINS). These receptors participate in cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion in many physiologically important processes, including embryological development; HEMOSTASIS; THROMBOSIS; WOUND HEALING; immune and nonimmune defense mechanisms; and oncogenic transformation.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that activate PLANT ROOT NODULATION in leguminous plants. Members of this genus are nitrogen-fixing and common soil inhabitants.
Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.
Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.
Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.
Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)
A soluble factor produced by MONOCYTES; MACROPHAGES, and other cells which activates T-lymphocytes and potentiates their response to mitogens or antigens. Interleukin-1 is a general term refers to either of the two distinct proteins, INTERLEUKIN-1ALPHA and INTERLEUKIN-1BETA. The biological effects of IL-1 include the ability to replace macrophage requirements for T-cell activation.
Single chains of amino acids that are the units of multimeric PROTEINS. Multimeric proteins can be composed of identical or non-identical subunits. One or more monomeric subunits may compose a protomer which itself is a subunit structure of a larger assembly.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Integrin beta-1 chains which are expressed as heterodimers that are noncovalently associated with specific alpha-chains of the CD49 family (CD49a-f). CD29 is expressed on resting and activated leukocytes and is a marker for all of the very late activation antigens on cells. (from: Barclay et al., The Leukocyte Antigen FactsBook, 1993, p164)
The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.
A cell surface receptor mediating cell adhesion to the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX and to other cells via binding to LAMININ. It is involved in cell migration, embryonic development, leukocyte activation and tumor cell invasiveness. Integrin alpha6beta1 is the major laminin receptor on PLATELETS; LEUKOCYTES; and many EPITHELIAL CELLS, and ligand binding may activate a number of signal transduction pathways. Alternative splicing of the cytoplasmic domain of the alpha6 subunit (INTEGRIN ALPHA6) results in the formation of A and B isoforms of the heterodimer, which are expressed in a tissue-specific manner.
The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.
A family of glycosidases that hydrolyse crystalline CELLULOSE into soluble sugar molecules. Within this family there are a variety of enzyme subtypes with differing substrate specificities that must work together to bring about complete cellulose hydrolysis. They are found in structures called CELLULOSOMES.
The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
Mushrooms in the order AGARICALES containing B vitamins, cortinelin, and the polysaccharide LENTINAN.
A highly caustic substance that is used to neutralize acids and make sodium salts. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Cyclic GLUCANS consisting of eight (8) glucopyranose units linked by 1,4-glycosidic bonds.
Cements that act through infiltration and polymerization within the dentinal matrix and are used for dental restoration. They can be adhesive resins themselves, adhesion-promoting monomers, or polymerization initiators that act in concert with other agents to form a dentin-bonding system.
The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the air. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
A homologous group of cyclic GLUCANS consisting of alpha-1,4 bound glucose units obtained by the action of cyclodextrin glucanotransferase on starch or similar substrates. The enzyme is produced by certain species of Bacillus. Cyclodextrins form inclusion complexes with a wide variety of substances.
Ground up seed of WHEAT.
A subclass of beta-adrenergic receptors (RECEPTORS, ADRENERGIC, BETA). The adrenergic beta-1 receptors are equally sensitive to EPINEPHRINE and NOREPINEPHRINE and bind the agonist DOBUTAMINE and the antagonist METOPROLOL with high affinity. They are found in the HEART, juxtaglomerular cells, and in the central and peripheral nervous systems.
Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.
Yeast and fungal β-glucans contain 1-6 side branches, while cereal β-glucans contain both β-1,3 and β-1,4 backbone bonds. The ... Typically, β-glucans form a linear backbone with 1-3 β-glycosidic bonds but vary with respect to molecular mass, solubility, ... β-Glucans (beta-glucans) comprise a group of β-D-glucose polysaccharides naturally occurring in the cell walls of cereals, ... yeast, and cereals such as oat and barley. Each type of beta-glucan comprises a different molecular backbone, level of ...
Yeast and fungal β-glucans contain 1-6 side branches, while cereal β-glucans contain both β-1,3 and β-1,4 backbone bonds. The ... Although technically β-glucans are chains of D-glucose polysaccharides linked by β-type glycosidic bonds, by convention not all ... Cereal[edit]. Main article: Oat beta-glucan. Cereal β-glucans from oat, barley, wheat, and rye have been studied for their ... β-glucan types[edit]. β-glucans form a natural component of the cell walls of bacteria, fungi, yeast, and cereals such as oat ...
In this cell-free biosystem, beta-1,4-glycosidic bond-linked cellulose is partially hydrolyzed to cellobiose. Cellobiose ... The enzyme glucan, water dikinase (GWD) phosphorylates at the C-6 position of a glucose molecule, close to the chains 1,6-alpha ... The other product, glucose, can be assimilated by a yeast. This cell-free bioprocessing does not need any costly chemical and ... The major sources of starch intake worldwide are the cereals (rice, wheat, and maize) and the root vegetables (potatoes and ...
4-beta-D-glucosidic linkages in cellulose, lichenin and cereal β-D-glucans. Xyloglucan-specific endo-beta-1,4-glucanase ... The enzyme aids in autolysis of yeast cells to release polysaccharides and mannoproteins, which is believed to aid in the color ... As they perform hydrolysis of the glucosidic bond, they are hydrolases. Used in enological practices during the aging process ... Glycoside hydrolases, a family of enzyme that cut a glycoside from a non-glycosidic molecule Glycoside hydrolase family 5 ...
4-α-D-glucan glucohydrolase) will cleave α(1-6) glycosidic linkages, as well as the last α-1,4 glycosidic bond at the ... While amylases are found naturally in yeast cells, it takes time for the yeast to produce enough of these enzymes to break down ... Different temperatures optimize the activity of alpha or beta amylase, resulting in different mixtures of fermentable and ... "Chemical genetics and cereal starch metabolism: structural basis of the non-covalent and covalent inhibition of barley β- ...
4-beta-D-glycosidic linkages in cellulose, hemicellulose, lichenin, and cereal beta-D-glucans. Because cellulose molecules bind ... Tsai SL, DaSilva NA, Chen W (January 2013). "Functional display of complex cellulosomes on the yeast surface via adaptive ... The enzyme is categorised as an endoglucanase, which internally cleaves β-1,4 -glycosydic bonds in cellulose chains ... beta-1,4-glucanase, beta-1,4-endoglucan hydrolase, endoglucanase D, 1,4-(1,3,1,4)-beta-D-glucan 4-glucanohydrolase), ...
β-glucans are glucose molecules linked via β-(1,3)- or β-(1,6)- bonds and provide rigidity to the cell wall while α-glucans are ... They share the 1,3-β-glucan synthesis pathway with plants, using homologous GT48 family 1,3-Beta-glucan synthases to perform ... For example, endosperm cell walls in the seeds of cereal grasses, nasturtium and other species, are rich in glucans and other ... 5-7. Xie X, Lipke PN (August 2010). "On the evolution of fungal and yeast cell walls". Yeast. 27 (8): 479-88. doi:10.1002/yea. ...
Beta-glucan from oat bran, whole oats, oatrim, or rolled oats (3 grams per day) ... are so because humans lack the necessary enzymes to split the glycosidic bond and they reach the large intestine. Many foods ... American Association of Cereal Chemists. March 2001. Retrieved 27 July 2018.. *^ Jones JM (2014). "CODEX-aligned dietary fiber ... 3 g or more per day of beta-glucan soluble fiber from either whole oats or barley, or a combination of whole oats and barley ...
Beta-glucan from oat bran, whole oats, or rolled oats; or whole grain or dry-milled barley (3 grams per day) ... are so because humans lack the necessary enzymes to split the glycosidic bond and they reach the large intestine. Many foods ... American Association of Cereal Chemists. March 2001. Retrieved 27 July 2018.. *^ Jones JM (April 2014). "CODEX-aligned dietary ... Examples are beta-glucans (in oats, barley, and mushrooms) and raw guar gum. Psyllium - a soluble, viscous, nonfermented fiber ...
in yeasts. Aromatic alcohols (example: tyrosol) are produced by the yeast Candida albicans.[48] They are also found in beer.[49 ... Alkylresorcinols can be found in cereals.[citation needed] 2,4-Bis(4-hydroxybenzyl) phenol is a phenolic compound found in the ... Methylations can occur by the formation of an ether bond on hydroxyl groups forming O-methylated polyphenols. In the case of ... "Profiling of phenolic glycosidic conjugates in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana using LC/MS". Metabolomics. 2 (4): 197-219. doi: ...
D-glucan glucohydrolase) will cleave α(1-6) glycosidic linkages, as well as the last α-1,4 glycosidic bond at the nonreducing ... While amylases are found naturally in yeast cells, it takes time for the yeast to produce enough of these enzymes to break down ... Different temperatures optimize the activity of alpha or beta amylase, resulting in different mixtures of fermentable and ... "Chemical genetics and cereal starch metabolism: structural basis of the non-covalent and covalent inhibition of barley β- ...
Beta Glucans are polysaccharides of D-glucose monomers linked by b-glycosidic bonds. They occur most commonly as cellulose in ... plants, bran of cereal grains, cell walls of bakers yeast (saccharomyces cerevisiae), certain fungi, mushrooms, and bacteria. ... Yeast (saccharomyces cerevisiae) and medicinal mushroom-derived B-glucans are notable for the ability to modulate the immune ... Reishi or Maitake Mushrooms, or Beta Glucan combinations like Immune Essentials, Immunotix: ...
β-Glucans (or beta-glucans) are polysaccharides of D-glucose monomers linked by glycosidic bonds. They occur most commonly as ... They occur most commonly as cellulose in plants and trees, the bran of cereal grains, the cell wall of bakers yeast, certain ... Beta-glucan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 0 views. en.wikipedia.org/Beta-glucan beta-glucan info reference wikipedia ... β-Glucans (or beta-glucans) are polysaccharides of D-glucose monomers linked by glycosidic bonds. ...
β-Glucans (or beta-glucans) are polysaccharides of D-glucose monomers linked by glycosidic bonds. They occur most commonly as ... They occur most commonly as cellulose in plants and trees, the bran of cereal grains, the cell wall of bakers yeast, certain ... Beta-glucan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 0 views. en.wikipedia.org/Beta-glucan beta-glucan info reference wikipedia ... β-Glucans (or beta-glucans) are polysaccharides of D-glucose monomers linked by glycosidic bonds. ...
Beta-Glucanase is an endoglycosidase that hydrolyzes the -(1g3) glycosidic bonds in beta-glucan. Betaglucans are ... They are present in high amounts in yeasts and cereals such as barley, rye, and rice. Beta-glucanase digests beta-glucans into ... glycosidic bonds. Maltases ability to cleave ??-(1g6) glycosidic bonds allows it to breakdown isomaltose. Maltase has a ... glycosidic bonds, glucoamylase also efficiently hydrolyzes the ??-(1g6) glycosidic bonds at the branch points of amylopectin ...
Yeast and fungal β-glucans contain 1-6 side branches, while cereal β-glucans contain both β-1,3 and β-1,4 backbone bonds. The ... Typically, β-glucans form a linear backbone with 1-3 β-glycosidic bonds but vary with respect to molecular mass, solubility, ... β-Glucans (beta-glucans) comprise a group of β-D-glucose polysaccharides naturally occurring in the cell walls of cereals, ... yeast, and cereals such as oat and barley. Each type of beta-glucan comprises a different molecular backbone, level of ...
Beta Glucan Supplier and Manufacturer in China for more than 10 years, Buy Oat Glucan - Beta Glucan Food Grade and Feed Grade ... Beta Glucan Supplier, FOODCHEM is Top Oat Glucan - ... the bran of cereal grains, the cell wall ofbakers yeast, ... β-Glucans(beta-glucans) arepolysaccharides of D-glucose monomers linked by β-glycosidic bonds. β-glucansare a diverse group of ... 4, What is the price of Oat Glucan - Beta Glucan?. Foodchem is a famous supplier and manufacturer of Oat Glucan - Beta Glucan ...
Yeast and fungal β-glucans contain 1-6 side branches, while cereal β-glucans contain both β-1,3 and β-1,4 backbone bonds. The ... Although technically β-glucans are chains of D-glucose polysaccharides linked by β-type glycosidic bonds, by convention not all ... Cereal[edit]. Main article: Oat beta-glucan. Cereal β-glucans from oat, barley, wheat, and rye have been studied for their ... β-glucan types[edit]. β-glucans form a natural component of the cell walls of bacteria, fungi, yeast, and cereals such as oat ...
They typically consist of glucose polymers with a backbone of 1-3 beta-glycosidic bonds and different variation of side chains ... Beta-glucans derived from yeast and fungi typically have a (1,3) β-backbone with a small number of (1,6) β-linked side chains. ... Most people who get beta glucan are most likely to be getting it from oats. It is found in the cell-wall of cereals like oat ... Beta Glucan for skin aging. Oat beta glucan, due to its structure had been identified as a candidate to treat skin conditions, ...
Beta glucan (,svg style=vertical-align:-2.29482pt;width:8.8500004px; id=M1 height=13.425 version=1.1 viewBox=0 0 ... glucan) is a soluble fiber readily available from oat and barley grains that has been gaining interest due to its multiple ... glucans and their ability to form highly viscous solutions in the human gut may constitute the basis of their health benefits. ... glucan as a food ingredient is being widely considered with the dual purposes of increasing the fiber content of food products ...
Thus, SJP-SNU is a useful yeast possessing the basic traits of a probiotic, and further studies to demonstrate its efficacy as ... The yeast strain SJP-SNU was investigated as a probiotic and was characterized with respect to growth temperature, bile salt ... Cellulase, endo-1,3(4)-beta-glucanase and glucoamylase cleave the glycosidic bonds of cellulose, cereal d-glucans and starch, ... No yeasts were isolated in the cecal feces of the negative control and S. cerevisiae-administered chickens, whereas yeasts were ...
3D Glucan is the worlds most effective & scientifically-proven immune boosting super-supplement. Beta Glucan is great for all ... Typically, β-glucans form a linear backbone with 1-3 β-glycosidic bonds but vary with respect to molecular mass, solubility, ... β-Glucans (beta-glucans) comprise a group of β-D-glucose polysaccharides naturally occurring in the cell walls of cereals, ... Bakers Yeast Beta Glucan decreases episodes of common childhood illness in ages 1-4 year old children during cold season in ...
... endo-1-4-beta-D-glucanase) (Aspergillus niger) for use in research, biochemical enzyme assays and in vitro diagnostic analysis. ... Bonds broken and formed during the mixed-linkage glucan: xyloglucan endotransglucosylase reaction catalysed by Equisetum hetero ... Soybean meal/yeast extract at 0.5 % were better nitrogen sources for both cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzyme production while ... Enzymatic degradation of carbohydrates is of major significance in the industrial processing of cereals and fruits. In the ...
In this cell-free biosystem, beta-1,4-glycosidic bond-linked cellulose is partially hydrolyzed to cellobiose. Cellobiose ... The enzyme glucan, water dikinase (GWD) phosphorylates at the C-6 position of a glucose molecule, close to the chains 1,6-alpha ... The other product, glucose, can be assimilated by a yeast. This cell-free bioprocessing does not need any costly chemical and ... The major sources of starch intake worldwide are the cereals (rice, wheat, and maize) and the root vegetables (potatoes and ...
Beta Glucan, Fiber, Digestion, Supplements. It slows down digestion and has been clinically proven to lower cholesterol. The ... Glycosidic bonds). These higher fiber foods are currently underconsumed, contributing to only about 6% of total dietary fiber ... Many beta-glucan supplements source their beta-glucan from substances like bakers yeast. Is an enzyme that helps break down ... Whole-grain cereals contain insoluble fibers, including cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Accordingly, the american college ...
D-glucan glucohydrolase) will cleave α(1-6) glycosidic linkages, as well as the last α-1,4 glycosidic bond at the nonreducing ... While amylases are found naturally in yeast cells, it takes time for the yeast to produce enough of these enzymes to break down ... Different temperatures optimize the activity of alpha or beta amylase, resulting in different mixtures of fermentable and ... "Chemical genetics and cereal starch metabolism: structural basis of the non-covalent and covalent inhibition of barley β- ...
... glycosidic bonds. These linkages are not found in natural starch. Because of the presence of several types of chemical bonds, ... beta-glucans, tagatose, and resistant dextrins in general, besides resistant oligo-glucosaccharides. According to an embodiment ... a cereal product such as a breakfast cereal, a frozen product intended for consumption after heating in a micro-wave or an oven ... Examples of suitable probiotic micro-organisms include yeasts such as Saccharomyces, Debaromyces, Candida, Pichia and ...
It hydrolyzes 1.4-beta-D-glycosidic linkages in cellulose, lichenin and cereal beta-D-glucans. It is used in industries like ... Instant Dry Yeast Shandong Bio Sunkeen Co., Ltd. 山东圣琪生物有限公司 Instant Dry Yeast is a light yellow yeast, available in particles ... It hydrolyzes the α-1,4 glycosidic bonds of starch chain and generate high-level...展開 SQzyme FA L is a light brown liquid ... It hydrolyzes 1.4-beta-D-glycosidic linkages in cellulose, lichenin and cereal beta-D...展開 SQzyme CS L is a concentrated liquid ...
... also beta-glucans) denotes polysaccharides of D-glucose monomers linked by beta-glycosidic bonds where such glucans are also ... cereal beta-D-glucans, xylanase, pentosanase and/or mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment of the invention the ... yeast and/or mixtures thereof. The cellular structure of a wafer can be further strengthened using known stabilisers such as ... beta-1 ,4-glucanase, beta-1 ,4-endoglucan hydrolase, endoglucanase D, 1 ,4- (1 ,3,1 ,4)-beta-D-glucan 4-glucanohydrolase, ...
It hydrolyzes 1.4-beta-D-glycosidic linkages in cellulose, lichenin and cereal beta-D-glucans. It is used in industries like ... It hydrolyzes the α-1,4 glycosidic bonds of starch chain and generate high-level...展開 SQzyme FA L is a light brown liquid ... yeast- leavened baked goods, wine and spirits. 收起 ... It hydrolyzes 1.4-beta-D-glycosidic linkages in cellulose, ... It hydrolyzes the α-1,4 glycosidic bonds of starch chain and generate high-level maltose, maltotriose, glucose and other ...
The immune response can be modulated by nutrients like beta-glucans of yeast, fungi, and bacteria, but also of cereals like oat ... Beta-glucans are defined as glucose polymers linked together by a linear β 1-3 -glycosidic chain core. They are considered ... Beta-glucans are polysaccharides consisting of a backbone of D-glucose subunits linked by (1,3)-β -glucosidic bonds with ... Beta-glucan as fat replacer in mayonnaise. Application of beta-glucan prepared from spent brewers yeast as a fat replacer in ...
Alpha amylase (α-Amylase) is a faster-acting enzyme than beta amylase (β-amylase). The amylases act on α-1-4 glycosidic bonds ... The food enzyme is an alpha amylase (4‐α‐d‐glucan glucanohydrolase; EC 3.2.1.1) produced with the genetically modified Bacillus ... Microbial amylases obtained from bacteria, fungi, and yeast have been used predominantly in industrial sectors and scientific ... Muralikrishna G, Nirmala M. Cereal α-amylases-an overview. Carbohydr Polym. 2005;60:163-173. ...
... glycosidic bonds (-D-glucan). A structural and conformational analysis of cellulose indicates that cellobiose (4-O--D- ... Recently, engineered yeasts have been described efficiently fermenting xylose, and arabinose, and even both together. Yeast ... Conformations of beta-D-glucopyranose. Relative energy of beta-D-glucopyranose conformers ... and cob remaining in the field following the harvest of cereal grain. Stover makes up about half of the yield of a crop and is ...
... beta-1,4 bonds in mixed beta-1,3 glucans such as cereal beta-D-glucans or xyloglucans, and other plant material containing ... 4-beta-D-glucan 4-glucanohydrolase (E.C. No. 3.2.1.4) which catalyses the endohydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-glycosidic linkages in ... "Yeast" as used herein includes ascosporogenous yeast (Endomycetales), basidiosporogenous yeast, and yeast belonging to the ... 4-beta-glucan substrates. [0249] (2) The "exo-1,4-beta-D-glucanases" including both the 1,4-beta-D-glucan glucohydrolases (EC ...
Beta Glucanase. is a carbohydrate digesting enzyme that breaks down glycosidic bonds within beta-glucan. Glucans can create up ... Our Product is not Genetically Modified , is Yeast Free, no Caffeine, Alcohol free, Corn free, Gluten free, Dairy free, Soy ... Many common fiber rich breakfast cereals contain large amounts of hemicellulose. Hemicellulase is not produced in the human ... The Beta-1, 3-D glucan is highly purified, over 93% pure, with a certified 1,3/1,6 carbohydrate content. The aloe vera is ...
... beta-glucans, fructo-oligosaccharides, resistant starches, soluble corn (gluco) fiber, polydextrose, and gums such as guar, ... An advantage of this is that compounds according to the invention have a low content of easily hydrolyzable bonds. The compound ... yeast extract 2 g/l, NaCl 0.1 g/l, K.sub.2HPO.sub.4 0.04 g/l, KH.sub.2PO.sub.4 0.04 g/l, MgSO.sub.4.7H.sub.2O 0.01 g/l, CaCl. ... Oligosaccharides are widely used in foods such as soft drinks, cookies, cereals, candies, and dairy products. Other ...
K-YBGL - β-Glucan Assay Kit (Yeast & Mushroom) K-EBHLG - Enzymatic Yeast β-Glucan Assay Kit K-GLUC - D-Glucose Assay Kit (GOPOD ... activities toward beta-glucans and therefore cannot readily be assigned to existing Enzyme Commission groups. The amino acid ... but data in the literature also indicate that lichen and cereal-derived β-glucans may have immuno-modulatory functions. The aim ... An Endoglucanase, EglA, from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus Hydrolyzes β-1,4 Bonds in Mixed-Linkage (1→3),( ...
... beta-glucans are based on yeast, especially Saccharomyces, especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae obtained. Andere geeignete ... The fructose units are linked together via a beta (2-1) glycosidic bond. Der mittlere Polymerisationsgrad von Inulinen, die als ... are used as sources of raw materials cereals such as oats and barley, as well as fungi, yeasts and bacteria in Question. Au ... beta-apo-e 160 e beta-apo-8-carotenic acid ethyl ester (C30), Apocarotinester, Beta -Carotins ureester, e 160 f lutein, ...
The glucose units are primarily linked with α(1→4) glycosidic bonds. Maltodextrin is typically composed of a mixture of chains ... Maltodextrin derived from cereals containing gluten is exempt from labeling, as set out in Annex II of EC Directive 2000/13.[3] ... Maltodextrin is not fermented by yeast, so it does not increase the alcohol content of the brew. It is also used in snacks such ... Beta-glucan * Lentinan * Sizofiran * Zymosan * Cellulose * Chitin * Dextrin / Dextran * Fructose / Fructan * Inulin ...
... glycosidic linkages in cellulose, hemicellulose, lichenin, and cereal beta-D-glucans. Because cellulose molecules bind strongly ... Tsai SL, DaSilva NA, Chen W (January 2013). "Functional display of complex cellulosomes on the yeast surface via adaptive ... Endocellulases (EC 3.2.1.4) randomly cleave internal bonds at amorphous sites that create new chain ends. ... beta-1,4-glucanase, beta-1,4-endoglucan hydrolase, endoglucanase D, 1,4-(1,3,1,4)-beta-D-glucan 4-glucanohydrolase), ...
... beta-1,4 bonds in mixed beta-1,3 glucans such as cereal beta-D-glucans or xyloglucans and other plant material containing ... 3.2.1.4) catalyses endo hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-glycosidic linkages in cellulose, cellulose derivatives (such as carboxy ... The solubilised bran will e.g. not have the same effect on the gluten development and strength in yeast raised bread. [0040] 2 ... 4-beta-D-xylanase; 1,4-beta-xylan xylanohydrolase; beta-xylanase; beta-1,4-xylan xylanohydrolase; endo-1,4-beta-xylanase; beta- ...
  • In general, β-1,3 linkages are created by 1,3-Beta-glucan synthase, and β-1,4 linkages are created by cellulose synthase. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1,4-α- D -glucan glucohydrolase) will cleave α(1-6) glycosidic linkages, as well as the last α-1,4 glycosidic bond at the nonreducing end of amylose and amylopectin , yielding glucose . (wikipedia.org)
  • Glucans are polymers of D-glucose with differing linkages in linear or branched sequences. (megazyme.com)
  • The specific reaction involved is the hydrolysis of the 1,4-beta-D- glycosidic linkages in cellulose, hemicellulose , lichenin , and cereal beta-D-glucans . (wikipedia.org)
  • Polysaccharides are polymeric carbohydrate molecules composed of long chains of monosaccharide units bound together by glycosidic linkages, and on hydrolysis give the constituent monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. (unionpedia.org)
  • Only monosaccharides can be absorbed from the small intestine, but glycosidic linkages in disaccharides, starch, and glycogen may be hydrolyzed by endogenous enzymes in the small intestine, resulting in release of their constituent monosaccharides. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Cellulose is a polymer of the simple sugar glucose covalently bonded by beta-1,4-linkages. (allindianpatents.com)
  • Endo-1,4-β- d -glucanase (or endoglucanase, EG) is the major constituent of cellulase, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of the 1,4-β- d -glycosidic linkages in cellulose, hemicellulose, lichenin, and cereal β- d -glucans (Karlsson et al. (springeropen.com)
  • They occur most commonly as cellulose in plants and trees, the bran of cereal grains, the cell wall of baker's yeast, certain types of fungi, and many kinds of mushrooms and bacteria. (diigo.com)
  • β-Glucans (beta-glucans) comprise a group of β-D-glucose polysaccharides naturally occurring in the cell walls of cereals, bacteria, and fungi, with significantly differing physicochemical properties dependent on source. (wikipedia.org)
  • β-glucans form a natural component of the cell walls of bacteria, fungi, yeast, and cereals such as oat and barley. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beta-glucans can also be found in bacteria and fungi, but these have different properties than oat beta glucans. (crvitality.com)
  • Beta-glucans derived from yeast and fungi typically have a (1,3) β- backbone with a small number of (1,6) β -linked side chains. (crvitality.com)
  • Beta-glucans derived from yeast and fungi tend to be effective in modulating the immune system. (crvitality.com)
  • Many fungi have been classified on the basis of morphology, but molecular taxonomy has been used in the classification of yeasts. (springeropen.com)
  • β-Glucans (beta- glucans ) comprise a group of β-D-glucose polysaccharides naturally occurring in the cell walls of cereals , fungi, and more specifically yeast where it is found in it's most abundant quantity. (betaexpress.com)
  • Beta-glucan is a soluble fiber found in certain types of algae, bacteria, fungi, and yeast, and in particular plants such as barley and oats. (foodpharmacy.blog)
  • Microbial amylases obtained from bacteria, fungi, and yeast have been used predominantly in industrial sectors and scientific research. (healthjade.com)
  • They belong to the group of polysaccharides present in the cell wall of bacteria, fungi, yeast, but also in cereals such as barley and oat [1]. (termedia.pl)
  • Broad-specificity GH131 beta-glucanases are a hallmark of Fungi and Oomycetes that colonise plants. (univ-mrs.fr)
  • One of the most common sources of β(1,3)D-glucan for supplement use is derived from the cell wall of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). (wikipedia.org)
  • Branched ?1,3 / ?1,6, Dietary Supplement, Jarrow Formulas Beta Glucan is made from a special ?1,3 / ?1,6 glucan extract of the Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cell walls. (foodpharmacy.blog)
  • Many beta-glucan supplements source their beta-glucan from substances like baker's yeast. (foodpharmacy.blog)
  • The beta-glucan obtained in this way had higher properties as compared with commercial beta-glucan from baker's yeast. (voltfansite.com)
  • Cellulose is not conventionally considered a β-glucan, as it is insoluble and does not exhibit the same physicochemical properties as other cereal or yeast β-glucans. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is in contrast to many structural polysaccharides such as chitin, cellulose and peptidoglycan, which are bound by beta bonds and are much more resistant to hydrolysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cellulases break down the cellulose molecule into monosaccharides ("simple sugars") such as beta- glucose , or shorter polysaccharides and oligosaccharides . (wikipedia.org)
  • Cellulose, arabinoxylans, and mixed linked β-(1,3) (1,4)- d -glucans are the main cell wall polysaccharides in cereal grains, but vary in proportion and structure depending on the grain and tissue within the grain. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A major group of CWDE consists of cellulases, which are glycosyl hydrolases (GHs) and catalyse hydrolysis of the β-1,4-glycosidic bonds in cellulose. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Once the cellulose is converted to glucose, the glucose is easily fermented by yeast into ethanol. (allindianpatents.com)
  • Endo-1,4-β- d -glucanase (EG), as a key constituent of cellulase taking the responsibility of cutting β-1,4 glycosidic bonds, plays the essential role in the process of degrading cellulose by cellulase. (springeropen.com)
  • Probiotics were defined as live microorganisms which confer a health benefit on the host and include bacteria, Lactobacillus , Bifidobacterium etc. and yeasts (Ref. FAO/WHO. (springeropen.com)
  • Each type of beta-glucan comprises a different molecular backbone, level of branching, and molecular weight which affects its solubility and physiological impact. (wikipedia.org)
  • If you did, then you have consumed a certain type of beta-glucan which has been shown to lower cholesterol, boost immunity and lower blood glucose. (crvitality.com)
  • Each type of beta-glucan can have amazing and diverse physiological effects on the human body with some overlapping beneficial effects. (crvitality.com)
  • It is very easy to get 500 milligrams of beta glucan by taking transfer point beta glucan 1,3d because this supplement is in a concentrated form. (foodpharmacy.blog)
  • In addition, these side-chains can be attached to other types of molecules, like proteins, as in polysaccharide-K. The most common forms of β-glucans are those comprising D-glucose units with β-1,3 links. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common forms of β-glucans are those comprising D-glucose units with β-1,3 links. (wikipedia.org)
  • They typically consist of glucose polymers with a backbone of 1-3 beta-glycosidic bonds and different variation of side chains: Oat beta-glucans having (1-4)-d-glucopyranose units which are separated every 2-3 units be single beta glucan (1-3) glucose units. (crvitality.com)
  • Starch or amylum is a polymeric carbohydrate consisting of numerous glucose units joined by glycosidic bonds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Working from the non-reducing end, β-amylase catalyzes the hydrolysis of the second α-1,4 glycosidic bond, cleaving off two glucose units ( maltose ) at a time. (wikipedia.org)
  • The glucose units are primarily linked with α(1→4) glycosidic bonds . (netlibrary.net)
  • Amylose is a polysaccharide made of α-D-glucose units, bonded to each other through α(1→4) glycosidic bonds. (unionpedia.org)
  • β-glucans are non-starch polysaccharides composed of D-glucose units joined together in chains via β-glycosidic bonds [8]. (peertechz.com)
  • β-glucans were first discovered in lichens, and shortly thereafter in barley. (wikipedia.org)
  • The approved health claim was later amended to include these sources of β-glucan: rolled oats (oatmeal), oat bran, whole oat flour, oatrim (the soluble fraction of alpha-amylase hydrolyzed oat bran or whole oat flour), whole grain barley and barley beta-fiber. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cereal β-glucans from oat, barley, wheat, and rye have been studied for their effects on cholesterol levels in people with normal cholesterol levels and in those with hypercholesterolemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is found in the cell-wall of cereals like oat and barley but can be found in other food sources in smaller amounts. (crvitality.com)
  • Structure of barley beta-amylase. (wikipedia.org)
  • Primary methods employ defined oligosaccharides or highly purified polysaccharides and measure the rate of hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds using a reducing-sugar method. (megazyme.com)
  • In baking, β-amylase and α-amylase give controlled degradation of starch to fermentable sugars so as to sustain yeast growth and gas production. (megazyme.com)
  • Glucose molecules are bound in starch by the easily hydrolyzed alpha bonds. (wikipedia.org)
  • 9. The method according to claim 1, wherein said one or more starch modifying enzyme is selected from the group consisting of an alpha-amylase, a pullulanase, isoamylase and a beta-amylase. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • β-glucans are non-starch polysaccharides that are being used as food additives for their numerous health benefits including the ability to lower the postprandial glucose response. (peertechz.com)
  • Oat β-glucans were added at concentration levels of 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% (w/w) to each of the four starch types. (peertechz.com)
  • Incremental Area under the Curve (iAUC) was used to represent the estimated glycemic response of the β-glucan/starch composites. (peertechz.com)
  • Substitution at 10% β-glucans caused a significant increase in ∆H of blank tapioca starch (p ≤ 0.05). (peertechz.com)
  • In food science and in many informal contexts, the term carbohydrate often means any food that is particularly rich in the complex carbohydrate starch (such as cereals, bread and pasta) or simple carbohydrates, such as sugar (found in candy, jams , and desserts). (omicsgroup.org)
  • β-Glucans (or beta-glucans) are polysaccharides of D-glucose monomers linked by glycosidic bonds. (diigo.com)
  • β-glucans are long-chain polysaccharides containing D-glucose monomers linked by β-glycosidic bonds, with or without β-1,6-(D)-glucose smaller side chains. (termedia.pl)
  • A particular interest in oat β-glucan arose after a cholesterol lowering effect from oat bran reported in 1981. (wikipedia.org)
  • The present invention relates to the solubilisation of cereal bran, for preparing compositions comprising soluble fractions of cereal bran and the use of these compositions comprising solubilised cereal bran for the preparation of food products, such as bread. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • 12. The method according to claim 1, wherein said cereal bran is obtained from an industrial milling process and further milled to obtain an average particle size below 500 μm, such as below 400 μm, such as below 200 μm. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • 13. The method according to claim 1, wherein the solubilised cereal bran is further treated to inactivate further enzyme activity. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • Some β-glucan molecules have branching glucose side-chains attached to other positions on the main D-glucose chain, which branch off the β-glucan backbone. (wikipedia.org)
  • The system is validated using antibodies and carbohydrate-binding modules known to target α- or β-glucans in different biological contexts, extending knowledge on their specificities, and applied to reveal new information on glucan recognition by two signaling molecules of the immune system against pathogens: Dectin-1 and DC-SIGN. (megazyme.com)
  • Other enzymes act on the cell wall polysaccharides, mixed-linkage β-glucan and arabinoxylan, reducing the viscosity and thus aiding filtration, and reducing the possibility of subsequent precipitation of polymeric material (Bamforth, 1982). (megazyme.com)
  • Beta Glucans are polysaccharides composed solely of glucose. (betaexpress.com)
  • The sequencing of the glucan oligosaccharides by the MS method and their interrogation on the microarrays provides detailed information on linkage, sequence and chain length requirements of glucan-recognizing proteins, and are a sensitive means of revealing unsuspected sequences in the polysaccharides. (megazyme.com)
  • There are 2 types of vita min A: 1) Fat soluble from fish liver oil, and 2) water soluble from Beta Carotene. (gilmermirror.com)
  • Some forms of beta glucans are useful in human nutrition as texturing agents and as soluble fiber supplements, but problematic in brewing as excessive levels make the wort too viscous. (diigo.com)
  • β-glucans are used as texturing agents in various nutraceutical and cosmetic products, and as soluble fiber supplements. (wikipedia.org)
  • A serving of oatmeal supplies 0.75 grams of the 3.0 g of β-glucan soluble fiber necessary per day to have this effect. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the diet, β-glucans are a source of soluble, fermentable fiber - also called prebiotic fiber - which provides a substrate for microbiota within the large intestine, increasing fecal bulk and producing short-chain fatty acids as byproducts with wide-ranging physiological activities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some forms of betaglucans are useful in human nutrition as texturing agents and as soluble fibersupplements, but can be problematic in the process of brewing. (foodchem.cn)
  • Cellobiose is a water-soluble beta-1,4-linked dimer of glucose. (allindianpatents.com)
  • Arabinoxylan is a hemicellulose found in both the primary and secondary cell walls of plants, including woods and cereal grains, consisting of copolymers of two pentose sugars - arabinose and xylose. (unionpedia.org)
  • Overall, understanding the structure, characteristics and measurable chemical properties of fiber in feed ingredients may result in more accurate diet formulations, resulting in an improvement in the utilization of energy from less expensive high-fiber ingredients and a reduction in reliance on energy from more costly cereal grains. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 7. The method according to claim 1, wherein said one or more cell-wall modifying enzyme is selected from the group consisting of a xylanase, and a cellulase, such as cellobiohydrolases, endo-glucanases, and beta-glucanase. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • Alpha amylase (α-Amylase) is a faster-acting enzyme than beta amylase (β-amylase). (healthjade.com)
  • Its main activity is protease, it can hydrolyze yeast and fish meal in the increase in amino acid content, can also add animal endogenous enzyme deficiency, improve the feed energy utilization, promote livestock and poultry growth, increase daily gain, reduce the weight Than to improve its production performance. (sunsonenzymes.com)
  • Cellobiases (EC 3.2.1.21) or beta-glucosidases hydrolyse the exocellulase product into individual monosaccharides. (wikipedia.org)
  • Endocellulases (EC 3.2.1.4) randomly cleave internal bonds at amorphous sites that create new chain ends. (wikipedia.org)
  • β-(1,3/1,6)-D-glucan is an insoluble polysaccharide isolated from the mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus . (termedia.pl)
  • Typically, β-glucans form a linear backbone with 1-3 β-glycosidic bonds but vary with respect to molecular mass, solubility, viscosity, branching structure, and gelation properties, causing diverse physiological effects in animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The same type of bond is found in the animal reserve polysaccharide glycogen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Callose is a plant polysaccharide, it is made by the Glucan Synthase-Like gene (GLS) in various places within a plant. (unionpedia.org)
  • Although technically β-glucans are chains of D-glucose polysaccharides linked by β-type glycosidic bonds, by convention not all β-D-glucose polysaccharides are categorized as β-glucans. (wikipedia.org)
  • In fermentation , yeast ingests sugars and excretes ethanol . (wikipedia.org)
  • Beta Glucan is one thing we can take internally or apply on our skin to prevent skin aging and enhance our immune system and skin's healing capacity. (crvitality.com)
  • As already mentioned, beta glucans significantly improve the immune system and its response to pathogens. (crvitality.com)
  • In a natural way, that is safe, safe and beyond safe, beta glucan from this one source will turn your Woody Allen immune system into Arnold Schwarzenegger type power. (betaexpress.com)
  • Before starting a new supplement, you should know what Beta Glucan is, how it works, and why it's necessary. (betaexpress.com)
  • The Worlds Most Effective & Scientifically Proven Immune Boosting Super-Supplement is Beta-1, 3D Glucan. (betaexpress.com)
  • You should not be surprised that BetaExpress Beta Glucan was found to be the most effective immune supplement out of the hundreds that were tested. (betaexpress.com)
  • Looking for beta glucan blood sugar supplement review? (foodpharmacy.blog)
  • Beta glucan blood sugar how much the integrated naturals supplement cost? (foodpharmacy.blog)
  • The 20% and 30% β-glucan samples also had significantly higher ∆H than the blank and the 10% β-glucan samples. (peertechz.com)
  • Glucans are arranged in six-sided D-glucose rings connected linearly at varying carbon positions depending on the source, although most commonly β-glucans include a 1-3 glycosidic link in their backbone. (wikipedia.org)
  • The aim of this study was to determine the effect of substituting β-glucans on the glycemic response and thermal properties of four commonly consumed starches. (peertechz.com)
  • Bipolaris sorokiniana is a filamentous fungus that causes spot blotch disease in cereals like wheat and has severe economic consequences. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The glucome microarray comprises 153 oligosaccharide probes with high purity, representing major sequences in glucans. (megazyme.com)
  • These enzymes include endoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases, and beta-glucosidases. (allindianpatents.com)
  • The Beta Glucan product works by activating the immune cells known as Macrophages . (betaexpress.com)
  • After oral consumption, beta glucans are delivered to the bone marrow granulocytes by macrophages traveling through lymphatic circulation, This patented Beta Glucan preparation, protected by U. S. patent # 5,576,015, has demonstrated immunogenic activity in clinical trials. (foodpharmacy.blog)
  • β-glucans increase host immune defense by activating the complement system, enhancing the phagocytic and proliferation activity of professional phagocytes - granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. (termedia.pl)
  • Maltodextrin derived from cereals containing gluten is exempt from labeling, as set out in Annex II of EC Directive 2000/13. (netlibrary.net)
  • Rujirat Santipanichwong and Manop Suphantharika studied the application of carotenoids beta-carotene and lutein, as natural colourants in reduced fat mayonnaise with 50% substitution of oil using spent brewer's yeast beta-glucan as a fat replacer. (voltfansite.com)
  • Fouda M, Anderson A (2016) Effect of Substitution of β-Glucans on the Glycemic Response and Thermal Properties of Four Common Starches. (peertechz.com)
  • 4)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-beta-D-glucan glycanohydrolase) are hydrolytic enzymes that break down glycosidic bonds in chitin. (unionpedia.org)
  • Although the ideal dietary pattern for patients with metabolic syndrome has not been defined, there is growing evidence that high intakes of fruits, vegetables, legumes, and cereals are beneficial [ 5 - 11 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Enzymatic degradation of carbohydrates is of major significance in the industrial processing of cereals and fruits. (megazyme.com)
  • High-throughput micro-methods are needed to screen proteins for recognition of specific glucan sequences as a lead to structure-function studies and their exploitation. (megazyme.com)
  • All amylases are glycoside hydrolases and act on α-1,4- glycosidic bonds . (wikipedia.org)
  • Unraveling the subtleties of beta-(1->3)-glucan phosphorylase specificity in the GH94, GH149 and GH161 glycoside hydrolase families. (univ-mrs.fr)
  • β-glucans found in the cell walls of yeast contain a 1,3 carbon backbone with elongated 1,6 carbon branches. (wikipedia.org)
  • These beta glucans have also been found to have a number of positive and beneficial effects on the skin. (crvitality.com)
  • Beta glucans have also been found to boost collagen synthesis, which results in fewer signs of aging like fine lines and crows feet. (crvitality.com)
  • Dicalcium Phosphate Powder as it is sometimes called, calcium monohydrogen phosphate, is a type of dibasic calcium phosphate that is normally found in sources such as cereals, noodles, enriched flour, chicken feed and some types of dog snacks. (bioveningredients.co.in)
  • Foodchem is both manufacturer and trading company, we are Oat Glucan - Beta Glucan distributor, at the same time, we are manufacturer of other products. (foodchem.cn)
  • Different products have different MOQ, for Oat Glucan - Beta Glucan, the MOQ is 100kg. (foodchem.cn)
  • The authors suggest that beta-glucan obtained from brewer's yeast can be used in food products as a thickening, water-holding, or oil-binding agent and emulsifying stabilizer. (voltfansite.com)
  • The data from this study suggest the potential use of β-glucan as a suitable food ingredient in diabetic food products. (peertechz.com)
  • Differences in molecular weight, shape, and structure of β-glucans dictate the differences in biological activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • To strengthen the heart health properties, the beta glucan synbiotic also contains red beetroot, shown in research as a rich source of dietary nitrate for heart and vascular health. (foodpharmacy.blog)
  • 14] described the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of β-(1,3/1,6)-D-glucan isolated from Pleurotus ostreatus on the acetic acid-induced writhing reaction in mice, a typical model for quantifying inflammatory pain. (termedia.pl)
  • Yeasts have enriched their genetic material by genome duplication, hybridization and the acquisition of foreign genes and diversified their genomes via extensive gene loss and loss of heterozygosity (Butler et al. (springeropen.com)
  • Glucans differ not only in the molecule length and branching, but also in their tertiary structure based on their source. (termedia.pl)
  • Oat Glucan - Beta Glucan is one of the popular food additives and ingredients in most countries, As a professional Oat Glucan - Beta Glucan supplier and manufacturer, Foodchem International Corporation has been supplying and exporting Oat Glucan - Beta Glucan from China for almost 10 years, please be assured to buy Oat Glucan - Beta Glucan at Foodchem. (foodchem.cn)
  • A preparation of beta-glucan, obtained from spent brewer's yeast, was evaluated for potential food applications. (voltfansite.com)