Sorghum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The grain is used for FOOD and for ANIMAL FEED. This should not be confused with KAFFIR LIME or with KEFIR milk product.Cereals: Seeds from grasses (POACEAE) which are important in the diet.Oryza sativa: Annual cereal grass of the family POACEAE and its edible starchy grain, rice, which is the staple food of roughly one-half of the world's population.Crops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Triticum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.Hordeum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The EDIBLE GRAIN, barley, is widely used as food.Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Plant Weeds: A plant growing in a location where it is not wanted, often competing with cultivated plants.Brachypodium: A plant genus in the family POACEAE. Brachypodium distachyon is a model species for functional genomics studies.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Agricultural Irrigation: The routing of water to open or closed areas where it is used for agricultural purposes.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Crop, Avian: A thin-walled distention of the alimentary tract protruding just outside the body cavity in the distal end of the neck (esophagus), used for the temporary storage of food and water.Weed Control: The prevention of growth and or spread of unwanted plants.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Gibberella: A genus of ascomycetous fungi of the family Hypocreaceae, order Hypocreales including several pathogens of grains and cereals. It is also the source of plant growth regulators such as gibberellin and gibberellic acid.Fusarium: A mitosporic Hypocreales fungal genus, various species of which are important parasitic pathogens of plants and a variety of vertebrates. Teleomorphs include GIBBERELLA.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Trichothecenes: Usually 12,13-epoxytrichothecenes, produced by Fusaria, Stachybotrys, Trichoderma and other fungi, and some higher plants. They may contaminate food or feed grains, induce emesis and hemorrhage in lungs and brain, and damage bone marrow due to protein and DNA synthesis inhibition.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Panicum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The seed is one of the EDIBLE GRAINS used in millet cereals and in feed for birds and livestock (ANIMAL FEED). It contains diosgenin (SAPONINS).Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Avena sativa: A plant species of the family POACEAE that is widely cultivated for its edible seeds.Quantitative Trait Loci: Genetic loci associated with a QUANTITATIVE TRAIT.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Saccharum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE widely cultivated in the tropics for the sweet cane that is processed into sugar.Chromosomes, Plant: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.Malate Dehydrogenase (NADP+)Dietary Fiber: The remnants of plant cell walls that are resistant to digestion by the alimentary enzymes of man. It comprises various polysaccharides and lignins.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Digestion: The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.Secale cereale: A hardy grain crop, rye, grown in northern climates. It is the most frequent host to ergot (CLAVICEPS), the toxic fungus. Its hybrid with TRITICUM is TRITICALE, another grain.Starch: Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.Nutritive Value: An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial: DNA constructs that are composed of, at least, a REPLICATION ORIGIN, for successful replication, propagation to and maintenance as an extra chromosome in bacteria. In addition, they can carry large amounts (about 200 kilobases) of other sequence for a variety of bioengineering purposes.Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Tannins: Polyphenolic compounds with molecular weights of around 500-3000 daltons and containing enough hydroxyl groups (1-2 per 100 MW) for effective cross linking of other compounds (ASTRINGENTS). The two main types are HYDROLYZABLE TANNINS and CONDENSED TANNINS. Historically, the term has applied to many compounds and plant extracts able to render skin COLLAGEN impervious to degradation. The word tannin derives from the Celtic word for OAK TREE which was used for leather processing.Prolamins: A group of seed storage proteins restricted to the POACEAE family. They are rich in GLUTAMINE and PROLINE.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Plants, Edible: An organism of the vegetable kingdom suitable by nature for use as a food, especially by human beings. Not all parts of any given plant are edible but all parts of edible plants have been known to figure as raw or cooked food: leaves, roots, tubers, stems, seeds, buds, fruits, and flowers. The most commonly edible parts of plants are FRUIT, usually sweet, fleshy, and succulent. Most edible plants are commonly cultivated for their nutritional value and are referred to as VEGETABLES.Zearalenone: (S-(E))-3,4,5,6,8,10-Hexahydro-14,16-dihydroxy-3-methyl-1H-2-benzoxacyclotetradecin-1,7(8H)-dione. One of a group of compounds known under the general designation of resorcylic acid lactones. Cis, trans, dextro and levo forms have been isolated from the fungus Gibberella zeae (formerly Fusarium graminearum). They have estrogenic activity, cause toxicity in livestock as feed contaminant, and have been used as anabolic or estrogen substitutes.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Synteny: The presence of two or more genetic loci on the same chromosome. Extensions of this original definition refer to the similarity in content and organization between chromosomes, of different species for example.Biofuels: Hydrocarbon-rich byproducts from the non-fossilized BIOMASS that are combusted to generate energy as opposed to fossilized hydrocarbon deposits (FOSSIL FUELS).Food, Fortified: Any food that has been supplemented with essential nutrients either in quantities that are greater than those present normally, or which are not present in the food normally. Fortified food includes also food to which various nutrients have been added to compensate for those removed by refinement or processing. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Setaria Plant: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The small pointed seeds are grown for hay in North America and western Europe and important as food in China and other Asian countries.Bread: Baked food product made of flour or meal that is moistened, kneaded, and sometimes fermented. A major food since prehistoric times, it has been made in various forms using a variety of ingredients and methods.Pennisetum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The seed is one of the millets used in EDIBLE GRAIN. It contains vitexin. The common name of buffelgrass is also used for CENCHRUS.Striga: A plant genus of the family Orobanchaceae that is parasitic on the roots of other plants. Members contain the flavones, APIGENIN and LUTEOLIN.
Adults will sometimes feed on cultivated cereal and millet crops such as sorghum and maize, damaging flowers and grain. It is ... The species is commonly seen on grasses in southern India after the northeast monsoon. ...
... namely cereal crops, cash crops and other food crops. Vegetable crops are also grown. The cereal crops produced are red sorghum ... Cash crops include groundnuts, sesame and soybeans. Peanut is the most commonly grown crop. Market gardening is an activity ... white sorghum, millet, maize and rice. These crops are produced mainly for self-consumption, but some are sold on the market, ... On the whole, the main vegetable crops grown in the commune are experiencing a general upward trend in the areas sown. The same ...
The larvae feed on all types of grasses, early stages of cereal crops (e.g., corn, rice, wheat, millet, sorghum), sugarcane, ... The species is commonly found in Africa, but can also be seen in Yemen, some Pacific islands, and parts of Australia. African ... The species targets most cereal crops, including maize, sorghum, rice, millet, and other grasses. Young caterpillars are also ... Akin to other species of the genus Spodoptera, S. exempta lives in tropical and subtropical environments near cereal crops and ...
Sorghum is the world's fifth-most important cereal crop after rice, wheat, maize, and barley. S. bicolor is typically an annual ... Sorghum bicolor, commonly called sorghum (/ˈsɔːrɡəm/) and also known as great millet, durra, jowari, or milo, is a grass ... United Sorghum Checkoff Program "Sorghum and millets in human nutrition". www.fao.org. Retrieved 2017-04-05. Sorghum, a crop of ... Sorghum bicolor is the cultivated species of sorghum; its wild relatives make up the botanical genus Sorghum. The leading ...
... either as a sole crop or intermixed with cereals, such as sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum), or ... The crop is cultivated on marginal land by resource-poor farmers, who commonly grow traditional medium- and long-duration (5-11 ... Pigeon peas are both a food crop (dried peas, flour, or green vegetable peas) and a forage/cover crop. In combination with ... With the maize crop failing three out of five years in drought-prone areas of Kenya, a consortium led by the International ...
Other warm climate cereals, such as sorghum, are adapted to arid conditions. Cool-season cereals are well-adapted to temperate ... Cereal grains are grown in greater quantities and provide more food energy worldwide than any other type of crop and are ... Rice is commonly grown in flooded fields, though some strains are grown on dry land. ... Spring cereals typically require more irrigation and yield less than winter cereals. Once the cereal plants have grown their ...
Cereal crop farming is developed in the region, so diverse types of high quality cereals such as millet, barnyard millet, ... Various foods made of sorghum can also be found in the province such as susu jijim (sorghum pancakes). In the province, there ... Jobap, a bowl of mixed steamed rice and millet, is commonly served in place of ssalbap (steamed rice), and foods made with ... The climate is relatively mild, and various types of cereal crops are harvested, so dishes made with grain crops are especially ...
Crops most commonly affected are corn, sorghum, rice and sugarcane. Three species cause the most damage: Striga asiatica, S. ... Some species are serious pathogens of cereal crops, with the greatest effects being in savanna agriculture in Africa. It also ... Maize, sorghum, and sugarcane crops affected by witchweed in the United States have an estimated value well over $20 billion. ... This method has been used in sorghum plantations by planting Celosia argentea between the sorghum rows. Cotton, sunflower and ...
It is commonly found in cane fields and cereal crops. In dry seasons, it is seen in arid country but always near water. It is ... bullrush millet Pennisetum typhoides and Sorghum species. It has also been recorded that it feeds on feral millet Pannicum ... at times eating seeds of cereal crops. Chestnut-breasted mannikin is a highly sociable species, flocking in large number ...
Industrial crops, Food adjuncts Food crops - cereals - Rice, wheat, maize, sorghum, ragi, Pulses, legumes, fruits, vegetables ... taxonomical and agricultural among the agriculture classification of crops is most widely accepted because it is commonly it ... It is possible that one crop which has been included as a food crop may figure also as an industrial crop. e.g. maize or ... Millets - number of small grained cereals which are of minor importance as food. Pseudo-cereals - plants other than those of ...
It infests raw or processed cereals such as wheat, oats, barley, sorghum, rye and buckwheat. It can breed in crops with a ... The maize weevil commonly attacks standing crops, in particular, maize before harvest, and is also commonly associated with ... This species attacks both standing crops and stored cereal products, including wheat, rice, sorghum, oats, barley, rye, ... The maize weevil also infests other types of stored, processed cereal products such as pasta, cassava, and various coarse, ...
D. intortum and D. uncinatum are inter-cropped in maize and sorghum fields to repel Chilo partellus, a stem-boring grass moth ... Reasons for production of these compounds that have benefited cereal crop production are however unknown, as they don't seem to ... Taxonomic authorities commonly disagree about the naming and placement of species. For example, Desmodium spirale as described ... These compounds are used aggressively in agriculture in push-pull technology to manage two major pests of cereals, especially ...
Because of its tolerance to difficult growing conditions, it can be grown in areas where other cereal crops, such as maize or ... Pearl millet is called bajra in India and is commonly used to make the flat bread bhakri. It is also boiled to make an Indian ... It is a main staple (along with sorghum) in a large region of northern Nigeria, Niger, Mali and Burkina Faso. In Nigeria it is ... Pearl millet is a summer annual crop well-suited for double cropping and rotations. Today pearl millet is grown on over 260,000 ...
Corn, alfalfa, wheat, oats, and sorghum crops are often anaerobically fermented to create silage. Many crops such as alfalfa, ... cattle are commonly fed cereal grains. In many areas of the world, dairy rations also commonly include byproducts from other ... Crops grown may include corn, alfalfa, timothy, wheat, oats, sorghum and clover. These plants are often processed after harvest ... Lameness is commonly considered one of the most significant animal welfare issues for dairy cattle,[41][42][43][44] and is best ...
Sorghum is an important species of the grass family, Paceae, and is considered the world's fifth most important cereal crop. ... Weeds reduce yields and compete with sorghum. Weeds that are commonly associated with Sorghum are striga, shattercane, and ... There are several different types of sorghum such as grain sorghum, grass sorghum, sweet sorghum and broomcorn. Grain Sorghum ... "Sorghum Crop". ICRISAT. Retrieved November 23, 2015. Reddy, B (2004). "Sorghum, a crop of substance". International Crops ...
... s have been isolated from all major cereal crops, and from sources as diverse as peanut butter and cannabis. The ... Aflatoxins are most commonly ingested. However the most toxic type of aflatoxin, B1, can permeate through the skin. The United ... sorghum, sunflower seeds, tree nuts, wheat, and a variety of spices. When contaminated food is processed, aflatoxins enter the ... Organic crops which are not treated with fungicides may be more susceptible to contamination with aflatoxins. No animal species ...
It is related to the major cereal grain species wheat, barley, oats, maize, rice, rye, sorghum, and millet. It has many ... It is now emerging as a model for crop plant disease, facilitating the model-to-crop transfer of knowledge on disease ... Brachypodium distachyon, commonly called purple false brome or stiff brome, is a grass species native to southern Europe, ... 2006). "Alignment of the Genomes of Brachypodium distachyon and Temperate Cereals and Grasses Using Bacterial Artificial ...
... is heat-stable and is found worldwide in a number of cereal crops, such as maize, barley, oats, wheat, rice, and ... Commonly used extraction solvents are aqueous mixtures of methanol, acetonitrile, or ethyl acetate followed by a range of ... sorghum. In addition to its actions on the classical estrogen receptors, zearalenone has been found to act as an agonist of the ... Tanaka, T.; Hasegawa, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Lee, U. S.; Sugiura, Y.; Ueno, Y. (1988). "Worldwide Contamination of Cereals by the ...
... is the leaves and stalks of field crops, such as corn (maize), sorghum or soybean that are commonly left in a field ... It is similar to straw, the residue left after any cereal grain or grass has been harvested at maturity for its seed. It can be ... Stover from various crops can also be used in mushroom compost preparation. The word 'stover' derives from the English legal ... Corn stover Crop residue Lardy, Greg; Anderson, Vern. "Alternative Fees for Ruminants" (PDF). North Dakota State University ...
Ethiopia's major staple crops include a variety of cereals, pulses, oilseeds, and coffee. Grains are the most important field ... The principal grains are teff, wheat, barley, corn, sorghum, and millet. The first three are primarily cool-weather crops ... Taro, yams, and sweet potatoes are commonly grown in the same region as the ensete. The consumption of vegetables and fruits is ... Principal crops include coffee, pulses (e.g., beans), oilseeds, cereals, potatoes, sugarcane, and vegetables. Exports are ...
It is a major crop, although often supplemented with cereal crops. However its value as a famine food has fallen due to a ... Ensete ventricosum, commonly known as the Ethiopian banana, Abyssinian banana, false banana, enset or ensete, is an herbaceous ... Enset is often intercropped with sorghum, although the practice amongst the Gedeo is to intercrop it with coffee. ... Enset will tolerate drought better than most cereal crops. Wild enset plants are produced from seeds, while most domesticated ...
Maize (Zea mays) is a major cereal crop; it is third behind rice and wheat in production. An average of 380 million tons are ... The virus can also be spread through the seed or mechanically by leaf rubbing of Johnson grass and sorghum. MDMV in the field ... Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus is spread by seed, by infected leaves rubbing on non-infected leaves and perhaps most commonly, via ... Maize is the most widely grown crop ranging from tropical areas with altitudes over 3000 m to temperate areas extending as far ...
... are actively controlled to limit damage in growing crops, loss and contamination of stored crops and structural damage to ... Nowadays, the house mouse is the most commonly used laboratory rodent, and in 1979 it was estimated that fifty million were ... Across Africa, rodents including Mastomys and Arvicanthis damage cereals, groundnuts, vegetables and cacao. In Asia, rats, mice ... and species such as Microtus brandti, Meriones unguiculatus and Eospalax baileyi damage crops of rice, sorghum, tubers, ...
... widely grown around the world as cereal crops or grains for fodder and human food. Millets are important crops in the semiarid ... Lambs do better on millet compared to sorghum. Millet does not contain prussic acid which can be in sorghum. Prussic acid ... Instead of letting the plant reach maturity it can be grazed by stock and is commonly used for sheep and cattle. Millet is a C4 ... Handbook of Cereal Science and Technology. CRC Press. 99 2nd ed: 177-210. "Sorghum and millet in human nutrition". Food and ...
They often parasitize cereal crops like sugarcane, maize, millet, sorghum, and other major agricultural crops like cowpea, ... commonly called the terminal or primary haustoria. Plants are reduced to short vegetative stems, their alternate leaves are ... This family has tremendous economic importance because of the damage to crops caused by some species in the genera Orobanche ... it is estimated to affect the livelihood of over 100 million people killing 20 to 100 percent of crops depending on infestation ...
Cereals. Barley. Barley wine. Guinness. Corn. Mageu. Pozol. Tejuino. Tesgüino. Millet. Oshikundu. Tongba. Rice. Agkud. Amazake ... Sorghum. Baijiu (Kaoliang wine). Multiple grains. Ara. American whiskey. Canadian whisky. Shōchū. Whisky. ... Landowners who grew rice crops would have rice left over at the end of the season and, rather than letting these leftovers go ... Saucer-like cups called sakazuki are also used, most commonly at weddings and other ceremonial occasions, such as the start of ...
... namely cereal crops, cash crops and other food crops. Vegetable crops are also grown. The cereal crops produced are red sorghum ... Cash crops include groundnuts, sesame and soybeans. Peanut is the most commonly grown crop. Market gardening is an activity ... white sorghum, millet, maize and rice. These crops are produced mainly for self-consumption, but some are sold on the market, ... On the whole, the main vegetable crops grown in the commune are experiencing a general upward trend in the areas sown. The same ...
Adults will sometimes feed on cultivated cereal and millet crops such as sorghum and maize, damaging flowers and grain. It is ... The species is commonly seen on grasses in southern India after the northeast monsoon. ...
Sorghum is the worlds fifth-most important cereal crop after rice, wheat, maize, and barley. S. bicolor is typically an annual ... Sorghum bicolor, commonly called sorghum (/ˈsɔːrɡəm/) and also known as great millet, durra, jowari, or milo, is a grass ... United Sorghum Checkoff Program "Sorghum and millets in human nutrition". www.fao.org. Retrieved 2017-04-05. Sorghum, a crop of ... Sorghum bicolor is the cultivated species of sorghum; its wild relatives make up the botanical genus Sorghum. The leading ...
Every cover crop species has its own niche and attributes for agricultural production. ... Cover Crops Rotations after Cash Grain Crop-Cover crops offer many benefits for agriculture that include erosion control; ... Cover crops for organic matter (high C:N): Sorghum Sudan grass, cereal rye, annual ryegrass, triticale, oats, wheat, spelt, and ... Legume cover crops are commonly used for nitrogen contribution because of their inherent capacity to fix atmospheric N (inert ...
The commonly cultivated food grasses are called cereals, after the Greek goddess Ceres. Major grain crops include barley, ... millet, oats, rice, rye, sorghum, wheat and corn (maize). Rice, probably the most important grain, is the primary food source ... Food crops have originated in many different parts of the world. Scientists estimated where each crop originated by using ... Examples might include bread from wheat; cereals from oats, wheat and corn; juice from oranges and apples; etc. Ask, Did you ...
In particular, the present invention provides for ,i,sorghum ,/i,plants, ... The present invention provides for compositions and methods for producing sorghum crop plants that are resistant to herbicides ... Striga commonly known as witchweed, is a genus of noxious parasitic plants of grasses and monocot cereal crops, such as maize, ... 6. The sorghum hybrid of claim 1, wherein said sorghum hybrid germplasm comprises SEQ ID NO:1. 7. The sorghum hybrid of claim 6 ...
... is the second most widely produced cereal crop after corn and the third most important staple food behind corn and sorghum [2 ... Additionally, wheat straw is commonly used as a roof thatching material and as animal feed in most wheat-growing rural areas of ... Sakamoto S, Fukui K. Collection and preliminary observation of cultivated cereals and legumes in Ethiopia. Kyoto Univ Afr Stud ... Ethiopia is one of the few countries that has been served as the center of primary gene pool for various crops [4,5,6]. ...
... and is the fifth most commonly grown cereal in the world. It is tolerant to dry environments so is an important crop in the ... Sorghum is also a rich source of sorghum-specific natural products. Upon wounding or pathogen invasion, leaves of sorghum ... 1993 Role of pigments and tannins in the reaction of tan and red near isogenic sorghum lines to leaf diseases. Afr. Crop Sci. J ... 2006 Sorghum and millet phenols and antioxidants. J. Cereal Sci. 44: 236-251. ...
We are now entering sorghum and millet zones, and these crops will outperform maize most years. Sorghum and millet are also ... The lablab should be sown about 28 days after the maize to avoid severe cereal crop yield depression from competition. ... Animal production Can achieve up to 0.8 kg/hd/day LWG and up to 1,200 kg/ha/yr LWG (commonly 300-500 kg/ha/yr LWG ) depending ... Sweet sorghum hybrids tiller well, are tall with fine stems, flower early and have low prussic acid. Sweet sorghum x Sudan ...
Abstract Sorghum bicolor, commonly known as Sorghum, is one of the worlds leading cereal crops. Sorghum and its derivatives ... Introduction Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) is one of the most important drought tolerant crops which allows farmers to ... Red Sorghum Topics: Commercial sorghum, Zhang Yimou, Sorghum Pages: 10 (4137 words) Published: April 13, 2002 ... Low shear at alkaline pH was employed to extract the sorghum starch from its flour. The extraction of sorghum yielded a ...
... but many of these grasslands have been plowed for crop production. ... Oats and rye are the chief domestic crops from Russia and Europe. Cereal, bread, and pasta are common foods made from these ... These grasses include the cereal grains: wheat, oats, barley, rye, corn, millet, sorghum, and rice. Wheat and corn are grown ... Grassland animals, such as the American bison (commonly known as the buffalo), have been used for food since the earliest times ...
... researchers and county government officials to interact and showcase crop variety combinations less vulnerable to climate risk. ... The additional land management measures on his farm and a healthy sorghum/cowpea crop impressed many farmers who promised to ... In Makueni for instance, farmers learned that the commonly grown variety Katengu required lots of water and was a favourite ... Cereal and legume crop trials conducted in Kenya and Tanzania provide farmers and researchers an opportunity to select the best ...
Sorghum is the fifth most widely planted cereal crop in the world and is commonly cultivated in arid and semi-arid regions such ... Despite its importance as a food source, sorghum genetic improvement through transgenic approaches has been limited because of ... Kiwifruit is an important fruit crop; however, technologies for its functional genomic and molecular improvement are limited. ... Developing a flexible, High-efficiency Agrobacterium-mediated Sorghum Transformation System with Broad Application. ...
Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is the major cereal crop used to produce the traditional beer commonly called dolo. Improvement of ... Crop rotation and intercropping are regarded as better cropping in terms of yield improvement of both cereal and legume crops ... Water use of selected sorghum (Sorghum Bicolor L. Moench) genotypes.  Hadebe, Sandile Thamsanqa. ... Maize crop growth and development related to solar radiation.  Kaiser, Heinz Werner. (2015-04-23) ...
... but millet and sorghum are more reliable crops apart from in the highest-rainfall zones. National cereal production (roughly 80 ... In drier central and western zones, farmers commonly have small areas of drought -tolerant fodders (e.g. Agave americana, ... This allocation is generally used for maize, millet or cash crops, and is seldom planted to pasture crops. Crop residues may be ... The principal form of dryland fodder is cereal crop residues, which make an important contribution to livestock diets in ...
... and rice has revolutionized our understanding of plant biology but it has yet to translate into the improvement of major crop ... Cereals constitute over 50% of total crop production worldwide (http://www.fao.org/) and cereal seeds are one of the most ... Rye is second after wheat among grains most commonly used in the production of bread and is also very important for mixed ... This has necessitated the development of genomic resources and programs for maize, sorghum, wheat, and barley to serve as the ...
Sorghum: Sorghum is an ancient cereal grain that was collected 8,000 years ago in southern Egypt and later domesticated in ... Some specialty sorghums are high in antioxidants. • Spelt: Commonly eaten in medieval times, spelt is part of the wheat family ... Because of its natural drought tolerance, its an important crop in many parts of Africa and Asia. Sorghum is easy to ...
CROP / REGION TEFF BARLEY WHEAT FINGER. MILLET OATS RYE RICE MAIZE SORGHUM TOTAL. CEREALS PULSES CEREALS. AND PULSES. ... as a direct result of excessive rains in mid and high altitude areas where pulses are commonly grown. 3.2 Rainfall and crop ... Cereals Pulses Cereals and Pulses Area ( 000 ha). Production ( 000 tons). Area ( 000 ha). Production. ( 000 tons) Area ( ... Main crops in the region are maize and sorghum and there is also finger millet. The total area planted with cereals is 11 800 ...
A Franco-Kenyan research team has managed to do just that for sorghum, one of the main cereals in Africa. The scientists ... Boron deficiency is one of the most widespread causes of reduced crop yield. Missouri and the eastern half of the United States ... of scientists including researchers from the University of Georgia recently published the genome of Brassica napus-commonly ... Cultivating biodiversity: Sorghum example - Sept. 2. It is difficult to distinguish the human impact on the effects of natural ...
... of the worlds cereal crop. Mycotoxins include over 300 toxic compounds produced when certain molds or fungi infect crops. ... Zearalenone (ZEA) mycotoxins originate in grains such as corn, barley, oats, wheat, rice and sorghum.[iv] Theyve even been ... ZEA urinary levels and their intake of commonly contaminated sources such as beef and popcorn. ... Mycotoxins form while cereal crops are growing or in post-harvest storage. The contamination is nearly impossible to eliminate ...
It also is used as a green manure crop, a nitrogen fixing crop, or for erosion control. Similar to other grain legumes, cowpea ... Commonly, the terminal leaflet is longer and larger than the lateral leaflets. There is a wide range in leaf size and shape. ... The history of cowpea dates to ancient West African cereal farming, 5 to 6 thousand years ago, where it was closely associated ... especially where cowpeas border fields of maturing corn or sorghum. Lesser cornstalk borer damage may be significantly reduced ...
Try Sorghum grains for flaked cereals, breads, pastas, rolls & snacks. Available products include organic whole grain flour, ... Originating in Africa, but commonly grown in the U.S., it is one of the most important cereal crops in the world. Highly ... Amaranth Buckwheat Natures Color™ Barley Millet Quinoa Colorado Quinoa Rye Sorghum Spelt Teff Triticale White Sonora Wheat ... Sorghum. This medium-sized round grain has a mild, lightly sweet taste that melds well with other flavors. ...
According to statistics of the mid-1980s, tef produced 23 percent of Ethiopias cereal grain. The others were sorghum (26 ... It is notable that Ethiopians commonly mix fenugreek (abish), lentils, peas (ater). or faba bean (bakela) with injera batter, a ... As a standby, they wait until their main crop-maize, sorghum, or maybe wheat-shows signs of failing. Then they sow a fast- ... Few other cereals can be grown there. In fact, tef is able to withstand wet conditions perhaps better than any cereal other ...
It is the 6th cereal crop in terms of the worlds agricultural production. A majority of the worlds commercial millet crop is ... The most commonly found millets are Jowar (Sorghum), Sama (Little millet), Ragi (Finger Millet), Korra (Foxtail millet) and ... Millets are one of the most important cereal grains. These are consumed by more than 1/3rd of the worlds population. ...
Anti-nutrients are one of the key factors, which reduce the bioavailability of various components of the cereals and legumes. ... Major anti-nutritional factors, which are found in edible crops include saponins, tannins, phytic acid, gossypol, lectins, ... Various other factors like trypsin inhibitors and phytates, which are present mainly in legumes and cereals, reduce the ... Legumes and cereals contain high amounts of macronutrients and micronutrients but also anti-nutritional factors. ...
  • Sweet sorghum syrup is known as molasses in some parts of the U.S., although it is not true molasses. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some countries, sweet sorghum stalks are used for producing biofuel by squeezing the juice and then fermenting it into ethanol. (wikipedia.org)
  • The high biomass sorghum, sweet sorghum bagasse (2 cuts or crops year−1) or Bermuda grass capable of yielding up to 50, 60 and 27 tons of dry forage ha−1 year−1 rich in cellulose and hemicellulose can be efficiently transformed into bioethanol using second-generation technologies consisting of milling, pretreatment (chemical and/or enzymatic) and fermentation with microorganisms capable of transforming C5/C6 sugars to obtain ethanol. (intechopen.com)
  • Aflatoxins have been isolated from all major cereal crops, and from sources as diverse as peanut butter and cannabis. (ueba.me)
  • Mancozeb is used to protect many fruit, vegetable, nut and field crops against a wide spectrum of fungal diseases, including potato blight, leaf spot, scab (on apples and pears), and rust (on roses). (orst.edu)
  • Field crops contribute some three-fourths of the total value of Egypt's agricultural production, while the rest comes from livestock products, fruits and vegetables, and other specialty crops. (britannica.com)
  • No classification of the field crops of the United States can be made that will be entirely satisfactory and even if it could be made so, would not remain satisfactory, on account of new uses to which plants are constantly being put. (google.com.mx)
  • Area and Value of Field Crops in 1899, in 17. (google.com.mx)
  • About one acre in thirty of the cultivated area was devoted to fruits and vegetables, while their value was about one-tenth that of the field crops. (google.com.mx)
  • 1 Traditional Field Crops (Peace Corps, 1981, 283 p. (appropedia.org)
  • On 16th and 24th of July 2014, farmer field days were conducted in Makueni and Nyando bringing together over 200 farmers, researchers and county government officials to interact and showcase crop variety combinations less vulnerable to climate risk. (cgiar.org)
  • Tef is a reliable cereal for an unreliable climate. (nap.edu)
  • The Sorghum plant prefers tropical and subtropical climate. (organicseeds.top)
  • Dr. Tuinstra and his collaborators are responding to these concerns with efforts to develop 'climate resilient' cultivars of maize and sorghum that will contribute to the adaptation of agriculture to warmer and drier environments. (purdue.edu)
  • Due to the climate variability and change, there is a need to enhance sorghum productivity for improved sustainable food production and income generation, especially for resource poor farmers. (scirp.org)
  • My idea for sustainable crop protection involves the use of plant species to control weeds in crop production systems particularly targeting resource poor farmers practicing Conservation Agriculture (CA). Conservation agriculture is a climate smart technique of growing crops through the simultaneous implementation of three interlinked principles namely minimal soil disturbance, crop rotations and retention of crop residues. (iupac2019.be)
  • Innovative crop protection products and plant biotechnology provide solutions to reduce the energy consumption in agriculture while conserving natural resources and contributing to mitigate the effect of climate change. (altenergymag.com)
  • It is well adapted to water-deficient environments and thus is one of the crops capable of adapting to climate changes. (springer.com)
  • This required increase in crop production will need to occur in the context of mounting water scarcity, decreasing area and environmental degradation of arable land (partly caused by agriculture), increasing pollution, inevitable emergence of new races and biotypes of pathogens and pests, and possible adverse effects of climate change. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Climate and ecological conditions, for example, determine what food crops and livestock are practical to grow locally. (cfiks.org)
  • The field trails will be conducted to assess whether sorghum as surface mulches, live mulches, soil incorporated residues and as a rotational crop has the potential of controlling weeds in sesame. (iupac2019.be)
  • The research will also assess the bioherbicidal potential of sorgaab as early post emergence sprays that can be used to control weeds then finally a soil analysis to determine the persistence of sorghum allelochemicals. (iupac2019.be)
  • It can be used to prevent the growth of winter-hardy weeds, and can either be harvested as a bonus crop, or tilled directly into the ground in spring to provide more organic matter for the next summer's crop. (combiculture.com)
  • 2,4-D exhibits relatively good selectivity , meaning, in this case, that it controls a wide number of broadleaf weeds while causing little to no injury to grass crops at normal use rates. (thefullwiki.org)
  • One American plant pathologist who is very concerned about the herbicide-resistant weeds is Doug Gurian-Sherman, Ph.D., now a senior scientist in the Food and Environment Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists in Washington, D.C. Previously between 1995 and 2000, Dr. Gurian-Sherman was a staff scientist at the Environmental Protection Agency where he evaluated risks and safety of pesticides and genetically modified crops. (earthfiles.com)
  • They harbor insects, and some weeds are hosts for crop disease. (appropedia.org)
  • A few weeds like Striga (witchweed) are parasitic and cause yellowing, wilting, and loss of crop vigor. (appropedia.org)
  • However, tall-growing weeds that were not adequately controlled earlier can easily overtake these "short" crops if allowed to continue growing. (appropedia.org)
  • 5- The method according to claim 3 or 4, wherein the silage is traditional grass, maize, Lucerne, wilted grass, crop cereal or sugarcane silage. (sumobrain.com)
  • If moisture removal is the main objective this summer, harvesting the crop as green feed, silage, or swath grazing is recommended. (gov.mb.ca)
  • Winter cereals are not the best option for producing green feed or silage because they require an over wintering period to produce tillers. (gov.mb.ca)
  • Filamentous moulds are common spoilage organisms of food products, e.g. fermented milk products, cheese, bread, as well as stored crops and feed such as hay and silage (Filtenborg, et al. (ispub.com)
  • Nyando farmers ranked the crop yield as the greatest factor in determining what variety to adopt. (cgiar.org)
  • From visual inspections of the grain crops and from discussions with farmers, traders and MOA staff, the Mission prepared its own forecasts of crop yield, by zone and by cereal. (fao.org)
  • Heat stress in maize can influence the overall health and production of the crop with yield losses realized through premature senescence of vegetative and reproductive structures. (purdue.edu)
  • Development of high yielding, drought tolerant, and dwarf sorghums with early maturity enables effective utilization of available soils moisture and in optimizing plant density for achieving higher yield in farmers' fields. (scirp.org)
  • Pigeon peas can be of a perennial varieity, in which the crop can last 3-5 years (although the seed yield drops considerably after the first two years), or an annual varieity more suitable for grain production. (thefullwiki.org)
  • Canadian environmental management consultancy Envirochem Services says crops such as switchgrass have a much higher yield per acre. (power-technology.com)
  • Efficient and reproducible regeneration protocols are essential for successful genetic transformation in crop yield improvements. (springer.com)
  • Yield is maximized in general by increasing the "harvest index": reducing the part of the crop that we don't want (which in cereal means the straw) and increasing the bit we do want (the grain). (campaignforrealfarming.org)
  • A sorghum rust infection at this level can cause substantial reduction in yield. (infonet-biovision.org)
  • Some species of sorghum can contain levels of hydrogen cyanide, hordenine and nitrates lethal to grazing animals in the early stages of the plant's growth. (wordpress.com)
  • The additional land management measures on his farm and a healthy sorghum/cowpea crop impressed many farmers who promised to emulate them. (cgiar.org)
  • Therefore, cowpea seed is valued as a nutritional supplement to cereals and an extender of animal proteins. (wisc.edu)
  • Cowpea can be used at all stages of growth as a vegetable crop. (wisc.edu)
  • Two feeding trials were conducted to study the combined effects of (i) varying degrees of selective consumption and (ii) supplementation with cowpea (Trail 1) or groundnut haulms (Trial 2), on intake of organic matter (IOM) from sorghum stover, and total intake of digestible organic matter (IDOM). (wur.nl)
  • For rations without cowpea in Trial 1, the maintenance level of IDOM was reached by offering 61 g sorghum OM (kg-0.75 per day) of which 47 g was consumed. (wur.nl)
  • With the same amount of offered sorghum 9, 18, 28, 38 and 48 g cowpea OM were needed to attain intake levels equivalent to 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 times maintenance, respectively. (wur.nl)
  • With prices of cowpea and groundnut haulms 4 times higher than that of stover, the results of Trial 1 indicate that least cost rations for feeding at 1.2 M (maintenance) would consist of 72 g sorghum OM (kg-0.75 per day) combined with 7 g cowpea haulms. (wur.nl)
  • Quantifying productivity and water use of sorghum intercrop systems. (ukzn.ac.za)
  • In this region, the main focus has been on macronutrients but there is emerging though scattered evidence of crop productivity limitations by the secondary and micronutrients. (springer.com)
  • We conclude that S and micronutrients are holding back crop productivity especially on soils where response to macronutrients is low and that more research is needed to unravel conditions under which application of S and micronutrients may pose financial risks. (springer.com)
  • 2015 ). However, there are strong indications from some studies of the effects of deficiencies in secondary nutrients and micronutrients limiting crop productivity in SSA, especially under continuous cropping without nutrient replenishment (Vanlauwe et al. (springer.com)
  • Future increases in the production of cereals and non-cereal agricultural commodities will have to be essentially achieved through increases in productivity, as the possibilities of expansion of area and livestock population are minimal. (niir.org)
  • Stay-green is correlated with enhanced crop productivity, grain quality, and lodging resistance in many crops. (purdue.edu)
  • The crop is favored due to its productivity and short growing season under dry, high-temperature conditions. (diet-health.info)
  • Millets are diverse and broadly adapted crops but also a source of some confusion for both farmers and consumers. (missouri.edu)
  • Teff ( Eragrostis tef ) is another small-seeded African grain that is sometimes loosely grouped with the millets, mainly because it's an African grass crop. (missouri.edu)
  • In this publication, both the grain and cover crop uses of these millets will be discussed, and where relevant, their use for forage or other economic uses. (missouri.edu)
  • Sorghum is also counted as major millets and known asjonna in Andhra Pradesh, Jolla' in Kannada,cholam in Tamil Nadu and Jowar in Hindi. (diet-health.info)
  • Agriculture produced in the commune is highly diversified and focuses on three types of crops, namely cereal crops, cash crops and other food crops. (wikipedia.org)
  • Having visited all these farms and seen healthy crops, I believe we have found something to save us from perennial food shortage", said Patrick Kioko, a farmer from Kathonzweni, Makueni. (cgiar.org)
  • This year s FAO/WFP Crop and Food Supply Assessment Mission was divided into two parts. (fao.org)
  • These crop estimates were combined with the food aid needs assessment to identify the location of deficit and surplus areas, and to provide information on the feasibility of local food purchases. (fao.org)
  • The crop and food supply assessment team, comprising international and local FAO staff, and MOA agronomists, visited 40 zones and all the major producing regions over a period of two weeks using four separate groups. (fao.org)
  • Despite its importance as a food source, sorghum genetic improvement through transgenic approaches has been limited because of an inefficient transformation system. (usda.gov)
  • Real processing, treatment of cereals and other plants is to prepare their starch for human food, animal feed, or industrial use. (niir.org)
  • Cereals are used for both human and animal food and as an industrial raw material. (niir.org)
  • The content of the book includes information about cereal food technology. (niir.org)
  • Cereal prices, which are generally similar to slightly above average, are supporting poor households' access to food. (fews.net)
  • The average to above-average harvests expected in October 2019, as well as the observed decline in prices and improved terms of trade between livestock and cereals, will improve household access to food. (fews.net)
  • However, root and tuber crops (RTCs) such as potato, sweetpotato, cassava, and yam may hold more potential for providing food security in the future, and knowledge of their root system additionally focuses directly on the edible portion. (frontiersin.org)
  • Both these types are some of the fastest growing crops, which can support the rising food demands of the urban and rural areas of the developed and developing countries. (marketsandmarketsblog.com)
  • Indeed, considered in continental perspective, peanut is among the largest African food providers-probably coming right after maize, cassava, and sorghum. (nap.edu)
  • Yet while the exotic crop soars to ever-greater heights its stay-at-home cousin languishes almost unknown to agricultural science, food science, economic development, and the world at large. (nap.edu)
  • [ 1 ] In combination with cereals , pigeon peas make a well-balanced human food. (thefullwiki.org)
  • In countries like India, human food demand for food and feed oilseed crops (e.g. soybean, sunflower) exceeds supply, so it is not desirable to divert large quantities of these crops for biodiesel. (altenergymag.com)
  • 13. Assessing the Potential of Dioscorea praehensilis (bush yam) as a Commercial and Food Security Crop in Ghana. (ruforum.org)
  • Crops in this category are classified or grouped according to the main food substances existing in them. (fabioclass.com)
  • these are crops that store food in their roots. (fabioclass.com)
  • This bulletin discusses the uses of sorghum grain, including in animal feeds, human food, and alcohol production. (unt.edu)
  • This report discusses the uses of sorghum grain for human food and animal feed, including information about nutrition, digestibility, and storage and preparation. (unt.edu)
  • Doug Gurian-Sherman, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist, Senior Scientist in the Food and Environment Program, Union of Concerned Scientists, and previous Staff Scientist, Environmental Protection Agency, evaluating risks and safety of pesticides and genetically modified crops, Washington, D. C. (earthfiles.com)
  • We want farmers to pick out the best variety of sorghum after analyzing the growth patterns, resistance to pests, water uptake and attraction to birds," said Justus Ngesu, Agricultural extension officer for Makueni County. (cgiar.org)
  • Each year, Ethiopian farmers plant almost 1.4 million hectares of tef, 1 and they produce 0.9 million tons of grain, or about a quarter of the country's total cereals. (nap.edu)
  • However, sorghum production to date is predominantly a minor crop of interest that is left to subsistence farmers . (scirp.org)
  • Some farmers intersperse the plant among other crops but most grow it in mini-monoculture. (nap.edu)
  • The crop is cultivated on marginal land by resource-poor farmers, who commonly grow traditional medium- and long-duration (5-11 months) landraces . (thefullwiki.org)
  • It has led to a labour burden on women and children who spend most of their time hand-weeding and adulteration of any pesticide farmers think works in a dicotyledonous crop. (iupac2019.be)
  • There several methods of manipulating sorghum allelopathy that can be easily adopted by resource poor farmers or by farmers that are transitioning from conventional agriculture to CA. Exploitation of sorghum allelopathy then comes in as an environmentally friendly and easy to adopt weed control method as it can applied as common cultural weed control methods that farmers already know. (iupac2019.be)
  • Richard Pankhurst reports (citing Augustus B. Wylde) that in 19th-century Ethiopia, durra was "often the first crop sown on newly cultivated land", explaining that this cereal did not require the thorough ploughing other crops did, and its roots not only decomposed into a good fertilizer, but they also helped to break up the soil while not exhausting the subsoil. (wikipedia.org)
  • The final visit was at farmer Peter Nguli's farm who in addition to the crops, had constructed a water pan and terraces to capture rain water and control soil erosion. (cgiar.org)
  • Perennial grass species are most often used in vegetable crop production or orchards or vineyards to reduce soil erosion and facilitate machinery traffic during high soil moisture conditions. (oregonstate.edu)
  • A new high-performance broad spectrum, soil active herbicide for use in established permanent crops such as citrus, grapes, fruit trees, tree nuts, industrial plantations and perennial sugar cane. (bayer.com)
  • They are also not as capable of de-watering a soil in the year of seeding as a spring cereal. (gov.mb.ca)
  • This knowledge will be applied to improving drought tolerance of these and other crops through marker-assisted selection and potentially transgenic approaches. (purdue.edu)
  • Both Westerwold (a true annual) and Italian (a biennial) ryegrass are commonly called "annual" ryegrass in Ontario. (fieldcropnews.com)
  • Sorghum is cultivated in many parts of the world today. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tef (Eragrostis tef) is a significant crop in only one country in the world-Ethiopia. (nap.edu)
  • 2010 ). In comparison to other regions of the world, relatively little research has been done on secondary and micronutrient deficiencies in soils and the corresponding crop responses in SSA. (springer.com)
  • Human hepatocelluar carcinoma is the fifth most commonly occurring cancer in the world and the third greatest cause of cancer mortality (Anwar et al. (ispub.com)