A semi-synthetic cephalosporin antibiotic.
A semisynthetic cephalosporin antibiotic with antimicrobial activity similar to that of CEPHALORIDINE or CEPHALOTHIN, but somewhat less potent. It is effective against both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms.
A group of broad-spectrum antibiotics first isolated from the Mediterranean fungus ACREMONIUM. They contain the beta-lactam moiety thia-azabicyclo-octenecarboxylic acid also called 7-aminocephalosporanic acid.
A cephalorsporin antibiotic.
Long-acting, broad-spectrum, water-soluble, CEPHALEXIN derivative.
A cephalosporin antibiotic.
Six-carbon alicyclic hydrocarbons.

The effect of three frequently applied antibiotics on the colonization resistance of the digestive tract of mice. (1/52)

The influence of treatment with increasing oral doses of three absorbable antibiotics on the colonization resistance of the digestive tract was investigated in mice. Mice treated with ampicillin or epicillin in any of the applied doses had a strongly decreased colonization resistance as demonstrated by 'bacterial overgrowth' after contamination with resistant strains of Escherichia coli. After a treatment period 2 weeks, Streptococcus faecalis became resistant in a number of animals. Oral treatment with cephradine on the other hand had no obvious influence on the endogenous flora of the mice, nor was the colonization resistance decreased.  (+info)

Factors associated with antibiotic resistance in coliform organisms from community urinary tract infection in Wales. (2/52)

Routine susceptibility data for urinary coliform isolates from community practice were analysed in comparison with dispensed antibiotic prescriptions for all conditions and social deprivation data for Bro Taf and North Wales Health Authorities for financial years 1996--1998. Prescribing rates and resistance rates varied widely between practices. Among isolates from practices with high usage of an antibiotic, rates of resistance to that antibiotic tended to be high, and usage correlated significantly with resistance between practice population units. Cross-correlations were found between usage of one antibiotic and resistance to another, particularly for trimethoprim and ampicillin. Usage, particularly of trimethoprim, was associated with multi-resistance to up to four antibiotics. Resistance was more frequent in isolates from males, children and the elderly. Ampicillin resistance correlated with social deprivation. Analyses including or excluding potential repeat isolates yielded closely similar results. Indices reflecting sampling behaviour (laboratory coliform positivity rates, positivity per 1000 registered patients, specimens submitted per 1000 registered patients) varied widely between surgeries, suggesting lack of consensus on urine sampling policies. These indices showed only weak correlations with usage or resistance. Associations between resistance and usage were compared for isolates from two patient subsets that were likely to differ in their proportions of non-Escherichia coli isolates: female patients aged 16--55 years; and males, children and patients aged >55 years. The latter showed higher base levels of resistance, but the associations of resistance with usage were statistically indistinguishable for the two populations. The results suggest that usage of antibiotics in a practice population may affect the rate of urinary infection caused by resistant coliform organisms in that population.  (+info)

Intraperitoneal ciprofloxacin and rifampicin versus cephradine as initial treatment of (C)APD-related peritonitis: a prospective randomized multicenter comparison (CIPPER trial). (3/52)

OBJECTIVE: The initial treatment of peritonitis has evolved from single-agent to combination regimens. The initial response rates improved with these newer regimens but relapsing peritonitis continues to occur. For biofilm-embedded or intracellularly sequestrated bacteria, a combination of intracellularly- and biofilm-active agents such as ciprofloxacin and rifampicin might be beneficial. Many Dutch centers continue to use cephradine as initial treatment, claiming clinically adequate responses with this regimen. We compared the impact of these two regimens on outcome in patients who developed a new episode of peritonitis. DESIGN: Prospective randomized open trial. SETTING: Multicenter study including 14 Dutch dialysis units. PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS: From October 1996 to October 1999, 367 patients from 14 centers were randomized to be treated with ciprofloxacin + rifampicin (CR; each 50 mg/L) or cephradine (C; 250 mg/L) in case of peritonitis. Of these 367 patients, 98 developed peritonitis, 44 of whom were treated with CR and 54 with C. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical response, divided into early (during the 2 weeks of therapy) and late (including the following 4 weeks) response. Success was defined as disappearance of all signs and symptoms by days 4-6, through day 42. Bacteriological response was either success (eradication) or failure (persistence, superinfection, or eradication with relapse/reinfection). RESULTS: The groups were comparable for age, sex, duration of continuous ambulatory/automated peritoneal dialysis, and occurrence of diabetes. Bacteriological cultures in both groups revealed predominantly gram-positive micro-organisms. Initial and late clinical successes were obtained in 27/54 and 20/54 episodes (50% and 37%) in the C group, and 33/44 and 28/44 episodes (75% and 63.6%) in the CR group (p = 0.021 and p = 0.019). Bacteriological success occurred in 29.6% in the C group, and in 59.1% in the CR group (p= 0.026), with failure in 46.3% and 18.2%, respectively. Peritonitis episodes were bacteriologically not evaluable in 24.1% of episodes in the C group and 22.7% of episodes in the CR group, due mostly to no growth in the initial culture. CONCLUSION: The CIPPER Trial showed ciprofloxacin + rifampicin to be superior to cephradine as empiric treatment of peritonitis.  (+info)

Prolonged intestinal absorption of cephradine with chitosan-coated ethylcellulose microparticles in rats. (4/52)

Cephradine-containing ethylcellulose microparticles (MPC) were prepared by the solvent evaporation method. Chitosan-coated MPC (Chi-MPC) were prepared by doping MPC with viscous chitosan solution and subsequently drying. When fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled chitosan-coated ethylcellulose microparticles without drug were administered intraduodenally, they moved slowly in the intestine, that is, most of them were retained at the upper and middle parts of the small intestine for more than 8 h, which is considered due to mucoadhesive properties of coated chitosan. When MPC and Chi-MPC was incubated at 37 degrees C in the JP 14 second fluid, pH 6.8, both released the drug slowly with similar release rates. Cephradine solution and suspension, MPC and Chi-MPC were administered intraduodenally to investigate intestinal drug absorption. Only Chi-MPC suppressed the initial plasma level and maintained the plasma concentration for a long time up to 24 h, suggesting Chi-MPC would be useful for prolonged intestinal absorption of cephradine.  (+info)

Is antibiotic penetration compromised in the ischaemic tissues of patients undergoing amputation? (5/52)

Antibiotic prophylaxis is indicated for patients undergoing amputation for severe ischaemia or gangrene. However, the adequacy of tissue levels of antibiotics in ischaemic tissue is not known. In this study the serum and tissue antibiotic levels were measured after intravenous administration of metronidazole (15 mg/kg body weight) and cephradine (20 mg/kg body weight). In 11 patients, venous samples were taken at time 0 (induction of anaesthesia) 10, 30 and 60 min. Samples of 2 g each of fat and muscle were collected from the amputation site and three distal sites. Metronidazole and cephradine levels were measured and the degree of limb ischaemia estimated preoperatively by an isotope limb blood flow method. Our results indicate that both metronidazole and cephradine penetrate ischaemic tissues to levels equivalent of a Mean Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) 50 for most organisms encountered in vascular surgery, and that the degree of ischaemia does not alter this.  (+info)

Occupational contact allergy to cephalosporins. (6/52)

Contact sensitivity to systemically administered drugs occurs mainly among healthcare workers and is frequently caused by antibiotics. A 32-year-old nurse presented with a 1(1/2) year history of hand dermatitis and a 2 month history of palpebral eczema, which were clearly work related. Patch tests with standard and gloves series were negative. Testing of the products commonly handled by the patient were positive for cefradine and cefazolin. Testing of other cephalosporins the patient had not come in contact with were also positive for cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and cefotaxime. This cross-reactivity may be explained by similar molecular structures. The patient stopped preparing cephalosporin solutions for systemic administration and the lesions cleared.  (+info)

Comparative study of cephradine and amoxicillin-clavulanate in the treatment of recurrent urinary tract infections. (7/52)

Eighty-eight female patients with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections were treated according to a randomization scheme with either 1 g of cephradine every 12 h (47 patients) or 375 mg of amoxicillin-clavulanate every 8 h (41 patients) for 7 days. The treatments were equally effective (cure rates of 89% for cephradine and 88% for amoxicillin-clavulanate) and showed similar relapse rates (cephradine, 14%; amoxicillin-clavulanate, 11%). Adverse effects were similar in both groups (cephradine, 23%; amoxicillin-clavulanate, 22%).  (+info)

Comparison of in vitro activity of cephalexin, cephradine, and cefaclor. (8/52)

Inhibitory activity of cephalexin, cephradine, and cefaclor was compared by the WHO-ICS agar dilution technique. Cefaclor was substantially more active against staphylococci, streptococci, gonococci, meningococci, Haemophilus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter diversus, Proteus mirabilis, salmonellae, and shigellae than was cephalexin, which in turn was more active than cephradine. Cefaclor appeared to be less resistant to staphylococcal penicillinase than did the other two agents. None of these cephalosporins was active against Enterobacter, Serratia, indole-positive Proteeae, Pseudomonas, or Bacteroides fragilis.  (+info)

Cephradine is a type of antibiotic known as a first-generation cephalosporin. It is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections, including respiratory tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, bone and joint infections, and genitourinary tract infections. Cephradine works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, which leads to the death of the bacteria.

Cephradine is available in oral (by mouth) and intravenous (into a vein) forms. Common side effects of cephradine include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. More serious side effects can occur, such as allergic reactions, seizures, and severe skin reactions. It is important to take cephradine exactly as directed by a healthcare professional and to inform them of any medical conditions or medications being taken that could interact with the antibiotic.

Cephalexin is a type of antibiotic known as a first-generation cephalosporin. It works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, which is essential for its survival. Without a functional cell wall, the bacterial cells become unstable and eventually die.

Cephalexin is effective against a wide range of gram-positive and some gram-negative bacteria, making it a useful antibiotic for treating various types of infections, such as respiratory tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, bone and joint infections, and urinary tract infections.

Like all antibiotics, cephalexin should be used only to treat bacterial infections, as it has no effect on viral infections. It is important to take the full course of treatment as directed by a healthcare professional, even if symptoms improve before the medication is finished, to ensure that the infection is fully treated and to reduce the risk of antibiotic resistance.

Common side effects of cephalexin include nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach pain. In rare cases, more serious side effects such as allergic reactions, severe skin rashes, or liver damage may occur. It is important to seek medical attention immediately if any signs of an allergic reaction or serious side effect are experienced while taking cephalexin.

Cephalosporins are a class of antibiotics that are derived from the fungus Acremonium, originally isolated from seawater and cow dung. They have a similar chemical structure to penicillin and share a common four-membered beta-lactam ring in their molecular structure.

Cephalosporins work by inhibiting the synthesis of bacterial cell walls, which ultimately leads to bacterial death. They are broad-spectrum antibiotics, meaning they are effective against a wide range of bacteria, including both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms.

There are several generations of cephalosporins, each with different spectra of activity and pharmacokinetic properties. The first generation cephalosporins have a narrow spectrum of activity and are primarily used to treat infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

Second-generation cephalosporins have an expanded spectrum of activity that includes some Gram-negative organisms, such as Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. Third-generation cephalosporins have even broader spectra of activity and are effective against many resistant Gram-negative bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

Fourth-generation cephalosporins have activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms, including some that are resistant to other antibiotics. They are often reserved for the treatment of serious infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

Cephalosporins are generally well tolerated, but like penicillin, they can cause allergic reactions in some individuals. Cross-reactivity between cephalosporins and penicillin is estimated to occur in 5-10% of patients with a history of penicillin allergy. Other potential adverse effects include gastrointestinal symptoms (such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea), neurotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Cephaloglycin" is not a recognized or established medical term or drug name. It seems that there might be a misunderstanding or a spelling mistake in your query. Cephalosporins are a group of antibiotics commonly used to treat various bacterial infections, but I cannot find any specific information related to "Cephaloglycin." If you have more context or details, I'd be happy to help further.

Cefadroxil is a type of antibiotic known as a cephalosporin. It works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, which is necessary for its survival. Without a functional cell wall, the bacteria eventually die. Cefadroxil is used to treat a variety of infections caused by bacteria, including skin infections, ear infections, and urinary tract infections.

Cefadroxil is available as a prescription medication and is typically taken by mouth in the form of a tablet or liquid suspension. It is usually taken one to two times a day, depending on the severity of the infection and the individual patient's needs.

As with all antibiotics, it is important to take cefadroxil exactly as directed by your healthcare provider and to finish the entire course of treatment, even if you start to feel better. This will help ensure that the infection is fully treated and reduce the risk of the bacteria becoming resistant to the antibiotic.

Some common side effects of cefadroxil include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach pain. In rare cases, more serious side effects may occur, such as an allergic reaction or severe skin reactions. If you experience any unusual symptoms while taking cefadroxil, it is important to contact your healthcare provider right away.

Cephaloridine is a type of antibiotic that belongs to the class of cephalosporins. It is used for treating various bacterial infections, including respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, bone and joint infections, and septicemia.

Cephaloridine works by inhibiting the synthesis of the bacterial cell wall, leading to bacterial death. It is administered intramuscularly or intravenously and is known for its broad-spectrum activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. However, due to its potential nephrotoxicity (kidney toxicity), it has largely been replaced by other antibiotics with similar spectra of activity but better safety profiles.

It's important to note that the use of cephaloridine should be reserved for infections caused by bacteria that are resistant to other antibiotics, and its administration should be closely monitored by a healthcare professional to minimize the risk of adverse effects.

Cyclohexanes are organic compounds that consist of a six-carbon ring arranged in a cyclic structure, with each carbon atom joined to two other carbon atoms by single bonds. This gives the molecule a shape that resembles a hexagonal ring. The carbons in the ring can be saturated, meaning that they are bonded to hydrogen atoms, or they can contain double bonds between some of the carbon atoms.

Cyclohexanes are important intermediates in the production of many industrial and consumer products, including plastics, fibers, dyes, and pharmaceuticals. They are also used as solvents and starting materials for the synthesis of other organic compounds.

One of the most well-known properties of cyclohexane is its ability to exist in two different conformations: a "chair" conformation and a "boat" conformation. In the chair conformation, the carbon atoms are arranged in such a way that they form a puckered ring, with each carbon atom bonded to two other carbons and two hydrogens. This conformation is more stable than the boat conformation, in which the carbon atoms form a flattened, saddle-shaped ring.

Cyclohexanes are relatively nonpolar and have low water solubility, making them useful as solvents for nonpolar substances. They also have a relatively high boiling point compared to other hydrocarbons of similar molecular weight, due to the fact that they can form weak intermolecular forces called London dispersion forces.

Cyclohexane is a flammable liquid with a mild, sweet odor. It is classified as a hazardous substance and should be handled with care. Exposure to cyclohexane can cause irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, and prolonged exposure can lead to more serious health effects, including neurological damage.

SKC sold only two cephalosporins-Ancef and Anspor (cephradine). Lilly dominated the cephalosporin market with its sales of ...
... (INN) or cephradine (BAN) is a first generation cephalosporin antibiotic. Respiratory tract infections (such as ... Cephradine, Ceponin, Lacef, Licef-A, Lisacef, Lofadine, Recef, S-60, Sefree, Sephros, Topcef, Tydine, Unifradine, and U-Save UK ... cephradine (5). The antibiotic is produced under many brand names across the world. Bangladesh: Ancef, Ancef forte, Aphrin, ... Cephradine, Kebili, Saifuding, Shen You, Taididing, Velosef, Xianyi, and Xindadelei Colombia: Cefagram, Cefrakov, Cefranil , ...
... usually oxacillin sodium or cephradine, and assert that surgery and drainage are unnecessary.: p. 609 Wilson-MacDonald argues ...
... cephradine MeSH D02.065.589.099.249.210 - cephaloridine MeSH D02.065.589.099.249.210.150 - ceftazidime MeSH D02.065.589.099. ...
Detailed drug Information for Jantoven. Includes common brand names, drug descriptions, warnings, side effects and dosing information.
Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is one of the porphyrias, a group of diseases involving defects in heme metabolism and that results in excessive secretion of porphyrins and porphyrin precursors. AIP manifests itself by abdomen pain, neuropathies, and constipation, but, unlike most types of porphyria, patients with AIP do not have a rash.
SKC sold only two cephalosporins-Ancef and Anspor (cephradine). Lilly dominated the cephalosporin market with its sales of ...
Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is one of the porphyrias, a group of diseases involving defects in heme metabolism and that results in excessive secretion of porphyrins and porphyrin precursors. AIP manifests itself by abdomen pain, neuropathies, and constipation, but, unlike most types of porphyria, patients with AIP do not have a rash.
CEPHRADINE 06170 CERUMENEX 06175 CERYLIN 06210 CETAPHIL 06215 CETAPRED 06294 CHEMOTHERAPY 40335 CHEMSTRIP UGK 06400 CHLOR- ...
CEPHRADINE 06170 CERUMENEX 06175 CERYLIN 06210 CETAPHIL 06215 CETAPRED 05895 CATAPRES 05955 CECLOR 05995 CEFAZOLIN 05990 CEFOL ... CEPHRADINE 06170 CERUMENEX 06175 CERYLIN 06210 CETAPHIL 06215 CETAPRED 06294 CHEMOTHERAPY 40335 CHEMSTRIP UGK 06400 CHLOR- ...
Cephradine (38821-53-3). * HPMC/Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose (9004-65-3). * Kit tat-Test tal-Glycohemoglobin A1c ( HbA1c).. ...
Keftab, which contains the antibiotics Cephalexin, Cephradine, Benzylpenicillin, and Cefadroxil, is a commonly prescribed ...
Cephradine. Imprint. biocraft 113. Strength. 500 MG. Color. Green. Shape. Capsule-shape. Availability. Prescription only. Pill ... This green capsule-shape pill with imprint biocraft 113 on it has been identified as: Cephradine 500 MG. ... This medicine is known as cephradine. It is available as a prescription only medicine and is commonly used for Bacterial ...
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Cephradine 500 mg capsule. 6 capsules/strip. Healthcare Pharmaceuticals Ltd.. Product Information ...
Cephradine. 250 mg ANTIBIOTIC. CAPSULE. BLISTER/ALU ALU. Cephradine. 500 mg ANTIBIOTIC. CAPSULE. BLISTER/ALU ALU. ...
Hereditary coproporphyria is one of the porphyrias, a group of diseases that involves defects in heme metabolism and that results in excessive secretion of porphyrins and porphyrin precursors. Inheritance is autosomal (usually autosomal dominant, but sometimes autosomal recessive).
Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is one of the porphyrias, a group of diseases involving defects in heme metabolism and that results in excessive secretion of porphyrins and porphyrin precursors. AIP manifests itself by abdomen pain, neuropathies, and constipation, but, unlike most types of porphyria, patients with AIP do not have a rash.
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I am a breastfeeding mother and i want to know if it is safe to use Cloxacillin? Does Cloxacillin has any short or long term side effects on infant?
cephradine (Velosef).. To make sure cefprozil is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:. * kidney disease; ...
Cephradine Susc Islt Code System Concept Status. Published. Code System Preferred Concept Name. Cephradine [Susceptibility]. ...
Cephradine (as monohydrate)......250mg. (USP Specifications). Velo 500mg Capsule Capsules : 12 Capsules. Each hard geletin ...
Cefrag;Cefradin Cephradine. CAS:. 38821-53-3. MF:. C16H19N3O4S. ...
Antimicrobials were prescribed in 95%; cephradine and ivermectin were the most frequent. About 51% presented infectious ... Antimicrobials were prescribed in 95%; cephradine and ivermectin were the most frequent. About 51% presented infectious ...
Cephradine D2.886.675.966.500.249.200.185 D2.886.665.74.200.185. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.200.185. Cerebellar Cortex A8.186. ...
Cephradine D2.886.675.966.500.249.200.185 D2.886.665.74.200.185. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.200.185. Cerebellar Cortex A8.186. ...
Cephradine is a first-generation cephalosporin antibiotic used to treat infectious diseases caused by bacteria such as upper ... In Vitro Comparative Quality Evaluation of Some Brands of Cephradine Capsules Available in Selected Community Pharmacies in ...
  • Cephradine is a first-generation cephalosporin antibiotic used to treat infectious diseases caused by bacteria such as upper respiratory infections, ear infections, skin infections, and urinary tract infections. (edu.bd)
  • Limited information indicates cephradine produces low levels in milk that are not expected to cause adverse effects in breastfed infants. (nih.gov)