A condition in which the HEAD of the FETUS is larger than the mother's PELVIS through which the fetal head must pass during a vaginal delivery.
Measurement of the dimensions and capacity of the pelvis. It includes cephalopelvimetry (measurement of fetal head size in relation to maternal pelvic capacity), a prognostic guide to the management of LABOR, OBSTETRIC associated with disproportion.
Removal of the fetus from the uterus or vagina at or near the end of pregnancy with a metal traction cup that is attached to the fetus' head. Negative pressure is applied and traction is made on a chain passed through the suction tube. (From Stedman, 26th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
A heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by the early onset of hypotonia, developmental delay of motor skills, non-progressive weakness. Each of these disorders is associated with a specific histologic muscle fiber abnormality.
A diminution of the skeletal muscle tone marked by a diminished resistance to passive stretching.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.
A term used to describe pregnancies that exceed the upper limit of a normal gestational period. In humans, a prolonged pregnancy is defined as one that extends beyond 42 weeks (294 days) after the first day of the last menstrual period (MENSTRUATION), or birth with gestational age of 41 weeks or more.
An infant born at or after 42 weeks of gestation.

Rising trend and indications of caesarean section at the university of Maiduguri teaching hospital, Nigeria. (1/5)

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Vaginal birth after cesarean for cephalopelvic disproportion: effect of birth weight difference on success. (2/5)

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The active management of impending cephalopelvic disproportion in nulliparous women at term: a case series. (3/5)

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Short stature as an independent risk factor for cephalopelvic disproportion in a country of relatively small-sized mothers. (4/5)

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Rise in cesarean section rate over a 20-year period in a public sector hospital in northern Thailand. (5/5)

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Cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) is a medical condition that occurs when the baby's head or body is too large to pass safely through the mother's pelvis during childbirth. This condition can make vaginal delivery difficult or impossible, and may require a cesarean section (C-section) to deliver the baby.

CPD can be caused by several factors, including the size and shape of the mother's pelvis, the size and position of the baby, and medical conditions such as diabetes or obesity that can cause the baby to grow larger than average. CPD is typically diagnosed during labor when progress has stalled despite strong contractions, and the baby's head is not descending into the pelvis.

If CPD is suspected, the healthcare provider will typically perform a physical examination to assess the size and position of the baby and the shape and size of the mother's pelvis. Imaging tests such as ultrasound or X-ray may also be used to help make the diagnosis. If CPD is confirmed, the healthcare provider will discuss the risks and benefits of different delivery options with the mother and develop a plan for safe delivery.

Pelvimetry is a medical measurement and evaluation of the size and shape of the pelvis, which can be performed in several ways:

1. Clinical pelvimetry: This involves physical examination to assess the dimensions of the pelvis by palpation and measurement of the distance between bony landmarks.
2. Radiological pelvimetry: This uses X-ray or CT imaging to obtain more accurate measurements of the pelvic diameters, including the anteroposterior, transverse, and oblique dimensions.
3. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pelvimetry: This method is considered the most accurate for assessing the size and shape of the pelvis, as it provides detailed images without radiation exposure.

Pelvimetry is often used in obstetrics to evaluate whether a woman's pelvis can accommodate a fetus during childbirth (known as "obstetric pelvimetry"). It helps healthcare providers determine if a vaginal delivery is possible or if a cesarean section may be necessary. However, the use of pelvimetry in modern obstetrics has become less common due to its limited predictive value and the increasing focus on individualized birth management.

Vacuum extraction, obstetrical is a medical procedure used during childbirth to help deliver the baby when there are signs of fetal distress or if the mother is experiencing exhaustion during labor. This assisted delivery technique involves the application of suction through a vacuum device that attaches to the baby's head, allowing the healthcare provider to gently pull the baby out as the mother pushes.

The vacuum extractor consists of a soft or rigid cup connected to a pump, which creates negative pressure inside the cup. The cup is placed on the fetal scalp and engaged during a contraction when the cervix is fully dilated and the baby's head has descended into the pelvis. The healthcare provider then uses controlled traction to help deliver the baby while monitoring both the mother and the infant for any signs of distress or complications.

Vacuum extraction should only be performed by experienced healthcare providers, as it carries risks such as scalp trauma, cephalohematoma (a collection of blood under the skin on the baby's head), subgaleal hematoma (a more serious type of bleeding beneath the scalp), and intracranial hemorrhage (bleeding inside the skull). Proper evaluation, technique, and monitoring are crucial to minimize these risks and ensure a safe delivery for both mother and baby.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Congenital structural myopathies are a group of inherited genetic disorders that affect the structure and function of skeletal muscles. These conditions are present at birth or develop in early infancy and are caused by genetic mutations that lead to abnormalities in the muscle contractile apparatus, including the sarcomere, muscle filaments, and muscle membrane.

The structural abnormalities can affect the muscle fibers' ability to generate force, leading to muscle weakness, hypotonia (low muscle tone), and other symptoms. The severity of the condition can vary widely, from mild to severe, depending on the specific type of myopathy and the extent of muscle involvement.

Examples of congenital structural myopathies include:

1. Congenital fiber-type disproportion (CFTD): a condition characterized by small, atrophic type 1 muscle fibers and normal or enlarged type 2 fibers.
2. Central core disease (CCD): a condition caused by mutations in the ryanodine receptor gene, which leads to the formation of abnormal structures called cores within the muscle fibers.
3. Nemaline myopathy: a condition characterized by the presence of rod-shaped structures called nemalines in the muscle fibers.
4. Myotubular myopathy: a condition caused by mutations in the myotubularin gene, which leads to abnormalities in the muscle fiber nuclei and weakened muscle function.
5. Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD): a group of conditions characterized by muscle weakness, hypotonia, and joint contractures, often associated with structural abnormalities in the muscle membrane or extracellular matrix.

Diagnosis of congenital structural myopathies typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, genetic testing, and muscle biopsy. Treatment is generally supportive and may include physical therapy, orthotics, and assistive devices to help manage symptoms and improve function. In some cases, medications or surgical interventions may be necessary to address specific complications.

Muscle hypotonia, also known as decreased muscle tone, refers to a condition where the muscles appear to be flaccid or lacking in tension and stiffness. This results in reduced resistance to passive movements, making the limbs feel "floppy" or "like a rag doll." It can affect any muscle group in the body and can be caused by various medical conditions, including neurological disorders, genetic diseases, and injuries to the nervous system. Hypotonia should not be confused with muscle weakness, which refers to the inability to generate normal muscle strength.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

The pelvic bones, also known as the hip bones, are a set of three irregularly shaped bones that connect to form the pelvic girdle in the lower part of the human body. They play a crucial role in supporting the spine and protecting the abdominal and pelvic organs.

The pelvic bones consist of three bones:

1. The ilium: This is the largest and uppermost bone, forming the majority of the hip bone and the broad, flaring part of the pelvis known as the wing of the ilium or the iliac crest, which can be felt on the side of the body.
2. The ischium: This is the lower and back portion of the pelvic bone that forms part of the sitting surface or the "sit bones."
3. The pubis: This is the front part of the pelvic bone, which connects to the other side at the pubic symphysis in the midline of the body.

The pelvic bones are joined together at the acetabulum, a cup-shaped socket that forms the hip joint and articulates with the head of the femur (thigh bone). The pelvic bones also have several openings for the passage of blood vessels, nerves, and reproductive and excretory organs.

The shape and size of the pelvic bones differ between males and females due to their different roles in childbirth and locomotion. Females typically have a wider and shallower pelvis than males to accommodate childbirth, while males usually have a narrower and deeper pelvis that is better suited for weight-bearing and movement.

Prolonged pregnancy, also known as post-term pregnancy, is a medical condition defined as a pregnancy that continues beyond 42 weeks (294 days) of gestation from the first day of the last menstrual period. It is important to note that this definition is based on the estimated date of delivery and not the actual conception date. Prolonged pregnancies are associated with increased risks for both the mother and the fetus, including stillbirth, meconium aspiration, fetal distress, and difficulty during labor and delivery. Therefore, healthcare providers closely monitor pregnant women who reach 41 weeks of gestation to ensure timely delivery if necessary.

A postmature infant is a newborn who is delivered at or after 42 weeks (294 days) of gestation. These infants are also known as "post-term" or "post-dates." At this stage, the placenta may not function optimally, leading to potential issues such as decreased fetal movement, meconium staining of amniotic fluid, and low birth weight. Postmature infants may require close monitoring and evaluation after delivery to ensure their well-being.

... (CPD) exists when the capacity of the pelvis is inadequate to allow the fetus to negotiate the ... "Cephalopelvic Disproportion (CPD): Causes and Diagnosis". American Pregnancy Association. 26 April 2012. Retrieved 2016-03-22. ... Theoretically, pelvimetry may identify cephalo-pelvic disproportion. However, a woman's pelvis loosens up before birth (with ... "Maternal height and external pelvimetry to predict cephalopelvic disproportion in nulliparous African women: a cohort study". ...
This is called cephalopelvic disproportion. Caesarean sections are encouraged if this happens. Complications include bleeding, ...
Cephalopelvic disproportion is the issue that arises when the fetus' body or head is too large to pass through the woman's ... "Cephalopelvic Disproportion (CPD): Causes and Diagnosis". American Pregnancy Association. 2012-04-26. Retrieved 2018-12-06. ( ... and cephalopelvic disproportion. Both fetal malpresentation and cervical dystocia may result in obstructed labor. The cause of ...
Consequently, there is a usually high incidence of cephalopelvic disproportion and obstructed labor in humans. The obstetrical ...
"Cephalopelvic disproportion is associated with an altered uterine contraction shape in the active phase of labor". American ...
... cephalopelvic disproportion, and polyhydramnios. In an uncomplicated face presentation duration of labor is not altered. ...
In obstetrics a trial of labour is the conduction of spontaneous labour in a moderate degree of cephalopelvic disproportion. It ...
It can theoretically identify cephalo-pelvic disproportion, which is when the capacity of the pelvis is inadequate to allow the ... Theoretically, pelvimetry may identify cephalo-pelvic disproportion, which is when the capacity of the pelvis is inadequate to ...
... labor can be induced after assessing the favorability of the cervix and excluding cephalo-pelvic disproportions. Otherwise ...
Risk factors associated with this injury include cephalopelvic disproportion, rapid second stage of labor, epidural anesthesia ... Risk factors associated with the condition have been identified and include cephalopelvic disproportion, large fetuses, ...
... and cephalopelvic disproportion (a small pelvis or large infant). Prolonged labour may result in maternal exhaustion, fetal ...
... abortion abruption breech birth cephalo-pelvic disproportion caesarean section, cesarean section, C-section dermatoses of ...
... cephalopelvic disproportion MeSH C13.703.420.288 - dystocia MeSH C13.703.420.288.728 - uterine inertia MeSH C13.703.420.339 - ...
Cephalo-pelvic disproportion, the quick and rapid delivery, delayed and prolonged delivery, the abnormal birth position, ...
... and cephalopelvic disproportion (a small pelvis or large infant). Prolonged labour may result in maternal exhaustion, fetal ...
... a pathological condition Cephalopelvic disproportion, when the capacity of the pelvis is inadequate to allow the fetus to ...
... have cephalopelvic disproportion, less than six previous term babies with nonvertex presentation, hyper or hypotonic uterine ...
Included in these observations are other complications related to delivery such as cephalopelvic disproportion, which is a ... Cephalopelvis disproportion is most common in younger women. Many of these risks are higher among younger females, and a more ... such as cephalopelvis disproportion, than adolescents, while being at higher risk for other labor complications. Promiscuity in ...
... yet the proportion of those of them who developed cephalopelvic disproportion and needed operative delivery, fell sharply. This ...
Oxytocin injection (synthetic) is contraindicated in any of these conditions: Substantial cephalopelvic disproportion ...
Cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) exists when the capacity of the pelvis is inadequate to allow the fetus to negotiate the ... "Cephalopelvic Disproportion (CPD): Causes and Diagnosis". American Pregnancy Association. 26 April 2012. Retrieved 2016-03-22. ... Theoretically, pelvimetry may identify cephalo-pelvic disproportion. However, a womans pelvis loosens up before birth (with ... "Maternal height and external pelvimetry to predict cephalopelvic disproportion in nulliparous African women: a cohort study". ...
Jacobs law firm for assistance in medical malpractice and cephalopelvic disproportion suits. Free consultation (203) 777-2300 ... Cephalopelvic Disproportion Injuries. Cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) is a relatively common labor complication in which the ... How Jacobs & Jacobs Handles Cases of Cephalopelvic Disproportion Injuries. Typically, cephalopelvic disproportion is detected ...
Cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) is a condition that occurs when there is a size discrepancy between the maternal pelvis and ... What is Cephalopelvic Disproportion (CPD)?. Cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) is a birth injury or condition that occurs when ... Though the causes of cephalopelvic disproportion vary, both of these risks are still endemic to cephalopelvic disproportion, as ... dramatically increased in the event that cephalopelvic disproportion is a known condition. Cephalopelvic disproportion presents ...
... cephalopelvic disproportion; previous difficult or traumatic deliveries; unexplained vaginal bleeding; or heart, liver, or ...
Cephalopelvic disproportion--The relationship of the size, presentation and position of the fetal head to the maternal pelvis ... Cephalopelvic disproportion, Cord prolapse, Anesthetic complications, Fetal distress, Other complications of labor and/or ...
No disproportion should be suspected between the size of the head and the size of the pelvic inlet and mid pelvis. ... Confirmed cephalopelvic disproportion. * Unsuccessful trial of vacuum extraction (relative contraindication). * Absence of ...
Cephalopelvic disproportion.--The relationship of the size, presentation and position of the fetal head to the maternal pelvis ... Cephalopelvic disproportion 272 1 CORD Cord prolapse 273 1 ANESTHE Anesthetic complications 274 1 DISTRESS Fetal distress 275 1 ...
Evidence or clinical suspicion of marked cephalopelvic disproportion. *Conditions for which induction of labor is ...
Cephalopelvic disproportion NOS*Disproportion of mixed maternal and fetal origin, with normally formed fetus ... Fetopelvic disproportion. *There are 3 ICD-9-CM codes below 653.4 that define this diagnosis in greater detail. Do not use this ... deformity (bone) - see also Deformity, pelvis, with disproportion*. soft tissue 654.9. *. causing obstructed labor 660.2. ...
Cephalopelvic disproportion must be considered when progress is slow. Intrapartum X-ray pelvimetry has not proven to be useful ... If the membranes are still intact during labour slow progress is usually not caused by disproportion. Expectant management ... is available about expectant management versus active management in case of slow progress without signs of disproportion, no ...
Significant cephalopelvic disproportion. Unfavorable fetal positions or presentations, eg, transverse lies,which are ... Fetal distress, polyhydramnios, partial placenta previa, prematurity, borderline cephalopelvic disproportion, previous major ...
Failing to identify and act on cephalopelvic disproportion. This is where the babys head is too large, or the mothers pelvis ...
clinical suspicion of cephalopelvic disproportion. * 2. previous caesarean section. * 3. brow or face presentation ...
Detection of cephalopelvic disproportion using a virtual reality model: a feasibility study of three cases]. J Radiol. 2011;92 ... However, two of the seven patients developed clinical cephalopelvic dystocia requiring C-section for delivery (patients 3 and 7 ... dedicated to studying the process of birth by cephalopelvic confrontation, with libraries of models and fetal behaviors inside ...
Maternal short stature is a risk factor for caesarean delivery, and largely related to cephalopelvic disproportion (53). It is ...
passenger: big baby, malposition, cephalopelvic disproportion. **passage: trauma, shape, disproportion. *maternal sepsis, PPH, ...
The patient is a primigravida with strong, painful contractions and no signs of cephalopelvic disproportion. Chalcedony is a ...
Its main cause is spontaneous rupture due to cephalopelvic disproportion and malpresentations resulting in an obstructed labour ...
Another possible reason lumbosacral pain occurs is cephalo-pelvic disproportion, which exerts pressure on the sacral nerves and ...
Cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) is what doctors call the condition when the fetal head is too big compared with the size of ...
... such as cephalopelvic disproportion, grand multiparity, hypertonic or hyperactive uterine patterns, or fetal distress where ...
Arulkumaran S: Malpresentation, malposition, cephalopelvic disproportion and obstetric procedures. Dewhursts Textbook of ...
Cephalopelvic Disproportion. In some cases, the mothers pelvis is unusually narrow or the babys skull is unusually large. ... Depending on the level of cephalopelvic disproportion, a traditional birth may not be safe or appropriate, and a C-section may ...
Maternal height and age: Risk factors for cephalopelvic disproportion in Zimbabwe. Int. J. Epidemiol. 21(5):941-946. ... Relations between maternal height, fetal birthweight, and cephalopelvic disproportion suggest that young Nigerian primigravidae ... because of cephalopelvic disproportion (Tsu, 1992). Given the relatively low rate of stunting among women in Sub-Saharan Africa ... the lack of access to timely medical intervention for cephalopelvic disproportion and prolonged labor puts women with ...
... to describe how the size of the female pelvis influences cranial capacity through avoidance of cephalopelvic disproportion ...
Cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) Definition. July 21, 2022. June 3, 2022. Cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) is a medical ...
  • Theoretically, pelvimetry may identify cephalo-pelvic disproportion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its main cause is spontaneous rupture due to cephalopelvic disproportion and malpresentations resulting in an obstructed labour [2]. (who.int)
  • Its main cause is spontaneous hospital in Dohuk in the Kurdistan region rupture due to cephalopelvic disproportion of Iraq. (who.int)
  • Cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) is a relatively common labor complication in which the baby's head or shoulders are too large to pass through the mother's pelvis. (jacobs-jacobs.com)
  • Cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) is a birth injury or condition that occurs when there is a size discrepancy between the maternal pelvis and the fetal head such that the baby's head is too large to pass through the mother's pelvis. (beamlegalteam.com)
  • Cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) is a medical condition that can occur during pregnancy when the baby's head is too large to pass through the mother's pelvis. (birthformen.com)
  • Cephalopelvic disproportion occurs when the fetal head is too large, the maternal pelvis is too small, or the fetal head is malpositioned as it enters the birth canal, presenting a significant risk to both the mother and the child. (beamlegalteam.com)
  • Though problematic and potentially dangerous, diagnosing cephalopelvic disproportion can be difficult in the absence of extreme circumstances such as an abnormally small maternal pelvis or macrosomia (an abnormally large child), and often times it can only be identified by abnormalities in length of labor, abnormal fetal heart tones, or the presence of molding and/or caput during labor. (beamlegalteam.com)
  • Though the causes of cephalopelvic disproportion vary, both of these risks are still endemic to cephalopelvic disproportion, as the passage of the fetal head through a limited space can cause compressive forces to occur to the head itself as well as potentially cause the umbilical cord to be compressed in the event that it is trapped between the fetal head and the maternal pelvis during labor. (beamlegalteam.com)
  • Cephalopelvic disproportion presents a much higher degree of risk for fetal head compression, as the delicate fetal head must pass through a very unaccommodating maternal pelvis in addition to other potentially traumatic forces that are already present during labor. (beamlegalteam.com)
  • Umbilical cord compression is another dangerous condition that is often associated with cephalopelvic disproportion, as the potential for the umbilical cord to become trapped between the fetal head or body and the maternal pelvis is greatly increased when cephalopelvic disproportion is present. (beamlegalteam.com)
  • Ultrasonographic imaging and ultrasound examinations are both ways in which doctors can measure the size of the fetal head, and the assessment of the dimensions of the maternal pelvis through a process known as pelvimetry are important ways in which a physician may make a more accurate determination as to the existence of cephalopelvic disproportion. (beamlegalteam.com)
  • It includes cephalopelvimetry (measurement of fetal head size in relation to maternal pelvic capacity), a prognostic guide to the management of LABOR, OBSTETRIC associated with disproportion. (bvsalud.org)
  • Perhaps the most significant danger that cephalopelvic disproportion carries with it is the potential for compression of either the fetal head or the umbilical cord, both of which can have severe consequences for a child in labor. (beamlegalteam.com)
  • Though compression of the fetal head can occur as a result of other factors as well as in the absence of cephalopelvic disproportion, the risk is dramatically increased in the event that cephalopelvic disproportion is a known condition. (beamlegalteam.com)
  • Prolonged compression of the umbilical cord as a result of cephalopelvic disproportion can have severe consequences, as a lack of oxygen can lead to fetal asphyxia and potentially result in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, or 'HIE,' if the oxygen deprivation is too prolonged. (beamlegalteam.com)
  • Incluye la cefalopelvimetría (medida del tamaño de la cabeza fetal en relación con la capacidad pélvica materna), una guía pronóstica para el manejo del TRABAJO DE PARTO asociado a desproporción. (bvsalud.org)
  • Typically, cephalopelvic disproportion is detected through ultrasounds that gauge the girth of the baby's head and shoulders. (jacobs-jacobs.com)
  • Cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) exists when the capacity of the pelvis is inadequate to allow the fetus to negotiate the birth canal. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is not the first book or article to describe how the size of the female pelvis influences cranial capacity through avoidance of cephalopelvic disproportion during birth. (nhbs.com)
  • With such severe and potentially damaging risks involved, it is important the physicians take careful steps in order to determine whether cephalopelvic disproportion is present prior to attempting a vaginal delivery. (beamlegalteam.com)
  • Rafi was in the occiput transverse position (facing my hip) when they pulled him out, and the reasons for the c-section were given as cephalopelvic disproportion, failure to descend, and arrest of labor. (birthwithoutfearblog.com)
  • Depending on the level of cephalopelvic disproportion, a traditional birth may not be safe or appropriate, and a C-section may be preferred. (cerebralpalsysymptoms.com)
  • Though making an exact determination of cephalopelvic disproportion may be difficult prior to delivery, there are still many steps that doctors can take to gain a sense of the special dimensions that the baby will be navigating during labor in order to paint a clearer picture of what must be done to ensure a safe delivery and a healthy child. (beamlegalteam.com)
  • Malpresentation, malposition and cephalopelvic disproportion. (tcd.ie)
  • Of those women, 17% had a primary cesarean section (first-time cesarean section), with reasons including failure to progress (17 of 43), non-reassuring fetal tracing (11 of 43), malpresentation or breech (6 of 43), and cephalopelvic disproportion, variable fetal heart rate, and other (each 3 of 43). (grassrootshealth.net)
  • Dystocia may arise due to incoordinate uterine activity, abnormal fetal lie or presentation, absolute or relative cephalopelvic disproportion. (ajbm.net)
  • RÉSUMÉ La rupture de l'utérus est une urgence obstétrique grave qui met en danger la vie de la mère et du foetus. (who.int)
  • One of the causes for Erb's palsy is due to cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD), a condition that occurs when the infant is proportionately too large for the birth canal. (birthinjuryguide.org)
  • Cephalopelvic disproportion is also another medical condition that can cause a child to experience brain damage. (ricelawmd.com)
  • A mother may be diagnosed with cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) if the labor fails to progress. (hamptonking.com)
  • Arrested descent and cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) were diagnosed, a cesarean performed, and an 8-pound, 7-ounce baby delivered. (midwiferytoday.com)
  • If you or your child was harmed by medical negligence or malpractice related to cephalopelvic disproportion, turn to Hampton & King. (hamptonking.com)
  • A senior camp inmate Cannon Gap Road where the operation of the and lead a life so I got on by cephalopelvic disproportion and. (oui-be.com)