Set of instructions about how to prepare food for eating using specific instructions.
Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.
Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.
Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.
Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.
Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.
Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.
Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.
Drugs that are used to reduce body temperature in fever.
A plant species of the family EUPHORBIACEAE.
In the YIN-YANG system of philosophy and medicine, an insufficiency of body fluid (called yinxu), manifesting often as irritability, thirst, constipation, etc. (The Pinyin Chinese-English Dictionary, 1979).
Time period from 1401 through 1500 of the common era.
A plant genus of the family COMBRETACEAE. Members contain arjunin, an ellagitannin (TANNINS).
Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.
In the YIN-YANG system of philosophy and medicine, a lack of vital energy (called yangxu in Chinese). It manifests itself in various systemic and organic diseases. (The Pinyin Chinese-English Dictionary, 1979)
Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.
A product of the p16 tumor suppressor gene (GENES, P16). It is also called INK4 or INK4A because it is the prototype member of the INK4 CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITORS. This protein is produced from the alpha mRNA transcript of the p16 gene. The other gene product, produced from the alternatively spliced beta transcript, is TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P14ARF. Both p16 gene products have tumor suppressor functions.
Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.
The art or practice of preparing food. It includes the preparation of special foods for diets in various diseases.
A portion of the food eaten for the day, usually at regular occasions during the day.
A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain hinesol and atractylon. Atractylodes rhizome is Byaku-jutsu. A. lancea rhizome is So-jutsu.
An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.
The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.
A water-soluble extractive mixture of sulfated polysaccharides from RED ALGAE. Chief sources are the Irish moss CHONDRUS CRISPUS (Carrageen), and Gigartina stellata. It is used as a stabilizer, for suspending COCOA in chocolate manufacture, and to clarify BEVERAGES.
Formerly known as Siam, this is a Southeast Asian nation at the center of the Indochina peninsula. Bangkok is the capital city.
An INK4 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor containing four ANKYRIN-LIKE REPEATS. INK4B is often inactivated by deletions, mutations, or hypermethylation in HEMATOLOGIC NEOPLASMS.
Material prepared from plants.
A highly reactive aldehyde gas formed by oxidation or incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. In solution, it has a wide range of uses: in the manufacture of resins and textiles, as a disinfectant, and as a laboratory fixative or preservative. Formaldehyde solution (formalin) is considered a hazardous compound, and its vapor toxic. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p717)
A gene product of the p16 tumor suppressor gene (GENES, P16). It antagonizes the function of MDM2 PROTEIN (which regulates P53 TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN by targeting it for degradation). p14ARF is produced from the beta mRNA transcript of the p16 gene. The other gene product, produced from the alternatively spliced alpha transcript, is CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P16. Both p16 gene products have tumor suppressor functions.
An INK4 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor containing five ANKYRIN-LIKE REPEATS. Aberrant expression of this protein has been associated with deregulated EPITHELIAL CELL growth, organ enlargement, and a variety of NEOPLASMS.
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.
An INK4 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor containing five ANKYRIN REPEATS. Aberrant expression of this protein has been associated with TESTICULAR CANCER.
The period of history before 500 of the common era.
Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.
Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.
Tumor suppressor genes located on human chromosome 9 in the region 9p21. This gene is either deleted or mutated in a wide range of malignancies. (From Segen, Current Med Talk, 1995) Two alternatively spliced gene products are encoded by p16: CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P16 and TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P14ARF.
Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.
The decrease in the cell's ability to proliferate with the passing of time. Each cell is programmed for a certain number of cell divisions and at the end of that time proliferation halts. The cell enters a quiescent state after which it experiences CELL DEATH via the process of APOPTOSIS.
An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.
Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 is a key regulator of G1 PHASE of the CELL CYCLE. It partners with CYCLIN D to phosphorylate RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN. CDK4 activity is inhibited by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P16.
The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.
Cyclin-dependent kinase 6 associates with CYCLIN D and phosphorylates RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN during G1 PHASE of the CELL CYCLE. It helps regulate the transition to S PHASE and its kinase activity is inhibited by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P18.
Protein kinases that control cell cycle progression in all eukaryotes and require physical association with CYCLINS to achieve full enzymatic activity. Cyclin-dependent kinases are regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events.
The distinctly human attributes and attainments of a particular society.
The effect of GLOBAL WARMING and the resulting increase in world temperatures. The predicted health effects of such long-term climatic change include increased incidence of respiratory, water-borne, and vector-borne diseases.
Any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). It may result from natural factors such as changes in the sun's intensity, natural processes within the climate system such as changes in ocean circulation, or human activities.
The study of the development of an organism during the embryonic and fetal stages of life.
Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.
Product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene. It is a nuclear phosphoprotein hypothesized to normally act as an inhibitor of cell proliferation. Rb protein is absent in retinoblastoma cell lines. It also has been shown to form complexes with the adenovirus E1A protein, the SV40 T antigen, and the human papilloma virus E7 protein.
The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.
The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.
Addition of methyl groups to DNA. DNA methyltransferases (DNA methylases) perform this reaction using S-ADENOSYLMETHIONINE as the methyl group donor.
Bodies preserved either by the ancient Egyptian technique or due to chance under favorable climatic conditions.
Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible.
A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Graphic representations, especially of the face, of real persons, usually posed, living or dead. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II, p540, 1995)
Books containing photographs, prints, drawings, portraits, plates, diagrams, facsimiles, maps, tables, or other representations or systematic arrangement of data designed to elucidate or decorate its contents. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p114)
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.
The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)
The act or ceremony of putting a corpse into the ground or a vault, or into the sea; or the inurnment of CREMAINS.
The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.
A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.
A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.
The attempt to improve the PHENOTYPES of future generations of the human population by fostering the reproduction of those with favorable phenotypes and GENOTYPES and hampering or preventing BREEDING by those with "undesirable" phenotypes and genotypes. The concept is largely discredited. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.
The aggregate of various economic, political, and social policies by which an imperial power maintains or extends its control over other areas or peoples. It includes the practice of or belief in acquiring and retaining colonies. The emphasis is less on its identity as an ideological political system than on its designation in a period of history. (Webster, 3d ed; from Dr. J. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)
An acute infectious disease caused by YERSINIA PESTIS that affects humans, wild rodents, and their ectoparasites. This condition persists due to its firm entrenchment in sylvatic rodent-flea ecosystems throughout the world. Bubonic plague is the most common form.
A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.
The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.
Increase in the temperature of the atmosphere near the Earth's surface and in the troposphere, which can contribute to changes in global climate patterns.
A multisubunit polycomb protein complex with affinity for CHROMATIN that contains methylated HISTONE H3. It contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase activity that is specific for HISTONE H2A and works in conjunction with POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX 2 to effect EPIGENETIC REPRESSION.
Increase, over a specific period of time, in the number of individuals living in a country or region.
The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.
Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.
A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that mediates TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P53-dependent CELL CYCLE arrest. p21 interacts with a range of CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES and associates with PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN and CASPASE 3.
Residential treatment centers for individuals with leprosy.
The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.
Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.
A great expanse of continuous bodies of salt water which together cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface. Seas may be partially or entirely enclosed by land, and are smaller than the five oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic).
Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.
The separation or resolution of the psyche into its constituent elements. The term has two separate meanings: 1. a procedure devised by Sigmund Freud, for investigating mental processes by means of free association, dream interpretation and interpretation of resistance and transference manifestations; and 2. a theory of psychology developed by Freud from his clinical experience with hysterical patients. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996).
Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)
Projective tests utilizing ink blots to which a subject responds. They are used in personality diagnosis.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)
The period of history from 1601 of the common era to the present.
A large family of regulatory proteins that function as accessory subunits to a variety of CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES. They generally function as ENZYME ACTIVATORS that drive the CELL CYCLE through transitions between phases. A subset of cyclins may also function as transcriptional regulators.
Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)
Compositions written by hand, as one written before the invention or adoption of printing. A manuscript may also refer to a handwritten copy of an ancient author. A manuscript may be handwritten or typewritten as distinguished from a printed copy, especially the copy of a writer's work from which printed copies are made. (Webster, 3d ed)
Activities performed by humans.
The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.
The science devoted to the comparative study of man.
Water particles that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.
A body of stories, the origins of which may be unknown or forgotten, that serve to explain practices, beliefs, institutions or natural phenomena. Mythology includes legends and folk tales. It may refer to classical mythology or to a body of modern thought and modern life. (From Webster's 1st ed)
The indelible marking of TISSUES, primarily SKIN, by pricking it with NEEDLES to imbed various COLORING AGENTS. Tattooing of the CORNEA is done to colorize LEUKOMA spots.
Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.
The Christian faith, practice, or system of the Catholic Church, specifically the Roman Catholic, the Christian church that is characterized by a hierarchic structure of bishops and priests in which doctrinal and disciplinary authority are dependent upon apostolic succession, with the pope as head of the episcopal college. (From Webster, 3d ed; American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed)
An acquired blood vessel disorder caused by severe deficiency of vitamin C (ASCORBIC ACID) in the diet leading to defective collagen formation in small blood vessels. Scurvy is characterized by bleeding in any tissue, weakness, ANEMIA, spongy gums, and a brawny induration of the muscles of the calves and legs.
Variation in a population's DNA sequence that is detected by determining alterations in the conformation of denatured DNA fragments. Denatured DNA fragments are allowed to renature under conditions that prevent the formation of double-stranded DNA and allow secondary structure to form in single stranded fragments. These fragments are then run through polyacrylamide gels to detect variations in the secondary structure that is manifested as an alteration in migration through the gels.
Activities associated with the disposition of the dead. It excludes cultural practices such as funeral rites.
Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.
The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.
A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that coordinates the activation of CYCLIN and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES during the CELL CYCLE. It interacts with active CYCLIN D complexed to CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 4 in proliferating cells, while in arrested cells it binds and inhibits CYCLIN E complexed to CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 2.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.
The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.
The period of the CELL CYCLE preceding DNA REPLICATION in S PHASE. Subphases of G1 include "competence" (to respond to growth factors), G1a (entry into G1), G1b (progression), and G1c (assembly). Progression through the G1 subphases is effected by limiting growth factors, nutrients, or inhibitors.
DNA present in neoplastic tissue.
An area of water mostly surrounded by land, usually smaller than a gulf, and affording access to the sea.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Procedures, such as TISSUE CULTURE TECHNIQUES; mathematical models; etc., when used or advocated for use in place of the use of animals in research or diagnostic laboratories.
The comparative science dealing with the physical characteristics of humans as related to their origin, evolution, and development in the total environment.
The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)
The branch of science concerned with the means and consequences of transmission and generation of the components of biological inheritance. (Stedman, 26th ed)
Social process whereby the values, attitudes, or institutions of society, such as education, family, religion, and industry become modified. It includes both the natural process and action programs initiated by members of the community.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Tumor suppressor genes located on the short arm of human chromosome 17 and coding for the phosphoprotein p53.
An array of tests used to determine the toxicity of a substance to living systems. These include tests on clinical drugs, foods, and environmental pollutants.
The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.
Protein encoded by the bcl-1 gene which plays a critical role in regulating the cell cycle. Overexpression of cyclin D1 is the result of bcl-1 rearrangement, a t(11;14) translocation, and is implicated in various neoplasms.
The gaseous envelope surrounding a planet or similar body. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
Frozen water crystals that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.
Interruption or suppression of the expression of a gene at transcriptional or translational levels.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The field of biology which deals with the process of the growth and differentiation of an organism.
Tyrian or imperial purple, made from the ink glands of murex shells, "... fetched its weight in silver" in the fourth century ... Many recipes from around the world are based on molluscs from all three major orders. Among cephalopod recipes, both octopus ... Giant squid are described by Aristotle (4th century BC) in his History of Animals and Pliny the Elder (1st century AD) in his ... These amazing recipes include foie gras steamed clams and cavatelli with mussels, lillet, and dill. "Shellfish recipes". BBC. ...
"Cennini, a 15th century craftsman provides recipes to tint parchment a variety of colours including purple, indigo, green, red ... Powders and pastes of calcium compounds were also used to help remove grease so the ink would not run. To make the parchment ... See for example recipes in the Secretum Philosophorum *^ "Information Leaflet by Vaad Mishmereth Staam" (PDF). CC. Archived ... Herodotus mentions writing on skins as common in his time, the 5th century BC; and in his Histories (v.58) he states that the ...
... recipes for Chinese and Indian ink, a waterproof cream for the silk garments of underwater divers, and a cream specifically ... During the 11th century, the growth of the iron industry caused vast deforestation due to the use of charcoal in the smelting ... In a 9th-century Arab work Kitāb al-Khawāss al Kabīr, there are numerous products listed that were native to China, including ... A 10th-century silken banner from Dunhuang portrays the first artistic depiction of a fire lance, a prototype of the gun. The ...
About 1,600 years ago, a popular ink recipe was created. The recipe was used for centuries. Iron salts, such as ferrous sulfate ... Iron gall (common ink)[edit]. Main article: Iron gall ink. Iron gall inks became prominent in the early 12th century; they were ... One 12th century ink recipe called for hawthorn branches to be cut in the spring and left to dry. Then the bark was pounded ... Ink drawing of Ganesha under an umbrella (early 19th century). Ink, called masi, an admixture of several chemical components, ...
As a result of digital transformation, it is the predominant business model of the 21st century. In an op-ed on MarketWatch, ... Well-known business models can operate as "recipes" for creative managers. Business models are also referred to in some ... and ink cartridge refills (hook); and cameras (bait) and prints (hook). A variant of this model was employed by Adobe, a ... Unpacking Sourcing Business Models: 21st Century Solutions for Sourcing Services, The University of Tennessee, 2014 Berglund, ...
He taught his students how to make their own inks, chalks and crayons from materials found in nature, how to craft reed and ... Of course both far outsold him and outran him in popular attention through most of mid century.) In fact, despite his edgy ... Wilde took Watrous's lessons to heart, poring over recipes for oil mediums and eventually formulating a secret mixture for use ... In 1985 he took the opportunity to produce one lithograph in black ink on white paper there. "Wildeview II" measures 23½ × 36 ...
Several studies observed that 14th-century Chinese inks are made from very small and uniform pine soot; in fact the inks are ... For example, the ancient Egyptians and Greeks both had their own recipes for "carbon black". One Greek recipe, from 40 to 90 AD ... India ink (British English: Indian ink; also Chinese ink) is a simple black or coloured ink once widely used for writing and ... The ink is layered like watercolors, but once dry, the ink is waterproof and cannot be blended. Ink blotting is a form of art ...
... and during the 16th century in Europe. Giovanni Battista della Porta is credited with the first recipe for a sympathetic ink, ... The ink can be later made visible by different methods according to the type of invisible ink used. The ink may be revealed by ... Invisible ink, also known as security ink or sympathetic ink, is a substance used for writing, which is invisible either on ... One of the earliest writers to mention an invisible ink is Aeneas Tacticus, in the 4th century BC. He mentions it in discussing ...
... is one of a number of types of homemade inks whose recipes were widely available in the 19th century. People often ... "Open-Ink Wiki". Source Forty Centuries of Ink by David N. Carvalho (Project Gutenberg) Forty Centuries of Ink by David N. ... James Stark was a chemist during the 19th century who experimented with ink recipes for 23 years. He tested 229 recipes for ... The ink is very permanent and waterproof. Iron gall ink Carvalho, David (1904 / 2007). Forty Centuries of Ink - Chapter XIII. ...
Forty Centuries of Ink". Archived from the original on 2003-06-26. Retrieved 2006-04-19. For more about ink making and Aleppo ... which was quite popular until it was replaced by more modern chemical inks. An 1881 recipe for Alizarine ink may be found in ... to conventional iron gall ink. This added an attractive coloration to the ink, ... Alizarine ink was created in 1855 by Professor Leonhardi of Dresden, Germany, by adding alizarin dye (derived from the root of ...
Though not in mainstream 21st-century use like dye-based fountain pen inks, modern iron gall inks are still used in fountain ... The earliest recipes for oak gall ink come from Pliny the Elder, and are vague at best. Many famous and important manuscripts ... Iron gall ink (also known as common ink, standard ink, oak gall ink or iron gall nut ink) is a purple-black or brown-black ink ... LIST OF IRON-GALL-BASED FOUNTAIN PEN INKS, compiled by T. Medeiros KWZ Iron Gall inks Platinum Classic iron gall inks Platinum ...
Prior to the ready availability of manufactured ink, iron gall ink was often homemade. Stark's ink was one iron gall ink recipe ... A form of ink that predates fountain pens by centuries is iron gall ink. This blue-black ink is made from iron salts and tannic ... Richard Binder on Ink. Retrieved 2011-02-16. Carvalho, David Nunes (1904). Forty Centuries of Ink. Banks Law Publishing Company ... Fountain pen ink is a water-based ink intended for use with fountain pens. Fountain pen ink is almost exclusively dye-based ...
Forty Centuries of Ink by David Carvalho (Project Gutenberg). *IRON GALLATE INKS-LIQUID AND POWDER by Elmer W. Zimmerman, U.S. ... The earliest recipes for oak gall ink come from Pliny the Elder, and are vague at best. Many famous and important manuscripts ... Iron gall ink (also known as common ink, standard ink, oak gall ink or iron gall nut ink) is a purple-black or brown-black ink ... Though not in mainstream 21st-century use like dye-based fountain pen inks, modern iron gall inks are still used in fountain ...
... is one of a number of types of homemade inks whose recipes were widely available in the 19th century. People often ... The Iron Gall Ink Website (previously called the Ink Corrosion Website). *Open-Ink Wiki -- Stark's Iron Gall Ink Recipe by ... James Stark was a chemist during the 19th century who experimented with ink recipes for 23 years. He tested 229 recipes for ... Forty Centuries of Ink by David N. Carvalho (Project Gutenberg). *Forty Centuries of Ink by David N. Carvalho - chapter XIII & ...
"Farfalle Recipes". Farfalle Recipe Book. Archived from the original on 2012-03-14. Retrieved 2011-05-21.. ... Farfalle date back to the 16th century in the Lombardy and Emilia-Romagna regions of Northern Italy.[citation needed] Note that ... spinach for green and cuttlefish ink for black. A tomato variety may also be available. Green, white, and red varieties are ...
The ink must be black, and of a special recipe. They must say each word aloud while they were writing. They must wipe the pen ... In the 12th century within a Benedictine monastery at Wessobrunn, Bavaria there lived a female scribe named Diemut. She lived ... By the end of the 12th century they owned so many books that they needed someone to oversee their scriptorium and library. Two ... There are two obituaries that have been found that date back to the 16th century, both of the obituaries describe the women who ...
... the ink was certainly not conventional iron-gall ink like its two companion manuscripts, and indeed was unlike any recipe they ... Various scientists have formed their own theories to explain how the "20th century manufactured" anatase in the Vinland Map ink ... and chemical analyses have identified one of the major ink ingredients as a 20th-century artificial pigment. Individual pieces ... indicating that the ink was modern. They also confirmed that the ink contained only trace amounts of iron, and that the black ...
There was also an 18th-century recipe for toothpaste that contained dragon's blood. In modern times it is still used as a ... It is also added to red ink to make "Dragon's Blood Ink", which is used to inscribe magical seals and talismans. In folk ... Voyagers to the Canary Islands in the 15th century obtained dragon's blood as dried garnet-red drops from Dracaena draco, a ... The dragon's blood known to the ancient Romans was mostly collected from D. cinnabari, and is mentioned in the 1st century ...
Her singing career began in the early twenties of the 20th century. She was a pupil of Lilli Lehmann, the opera singer and ... After about two thousand attempts, she made the patented recipe known far beyond the borders of Austria under the name of La ... it is not an ink but a cream; this means that it does not harden completely after application, which means that the eyelashes ... Winterstein-Kambersky founded a cosmetics company in 1936, which is still family-owned and produces the recipe almost unchanged ...
"Recipe for Success: Century and more for Kamath, natural ice cream king". FNB News. Official website "Raghunandan S. Kamath: ... "Food & Grocery retailer iOrderFresh inks strategic tie-up with Natural Ice Cream in Delhi NCR". The Economic Times. Retrieved ...
... has been in use in India since at least the 4th century BC, where it was called masi, an admixture of several ... For example, the ancient Egyptians and Greeks both had their own recipes for "carbon black". One Greek recipe, from 40 to 90 AD ... India ink (British English: Indian Ink[1]; also Chinese ink) is a simple black or colored ink once widely used for writing and ... "Spotlight on Indian Ink". Winsor & Newton. November 10, 2013.. *^ "Spotlight on Indian Ink". www.winsornewton.com. Retrieved ...
13th century Holy doors Madonna and Child, 13th century 13th century Byzantine icon of Saint Michael the Archangel ... Highlights include "108 pages of previously unknown Greek poems and the oldest-known recipe attributed to the Greek physician ... including ink residues and small grooves in the parchment. Each page took approximately eight minutes to scan completely. These ... Until the twentieth century, access was through a door high in the outer walls. From the time of the First Crusade, the ...
For most of the 20th century, the city held the nickname "Oil Capital of the World" and played a major role as one of the most ... In 1910, iconic Tulsa restaurant Ike's Chili Parlor opened and Ivan "Ike" Johnson is purported to have acquired his recipe from ... Traditionally, many of these restaurants had live entertainment (including performers like Ella Fitzgerald and the Ink Spots) ... In the years after the Civil War and around the turn of the century, the area along the Arkansas River that is now Tulsa was ...
The 15th-century Japanese ink-wash master Sesshū Tōyō studied in Zhenjiang. The local Jinshan temple appears in the tale of ... The present recipe is said to date back 1400 years, with its major modern manufacturer-the Jiangsu Hengshun Vinegar Industry Co ... A natural spring in a park on the edge of Zhenjiang has been famed since the Tang (7th-9th century) as the best in Jiangsu for ... It became a prefectural seat during the middle of the 3rd century BC. The Sui took the city in AD 581 and made it an important ...
Before its invention, most inking of printing presses was done by manually pounding the type with ink balls, specially treated ... with various additives such as glycerin depending on the particular recipe. Early recipes also included gypsum plaster and tar ... By the turn of the 20th century, composition rollers were mass-manufactured by various companies, using machines that could ... A composition roller is a tool used in letterpress printing to apply ink to a bed of type in a printing press. It consists of a ...
Since the 16th century, collections of translations of the prayer have often been used for a quick comparison of languages. The ... The Lord's Prayer, ink and watercolor by John Morgan Coaley, 1889. Library of Congress. Lord's Prayer fragment from Lindisfarne ... the Lord's Prayer was used by cooks to time their recipes before the spread of clocks. For example, a step could be "simmer the ... The Didache, generally considered a first-century text, has a doxology, "for yours is the power and the glory forever", as a ...
Eponymous recipes[edit]. New dishes named after famous scientists include:[7] *Gibbs - infusing vanilla pods in egg white with ... Edible paper made from soybeans and potato starch, for use with edible fruit inks and an inkjet printer ... repeating 18th century experiments by British scientist Benjamin Thompson by leaving a 2 kg (4.4 lb) lamb joint in an oven at ... who said in the early 19th century that when making a food stock "the broth must come to a boil very slowly, otherwise the ...
Chinese Buddhist monks introduced soy sauce into Japan in the 7th century,[20] where it is known as shōyu (醬油, shōyu).[21][22] ... A Swedish recipe for "Soija" was published in the 1770 edition of Cajsa Warg's Hjelpreda i Hushållningen för Unga Fruentimber ... Thirty-five barrels from that shipment were then shipped to the Netherlands.[23][citation needed] In the 18th century, diplomat ... William Shurtleff; Akiko Aoyagi (2010). History of Soybeans and Soyfoods in Southeast Asia (13th Century To 2010): Extensively ...
... is a septic tank cleaner to the 20th century Lord Blackadder in Blackadder: Back and Forth. His first appearance is ... In the same episode Baldrick reveals his recipe for "Turnip Surprise" - "the surprise is: there's nothing in it except the ... "Ink and Incapability". *"Nob and Nobility". *"Sense and Senility". *"Amy and Amiability" ... For centuries we've tried, and they've always turned out total pig swill! My mum will be pleased as punch." This mood was ...
There even was a recipe where this would take place in garo, in the sauce. At the beginning of the Imperial era, however, this ... Fifth century BC Chinese texts describe sea turtles as exotic delicacies.[31] Sea turtles are caught worldwide, although in ... Cephalopods propel themselves with a water jet and lay down "smoke screens" with ink. Examples are octopus, squid and ... A stele of the late 3rd century BCE from the small Boeotian city of Akraiphia, on Lake Copais, provides us with a list of fish ...
"Cooking with Molasses - Brer Rabbit Molasses Recipes - Easy Baking Recipes". Brer Rabbit. Archived from the original on 2014-04 ... Cane molasses is an ingredient used in baking and cooking.[6] It was popular in the Americas prior to the 20th century, when it ... Mixed with gelatin glue and glycerine when casting composition ink rollers on early printing presses ...
"Bacolod inks sister ties with Korean city". Visayan Daily Star. 2012-10-16. Archived from the original on 2012-10-19. Retrieved ... "Bacolod City's Chicken Inasal - Recipe and Videos". March 16, 2013. Retrieved May 10, 2017.. ... missionaries placed the village under the care and protection of Saint Sebastian sometime in the middle of the 18th century. A ...
Since the 20th century, it has been used in the vegetarian cuisines of Western nations. ...
"sloe". The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia. 7. 1906.. *^ a b c "sloe". Oxford English Dictionary (1st ed.). Oxford University ... Seaton, Jessica (2017). Gather Cook Feast: Recipes from Land and Water by the Co-Founder of Toast. Penguin UK. p. 123.. ... was used as an ingredient in the making of some inks used for manuscripts.[26] ... A "sloe-thorn worm" used as fishing bait is mentioned in the 15th-century work, The Treatyse of Fishing with an Angle, by ...
... s were introduced to Java in Malay Archipelago circa 13th century or probably earlier. By the 17th century through their ... "Whole Wheat Bread Recipe: McCay's Miracle Loaf - Real Food". Mother Earth News.. ... Soybeans are also used in industrial products, including oils, soap, cosmetics, resins, plastics, inks, crayons, solvents, and ... which dates around the 12th to 13th century Java.[85] By the 13th century, the soybean had arrived and cultivated in Indonesia ...
"Slime Recipe - How to Make Borax and White Glue Slime". Chemistry.about.com. Retrieved 2016-08-07.. ... The word was adopted in the 17th century from Malay tingkal and from Urdu/Persian/Arabic تنکار‬ tinkār/tankār; thus the two ... To make indelible ink for dip pens by dissolving shellac into heated borax ... "Information Update - Health Canada advises Canadians to avoid homemade craft and pesticide recipes using boric acid - Recalls ...
Tull, Delena (2013). Edible and useful plants of the Southwest : Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona : including recipes, teas and ... The late 19th century herbal, the King's American Dispensatory, describes various folk medical uses that led individuals to ... The toxic extract of pokeweed berries can be processed to yield a red ink or dye.[31][32][33] ... redweed or red ink plant.[7] When used in Chinese medicine, it is called chuíxù shānglù (垂序商陸).[6][8][9] The plant and its ...
herbal, astronomical, biological, cosmological and pharmaceutical sections + section with recipes. Illumination(s). color ink, ... "Mysterious 15th century manuscript finally decoded 600 years later". The Independent. 2018-01-27. Retrieved 2018-01-27.. ... The similarity between the drawing inks and text inks suggested a contemporaneous origin.[6] ... Recipes, 22 folios: Full pages of text broken into many short paragraphs, each marked with a star in the left margin.[13][39] ...
15th century until the 19th century and remained in wide use for books and other uses until the second half of the 20th century ... Inking is controlled by keys very much similar to an offset press. UV inks for letterpress are in paste form, unlike flexo. ... 30 Recipes Suitable for Framing.. *^ Hoinski, Michael (February 4, 2015). "Artists Find an Audience for Painstaking Letterpress ... Paper Color: Dark ink on a light paper gives the best image. Inks are translucent and the paper color shows through. For light ...
"Southern Recipes - Southern Food and Recipes". Southernfood.about.com. June 17, 2009. Retrieved August 4, 2009.. ... In a reversal of the demographics of party alignment in the post-Civil War nineteenth century, in the 21st century state, ... Golden Ink. Retrieved November 29, 2006.. *^ "KRS 2.110 Public Holidays" (PDF). Kentucky General Assembly. Retrieved November ... 19th centuryEdit. Designed by the Washington Monument's architect Robert Mills in 1845, the U.S. Marine Hospital in Louisville ...
Sweet Chestnut Jam recipe. Storing Sweet Chestnuts, in The Cottage Smallholder. *^ Richardson, A.; Young, G. (2014). The Wisdom ... They appeared in France in the 16th century. Towards the end of 19th century, Lyon went into a recession with the collapse of ... Ink disease also appears in a number of other plants. The disease attacks the phloem tissue and the cambium of the roots and ... For three centuries, most barns and homes east of the Mississippi River were made from it.[46] In 1911, the food book The ...
The Materials of the Painter's Craft in Europe and Egypt from Earliest Times to the End of the XVIIth Century, with Some ... It also is used in bookbinding and as the adhesive component of some recipes for gesso and compo. ... acting as a preservative by forming a film over the surface as the ink dried.[8] The Chinese, such as Kao Gong Ji, also ... in the 20th century. Today it is used primarily in specialty applications, such as lutherie, pipe organ building, piano repairs ...
... circa 17th century. The common soy sauce has its origin in 2nd century CE China, however, kecap manis (sweet soy sauce) was ... Grace Young (2010). Stir-Frying to the Sky's Edge: The Ultimate Guide to Mastery, with Authentic Recipes and Stories. Simon and ... Nasi goreng hitam (black fried rice), or nasi goreng cumi hitam, coloured and flavoured with squid ink[73] ... "The Indonesians' nasi goreng recipes". Retrieved 17 December 2015.. *^ "Legendary 'nasi goreng' continues to draw crowds". The ...
One of the earliest writers to mention an invisible ink is Aeneas Tacticus, in the 4th century BC. He mentions it in discussing ... Giovanni Battista della Porta is credited with the first recipe for a sympathetic ink, derived from alum and vinegar, as well ... The ink can be later made visible by different methods according to the type of invisible ink used. The ink may be revealed by ... Invisible ink, also known as security ink, is a substance used for writing, which is invisible either on application or soon ...
"Slime Recipe - How to Make Borax and White Glue Slime". Chemistry.about.com. Retrieved August 7, 2016.. ... To make indelible ink for dip pens by dissolving shellac into heated borax[citation needed] ... The word was adopted in the 17th century from Malay tingkal and from Urdu/Persian/Arabic .mw-parser-output .script-arabic,.mw- ... "Information Update - Health Canada advises Canadians to avoid homemade craft and pesticide recipes using boric acid - Recalls ...
18th century[edit]. The Watt steam engine was conceived in 1765. James Watt transformed the steam engine from a reciprocating ... Joe Nickell (2000). Pen, ink, & evidence: a study of writing and writing materials for the penman, collector, and document ... Keiller's marmalade Janet Keiller (1797) - The first recipe of rind suspended marmalade or Dundee marmalade produced in Dundee. ... 21st century[edit]. 2003. *Beagle 2, a British landing spacecraft that forms part of the European Space Agency's 2003 Mars ...
Koehler, Jeff (2012). Morocco: A Culinary Journey with Recipes: A Culinary Journey with Recipes from the Spice-Scented Markets ... and it was partly remodeled by the Saadians in the 16th century and the Alaouites in the 17th century.[109] Historically it was ... "Bahrain : Royal Ranches Marrakech inks MoU with BMCE.(Memorandum of Understanding )(Banque Marocaine de Commerce Exteriur)". ... Laet, Sigfried J. de (1994). History of Humanity: From the seventh to the sixteenth century. UNESCO. ISBN 978-92-3-102813-7. . ...
Stebbins, R.A. (2013). The Committed Reader: Reading for Utility, Pleasure, and Fulfillment in the Twenty-First Century. Lanham ... Currently most reading is either of the printed word from ink or toner on paper, such as in a book, magazine, newspaper, ... such as reading the instructions in a cooking recipe), or for pleasure.[9] ... In 18th-century Europe, the then new practice of reading alone in bed was, for a time, considered dangerous and immoral. As ...
... a Joseon cookbook published around the late 19th century, it is presumed to have originated at least as early as the 19th ... Kong guksu recipe. Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kong-guksu&oldid=853107813" ...
Before the 20th century, the term asphaltum was also used.[2] The word is derived from the Ancient Greek ἄσφαλτος ásphaltos. ... William Salmon's Polygraphice (1673) provides a recipe for varnish used in etching, consisting of three ounces of virgin wax, ... Most of the bitumen was used for waterproofing roofs, but other uses included fuels, lubrication oils, printers ink, medicines ... After centuries of silence, the first mentions of Albanian bitumen appeared only in 1868, when the Frenchman Coquand published ...
Later in the 20th century, U.S. Army and Marine Corps units in Vietnam during the Vietnam War called their housing compounds " ... Over the years, the "recipe" has called for live grizzly bears, panthers, kerosene, horseshoes and anvils, among other ... and drew and inked the faces and hands of the characters. "He had the touch," Frazetta said of Capp in 2008. "He knew how to ... Capp also excelled at product endorsement, and Li'l Abner characters were often featured in mid-century American advertising ...
2007) Numerical Recipes 3rd Edition: The Art of Scientific Computing. *^ Baron, Michael. (2006) Probability and Statistics for ... The design for what would have been the first piece of software was written by Ada Lovelace in the 19th century but was never ... v. Independent Ink, Inc. case.[6]. Unix (1970s-present)Edit. Main article: History of Unix ... An outline (algorithm) for what would have been the first piece of software was written by Ada Lovelace in the 19th century, ...
About 1,600 years ago, a popular ink recipe was created. The recipe was used for centuries. Iron salts, such as ferrous sulfate ... Iron gall (common ink)[edit]. Main article: Iron gall ink. Iron gall inks became prominent in the early 12th century; they were ... One 12th century ink recipe called for hawthorn branches to be cut in the spring and left to dry. Then the bark was pounded ... Ink drawing of Ganesha under an umbrella (early 19th century). Ink, called masi, an admixture of several chemical components, ...
... recipes, processes and money-saving methods for the practical use of manufacturers, mechanics, housekeepers and home workers. ... Rollers for transferring ink to types have to possess special properties, which have reference both to the nature of the ink ... Henleys Twentieth Century Formulas Recipes Processes Vol3. Volume 3 of the book containing ten thousand selected household and ... To make a salt print, ink over it with waterproof ink, then bleach out white all but the black lines. Sensitize Clemons mat ...
The recipe for this cheese from Zeeuws-Vlaanderen dates back many centuries. Its name means "Flax Cheese", owing not to an ... Today it is still used to make linseed oil and printing ink. ... Recipe Forum. Encyclopedia of Cheese. Press Room. Awards. ...
The secret of making good ink had been lost in England for two centuries until Baskervilles experiments. His recipe is given ... His ink had a rich purple-black tint, and the uniformity of colour throughout his books testifies to the care taken in printing ... He seems to have been extremely curious in the choice of his paper and ink: the former being in general the fruit of Dutch ... Another edition was published in 1759; the typography, paper, and ink of both equal, if not excel, those of the Virgil. The ...
Iron gall ink was in use before the 7th century. A typical recipe for its manufacture required an infusion of crushed oak-galls ... It is only since 1945, that traditional iron gall inks have been officially replaced by dye-based inks, although a recipe ... Nevertheless, medieval recipes existed for erasing these acid based inks from parchment to recover the precious skins for ... Earlier carbon inks - sometimes referred to as India inks - were prone to dampness and abrasion, and as a result likely to ...
1,600 years ago, a popular ink recipe was created. In the 15th century, a new type of ink had to be developed in Europe ... Screen printing inks. Pad printing inks have formulations comparable to screen printing inks. Pad printing inks are formulated ... Ink may be a liquid or paste form contains pigments or dyes. Inks are used to color a surface to produce an image, text, or ... The India ink used in ancient India since at least the 4th century BC ...
"About 1,600 years ago, a popular ink recipe was created. The recipe was used for centuries. Iron salts, such as ferrous sulfate ... One 12th century ink recipe called for hawthorn branches to be cut in the spring and left to dry. Then the bark was pounded ... Classically named India ink - the inking material of ancient India - might be dated from the 4th century BC and was called masi ... But ink offers an entirely different vocabulary - since ink can come from other materials; the wash of ink usually comprises ( ...
... paper goods and ink. Between 1843-1846 they expanded their business into numerous new areas. ... Reference to literally hundreds of19th century ink recipes can be found. So exactly what was J. J. Butler making? ... Basically it was the iron in iron gall ink. Some ink recipes simply called from tossing a nail or scrap of iron into the ... Copying inks were made by adding an amount of sugar to the iron gall ink batch. This kept the ink in a moist state. Copying it ...
A surprising fact is that the ink recipe can be related to paint practices developed many centuries later during the ... "The fact that the lead was not added as a pigment but as a dryer infers that the ink had quite a complex recipe and could not ... "By applying 21st century, state-of-the-art technology to reveal the hidden secrets of ancient ink technology, we are ... "Something very striking was that we found that lead was added to the ink mixture, not as a dye, but as a dryer of the ink, so ...
Tyrian or imperial purple, made from the ink glands of murex shells, "... fetched its weight in silver" in the fourth century ... Many recipes from around the world are based on molluscs from all three major orders. Among cephalopod recipes, both octopus ... Giant squid are described by Aristotle (4th century BC) in his History of Animals and Pliny the Elder (1st century AD) in his ... These amazing recipes include foie gras steamed clams and cavatelli with mussels, lillet, and dill. "Shellfish recipes". BBC. ...
Starks ink is one of a number of types of homemade inks whose recipes were widely available in the 19th century. People often ... The Iron Gall Ink Website (previously called the Ink Corrosion Website). *Open-Ink Wiki -- Starks Iron Gall Ink Recipe by ... James Stark was a chemist during the 19th century who experimented with ink recipes for 23 years. He tested 229 recipes for ... Forty Centuries of Ink by David N. Carvalho (Project Gutenberg). *Forty Centuries of Ink by David N. Carvalho - chapter XIII & ...
University of Cordoba and Nova University in Portugal have replicated five medieval inks using 15th and 16th century recipes ...
By the seventeenth century this recipe had evolved into something very similar to the soy sauce we know today. This evolution ... The scientists manufactured ink made from soy oil, and produced soy-based whipped topping. Many of these processes and products ... In the sixth century, as Buddhism became more widely practiced, new vegetarian dietary restrictions came into fashion. These ... In many traditional brewed recipes, wheat is blended in equal parts with the soybeans. Pulverized wheat is made part of the ...
"Cennini, a 15th century craftsman provides recipes to tint parchment a variety of colours including purple, indigo, green, red ... Powders and pastes of calcium compounds were also used to help remove grease so the ink would not run. To make the parchment ... See for example recipes in the Secretum Philosophorum *^ "Information Leaflet by Vaad Mishmereth Staam" (PDF). CC. Archived ... Herodotus mentions writing on skins as common in his time, the 5th century BC; and in his Histories (v.58) he states that the ...
There is even a recipe for gold ink in a fourth century papyrus now in Leiden in The Netherlands. ... India ink or Chinese ink.. Carbon ink, probably the earliest writing ink developed, is still used today, but over the centuries ... where an oil-based ink was first produced in the fifth century. Vital to the art of printing, the development of paper and ink ... Another ink was called enkauston-which was used by Byzantine emperors to sign their names and from which comes our word "ink." ...
One of the earliest writers to mention an invisible ink is Aeneas Tacticus, in the 4th century BC. He mentions it in discussing ... Giovanni Battista della Porta is credited with the first recipe for a sympathetic ink, derived from alum and vinegar, as well ... The ink can be later made visible by different methods according to the type of invisible ink used. The ink may be revealed by ... Invisible ink, also known as security ink, is a substance used for writing, which is invisible either on application or soon ...
In the early-to-mid 20th century, Americans cooked from scratch mostly because there was no other option. They needed solutions ... Recipes Browse by: Dish Type Ingredient Cuisine Cooking Method Diet Season Menus Recipe Collections Quick Dinners View All ... At the turn of the 20th century, the most popular cookbook in the U.S. was The Boston Cooking School Cookbook (1896), better ... Everything from the typefaces the book uses to the pen and ink illustrations in the ads and margins evoke another, less showy, ...
Part cultural history, part travelogue, with recipes, historic engravings, photographs, and Kurlanskys own pen-and-ink ... drawings throughout, Havana celebrates the citys singular music, literature, baseball, and food; its five centuries of ...
This will be well-defined 21st download handbook of research methods in tourism requirements to do to understand century ... Italian Recipe C UK National Archives. have adequate maternal download critical thinking - the art of argument coverage. ... WritingTudor EraBritish HistoryArt HistoryMedieval BooksMedieval Polish Manuscript15th CenturyRecipes ForForwardsIron Gall Ink ... UK When Centuries named Yet longer of click or competition to their services, they found introduced because of the useful field ...
Topic: Ink recipes. Replies: 11. Views: 5730. Re: Ink recipes. The oak gall ink or tannin/iron inks are the ones to use for ... Surely it should only cover a couple of years, he was only a king for a short time, not the whole century :devil: But seriously ... Hi Foxy, cotton fustians are mentioned in a late 15th century statute, a number of them, mainly as an edict against fustian ... Guthrie is right to point you to the Divers Arts, his recipe is hawthorn bark but still relies on the chemical... ...
The technique is feasible thanks to the highly absorbing chemical elements in ancient European ink recipes. The corresponding x ... from the 16th century on. The objective is to elaborate new digitization techniques by x-ray tomography for the Venice Time ... We present x-ray imaging results for diverse ironbased- ink antique writings - single-page manuscripts, stacks and scrolls - ...
... was a key ingredient in many recipes for iron gall ink - for all you non-ink nerds, that was the writing ink used by most of ... So why did these inks fall out of favor? Sadly, they didnt play nice with the newfangled steel pens of the 19th century, says ... "As fountain pen inks, they performed OK," he says. "It was more the novelty of the fact they smelled like the wine they were ... But for centuries, writers relied on alcohol to keep the words flowing in a far less boozy form than the Burroughs and ...
In the late 19th century, Auguste Escoffier, the chef at the Ritz Hotel in Paris, codified and refined the recipes of French ... Like invisible ink, the green purée in the magic solution began to take solid form. When it had cohered satisfactorily, Castro ... One looks at it and doesnt know if this dish is from 83 or 96. In other words, who could tell if the recipe was ahead of ... He leafed through the pictures and recipes. What year is this dish? What year is this? he said. Its as if one were ...
... healthy diet recipes, weight loss recipes and healthy menus from EatingWell Magazine. ... Raspberries have delighted taste buds for many centuries. A member of the rose family, this fruit is native to Asia and North ... Beyond enjoying raspberries in pies, chutney and even wine, you can make your own ink from raspberry juice if you are so ... ALLRECIPESAllrecipes.com , Recipe.com , EatingWell , Better Recipes , Rachael Ray Magazine , Diabetic Living , Eat This, Not ...
Printer s ink has been running a race against gunpowder these many, many years. Ink is handicapped, in a way, because you can ... Ploughing deep, your recipe for killing weeds, is also the recipe for almost every good thing in farming. We now plough ... But the gunpowder destroys itself along with its victim, while a book can keep on exploding for centuries. ... Recipe (7) , Reservoir (7) , Retain (56) , Row (9) , Stream (81) , Thing (1915) , Valley (32) , Water (482) , Water ...
Pen, ink, and paper were all difficult to come by (Newton had his own recipe for ink), so abbreviations were common as well. ... The Seventeenth Century English scientist, mathematician and theologian Isaac Newton. was interested in the history of optical ... It is the telescope more than anything else that ushered Isaac Newton on to the public stage of Seventeenth Century science - ... Both words had similar meanings in the Seventeenth Century - something ghostly or not of this world. Much like spelling and ...
David Viagra Free Pill has taken century and was used it has its own book Viagra Free Pill not only accept that I can only be ... Kite used the book BJJ No-Gi Champ 2 magnetizable particles are completely caused more breaking up of the ink than that day. ... Pompey spread abroad among in deep red and towards a more pacifist kitchen cleanup classic in and early twenty-first centuries ...
17th century, 18th century, craft, Education, historic site, history, Ink, museum, Pen, Pennsbury Manor, Pennsylvania, ... Produced from varied plant, animal, and mineral extracts; a common recipe (often produced by farmers as an additional source of ... "One drop of ink makes thousands, perhaps millions think…" - Lord Byron. Although from different centuries, Lord Byron and ... in the 17th Century, the quill and ink maintained a strong hold, especially among the educated. As the primary resource for ...
We knew the recipe by heart for centuries:. we unlettered, tongueless, with hair of ash,. the slattern at the pestle, the bad ... yielding the vividest ink. More permanent. than lampblack or bistre, and at first pale grey,. it darkened, upon exposure,. to ... On a side board, near the ink stand,. her ear trumpet is horse whip clean,. and pictures groaning in frames. hide a jet black ... Helen Pizzeys poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in the North, Orbis, The Interpreters House, Ink Sweat & Tears, The ...
  • [7] Lemons were also used as organic inks by Arabs around 600 AD, and during the 16th century in Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • We present x-ray imaging results for diverse ironbased- ink antique writings - single-page manuscripts, stacks and scrolls - from the 16th century on. (eg.org)
  • It was imported to Arabia via the Silk Road and does appear in other cosmetic recipes from the 16th century and earlier. (wordpress.com)
  • I have also come across a very detailed entry in Garcia De la Orta's Colloques on the Simples & Drugs of India, 16th century, which describes the mineral and its uses. (wordpress.com)
  • It's in the 16th century English lists of customs duties. (livinghistory.co.uk)
  • But sulphuric acid as a separate substance is more a 16th century thing, with occaisional alchemical productions in the 14/15th centuries and possibly by Arabic alchemists before that. (livinghistory.co.uk)
  • So the real trick would be to see if you can find some dyers accounts or purchases or instruction manuals, especially from the 16th century, and see if they used it at all, and if they didn't, no you probably shouldn't. (livinghistory.co.uk)
  • Ink drawing of Ganesha under an umbrella (early 19th century). (wikipedia.org)
  • Seashells have been made into craft items such as Sailor's Valentines in the 19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stark's ink is one of a number of types of homemade inks whose recipes were widely available in the 19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. James Stark was a chemist during the 19th century who experimented with ink recipes for 23 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wine, it turns out, was a key ingredient in many recipes for iron gall ink - for all you non-ink nerds, that was the writing ink used by most of the Western world from the Middle Ages all the way up to the 19th century. (wesa.fm)
  • Sadly, they didn't play nice with the newfangled steel pens of the 19th century, says Abigail Quandt, head of book and paper conservation at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore. (wesa.fm)
  • In the 19th century, tiramisu became extremely popular among the English intellectuals and artists who lived in Florence. (whatscookingamerica.net)
  • Microdots were first developed in the latter half of the 19th century, but they weren't used heavily for steganography until World War I. They involve shrinking a message or image down to the size of a dot, which allows people to communicate and pass on information without their adversaries knowing. (comparitech.com)
  • For example, in the 19th century it was seen as a form of anaemia, so iron was prescribed. (hypotheses.org)
  • Research into paper artworks and the identification of drawing techniques dating from the 15th to the 19th century from the collection of Slovak National Gallery revealed that the most frequently used means of writing was a set of brown-gray inks. (springeropen.com)
  • During the 19th century, bistre was gradually substituted by sepia ink. (springeropen.com)
  • By applying 21st century, state-of-the-art technology to reveal the hidden secrets of ancient ink technology, we are contributing to the unveiling the origin of writing practices. (esrf.fr)
  • This will be well-defined 21st download handbook of research methods in tourism requirements to do to understand century aggression, and not as to be Australian genetic contrast from the local outcomes. (sara-jordan.com)
  • calligraphy puts flight to this nonsense, and teaches me to enter into the kind of silence that is restorative in our busy 21st century world. (eatlovesavor.com)
  • How we live together, coming from different cultural reference points, is the question for the 21st Century. (vibe.com)
  • It's bar director Christine Wiseman's 21st century rendition of a martini that involves charring repurposed onions and using celery to make a shrub. (observer.com)
  • Thankfully, kitchens in the 21st century are a wonderland of helpful gear and gadgets. (yahoo.com)
  • Making things is a great way to learn and an ability to make the things you need is an important 21st-century skill. (techlearning.com)
  • Earlier carbon inks - sometimes referred to as India inks - were prone to dampness and abrasion, and as a result likely to flake off the writing surface, especially from parchment. (surreycc.gov.uk)
  • Nevertheless, medieval recipes existed for erasing these acid based inks from parchment to recover the precious skins for writing! (surreycc.gov.uk)
  • [13] Though the Assyrians and the Babylonians impressed their cuneiform on clay tablets, they also wrote on parchment from the 6th century BC onward. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the advent of printing in the later fifteenth century, the demands of printers far exceeded the supply of animal skins for parchment. (thefullwiki.org)
  • The heyday of parchment use was during the medieval period, but there has been a growing revival of its use among contemporary artists since the late 20th century. (thefullwiki.org)
  • Although parchment never stopped being used (primarily for governmental documents and diplomas) it had ceased to be a primary choice for artist's supports by the end of 15th century Renaissance . (thefullwiki.org)
  • In addition to the identification of the pigments and inks also a detailed characterization of the parchment concerning its manufacturing process was achieved by that combination. (springer.com)
  • Ink, called masi , an admixture of several chemical components, has been used in India since at least the 4th century BC. (wikipedia.org)
  • [2] The practice of writing with ink and a sharp pointed needle was common in early South India . (wikipedia.org)
  • [3] Several Jain sutras in India were compiled in ink. (wikipedia.org)
  • The process of making India ink was known in China as early as the middle of the 3rd millennium BC, during Neolithic China . (wikipedia.org)
  • [11] The manufacture of India ink was well-established by the Cao Wei Dynasty (220-265 AD). (wikipedia.org)
  • India ink was first invented in China, though materials were often traded from India, hence the name. (wikipedia.org)
  • Classically named India ink - the inking material of ancient India - might be dated from the 4th century BC and was called masi, formulated of burnt bones, tar, pitch, and other substances. (girvin.com)
  • Ink is a liquid or paste that contains pigments or dyes and is used to color a surface to produce an image , text , or design . (wikipedia.org)
  • Ink may be a liquid or paste form contains pigments or dyes. (medium.com)
  • An ancient beginning of the nature of ink making, Chinese liquid pigments can be traced back to the 18th century BC, utilizing natural plant dyes, animal, and mineral inks based on such materials as graphite that were ground with water and applied with ink tools, reeds and brushes . (girvin.com)
  • The reservoir pen, which may have been the first fountain pen , dating back to 953, when Ma'ād al-Mu'izz , caliph of Egypt, demanded a writing tool that wouldn't run pigments on his clothing and hands, and was received a writing instrument that held ink in a containing channel. (girvin.com)
  • The material investigation aims to determine the composition of inks and pigments used for writing and illuminating, as well as the characterization of the support material. (springer.com)
  • One 12th century ink recipe called for hawthorn branches to be cut in the spring and left to dry. (wikipedia.org)
  • One 12th century ink instruments place orders research trends and discover our taking in boarders. (toddah.net)
  • Alchemical symbols, originally devised as part of the protoscience of alchemy, were used to denote some elements and some compounds until the 18th century. (blogspot.com)
  • notes on the early history of zinc from Babylon to the +18th century, compiled for the curious. (rug.nl)
  • a restored 18th-century town house. (travelandleisure.com)
  • 1) This is an example of a pottery dish from the 18th-century Moravian settlement at Salem, North Carolina, dating from 1775-1785, during Gottfried Aust's tenure as master potter. (outlandishobservations.com)
  • In the 17th and 18th centuries, the use of bistre was popular among artists such as Rembrandt van Rijn, Claude Lorrain, Conez Alexander and Thomas Gainsborough. (springeropen.com)
  • It's a sharp contrast to the bulk of cookbooks published in the first half of the 20th century, in which you'll find reassuringly simple recipes that inspire and educate without requiring expensive gear or hard-to-find spices. (seriouseats.com)
  • In the early-to-mid 20th century, Americans cooked from scratch mostly because there was no other option. (seriouseats.com)
  • At the turn of the 20th century, the most popular cookbook in the U.S. was The Boston Cooking School Cookbook (1896), better known as Fannie Farmer , after the orderly nutritionist who wrote it. (seriouseats.com)
  • This shipping crate side contained KC brand baking powder that was manufactured by the Jaques Manufacturing Company of Chicago, Illinois during the early 20th century. (si.edu)
  • Finally, Gage has recently (2006) written Color in Art , which traces the implementation of various color effects or color ideas in painting styles from the middle ages through the 20th century. (handprint.com)
  • Such damage is a frequent phenomenon in the case of manuscripts or drawings from early Middle Age to the 20th century [ 1 ]. (springeropen.com)
  • November, 1766 - Claire returns from the 20th century and is reunited with Jamie. (outlandishobservations.com)
  • John Randal, 20th-century English zoologist. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • James Porter, 20th-century U.S. physician. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Evidence for the earliest Chinese inks, similar to modern inksticks , is around 256 BC in the end of the Warring States period and produced from soot and animal glue . (wikipedia.org)
  • The earliest inks from all civilizations are believed to have been made with lampblack, a kind of soot, as this would have been easily collected as a by-product of fire. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two types of ink were prevalent at the time: the Greek and Roman writing ink (soot, glue, and water) and the 12th century variety composed of ferrous sulfate, gall, gum, and water. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eventually an oily, varnish-like ink made of soot, turpentine, and walnut oil was created specifically for the printing press. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evidence for the earliest Chinese inks, similar to modern inksticks, has been dated to 256 BC made from soot and animal glue . (girvin.com)
  • Before this invention, there were two predominant types of the Greek and Roman writing ink (soot, glue, and water) and the 1100s composition, based on ingredients of ferrous sulfate, gall, gum, and water. (girvin.com)
  • An oily, varnish-like ink made of soot, bound with turpentine and walnut oil was created specifically for the printing press. (girvin.com)
  • Giovanni Battista della Porta is credited with the first recipe for a sympathetic ink, derived from alum and vinegar , as well as the first book on secret writing and invisible inks, Magia Naturalis (1558, 1589). (wikipedia.org)
  • : 24 Since then, a wide variety of invisible inks have been used for all sorts of secretive purposes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some commercially available invisible inks glow very brightly, in a variety of colors, under UV light. (wikipedia.org)
  • From its humble origins that involved physically hiding communications and using invisible inks, it has now moved into the digital realm, allowing people to slip critical information into seemingly mundane files. (comparitech.com)
  • Philo of Byzantium was the first to discuss invisible inks , writing about them in the third century BC. (comparitech.com)
  • Alarmed medieval scholars realised an indelible ink was needed to prevent their work from vanishing. (surreycc.gov.uk)
  • It is showed, in particular, that contrary to the notion that the technology of printing somehow bypassed Muslims, the Islamic civilisation have left substantial evidence that block printing was a craft familiar to many in the medieval Islamic world between the 10th and the 15th centuries, long before Gutenberg invented press printing. (muslimheritage.com)
  • Copperas in the medieval sense is mostly ferrous sulphate or decomposed pyrites if found naturally, yet there are recipes which confuse this with copper. (livinghistory.co.uk)
  • Philo of Byzantium may be the first writer known to describe an invisible ink using a reagent around 280-220 BC, with oak galls and vitriol . (wikipedia.org)
  • One recent research project was carried out on fragments of Koranic manuscripts found in Sanaa in Yemen dating back to at least the eight-century. (medindia.net)
  • Because of its acidic and oxidative nature, iron gall ink promotes the endogenous degradation of paper manuscripts. (springeropen.com)
  • A new and innovative material-nanocellulose-is being evaluated as a stabilizer for manuscripts that have been degraded by iron gall ink. (springeropen.com)
  • Two different types of fibrillated nanocelluloses were applied on manuscripts damaged by iron gall inks in different treatment steps. (springeropen.com)
  • The selection comprises badly preserved or rewritten manuscripts (palimpsests) on the one hand, and manuscripts with a remarkable design on the other, deriving from the 8th to the 14th centuries. (springer.com)
  • Resultantly, in the 17th Century, the quill and ink maintained a strong hold, especially among the educated. (pennsburymanor.org)
  • 17th century - A dessert similar to tiramisu was was created in Siena, in the northwestern Italian province of Tuscany. (whatscookingamerica.net)
  • In the 17th century, before that level of knowledge of blood existed, 'steel filings' were often part of the remedy, and iron is a constituent of steel. (hypotheses.org)
  • By the seventeenth century this recipe had evolved into something very similar to the soy sauce we know today. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Setting a red recipe next to a white one, we can begin to suss out the issues, but three late seventeenth/early eighteenth century recipes provide both the red and white options within one entry and thus make the differences most apparent. (hypotheses.org)
  • The beautiful four storied house was built in early seventeenth century. (ranaruby.in)
  • But I do remember the story itself and the striking epitome thus provided for the revolutionary character (at its codification in the seventeenth century) of the explanatory system now called science. (stephenjaygould.org)
  • The comprehension of inks, their composition and their production techniques are derived from chemical sampling analysis or from the written text under examination. (girvin.com)
  • Scientists led by the ESRF and the University of Copenhagen have discovered the composition of red and black inks in ancient Egyptian papyri from circa 100-200 AD, leading to different hypotheses about writing practices. (esrf.fr)
  • They combined several synchrotron techniques (micro X-ray fluorescence, micro X-ray diffraction and micro-infrared spectroscopy) to probe the chemical composition from the millimetre to the sub-micrometre scale to provide information not only on the elemental, but also on the molecular and structural composition of the inks. (esrf.fr)
  • As the primary resource for composition, the quill (so named after the Latin word "penna", meaning feather) and ink were staples not only in Europe, but the colonies too. (pennsburymanor.org)
  • Many ancient cultures around the world have independently discovered and formulated inks for the purposes of writing and drawing. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to archaeological ink studies , ancient cultures around the world formulated inks for writing and drawing. (girvin.com)
  • Ink formulas vary, but commonly involve two components: Colorants Vehicles (binders) Inks generally fall into four classes: Aqueous Liquid Paste Powder Pigment inks are used more frequently than dyes because they are more color-fast, but they are also more expensive, less consistent in color, and have less of a color range than dyes. (wikipedia.org)
  • copper filings are used to mordant blue dyes, the Strasbourg Manuscript has a blueberry and copper dye recipe for string. (livinghistory.co.uk)
  • [11] [12] The traditional Chinese method of making the ink was to grind a mixture of hide glue , carbon black , lampblack, and bone black pigment with a pestle and mortar , then pouring it into a ceramic dish where it could dry. (wikipedia.org)
  • Strange Flowers , in which I burned one of my elementary school stories and collected the carbon to make an ink, a technique I learned from an infamous Mormon forger who I see as a proxy brother), my letters, skin, pills, and on & on. (wordpress.com)
  • This type of ink is still used and sold under the name of Indian ink or carbon-based ink. (coursera.org)
  • The earliest examples of preserving human thought by applying ink on a flexible and durable material, papyrus, are found in ancient Egypt at the dawn of recorded history (c. 3200 BCE). (esrf.fr)
  • One of the earliest writers to mention an invisible ink is Aeneas Tacticus , in the 4th century BC. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cure it in suka and it becomes kinilaw, an ancient recipe that may have been one of the earliest forms of ceviche. (nytimes.com)
  • a common recipe (often produced by farmers as an additional source of income) consisted of oak galls (growths on oak leaves caused by insects), copperas (a naturally occurring, greenish, crystalline, hydrated ferrous sulfate, used in manufacturing of fertilizers and inks and water purification), and water. (pennsburymanor.org)
  • People often made their own ink before commercially available ink was inexpensively and easily obtainable. (wikipedia.org)
  • A typical recipe for its manufacture required an infusion of crushed oak-galls (oak apples) in water. (surreycc.gov.uk)
  • All natural soap bar, natural soap bar, organic soap, with ingredients used for centuries, all natural ingredients from old soap recipes. (kreiner-natural-soaps.com)
  • I started to think about organic inks on the label, and organic glues, recycled cartons, lighter glass, less cork. (treehugger.com)
  • Tulips have been wildly popular for centuries, with their gorgeous, vibrant colors offering an extraordinary display - both in home gardens and fields where they're grown - inspiring many people to have a tulip tattoo design inked on their body. (hubpages.com)
  • The aim of the work was the material identification (colors and inks) used for the make-up of the two codices in order to gain a better understanding of their evolution and their provenance. (springer.com)
  • So subtly it has blended with modern surroundings and buildings which have not yet crossed half a century, it becomes extremely difficult to appreciate the fact that the building where Rembrandt stayed is older than my city Calcutta which was founded in 1690.What is more amazing is the strong look of the building - as if it's never going to crumble and look the same even after thousand years or so. (ranaruby.in)
  • In the 4th century BC, Aeneas Tacticus made mention of a hole punching technique. (comparitech.com)
  • Thicker inks, in paste form, are used extensively in letterpress and lithographic printing . (wikipedia.org)
  • They are also high in minerals, particularly calcium and magnesium, and in Vitamin B. They have been cultivated since the dawn of civilization in China and Japan and were introduced into the United States in the nineteenth century. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This article tells the story of such a clash in Britain in the late nineteenth century, tracing how Jewish bakers ran afoul of Britain's Sundays closing laws, which forbade bakers to bake and bakeries to sell their good on Sundays. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Among it's many properties, borax is great for things like cleaning, laundry boosting, plus it is sometimes used as an anti-fungal foot soak, to make indelible ink, to cure snake skins, and to make caviar. (wordpress.com)
  • During the last decade, many scientific studies have been conducted to elucidate the invention and history of ink in ancient Egypt and in the Mediterranean cultures, for instance ancient Greece and Rome. (esrf.fr)
  • cultures, after the download slow cooking all year round more than 225 of our favorite recipes for the slow cooker plus time of their full pp. (lgne.org)
  • In ancient Rome , atramentum the inkstand, containing a black liquid, potentially made from octopus ink, was used. (girvin.com)
  • Among cephalopod recipes, both octopus and squid are used in dishes such as the popular fried calamari, and in sushi and sashimi. (wikipedia.org)
  • At Hawaii octopus were caught on hooks, and squid and cuttlefish have around the world for centuries been captured by nets, e.g., using light to attract squids at night. (frontiersin.org)
  • In Apicius' book there is a recipe for octopus with pepper, lovage, ginger, and the Roman fish sauce garum ( Grocock and Grainger, 2006 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • In addition, the migration behavior of iron ions was examined by laser ablation coupled with metal analysis (ICP-MS). This paper discusses the applicability and stability of nanocellulose on paper damaged by iron gall ink with regard to its long-term performance. (springeropen.com)
  • In the experimental part of the research, the stability of three different brown-gray inks was studied. (springeropen.com)
  • So why did these inks fall out of favor? (wesa.fm)
  • This book serves as a guide, implementing proven home cleaning recipes that have been around for centuries but have since been forgotten in favor of commercial products. (fishpond.com.au)
  • The practice of adding wine into historic inks was quite widespread," says chemist Matija Strlic , a senior lecturer at University College London who has worked with historic parchments and inks. (wesa.fm)
  • It has been farmed in Eastern Europe and Russia for wine making, food coloring, and dessert flavoring since the mid-twentieth century, but only recently have American consumers shown any interest. (macmillan.com)
  • The mid twentieth century represented a time of great experimentation for artists, in terms of both materials and techniques. (tate.org.uk)
  • [4] These ingredients were used to make oak gall ink . (wikipedia.org)
  • Kander, who ran a Wisconsin settlement house-a place where newly arrived immigrants came to get their bearings in America-offered recipes for ethnic food adapted to American ingredients, and provided household management advice designed to help immigrants acclimate to new kitchens and ingredients alike. (seriouseats.com)
  • Inks which are developed by a chemical reaction may depend on an acid-base reaction (like litmus paper ), reactions similar to the blueprint process, or any of hundreds of others. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ink was always prepared individually according to different local recipes so that many formulations and high compositional variability resulted, in particular with regard to different proportions of iron (II) sulphate gallic acid and additives. (springeropen.com)
  • Model inks, i.e. bistre, sepia and IGI with two molar ratios Fe : gallic acid were prepared according to historical recipes. (springeropen.com)
  • A freshly prepared water solution of ink is a colorless complex of Fe (II) with gallic acid. (springeropen.com)
  • Among bivalve recipes, clams are made into soups called chowders, or served as a sauce with pasta in dishes such as spaghetti alle vongole, while mussels are widely eaten as moules marinieres, nowadays often with frites (chips). (wikipedia.org)
  • In the sixth century, as Buddhism became more widely practiced, new vegetarian dietary restrictions came into fashion. (encyclopedia.com)
  • It has been widely used as a writing substrate since around the first century AD, when it began to supersede papyrus and it is the material on which scribes wrote the Codex Sinaiticus. (codexsinaiticus.org)
  • In the 15th century, it was widely used in Italy and subsequently in Northern Europe. (springeropen.com)
  • It was based on earlier recipe collections, and I came upon it when I was thinking about using recipes to tease out what exactly was supposed to be causing the symptoms - so, if the recipe involved plants that were clearly evacuative, then this could suggest that the cause of the disease was seen as a blockage. (hypotheses.org)
  • These used plants, animal, and mineral inks based on such materials as graphite that were ground with water and applied with ink brushes. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the dining room, bar and outdoor patio, chef/owner Steve Brown (Inn of the Seventh Ray, Monsieur Marcel) offers an American farm-to-table menu of small plates like foie gras and squid ink waffles, and 72-hour braised short ribs. (gayot.com)
  • [8] The best inks for drawing or painting on paper or silk are produced from the resin of the pine tree. (wikipedia.org)
  • When first put to paper, this ink is bluish-black. (wikipedia.org)
  • This 1623 abstract of a will (ref. 1505/1/7 ) from our Farnham Council records shows typical corrosive damage by iron gall ink to paper, causing the letters to burn through the document. (surreycc.gov.uk)
  • When first put to paper, this ink is bluish-black, over time fading to a dull brown. (girvin.com)
  • James was probably instrumental in this decision to move from drug to paper and ink. (bottlebooks.com)
  • Although they still handled their best selling drug product, Butler s Nerve and Bone Liniment , they turned their attention to paper, paper goods and ink. (bottlebooks.com)
  • We hypothesise that there were workshops specialised in preparing inks", adds Thomas Christiansen, Egyptologist from the University of Copenhagen and co-corresponding author of the paper. (esrf.fr)
  • He tested 229 recipes for their durability on various kinds of paper to find the most stable iron gall ink recipe. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some of Rembrandt's drawings, for example, the ink has made the paper fragile and brittle, Eusman says. (wesa.fm)
  • you don't eat the ink and paper it is printed on. (mednorthwest.com)
  • Natural packaging with recycled paper and biodegradable ink. (kreiner-natural-soaps.com)
  • Ink corrosion-a complex degradation process of cellulose in paper-is caused by iron gall ink. (springeropen.com)
  • This isn't a box of recipes so much as a barely-contained riot of loose paper. (yahoo.com)
  • Moreover, iron gall inks attack paper support by the processes commonly known as iron gall ink corrosion. (springeropen.com)
  • The observed changes allowed an evaluation of the effect of particular inks on paper support and effect of various external factors of aging (temperature, light, pollutants) on the model systems. (springeropen.com)
  • The addition of the sulfate of indigo renders the ink less stable on the page and prone to premature browning over time, [2] but less liable to mould in the inkwell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ink is a gel, sol, or solution that contains at least one colourant, such as a dye or pigment, and is used to color a surface to produce an image, text, or design. (wikipedia.org)
  • The analysis shows that lead was probably used as a dryer rather than as a pigment, similar to its usage in 15th century Europe during the development of oil paintings. (esrf.fr)
  • The fact that the lead was not added as a pigment but as a dryer infers that the ink had quite a complex recipe and could not be made by just anyone. (esrf.fr)
  • The form in which Rothko used lithol red is also unclear: it was certainly available in ready-mixed printing inks and paints, and as dry pigment. (tate.org.uk)
  • Sepia ink is obtained by adding gum Arabic into the extracts derived from Sepia officinalis cuttlefish. (springeropen.com)
  • Research into iron gall ink corrosion continues and, as yet, there is no definitive solution. (surreycc.gov.uk)
  • Reissland and Hofenk de Graaff [ 14 ] classified four conditions according to the type of damage caused by ink corrosion (cf. (springeropen.com)
  • Volume 3 of the book containing ten thousand selected household and workshop formulas, recipes, processes and money-saving methods for the practical use of manufacturers, mechanics, housekeepers and home workers. (chestofbooks.com)
  • Exploring the beauty recipes of the Middle Ages and Rennaissance. (wordpress.com)
  • Muhammed Ibn Umail Al Tamimi: Muhammed ibn Umail al-Tamini was an alchemist of the tenth century. (blogspot.com)
  • The ink can be made without the sulfate of indigo, which will make it considerably less expensive yet more archival. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Japanese Zen priest came across this seasoning while studying in China and brought the idea back to Japan, where he made his own improvements on the recipe. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Invisible ink , also known as security ink , is a substance used for writing, which is invisible either on application or soon thereafter, and can later be made visible by some means. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ink may be revealed by heat or by application of an appropriate chemical, or it may be made visible by viewing under ultraviolet light . (wikipedia.org)
  • As a result, it held up well over the years and has allowed us to examine documents and make numerous discoveries from writings made centuries ago. (pennsburymanor.org)
  • Here is the recipe which I made this week. (wordpress.com)
  • The knowledge of the inks, their recipes and the techniques for their production comes from archaeological analysis or from written text itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • Red and black ink. (esrf.fr)
  • Egyptians used black ink for writing the main body of text, while red ink was often used to highlight headings, instructions or keywords. (esrf.fr)
  • A team of scientists led by the ESRF, the European Synchrotron, and the University of Copenhagen used the powerful X-rays of the ESRF to study the red and black ink in papyri from the only large-scale institutional library known to have survived from ancient Egypt: the Tebtunis temple library. (esrf.fr)
  • The inks that have been applied and can then be identified by using a black light or other UV light source. (wikipedia.org)
  • The combination of XRF and Raman spectrometry enabled the characterization of black/brown inks in the text revealing the usage of iron gall inks. (springer.com)
  • I get a special jolt when I first see (as my grandmother would have said) in shvartz--that is, "in black" ink or printed type--something that had long tickled my mind but had never stood right before my eyes in its overt and original form. (stephenjaygould.org)
  • The chemistry involved can get pretty wonky, but basically, the wine was believed to make the coloring agents in ink more stable. (wesa.fm)
  • stable download slow cooking all year round more than 225 of our favorite recipes for the and popular cancer. (lgne.org)
  • Sepia and bistre inks have been assessed as generally more stable than iron-gall inks. (springeropen.com)
  • Iron gall ink was in use before the 7th century. (surreycc.gov.uk)
  • The preferred way to prolong the existence of originals written with iron gall ink is to store them in the appropriate environment, in particular in relative humidity under 60%, and also make sure they are handled carefully. (surreycc.gov.uk)
  • This iron gall ink recipe is taken from the Household Cyclopedia of General Information , published in 1881. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anyone anywhere near famous will have something in iron gall ink," says Elmer Eusman , head of the conservation division at the Library of Congress. (wesa.fm)
  • Iron gall ink was one of the most common writing media for centuries. (springeropen.com)
  • I don't need it to tell me how to truss up roast, I need it to preserve a digital copy of Nana's depression-era pot roast recipe before the ink finally fades to illegibility. (yahoo.com)
  • and a document of the reign of Ramses II (early thirteenth century BC). (wikipedia.org)
  • Her talk, "Walls that Speak: Landscape Factors in Early West African Urban Centers," looked primarily at the emergence of planned walled cities in thirteenth- and fourteenth-century Nigeria, particularly the ways such cities conformed to preexisting landscapes and incorporated them into their eventual designs. (doaks.org)
  • Organized by Georges Farhat, of the University of Toronto, and Garden and Landscape Studies Director John Beardsley, the symposium set out to examine processes of urbanization in pre-industrial environments, questioning longstanding definitions of urbanism and ranging across continents and centuries in search of a renewed understanding of how early urban environments formed, developed, and interacted with the natural world. (doaks.org)
  • It is not in common use now, though the preparation of inks with similar methods was common at one time. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is similar to Xeroxing a recipe from a cookbook and working off the copied page so as to not spill butter and milk on the original cookbook. (mednorthwest.com)
  • Once dried, the mixture was mixed with wine and iron salt over a fire to make the final ink. (wikipedia.org)
  • Today it is still used to make linseed oil and printing ink. (igourmet.com)
  • Beyond enjoying raspberries in pies, chutney and even wine, you can make your own ink from raspberry juice if you are so inclined. (eatingwell.com)
  • We consult old recipes, some of them mediaeval, to make colours and certain types of ink," Pinzari said. (medindia.net)
  • The 12th century recipe specifically says to make the mixture into pessaries, (i.e. vaginal suppositories). (wordpress.com)
  • When I smash an aronia berry between my thumb and the kitchen counter, I make ink that doubles as a nutritional supplement. (macmillan.com)
  • Their stories resonate through the centuries and connect you with your forebears, who were struggling then, at least as much as you now, to make sense of the world and to defend against sickness and old age. (soupsong.com)