Central Venous Pressure: The blood pressure in the central large VEINS of the body. It is distinguished from peripheral venous pressure which occurs in an extremity.Venous Pressure: The blood pressure in the VEINS. It is usually measured to assess the filling PRESSURE to the HEART VENTRICLE.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Plasma Substitutes: Any liquid used to replace blood plasma, usually a saline solution, often with serum albumins, dextrans or other preparations. These substances do not enhance the oxygen- carrying capacity of blood, but merely replace the volume. They are also used to treat dehydration.Fluid Therapy: Therapy whose basic objective is to restore the volume and composition of the body fluids to normal with respect to WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE. Fluids may be administered intravenously, orally, by intermittent gavage, or by HYPODERMOCLYSIS.Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Hypovolemia: An abnormally low volume of blood circulating through the body. It may result in hypovolemic shock (see SHOCK).Blood Volume: Volume of circulating BLOOD. It is the sum of the PLASMA VOLUME and ERYTHROCYTE VOLUME.Blood Pressure Determination: Techniques for measuring blood pressure.Vascular Resistance: The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.Lower Body Negative Pressure: External decompression applied to the lower body. It is used to study orthostatic intolerance and the effects of gravitation and acceleration, to produce simulated hemorrhage in physiologic research, to assess cardiovascular function, and to reduce abdominal stress during childbirth.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Vascular Capacitance: The measure of a BLOOD VESSEL's ability to increase the volume of BLOOD it holds without a large increase in BLOOD PRESSURE. The vascular capacitance is equal to the change in volume divided by the change in pressure.Hydroxyethyl Starch Derivatives: Starches that have been chemically modified so that a percentage of OH groups are substituted with 2-hydroxyethyl ether groups.Pulmonary Wedge Pressure: The blood pressure as recorded after wedging a CATHETER in a small PULMONARY ARTERY; believed to reflect the PRESSURE in the pulmonary CAPILLARIES.Portal Pressure: The venous pressure measured in the PORTAL VEIN.Monitoring, Intraoperative: The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).Jugular Veins: Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.Intracranial Pressure: Pressure within the cranial cavity. It is influenced by brain mass, the circulatory system, CSF dynamics, and skull rigidity.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Hydrostatic Pressure: The pressure due to the weight of fluid.Isotonic Solutions: Solutions having the same osmotic pressure as blood serum, or another solution with which they are compared. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Transducers, Pressure: Transducers that are activated by pressure changes, e.g., blood pressure.Sympathetic Nervous System: The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure: Manometric pressure of the CEREBROSPINAL FLUID as measured by lumbar, cerebroventricular, or cisternal puncture. Within the cranial cavity it is called INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE.Pressoreceptors: Receptors in the vascular system, particularly the aorta and carotid sinus, which are sensitive to stretch of the vessel walls.Head-Down Tilt: Posture while lying with the head lower than the rest of the body. Extended time in this position is associated with temporary physiologic disturbances.Supine Position: The posture of an individual lying face up.Hypertension, Portal: Abnormal increase of resistance to blood flow within the hepatic PORTAL SYSTEM, frequently seen in LIVER CIRRHOSIS and conditions with obstruction of the PORTAL VEIN.Capillary Resistance: The vascular resistance to the flow of BLOOD through the CAPILLARIES portions of the peripheral vascular bed.Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Catheterization, Central Venous: Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.Blood Circulation: The movement of the BLOOD as it is pumped through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Splanchnic Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS supplying the abdominal VISCERA.Blood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Hypotension: Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.Plethysmography: Recording of change in the size of a part as modified by the circulation in it.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Baroreflex: A response by the BARORECEPTORS to increased BLOOD PRESSURE. Increased pressure stretches BLOOD VESSELS which activates the baroreceptors in the vessel walls. The net response of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM is a reduction of central sympathetic outflow. This reduces blood pressure both by decreasing peripheral VASCULAR RESISTANCE and by lowering CARDIAC OUTPUT. Because the baroreceptors are tonically active, the baroreflex can compensate rapidly for both increases and decreases in blood pressure.Constriction: The act of constricting.Intra-Abdominal Hypertension: Pathological elevation of intra-abdominal pressure (>12 mm Hg). It may develop as a result of SEPSIS; PANCREATITIS; capillary leaks, burns, or surgery. When the pressure is higher than 20 mm Hg, often with end-organ dysfunction, it is referred to as abdominal compartment syndrome.Intraoperative Care: Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.Organ Dysfunction Scores: Ratings that express, in numerical values, the degree of impairment or abnormality in the function of specific organs.Hemodilution: Reduction of blood viscosity usually by the addition of cell free solutions. Used clinically (1) in states of impaired microcirculation, (2) for replacement of intraoperative blood loss without homologous blood transfusion, and (3) in cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia.Shock: A pathological condition manifested by failure to perfuse or oxygenate vital organs.Hepatectomy: Excision of all or part of the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Vena Cava, Inferior: The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.Blood Volume Determination: Method for determining the circulating blood volume by introducing a known quantity of foreign substance into the blood and determining its concentration some minutes later when thorough mixing has occurred. From these two values the blood volume can be calculated by dividing the quantity of injected material by its concentration in the blood at the time of uniform mixing. Generally expressed as cubic centimeters or liters per kilogram of body weight.Colloids: Two-phase systems in which one is uniformly dispersed in another as particles small enough so they cannot be filtered or will not settle out. The dispersing or continuous phase or medium envelops the particles of the discontinuous phase. All three states of matter can form colloids among each other.Femoral Vein: The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.Cardiovascular Deconditioning: A change in cardiovascular function resulting in a reduction in BLOOD VOLUME, and reflex DIURESIS. It occurs frequently after actual or simulated WEIGHTLESSNESS.Reflex: An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.Forearm: Part of the arm in humans and primates extending from the ELBOW to the WRIST.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Portal Vein: A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.Intraocular Pressure: The pressure of the fluids in the eye.Pulmonary Edema: Excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid in the lung, an indication of a serious underlying disease or disorder. Pulmonary edema prevents efficient PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE in the PULMONARY ALVEOLI, and can be life-threatening.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Anesthesia, Epidural: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected into the epidural space.Shock, Septic: Sepsis associated with HYPOTENSION or hypoperfusion despite adequate fluid resuscitation. Perfusion abnormalities may include, but are not limited to LACTIC ACIDOSIS; OLIGURIA; or acute alteration in mental status.Intensive Care: Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Pulmonary Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Cardiovascular System: The HEART and the BLOOD VESSELS by which BLOOD is pumped and circulated through the body.Collateral Circulation: Maintenance of blood flow to an organ despite obstruction of a principal vessel. Blood flow is maintained through small vessels.Atrial Natriuretic Factor: A potent natriuretic and vasodilatory peptide or mixture of different-sized low molecular weight PEPTIDES derived from a common precursor and secreted mainly by the HEART ATRIUM. All these peptides share a sequence of about 20 AMINO ACIDS.Positive-Pressure Respiration: A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.Acid-Base Equilibrium: The balance between acids and bases in the BODY FLUIDS. The pH (HYDROGEN-ION CONCENTRATION) of the arterial BLOOD provides an index for the total body acid-base balance.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Hepatic Veins: Veins which drain the liver.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Arterial Pressure: The blood pressure in the ARTERIES. It is commonly measured with a SPHYGMOMANOMETER on the upper arm which represents the arterial pressure in the BRACHIAL ARTERY.Venous Insufficiency: Impaired venous blood flow or venous return (venous stasis), usually caused by inadequate venous valves. Venous insufficiency often occurs in the legs, and is associated with EDEMA and sometimes with VENOUS STASIS ULCERS at the ankle.Liver Circulation: The circulation of BLOOD through the LIVER.Ventricular Function, Right: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the right HEART VENTRICLE.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Water-Electrolyte Balance: The balance of fluid in the BODY FLUID COMPARTMENTS; total BODY WATER; BLOOD VOLUME; EXTRACELLULAR SPACE; INTRACELLULAR SPACE, maintained by processes in the body that regulate the intake and excretion of WATER and ELECTROLYTES, particularly SODIUM and POTASSIUM.Immersion: The placing of a body or a part thereof into a liquid.Sodium Chloride: A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.Body Temperature Regulation: The processes of heating and cooling that an organism uses to control its temperature.Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory: Method in which repeated blood pressure readings are made while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It allows quantitative analysis of the high blood pressure load over time, can help distinguish between types of HYPERTENSION, and can assess the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy.Heart-Assist Devices: Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the LEFT VENTRICLE, to pump blood. They consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors.Norepinephrine: Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Air Pressure: The force per unit area that the air exerts on any surface in contact with it. Primarily used for articles pertaining to air pressure within a closed environment.Atmospheric Pressure: The pressure at any point in an atmosphere due solely to the weight of the atmospheric gases above the point concerned.Epinephrine: The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Cerebrovascular Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.Living Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Tourniquets: Devices for the compression of a blood vessel by application around an extremity to control the circulation and prevent the flow of blood to or from the distal area. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Nitroprusside: A powerful vasodilator used in emergencies to lower blood pressure or to improve cardiac function. It is also an indicator for free sulfhydryl groups in proteins.Liver Cirrhosis: Liver disease in which the normal microcirculation, the gross vascular anatomy, and the hepatic architecture have been variably destroyed and altered with fibrous septa surrounding regenerated or regenerating parenchymal nodules.Esophageal and Gastric Varices: Dilated blood vessels in the ESOPHAGUS or GASTRIC FUNDUS that shunt blood from the portal circulation (PORTAL SYSTEM) to the systemic venous circulation. Often they are observed in individuals with portal hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PORTAL).Partial Pressure: The pressure that would be exerted by one component of a mixture of gases if it were present alone in a container. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Vasodilator Agents: Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Ventricular Pressure: The pressure within a CARDIAC VENTRICLE. Ventricular pressure waveforms can be measured in the beating heart by catheterization or estimated using imaging techniques (e.g., DOPPLER ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY). The information is useful in evaluating the function of the MYOCARDIUM; CARDIAC VALVES; and PERICARDIUM, particularly with simultaneous measurement of other (e.g., aortic or atrial) pressures.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Halothane: A nonflammable, halogenated, hydrocarbon anesthetic that provides relatively rapid induction with little or no excitement. Analgesia may not be adequate. NITROUS OXIDE is often given concomitantly. Because halothane may not produce sufficient muscle relaxation, supplemental neuromuscular blocking agents may be required. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p178)Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Portal System: A system of vessels in which blood, after passing through one capillary bed, is conveyed through a second set of capillaries before it returns to the systemic circulation. It pertains especially to the hepatic portal system.Leg: The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.Antihypertensive Agents: Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.

Differential regulation of IGF-I, its receptor and GH receptor mRNAs in the right ventricle and caval vein in volume-loaded genetically hypertensive and normotensive rats. (1/288)

It has been suggested, mainly by in vitro findings, that cardiovascular tissue in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) should be more prone to proliferate/hypertrophy than that of the Wistar-Kyoto rat (WKY). The present study tests the hypothesis that the tissue of the low-pressure compartment in SHR, being structurally similar to that of the WKY, shows an increased growth response due to activation of the GH-IGF-I system. An aortocaval fistula (ACF) was induced in 64 SHR and WKY male rats and 44 rats served as controls. They were all followed for 1, 2, 4 and 7 days after surgery. In separate groups of SHR (n=4) and WKY (n=3), central venous pressure was measured by telemetry recordings prior to opening of the fistula and for up to 16 h post-surgery. Systolic blood pressure was measured during the week post-surgery. The right ventricular (RV) and the caval vein IGF-I mRNA and RV IGF-I receptor and GH receptor mRNAs were quantitated by means of solution hybridisation assay. In rats with ACF the systolic blood pressure decreased, approximately 29% in SHR and 16% in WKY between 1 and 7 days post-surgery (P<0.05, n=5-6 in each group). SHR with ACF showed a transient elevation in central venous pressure vs WKY. Within the week following fistula induction both strains showed a similar, pronounced increase in RV hypertrophy. SHR with ACF showed a smaller, or even blunted, overall response with respect to activation of the GH-IGF-I system compared with WKY, the latter showing clear-cut elevation of gene expressions. Two days after shunt opening in SHR, RV and caval vein IGF-I mRNA increased by 57% and 108% (P<0.05 for both, n=5-6 in each group) respectively, and these expressions were then turned off, whereas RV GH receptor and IGF-I receptor mRNA expression remained unaffected compared with WKY rats. WKY rats showed on average a later and a greater response of GH-IGF-I system mRNA expression vs SHR. The present in vivo study suggests that the SHR requires less activation of the GH-IGF-I system for creating a given adaptive structural growth response.  (+info)

Baroreflex gain predicts blood pressure recovery during simulated ventricular tachycardia in humans. (2/288)

BACKGROUND: Despite similar degrees of left ventricular dysfunction and similar tachycardia or pacing rate, blood pressure (BP) response and symptoms vary greatly among patients. Sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) increases during sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT), and the magnitude of this sympathoexcitatory response appears to contribute to the net hemodynamic outcome. We hypothesize that the magnitude of sympathoexcitation and thus arterial baroreflex gain is an important determinant of the hemodynamic outcome of VT. METHODS AND RESULTS: We evaluated the relation between arterial baroreflex sympathetic gain and BP recovery during rapid ventricular pacing (VP) in patients referred for electrophysiological study. Efferent postganglionic muscle SNA, BP, and central venous pressure (CVP) were measured in 14 patients during nitroprusside infusion and during VP at 150 (n=12) or 120 (n=2) bpm. Arterial baroreflex gain was defined as the slope of the relationship of change in SNA to change in diastolic BP during nitroprusside infusion. Recovery of mean arterial pressure (MAP) during VP was measured as the increase in MAP from the nadir at the onset of pacing to the steady-state value during sustained VP. Arterial baroreflex gain correlated positively with recovery of MAP (r=0.57, P=0.034). No significant correlation between ejection fraction and baroreflex gain (r=0.48, P=0.08) or BP recovery (r=0.41, P=0.15) was found. When patients were separated into high versus low baroreflex gain, the recovery of MAP during simulated VT was significantly greater in patients with high gain. CONCLUSIONS: These data strongly suggest that arterial baroreflex gain contributes significantly to hemodynamic stability during simulated VT. Knowledge of baroreflex gain in individual patients may help the clinician tailor therapy directed toward sustained VT.  (+info)

Venous hydrostatic indifference point as a marker of postnatal adaptation to orthostasis in swine. (3/288)

The postulate that venous adaptation assists postural baroreflex regulation by shifting the hydrostatic indifference point (HIP) toward the heart was investigated in eight midazolam-sedated newborn piglets. Whole body head-up (+15, +30, and +45 degrees ) and head-down (-15 and -30 degrees ) tilt provided a physiological range of orthostatic strain. HIP for all positive tilts shifted toward the heart (P < 0.05), +45 degrees HIP shifted most [6.7 +/- 0.3, 5.9 +/- 0.5, and 3.6 +/- 0.3 (SE) cm caudal to right atrium on days 1, 3, and 6, respectively]. HIP for negative tilts (3.0 +/- 0.2 cm caudal to right atrium) did not shift with postnatal age. Euthanasia on day 6 caused 2.1 +/- 0.3-cm caudal displacement of HIP for positive and negative tilts (P < 0.05). HIP proximity to right atrium was not altered by alpha-, beta-adrenoceptor and cholinoceptor blockade on day 5. It is concluded that early HIP migration reflects enhancement of venous pressure control to head-up orthostatic strain. The effect is independent of baroreflex-mediated adrenoceptor and cholinoceptor mechanisms.  (+info)

Arterial pressure in humans during weightlessness induced by parabolic flights. (4/288)

Results from our laboratory have indicated that, compared with those of the 1-G supine (Sup) position, left atrial diameter (LAD) and transmural central venous pressure increase in humans during weightlessness (0 G) induced by parabolic flights (R. Videbaek and P. Norsk. J. Appl. Physiol. 83: 1862-1866, 1997). Therefore, because cardiopulmonary low-pressure receptors are stimulated during 0 G, the hypothesis was tested that mean arterial pressure (MAP) in humans decreases during 0 G to values below those of the 1-G Sup condition. When the subjects were Sup, 0 G induced a decrease in MAP from 93 +/- 4 to 88 +/- 4 mmHg (P < 0.001), and LAD increased from 30 +/- 1 to 33 +/- 1 mm (P < 0.001). In the seated position, MAP also decreased from 93 +/- 6 to 87 +/- 5 mmHg (P < 0.01) and LAD increased from 28 +/- 1 to 32 +/- 1 mm (P < 0.001). During 1-G conditions with subjects in the horizontal left lateral position, LAD increased compared with that of Sup (P < 0.001) with no further effects of 0 G. In conclusion, MAP decreases during short-term weightlessness to below that of 1-G Sup simultaneously with an increase in LAD. Therefore, distension of the heart and associated central vessels during 0 G might induce the hypotensive effects through peripheral vasodilatation. Furthermore, the left lateral position in humans could constitute a simulation model of weightlessness.  (+info)

Cardiac evaluation in hypotension-prone and hypotension-resistant hemodialysis patients. (5/288)

BACKGROUND: Hypotension during hemodialysis occurs frequently, but the precise mechanism remains unclear. In this study, the presence of myocardial ischemia and myocardial contractile reserve during infusions of the beta-adrenergic receptor agonist dobutamine was assessed by means of dobutamine-atropine stress echocardiography (DSE) in hypotension-prone (HP) and hypotension-resistant (HR) hemodialysis patients. METHODS: Eighteen HP patients (age 53 +/- 6 years) were compared with 18 HR patients (age 53 +/- 3 years), matched with respect to the duration of hemodialysis and cardiovascular history. New wall abnormalities during dobutamine stress reflect the presence of myocardial ischemia, whereas the increase in stroke index and cardiac index reflects myocardial contractile reserve. RESULTS: Wall motion score at rest (1.42 +/- 0.53 vs. 1.44 +/- 0.57) and dobutamine-induced new wall motion abnormalities (4 vs. 3 patients) between HP and HR patients were similar, but responses of cardiac index, stroke index, and systolic blood pressure to do butamine between the two groups were different. Not withstanding a similar cardiac index at rest (2.4 +/- 1.1 liter/min/m2 in HP and 2.8 +/- 1.2 liter/min/m2 in HR patients), dobutamine-induced increments in the cardiac index were considerably smaller in the former (0.8 +/- 1.3 liter/min/m2) than in the latter patients (2.3 +/- 1.6 liter/min/m2, P = 0.002), predominantly because of a progressive decrease in the stroke index in the HP patients. CONCLUSION: Impaired myocardial contractile reserve rather than ischemia is predominant in HP patients. This impaired myocardial contractile reserve may play a role in the development of hemodialysis-induced hypotension.  (+info)

A prolonged spinal cord ischaemia model in pigs. Passive shunting offers stable central haemodynamics during aortic occlusion. (6/288)

OBJECTIVES: to evaluate the effect of a modified aortic shunt on central haemodynamic variables during experimental thoracic aortic occlusion in a prolonged spinal cord ischaemia model. MATERIAL AND METHODS: central haemodynamic variables were evaluated during aortic cross-clamping. In the shunt group (n=11), after the placement of proximal and distal aortic clamps, distal aortic perfusion was restored through an aortoiliac shunt via the left subclavian artery. In the no-shunt group (n=11), spinal cord ischaemia was achieved with only proximal aortic cross-clamping. The clamping time was 60 minutes in the shunt group and 30 minutes in the no-shunt group. RESULTS: in the no-shunt group, all animals needed inotropic support, vasodilators and buffers during the experiment. None of these drugs were needed in the shunt group. In the no-shunt group, cross-clamping caused a significant increase in mean arterial pressure and heart rate compared to baseline values. These variables were stable in the shunt group during aortic occlusion. In the reperfusion period cardiac output, heart rate and arterial pCO(2)were significantly higher in the no-shunt than in the shunt group. CONCLUSION: the present experimental spinal cord ischaemia model, using double aortic cross-clamping with shunt, offers improved central haemodynamics. This enables the study of prolonged selective spinal cord ischaemia without interaction from vasoactive drugs or systemic reperfusion.  (+info)

Differential regulation of cardiac ANP and BNP mRNA in different stages of experimental heart failure. (7/288)

Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) are cardiac hormones that are involved in water and electrolyte homeostasis in heart failure. Although both hormones exert almost identical biological actions, the differential regulation of cardiac ANP and BNP mRNA in compensated and overt heart failure is not known. To study the hypothesis that cardiac BNP is more specifically induced in overt heart failure, a large aortocaval shunt of 30 days duration was produced in rats and compared with compensated heart failure. Compensated heart failure was induced either by a small shunt of 30 days duration or by a large shunt of 3 days duration. Both heart failure models were characterized by increased cardiac weight, which was significantly higher in the large-shunt model, and central venous pressure. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was elevated only in the overt heart failure group (control: 5.7 +/- 0. 7; small shunt: 8.6 +/- 0.9; large shunt 3 days: 8.5 +/- 1.7; large shunt 30 days: 15.9 +/- 2.6 mmHg; P < 0.01). ANP and BNP plasma concentrations were elevated in both heart failure models. In compensated heart failure, ANP mRNA expression was induced in both ventricles. In contrast, ventricular BNP mRNA expression was not upregulated in any of the compensated heart failure models, whereas it increased in overt heart failure (left ventricle: 359 +/- 104% of control, P < 0.001; right ventricle: 237 +/- 33%, P < 0.01). A similar pattern of mRNA regulation was observed in the atria. These data indicate that, in contrast to ANP, cardiac BNP mRNA expression might be induced specifically in overt heart failure, pointing toward the possible role of BNP as a marker of the transition from compensated to overt heart failure.  (+info)

Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during a valsalva maneuver in the standing position. (8/288)

Occasionally, lifting of a heavy weight leads to dizziness and even to fainting, suggesting that, especially in the standing position, expiratory straining compromises cerebral perfusion. In 10 subjects, the middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (V(mean)) was evaluated during a Valsalva maneuver (mouth pressure 40 mmHg for 15 s) both in the supine and in the standing position. During standing, cardiac output decreased by 16 +/- 4 (SE) % (P < 0.05), and at the level of the brain mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased from 89 +/- 2 to 78 +/- 3 mmHg (P < 0.05), as did V(mean) from 73 +/- 4 to 62 +/- 5 cm/s (P < 0.05). In both postures, the Valsalva maneuver increased central venous pressure by approximately 40 mmHg with a nadir in MAP and cardiac output that was most pronounced during standing (MAP: 65 +/- 6 vs. 87 +/- 3 mmHg; cardiac output: 37 +/- 3 vs. 57 +/- 4% of the resting value; P < 0.05). Also, V(mean) was lowest during the standing Valsalva maneuver (39 +/- 5 vs. 47 +/- 4 cm/s; P < 0.05). In healthy individuals, orthostasis induces an approximately 15% reduction in middle cerebral artery V(mean) that is exaggerated by a Valsalva maneuver performed with 40-mmHg mouth pressure to approximately 50% of supine rest.  (+info)

*Central venous pressure

... Monitoring Cardiovascular Physiology Concepts Central Venous Pressure and Pulmonary Capillary Wedge ... Central venous pressure (CVP) is the blood pressure in the venae cavae, near the right atrium of the heart. CVP reflects the ... Deep inhalation Distributive shock Hypovolemia Jugular venous pressure Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure "Central Venous ... Venous function and central venous pressure: a physiologic story - a technical discussion of the more modern understanding of ...

*Jugular venous pressure

A 1996 systematic review concluded that a high jugular venous pressure makes a high central venous pressure more likely, but ... The jugular venous pressure (JVP, sometimes referred to as jugular venous pulse) is the indirectly observed pressure over the ... pericarditis Pericardial tamponade An important use of the jugular venous pressure is to assess the central venous pressure in ... The " v " wave corresponds to Venous filling when the tricuspid valve is closed and venous pressure increases from venous ...

*Compliance (physiology)

"Venous Function and Central Venous Pressure". Anesthesiology. 108 (4): 735-48. doi:10.1097/ALN.0b013e3181672607. PMID 18362606 ... The tendency of the arteries and veins to stretch in response to pressure has a large effect on perfusion and blood pressure. ... Pressure stockings are sometimes used to externally reduce compliance, and thus keep blood from pooling in the legs. ... Venous compliance is approximately 30 times larger than arterial compliance. Compliance is calculated using the following ...

*Abdominojugular test

Does this patient have abnormal central venous pressure?". JAMA. 275 (8): 630-4. doi:10.1001/jama.1996.03530320054034. PMID ... AJR is a test for measuring jugular venous pressure (JVP) through the distention of the internal jugular vein. A positive AJR ... On an otherwise healthy individual, the jugular venous pressure remains constant or temporarily rises for a heartbeat or two, ... or over the center of the abdomen for 10 seconds with a pressure of 20 to 35 mm Hg while observing the swelling of the internal ...

*British Columbia Ambulance Service

... class of skills that are not included in the standard ACP skill-set are Venous Pressure Monitoring, Arterial & Central Line ... Venous pressure monitoring, Arterial & Central Line Monitoring, Chest Tube Management, transthoracic pacing, Blood Product ... arterial line management and central venous pressure monitoring; infusion of blood products; point of care testing using ... Central & Parenteral Line Management, Venous & Arterial blood sample collection, point of collection analysis of ABG's and ...

*Umbilical vein

It also provides a route for measuring central venous pressure. Model of human embryo 1.3 mm. long. Scheme of placental ... Under extreme pressure, the round ligament may reopen to allow the passage of blood. Such recanalization may be evident in ... The blood pressure inside the umbilical vein is approximately 20 mmHg. The unpaired umbilical vein carries oxygen and nutrient ... The umbilical vein provides convenient access to the central circulation of a neonate for restoration of blood volume and for ...

*High-altitude cerebral edema

Elevated intracranial pressure is generally accepted to be a late effect of HACE. High central venous pressure may also occur ... Retinal venous dilation occurs in 59% of people with HACE. Rarer symptoms include brisk deep tendon reflexes, retinal ... If a lumbar puncture is performed, it will show normal cerebral spinal fluid and cell counts but an increase in pressure. In ... The leaking may be caused by increased pressure, or it may be caused by inflammation that makes the endothelium vulnerable to ...

*Sepsis

... central venous pressure and central venous oxygen saturation should be measured. Lactate should be re-measured if the initial ... fluids should be administered until the central venous pressure (CVP) reaches 8-12mmHg. Once these goals are met, the central ... In cases of severe sepsis and septic shock where a central venous catheter is used to measure blood pressures dynamically, ... a mean arterial pressure of between 65-90 mmHg, a central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) greater than 70% and a urine output ...

*Intravenous therapy

Caregivers can also measure central venous pressure and other physiological variables through the line. It is commonly believed ... In cases of shock, a central venous catheter, a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC), venous cutdown or intraosseous ... A port (often referred to by brand names such as Port-a-Cath or MediPort) is a central venous line that does not have an ... Central IV lines have their catheters that are advanced through a vein and empty into a large central vein (a vein within the ...

*Surviving Sepsis Campaign

To achieve central venous pressure (CVP) of > 8 mm Hg To achieve central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) of > 70% To achieve ... usually noradrenaline for hypotension not responding to initial fluid resuscitation to maintain mean arterial pressure (MAP) > ...

*Livestock crush

"Changes in central venous pressure and blood lactate concentration in response to acute blood loss in horses". J. Am. Vet. Med ... In central Italy it is called a travaglio, but in Sardinia is referred to as Sardinian: sa macchina po ferrai is boisi, or "the ...

*Beck's triad (cardiology)

... thus causing a related increase in systolic blood pressure. The rising central venous pressure is evidenced by distended ... Hypotension with a Narrowed Pulse Pressure Jugular Venous Distention Muffled heart Sounds The fall in arterial blood pressure ... The signs are low arterial blood pressure, distended neck veins, and distant, muffled heart sounds. Narrowed pulse pressure ... It is caused by reduced diastolic filling of the right ventricle, due to pressure from the adjacent expanding pericardial sac. ...

*Venous access

Central venous catheters (CVCs) may also be used to measure the central venous pressure. The most common form of venous access ... "Venous access: a practical review for 2009". Canadian Family Physician. 55 (5): 494-6. PMC 2682308 . PMID 19439704. Venous ... Venous access is any kind of way to access the bloodstream through the veins, either to administer intravenous therapy ( ... is a peripheral venous cannula which is generally inserted in the hands or forearms. CVCs are required in some situations (e.g ...

*Etilefrine

... central venous pressure and mean arterial pressure of healthy individuals. Peripheral vascular resistance falls during the ... Intravenous infusion of this compound increases cardiac output, stroke volume, venous return and blood pressure in man and ... accompanied by rises in mean arterial pressure, occur when etilefrine is infused after administration of intravenous ...

*Emergency ultrasound

... does inferior vena cava collapsibility correlate with central venous pressure? J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2014 Apr;76(4):956-963 ... including the assessment of central venous collapsibility as a more standardized mesure of intravascular volume status. More ... including central and venous access, thoracentesis, paracentesis, pericardiocentesis, arthrocentesis, regional anesthesia, ... Conversely, weak heart activity and a very full, non-collapsible IVC would indicate a cardiac cause for low blood pressure. For ...

*Lymphangiectasia

... or increased central venous pressure (CVP) causing abnormal lymph drainage. Increased CVP can be caused by pericarditis or ... which causes low oncotic pressure. These signs include ascites, pleural effusion, and edema of the limbs and trunk. Weight loss ...

*Bainbridge reflex

... is an increase in heart rate due to an increase in central venous pressure. Increased blood volume is detected by stretch ... resulting in a decrease in the venous pressure of the great veins. This continues until right atrial blood pressure returns to ... As venous return increases, the pressure in the superior and inferior vena cava increase. This results in an increase in the ... During inhalation intrathoracic pressure decreases. It triggers increased venous return which is registered by stretch ...

*STS-30

Commander Walker and Pilot Grabe had problems with a device used to take measurements of central venous pressure to determine ...

*Peritonitis

Sequestration of fluid and electrolytes, as revealed by decreased central venous pressure, may cause electrolyte disturbances, ...

*Brain natriuretic peptide

... the actions of both BNP and ANP result in a decrease in cardiac output due to an overall decrease in central venous pressure ... actions of BNP are similar to those of ANP and include decrease in systemic vascular resistance and central venous pressure as ... The net effect of these peptides is a decrease in blood pressure due to the decrease in systemic vascular resistance and, thus ... This increases pressure in the glomerular capillaries, thus increasing the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), resulting in ...

*José L. Duomarco

La presión venosa central y periférica en condiciones normales y patológicas.(Central and peripheral venous pressure in normal ... XXVI, p. 1. Venous pressure of man in space. J.L. Duomarco; R. Rimini; Aerospace Medicine, Vol. 41 No. 2, February 1970. One of ... When already a renowned investigator, enthusiastic on space travel, Duomarco published in 1970 his last paper: "Venous Pressure ... Conclusively, this book is an outstanding contribution to the rational knowledge of venous pressure physiology and ...

*Tissue Doppler echocardiography

... as the right atrial pressure is the same as central venous pressure which can easily be assessed from venous congestion. . One ... this pressure difference is both a function of the pressure drop during early relaxation and the initial atrial pressure. In ... Thus, the ratio E/e' is related to the atrial pressure, and can show increased filling pressure, although with several ... The flow, is driven by the pressure difference between atrium and ventricle, ...

*Pulmonary edema

... high central venous pressures and high pulmonary artery pressures. Blood tests are performed for electrolytes (sodium, ... Negative pressure pulmonary edema in which a significant negative pressure in the chest (such as from an inhalation against an ... When directly or indirectly caused by increased left ventricular pressure pulmonary edema may form when mean pulmonary pressure ... raised jugular venous pressure and hepatomegaly, where the liver is enlarged and may be tender or even pulsatile. Other signs ...

*Centimetre of water

It is frequently used to measure the central venous pressure, the intracranial pressure while sampling cerebrospinal fluid, as ... This unit is commonly used to specify the pressure to which a CPAP machine is set after a polysomnogram. Inch of water Pressure ... is a less commonly used unit of pressure derived from pressure head calculations using metrology. It may be defined as the ... It is also a common unit of pressure in the speech sciences. ... pressure exerted by a column of water of 1 cm in height at 4 °C ...

*Bloodless surgery

... low central venous pressure anesthesia (for select cases), or suture ligation of vessels. Other methods include the use of ...

*Cushing's syndrome

Signs and symptoms may include high blood pressure, abdominal obesity but with thin arms and legs, reddish stretch marks, a ... Play media Symptoms include rapid weight gain, particularly of the trunk and face with sparing of the limbs (central obesity). ... Occasionally, determining the ACTH levels in various veins in the body by venous catheterization, working towards the pituitary ... Other signs include increased urination (and accompanying increased thirst), persistent high blood pressure (due to cortisol's ...
In Defense of the Central Venous Pressure. Jon-Emile S. Kenny M.D.. In the waning days of my fellowship I received a hemoptysis consult in the cardiac care unit. Sifting through CT scans, I overheard two house-officers giving sign-out for the evening. When reviewing the clinical data, one of the residents referred to the central venous pressure [CVP] as a random number generator. I spied them, gave a stern look and recalled being on morning rounds as a sleep-deprived intern; I was mercilessly grilled on the nuances of the central venous pressure and its measurement. I paused and thought: is this what were teaching housestaff? That this measurement is random?. The Venetian Marionette. Years ago, while strolling the promenade along Venice Beach, I saw a young street performer. He was a puppeteer, with an oddly dressed marionette; from the corner of my eye it appeared that his control over his puppet was poor. The marionette haphazardly bobbed up and down, extremities akimbo in utter randomness. ...
... (CVP) is the blood pressure in the venae cavae, near the right atrium of the heart. CVP reflects the amount of blood returning to the heart and the ability of the heart to pump the blood back into the arterial system. CVP is often a good approximation of right atrial pressure (RAP),[1] although the two terms are not identical, as a pressure differential can sometimes exist between the venae cavae and the right atrium. CVP and RAP can differ when arterial tone is altered. This can be graphically depicted as changes in the slope of the venous return plotted against right atrial pressure (where central venous pressure increases, but right atrial pressure stays the same; VR = CVP − RAP).. CVP has been, and often still is, used as a surrogate for preload, and changes in CVP in response to infusions of intravenous fluid have been used to predict volume-responsiveness (i.e. whether more fluid will improve cardiac output). However, there is increasing evidence that CVP, whether ...
Central venous pressure (CVP) is at the crucial intersection of the force returning blood to the heart and the force produced by cardiac function, which drives the blood back to the systemic circulation. The normal range of CVP is small so that before using it one must ensure proper measurement, specifically the reference level. A useful approach to hypotension is to first determine if arterial pressure is low because of a decrease in vascular resistance or a decrease in cardiac output. This is done by either measuring cardiac output or making a clinical assessment blood flow. If the cardiac output is decreased, next determine whether this is because of a cardiac pump problem or a return problem. It is at this stage that the CVP is most helpful for these options can be separated by considering the actual CVP or even better, how it changed with the change in cardiac output. A high CVP is indicative of a primary pump problem, and a low CVP and return problem. Understanding the factors that determine CVP
Central catheters are common in acute and critical care areas. Because of the complexity of the care for these patients, many central catheters have multiple lumens. Typically, the distal lumen opens at the tip of the catheter, while the other lumen(s) open slightly proximal to this on the sides of the catheter. Is a central venous pressure (CVP) measurement obtained from any one of the 2, 3, or 4 lumens of these catheters different from the measurement obtained from any of the other lumens? Very little direct evidence is available to guide us on this question. What little we know comes from studies on different types of catheter placement. Only 1 study specifically addressed the influence of port site.... ...
To assess the hemodynamic effects of connection to continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in a pediatric experimental animal model. Prospective experimental study was performed using piglets between 2 and 3 months of age and 9-11 kg. CRRT with a PrismaflexR monitor and HF20 filter (surface of 0.2 m2 ) was started after monitoring and anesthetic induction with an initial blood flow at 20 mL/min with 10 mL/min increases every minute until the goal flow of 5 mL/kg/min was achieved. Heart rate, blood pressure, central venous pressure, cardiac index, and renal blood flow were registered at baseline, 5, 15, 30, 60, 120, 180, 240, and 360 min ...
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Figure 2. If the patient had been in the natural squatting position for this delivery, the child, instead of being placed at the level of the placenta, would have been delivered downwards and would have been immediately subjected to a placental transfusion pressure 30+ cms. of water at birth due to gravity. Crying, (due to cold and liver pain) placental transfusion and cord closure would probably all have been completed within a minute or two.. The physiological mechanism that produces the "step" pattern is a sphincter-like closure of the umbilical vein that is reflexively controlled to work as a pressure valve. The right atrium has pressor receptors that are triggered by low central venous pressure; they control the release of anti-diuretic hormone. A pressor receptor in the left atrium that is triggered by adequate pressure to close the foramen ovale would be the ideal receptor to effect closure of the umbilical vessels. Some cord pulsation was recorded at this time, but blood flow in the ...
Uthoff, Heiko and Breidthardt, Tobias and Klima, Theresia and Aschwanden, Markus and Arenja, Nisha and Socrates, Thenral and Heinisch, Corinna and Noveanu, Markus and Frischknecht, Barbara and Baumann, Ulrich and Jaeger, Kurt A. and Mueller, Christian ...
In days gone by, people relied on the CVP as a simple means of predicting fluid responsiveness. But it turns out the CVP is really bad at predicting the patients responsiveness to fluid challenges. There are too many variables governing central venous pressure. This has become evident from some high-quality evidence, and it has been known for some time. Indeed, so obvious the uselessness of CVP in this scenario, and so entrenched the practice of its use, that prominent authors have described a recent meta-analysis as a plea for common sense.
In a prospective study conducted at the emergency departments of three U.S. medical centers, 300 patients with severe sepsis and septic shock were randomized to resuscitation to a target central venous pressure of 8-12 mm Hg, mean arterial pressure of >65 mm Hg, and either ScvO2 70% or lactate clearance >10% at 2 hours after initiation of resuscitation. The primary outcome was absolute in-hospital mortality. Overall, 23% of patients in the ScvO2 group died, compared with 17% in the lactate clearance group; the 6% difference between groups did not reach the predetermined statistical threshold of a 10% difference. Rates of adverse events were similar between groups ...
Buy Romsons CVP (Central Venous Pressure) Manometer online at best prices. Sliding Indicator, Moulded Clamps, Long Extension Tube, Sterile. COD Available
Assist anesthesiologists in monitoring of patients, including electrocardiogram (EKG), direct arterial pressure, central venous pressure, arterial blood gas, hematocrit, or routine measurement of temperature, respiration, blood pressure or heart rate ...
Biology Assignment Help, Cardiac care on admission for operation, Cardiac Care on Admission (First two hours) ECG is monitored by more than one lead (three to five). Left atrial pressure, arterial BP, central venous pressure, respiration rate, heart rate, body temperature and pulse oxymetry is monitored co
pThe penis returns to its non-erect state, dehydrated patients must go smoothly. Closed December 24th 6, or tongue -breathing problems -changes in blood sugar -cold hands or feet -difficulty sleeping. These fillers that are added to the drug have no medical use and do not to change the effectiveness of the final product, buy nolvadex online assume that results in order nolvadex online occurs causing progressive renal impairment in 1885. Tell your doctor if you have or have ever had diabetes or kidney or liver disease, the central venous pressure. I printed out the prescription savings card and took it to my local pharmacist, 30 p./ ...
Graphical depiction of composite venous collapsibility (a, left) and central venous pressure (b, right) measurements collected during standardized crystalloid b
TY - JOUR. T1 - Responsiveness of stroke volume variation and central venous pressure during acute normovolemic and hypervolemic hemodilution. AU - Ji, Fu Hai. AU - Li, Wen Jing. AU - Li, Jiang. AU - Peng, Ke. AU - Yang, Jian Ping. AU - Liu, Hong. PY - 2013/5/20. Y1 - 2013/5/20. N2 - Background Stroke volume variation (SVV) is a robust indicator of fluid responsiveness during volume change. We compared the sensibility of SVV by Vigileo/Flotrac to central venous pressure (CVP) when volume changes in patients undergoing intraoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) and acute hypervolemic hemodilution (AHH). Methods Forty patients were randomly divided into an ANH group (n=20) and an AHH group (n=20). All patients received general anesthesia and were mechanically ventilated. Data were collected from 7 different time-points in the ANH group: baseline, after withdrawal of 5%, 10%, and 15% of the estimated blood volume (EBV) and after replacement with an equal volume of 6% hydroxyethyl starch ...
BACKGROUND: Low central venous pressure (CVP) affects hemodynamic stability and tissue perfusion. This prospective study aimed to evaluate the optimal CVP during partial hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).. METHODS: Ninety-seven patients who underwent partial hepatectomy for HCC had their CVP controlled at a level of 0 to 5 mmHg during hepatic parenchymal transection. The systolic blood pressure (SBP) was maintained, if possible, at 90 mmHg or higher. Hepatitis B surface antigen was positive in 90 patients (92.8%) and cirrhosis in 84 patients (86.6%). Pringle maneuver was used routinely in these patients with clamp/unclamp cycles of 15/5 minutes. The average clamp time was 21.4+/-8.0 minutes. These patients were divided into 5 groups based on the CVP: group A: 0-1 mmHg; B: 1.1-2 mmHg; C: 2.1-3 mmHg; D: 3.1-4 mmHg and E: 4.1-5 mmHg. The blood loss per transection area during hepatic parenchymal transection and the arterial blood gas before and after liver transection were ...
To the Editor: Observing jugular venous pressure (JVP) is central to cardiovascular examination. Lewis, in 1930,1 was the first to report the use of the external jugular vein as a manometer for recording pressure in the right atrium. Unfortunately, some textbooks on clinical examination and many clinical teachers incorrectly state that the external jugular is unreliable for measuring JVP and that only the internal jugular should be used. The problem with this is that the internal jugular vein is located deep within the neck, where it is covered by the sternomastoid muscle and is therefore not usually visible.. ...
Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether a relationship exists between the inferior vena cava diameter (IVCD) or the superior vena cava diameter (SVCD) measured at the point of entry into the right atrium using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and the central venous pressure (CVP) under different experimental conditions. Design: Prospective study. Setting: University hospital, single institution. Participants: Seventy patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Interventions: CVP, lVCD, and SVCD were measured in a 2-dimensional, long-axis midesophageal bicaval view at end-diastole with electrocardiographic synchronization. Data were recorded during suspended ventilation, before and after leg elevation, and at different levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (0, 5, and 10 cmH(2)O). Measurements and Main Results: The relationship between lVCD and CVP had 2 portions: A first (CVP <= 11 mmHg) in which the lVCD showed a strong correlation with the CVP (R = 0.801, p < ...
Central venous pressure (CVP) and right atrial pressure (RAP) are important parameters in the complete hemodynamic assessment of a patient. Sonographic measurement of the inferior vena cava (IVC) diameter is a non-invasive method of estimating these parameters, but there are limited data summarizing its diagnostic accuracy across multiple studies. We performed a comprehensive review of the existing literature to examine the diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of sonographic measurement of IVC diameter as a method for assessing CVP and RAP. We performed a systematic search using PubMed of clinical studies comparing sonographic evaluation of IVC diameter and collapsibility against gold standard measurements of CVP and RAP. We included clinical studies that were performed in adults, used current imaging techniques, and were published in English. Twenty one clinical studies were identified that compared sonographic assessment of IVC diameter with CVP and RAP and met all inclusion criteria. Despite
The reliability of the individual practitioner in finding the jugular venous pulse is notoriously unreliable. Given the safety of ultrasound, its relatively cheap cost and its easy access, recent studies have looked into the possibility of ultrasound guided determination of the jugular venous pulse. Two separate studies in 2010, one by Northern Ontario Medical School, and the other by the University of Iowa have suggested a much higher reliability in ultrasound-determined jugular venous pulse. However, as with any new technological method it warrants further research before its application clinically ...
To prove my point I ask you, does the quality or quantity of bowel sounds matter in a patient without bowel complaints? Is there any part of the head exam that would change in the course of an inpatient admission? The lung exam may change in a case of pneumonia but isnt the fever curve and the general appearance of the patient better and more important to note? The rales of heart failure may improve in a case of congestive heart failure, but Id say that when your patient is sleeping flat, no longer dyspneic, and no longer tripoding, the pulmonary finding of rales is irrelevant ...
What does waves in JVP represent? The upward deflections are : 1. a (atrial contraction) 2. c (ventricular contraction and resulting bulging of tricuspid
Patients who present to the emergency department (ED) with return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest generally have poor outcomes. Guidelines for treatment can be complicated and difficult to implement. This study examined the feasibility of implementing a care bundle including therapeutic hypothermia (TH) and early hemodynamic optimization for comatose patients with return of spontaneous circulation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The study included patients over a 2-year period in the ED and intensive care unit of an academic tertiary-care medical center. The first year (prebundle) provided a historical control, followed by a prospective observational period of bundle implementation during the second year. The bundle elements included (a) TH initiated; (b) central venous pressure/central venous oxygen saturation monitoring in 2 h; (c) target temperature in 4 h; (d) central venous pressure greater than 12 mmHg in 6 h; (e) MAP greater than 65 mmHg in 6 h; (f) central venous ...
Influence of stroke volume variation on fluid treatment and postoperative complications in thoracic surgery Cengiz Sahutoglu, Erbil Turksal, Seden Kocabas, Fatma Zekiye Askar Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Ege University School of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey Background: Fluid management in critically ill patients usually relies on increasing preload to augment cardiac output. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate whether stroke volume variation (SVV) can guide fluid therapy and reduce complications.Patients and methods: In this retrospective study, a total of 88 patients who underwent lobectomy were divided into two groups: group 1 (SVV, n=43) and group 2 (conventional or central venous pressure [CVP], n=45). Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, SVV (only group 1), CVP (all patients), urea, creatinine, and hemoglobin levels before and after surgery, use of fluid, blood and inotropic agents, and postoperative complications were recorded retrospectively.Results: The mean age of
We included 777 patients [age: 63 ± 15 years; female gender: 274 (35 %); simplified acute physiology score II: 55.9 ± 20.6; ICU length of stay: 6 days (interquartile range (IQR) 3-13); ICU mortality: 32.8 %] and surveyed 2,694 FBs. At enrolment mean arterial pressure was 63 mmHg (IQR 55-71). The most frequent triggers of FB were hypotension, low urine output, tachycardia, skin mottling and hyperlactataemia. Amount of fluid given at each FB was highly variable between centres. Crystalloids were used in 91 % (2,394/2,635) and synthetic colloids in 3.3 % (87/2,635) of FBs. Overall, clinicians used any kind of haemodynamic assessment (central venous pressure measurement, predictive indices of fluid responsiveness, echocardiography, cardiac output monitoring or a combination of these) in 23.6 % (635/2,694) of all FBs surveyed, with an important between-centre heterogeneity.. ...
This is relevant to Question 10 from the second paper of 2004, Outline the factors associated with the accuracy of central venous pressure measurement by a central venous catheter.
List of disease causes of Edema due to increased venous pressure in children, patient stories, diagnostic guides. Diagnostic checklist, medical tests, doctor questions, and related signs or symptoms for Edema due to increased venous pressure in children.
Normal hemodynamic monitoring values for quick reference. There will be posts in the future going over each value and its clinical significance. Cardiac Index (CI) 2.5-4.2Cardiac Output (CO) 4-8Central Venous Pressure (CVP) 2-6Pulmonary Artery Pressure (PA):Systolic 15-25Diastolic 8-15Pulmonary Capillary Wedge Pressure (PCWP) 4-12Pulmonary Vascular Resistance (PVR) 37-250Systemic Vascular Resistance (SVR) 800-1300Stroke Volume 60-135
Introduction: Although the venous collapsibility index (VCI) and central venous pressure (CVP) have been shown to correlate reasonably well, little has been reported on the relationships between VCI and other commonly used hemodynamic variables (i.e., HR, blood pressure). This is a retrospective, post hoc analysis of data from a recently completed 3-year prospective study of VCI in critically ill and injured patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 267 previously recorded data pairs in a group of 82 adults (≥18 to ,90 years) patients were included in this analysis. Subsequent correlations were performed between VCI and the following clinical parameters: (a) Heart rate (HR), (b) systolic blood pressure (SBP), (c) diastolic blood pressure (DBP), (d) mean arterial pressure (MAP), (e) pulse pressure, (f) abdominal perfusion pressure (APP or MAP-CVP), (g) positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), head-of-bed elevation, and (h) HR-blood pressure index (i.e., HR minus MAP). In addition, ...
BACKGROUND: Dissection of aorta is a rare, but fatal complication of aortic cannulation in cardiac surgery can be caused by the sudden rise in blood pressure and hemodynamic variations. METHODS: In this study, 90 patients aged 18 years or older undergoing cardiac surgery were divided into two equal groups. Under similar conditions, trial group received 1.5 mg/kg of lidocaine for 90 s before cannulation and control group received normal saline. Hemodynamic parameters of patients including systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and central venous pressure before cannulation and 1, 3, and 5 min after cannulation were recorded in a form ...
The global Hemodynamic Monitoring Devices Market is expected to reach USD 1.4 billion by 2024, according to a new report by Grand View Research, Inc. The increasing demand for non-invasive monitoring techniques coupled with the rising prevalence of chronic illness is expected to drive the market over the forecast period. The hemodynamic monitoring market is influenced by new technologies such as echocardiography, thoracic electrical bio-impedance and others that maybe used to non-invasively monitor parameters such as cardiac output, arterial pressure, blood oxygen level, and central venous pressure. Furthermore, the rising population of critically ill patients coupled with defective healthcare facilities with drawbacks, such as understaffing, is propelling market players to develop minimal invasive hemodynamic monitoring devices that may be used in clinical and home care settings. Along with the new product development, the market is also anticipated to witness the development of technologies ...
PEEP will decrease cardiac output in hypovolemic and normovolemic patients because of the drop in venous return.. If a patient has poor LVEF or CHF, PEEP will reduce LV transmural pressure, reducing afterload, which improves LV function. PAOP will also be reduced.. ...
CVP and Arterial Monitoring. Outline. Direct Arterial Monitoring Transducer Troubles CVP Monitoring and its clinical significance. Direct Arterial Monitoring. Arterial cannulation w/ continuous pressure waveform display remains the accepted standard for BP monitoring Slideshow 176179 by...
The CVP optimizer uses the MarkowitzSharpe approach as applied to planning logistics and marketing models to increase profitability of a companys production and trading activities Any purchases and sales are regarded to be portfolio
I know there is a cpt of 36597, but its with the use of fluoroscopy. Per the doctor, he did not use the fluoroscopy. We have tried to research to find
1. Four Macaca fascicularis monkeys were bilaterally sympathectomized by removing the thoracic sympathetic chain from the middle cervical ganglion to the T-6 sympathetic ganglion. This was done chronically, allowing adequate recovery time. While under light pentobarbital anaesthesia, the animals were then subjected to blood volume expansions with isotonic, isooncotic dextran or to head-out immersions. Seven immersions and seven volume expansions were carried out.. 2. With immersion, there were significant increases in blood pressure, central venous pressure, urine flow, sodium excretion, potassium excretion, glomerular filtration rate, percentage of filtered sodium excreted and free water clearance. Although blood pressure and central venous pressure initially increased during the first immersion period, heart rate continued to increase with the immersion, while blood pressure and central venous pressure remained constant. Volume expansion caused an increase in central venous pressure, urine ...
We developed a method to measure the compliance, defined as ΔVΔP, of the total systemic vascular bed (Ct) without stopping systemic flow. In 10 open-chest dogs, venous return (and cardiac output) was maintained at a constant level by inserting a perfusion pump (with no reservoir) between the caval veins and the right atrium. About 5% of the estimated total blood volume was withdrawn from the dog within 45 seconds. Resultant changes in central venous pressure were measured 10, 30, 60, 120, and 180 seconds after the volume change. The bled volume was then reinfused to repeat similar venous pressure measurements for another 180 seconds. The measurements were repeated after slightly increasing the blood volume or sectioning the vagi. The mean value of Ct measured 10 seconds after hemorrhage or reinfusion was 1.96 ± 0.10 (SE) ml/mm Hg/kg body weight before vagotomy. Paired t-tests indicated no significant difference between measurements of bleeding and reinfusion, measurements with different ...
A 21-year-old patient with pulmonary atresia and ventricular septal defect (PA-VSD) was admitted to the hospital for tubal ligation. Invasive arterial and central venous (CVP) pressure, pulse oximetric oxygen saturation (SpO2), and (from the tip of o
Left ventricular and central venous pressures, echocardiographic assessment, and direct postmortem cardiac examination were used to verify that heart failure had developed 16 wk after left coronary arterial ligation in our test rats. Our findings showed an increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and an increased central venous pressure, both of which are signs of heart failure. Echocardiography is commonly used as a noninvasive method to assess cardiac function during heart disease (5, 7, 12, 39). Our 2D and 2D-guided M-mode images demonstrated an increased left ventricular internal diameter, endocardial area, and left ventricular volume in the heart failure rats compared with the control rats. Fractional shortening and ejection fraction were significantly lower in heart failure rats. Postmortem measurement showed that left ventricular mass was increased in the heart failure rats. This occurred simultaneously with chamber enlargement, but with relatively normal wall thickness, which ...
Apart from the aetiologies mentioned above, the perfusion pressure during CPB, i.e. the mean arterial pressure (MAP), may contribute to the occurrence of PPCI. The concept of cerebral autoregulation, has been shown to apply not only under regular physiologic conditions between MAP levels of 50-150 mmHg [9, 10] but also during heart surgery with non-pulsatile CPB and moderate haemodilution, where the autoregulation of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) in securing a flow-metabolism coupling [11-14] is limited to a functional range of cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) between 40 and 120 mmHg [15]. Based on the results from humane clinical studies, Govier et al. [16] and Murkin et al. [14, 17] reported that CBF was independent of MAP down to 30 mmHg or CPP (approximately the MAP minus the jugular venous pressure) of 20 mmHg during hypothermic CPB.. Though debated for many years, the topic of perfusion pressure strategy is still controversial, as many questions remain unanswered. Below the lower limit of ...
As regular PulmCCM readers know, the ProCESS, ARISE and ProMISe randomized trials showed no benefit of protocolized early goal-directed therapy as compared to usual conscientious care in the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock.. In response to ProCESS and ARISE, the influential Surviving Sepsis Campaign now advises that measurement of central venous pressure (CVP) and central venous oxygenation (ScVO2) -- two core components of the so-called EGDT sepsis bundle -- are not necessary for all patients with septic shock.. As long as patients have received timely antibiotics and fluid resuscitation, the Campaign says, "requiring measurement of CVP and ScvO2 in all patients ... is not supported by the available evidence.". They further reported that the Surviving Sepsis committee would "immediately review the evidence" to determine whether and when an update is needed to its practice-defining Surviving Sepsis Guidelines.. After the publication of ProMISe, it looks like that revision is coming ...
A 57 year old white man was seen in the outpatient clinic with a four month history of breathlessness on exertion, particularly when climbing the stairs. The breathlessness had started after a protracted episode of fever, weight loss, and breathlessness. His only medical history was pleurisy as a child, which had resolved after a routine course of antibiotics. He had no long term sequelae from this disease. He was a lifetime resident of the United Kingdom.. On examination the patient did not have a fever or any palpable lymphadenopathy. His heart rate was 76 bpm in normal sinus rhythm, jugular venous pressure (venous pulse) raised at 11 cm above the right atrium, and blood pressure 122/76 mm Hg, and his heart sounds were normal. His chest was clear but examination of his abdomen showed hepatomegaly. He had no pedal oedema. Oxygen saturations were 99% on room air. He did not desaturate after exercising up and down stairs; however, he did become tachycardic with a heart rate of 140 bpm.. Computed ...
&splt;p>Sina Jam&spamp;eacute;, MD and Mary Jam&spamp;eacute;, MD&splt;/p> &splt;p>December 15, 2016&splt;/p> &splt;p>A 90-year-old gentleman with a history of heart failure from ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy with reduced systolic function, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, and stage II CKD presented to his outpatient provider with shortness of breath. The patient reported progressively worsening dyspnea on exertion, orthopnea, and weight gain of three weeks duration. Medications were notable for amiodarone and recent initiation of carvedilol. At rest, the patient had a heart rate of 47 bpm and an oxygen saturation of 92%; with ambulation, his heart rate increased to 74 bpm and oxygen saturation dropped to 84%. On examination, jugular venous pressure was 16 cm of water; bilateral crackles and worsening bilateral pitting edema were also present. Given the bradycardia noted on examination, an ECG was obtained (Figure 1).&splt;/p> &splt;p>&splt;img src=&doublequot;http://www.sgim.org/Image Library/JGIM/Web
Between 12 and 24 min after anesthetized gilts were given a lethal iv dose of purified MCLR (72 $\mu$g/kg), mean aortic and central venous pressures, and renal and hepatic perfusion decreased ($\downarrow$) significantly, while portal venous pressure increased ($\uparrow$) significantly. Significant changes at 45 min included $\uparrow$ bile acids, total bilirubin, lactate, K, and pO$\sb2$, and $\downarrow$ platelet count, base excess, Hct, HCO$\sb3-$, and pCO$\sb2$. At 90 min, significant changes included $\uparrow$ ARG, P, BUN, and creatinine, and $\downarrow$ pH and glucose. Significant changes 150 min postdosing included $\uparrow$ AST, AP, ALT, CPK, and LDH. Livers were markedly enlarged, dark purple-red in color, and readily exuded blood on cut surfaces. Significantly $\uparrow$ liver weights and liver Fe and Hb concentrations were suggestive that 37.9% of the estimated blood volume was present in the liver. The major cause of acute death ($<$5 hr) following iv MCLR dosing in swine is ...
The writer was spending the day with the pain management team who consisted of, a pain nurse specialist and a senior house officer (SHO) from theatre. The patient was on a surgical ward and had a postoperative abdominal bleed, he had been rushed back to theatre were the bleeding had been stopped. The patient had a central venous pressure catheter (CVP line) insitu, which had become infected. The patient was in considerable pain his basic observations had been taken that morning, Johns blood pressure was low, pulse, respirations and temperature were all critically high and his oxygen saturation levels were below 90% on air. The doctors notes were unclear and the nurse managing Johns care did not understand what was meant regarding the CVP line. The nurse held a conversation with the Critical Care Outreach nurse and the Pain Specialist nurse and informed them she had not spoke with the doctor. The nurses interpretation of what the doctors notes were was to leave the CVP line in to enable ...
OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible cardiovascular alterations that may occur due to the use of buprenorphine in dogs anesthetized with desflurane.. MATERIALS. Eight adult healthy male and female mongrel dogs were used. The anesthetic induction was made using propofol (IV), and immediately after, the dogs were intubated and the tube was connected to a volatile anesthetic circuit, and desflurane was administrated at 1.5 MAC. During the experimental period, the dogs were maintained under controlled ventilation. After 15 minutes of anesthesia, the dogs received buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg/IV). Heart rate (HR); systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure (SAP, DAP, and MAP, respectively); cardiac output (CO), central venous pressure (CVP) and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) were evaluated. The measurements were realized 20 minutes after induction (M1), 15 minutes after buprenorphine administration (M2); and at each 15 minutes after M2 (M3, M4 and M5). The ...
Background: Endothelial dysfunction is an independent predictor of poor prognosis in patients with heart failure (HF). Using a novel approach of endovascular endothelial cell (EC) sampling, we previously showed that ECs collected from conduit veins using J-wires are activated in patients with HF as evidenced by increased expression of pro-inflammatory genes including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The underlying cause(s) of this endothelial activation and dysfunction is not known. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the HF state itself and the vascular strain associated with congestion can both account for these findings.. Methods: We studied 6 normal (NL) dogs (LV ejection fraction ,50%, central venous pressure (CVP) ~ 8 mmHg) and 6 dogs with HF (ejection fraction ~ 30%, CVP ~9 mmHg) produced by intracoronary microembolizations. This model of HF manifests the disease syndrome in the absence of other co-morbid conditions often present in patients ...
IV cardiac medication reference pocket card for pressors, beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, and vasodilators. Reference heart rate, systemic vascular resistance, cardiac output, central venous pressure with receptor activation chart. Cardiac Medica
branch and an active vasodilator branch [11]. Nonthermoregulatory reflexes, which include skin blood flow responses to changes in arterial and central venous pressure and exercise stresses, also operate through the two aforementioned branches of the sympathetic nervous system; however, the glabrous/ palmar skin operates only through the vasoconstrictor branch [10,11,41]. In the auto-regulation process, throughout a specific range of arterial blood pressure, steady-state blood flow is maintained at a fairly constant level [44]. Previous reports on cutaneous circulation has shown that, independent of neural control of blood flow, glabrous/palmar skin has the ability to buffer blood pressure oscillations and demonstrates a degree of dynamic auto-regulation. Conversely, nonglabrous or hairy skin has a diminished dynamic auto regulatory capacity [42]. We first tried to relate observations in the present study to some of the physiological findings reported earlier on the cutaneous responses to ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Blunt rupture of the myocardium. AU - Pevec, William C. AU - Udekwu, Anthony O.. AU - Peitzman, Andrew B.. PY - 1989. Y1 - 1989. N2 - With the evolution of regional trauma systems, patients with severe cardiac injury are arriving in emergency departments with the potential for survival. This paper reviews the 61 survivors of nonpenetrating rupture of the free walls of the myocardium reported in the English-language literature. The chambers were involved in the following frequency: right atrium, 36; left atrium, 11; right ventricle, 12; and left ventricle, four. Most victims were young males, and 85% were involved in motor vehicle accidents. Seventy percent had an: admission systolic blood pressure less than 80 mm Hg, 78% had distended neck veins or a central venous pressure greater than 20 cm H2O, 67% had a widened mediastinum on admission chest roentgenogram, and 48% had fractures of the bony thorax. More than one hour elapsed before initiation of repair in 59%. Forty-eight ...
Rivers E, Nguyen B, Havstad S, Ressler J, Muzzin A, Knoblich B, Peterson E, Tomlanovich M; Early Goal-Directed Therapy Collaborative Group ...
For some reason the Trans Membrane Pressure (TMP) shot up to its maximum level and so did the venous pressure. I was surprised. This had never happened before. I tried resetting a few times. No change. Then suddenly, blood started coming out from the dialysers two ends. I started to panic. I noticed that the tubes were not screwed tightly enough. I tightened both ends. The blood stopped leaking. The alarm however did not stop. The TMP and venous pressure continued to be at their maximum levels. Dialysis was not happening ...
Indeed, Shakespeares drunken dramatic characters confirm that thermal escalations play a central role in the way in which the early modern English conceived of drunkenness. These psycho-physiological effects include the flushing of the face and other caloric descriptors accompanying the drinking of alcohol. Such commonplaces are ubiquitous in Shakespeares plays. In Antony and Cleopatra, for example, Charmian observes "I had rather heat my liver with drinking" (1.2.24); and indeed, such a description of drinkings inward effects can lead to outward ones, too: as Caesar observes, well in his cups, "You see, we have burnt our cheeks. Strong Enobarb / Is weaker than the wine" (2.7.122-23). In Henry 5, the French Constable contrasts the diets of the English and French soldiers, concluding of English valor: "Can sodden water, /A drench for surreind jades, their barley-broth, / Decoct their cold blood to such valiant heat? / And shall our quick blood, spirited with wine, / Seem frosty?" ...
OBJECTIVE: Continuous assessment of central venous oxygen saturation (S(cevox)O(2)) with the CeVOX device (Pulsion Medical Systems, Munich, Germany) was evaluated against central venous oxygen saturation (S(cv)O(2)) determined by co-oximetry. METHODS: In 20 cardiac surgical patients, a CeVOX fiberoptic probe was introduced into a standard central venous catheter placed in the right internal jugular vein and advanced 2-3 cm beyond the catheter tip. After in vivo calibration of the probe, S(cevox)O(2), S(cv)O(2), mixed venous oxygen saturation (S(mv)O(2)) haemoglobin (Hb), body temperature, heart rate, central venous and mean arterial pressure, and cardiac index were assessed simultaneously at 30 min intervals during surgery and at 60 min intervals during recovery in the intensive care unit. Agreement between S(cevox)O(2), and S(cv)O(2) was determined by Bland-Altman analysis. Simple regression analysis was used to assess the correlation of S(cevox)O(2), and S(cv)O(2) to Hb, body temperature and ...
Central venous oxygen saturation (CVSO2) was measured in 31 patients with myocardial infarction. CVSO2 correlated well with the patients clinical course. In those patients not in heart failure, mean ± sem for CVSO2 was 70 ± 1%. When heart failure was present, CVSO2 averaged 56 ± 1%. When both heart failure and shock were present, CVSO2 averaged 43 ± 1%. In nine patients, serial determinations of arterial oxygen saturation and CVSO2 were made. In 22 of 26 instances, either a fall in CVSO2 was accompanied by an increase in the arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference or an increase in CVSO2 was accompanied by a decrease in arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Serial measurements of CVSO2 appear to be a useful method of monitoring changes in myocardial function in patients with myocardial infarction.. ...
Current sepsis therapies are largely supportive and limited to a few clinical interventions, including antibiotics, steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g., hydrocortisone) and early goal-directed therapies (EGDT). For instance, appropriate broad-spectrum antibiotics are often administered to patients to facilitate the elimination of bacterial pathogens [2]; however, the release of bacterial products (e.g., endotoxin or CpG-DNA) may adversely amplify inflammatory responses. Accordingly, anti-inflammatory steroids (e.g., hydrocortisone, methylprednisolone, dexamethasone, and fludrocortisone) are frequently used to modulate the excessive inflammatory response, despite the lack of reproducible efficacy in clinical sepsis trials [117-119]. As a supportive intervention, EGDT employs extremely tight control of numerous physiological parameters (such as central venous pressure, mean arterial blood pressure, central venous oxygen saturation, and hematocrit) with discrete, protocol-driven interventions ...
In medicine, Friedreichs sign is the exaggerated drop in diastolic central venous pressure seen in constrictive pericarditis (particularly with a stiff calcified pericardium) and manifested as abrupt collapse of the neck veins or marked descent of the central venous pressure waveform.. The sign is named after Nikolaus Friedreich.[1]. ...
Objective:To study the association between time to antibiotic administration and survival in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock in whom early goal-directed therapy was initiated in the emergency department.Design:Single-center cohort study.Setting:The emergency department of an academic ter
Dharmvir S. Jaswal, Peter Q. Eichacker. In early septic shock, early goal-directed therapy did not reduce 90-day mortality. Ann Intern Med. 2015;163:JC10. doi: 10.7326/ACPJC-2015-163-4-010. Download citation file:. ...
A 76 year old man was admitted with a four month history of progressive swelling of both legs and abdominal distension. He was icteric with bilateral pitting oedema to both groins. His abdomen was distended with prominent superficial vasculature and evidence of ascites. The jugular venous pressure was not raised. The chest x ray showed a normal cardiac silhouette with clear lung fields. An ultrasound scan revealed a well demarcated mass of 10 cm diameter within the right lobe of the liver. Initial blood tests revealed an elevated bilirubin of 41 mmol/l but normal a fetoprotein at 2 kU/l (normal range 0-8 kU/l). A liver biopsy confirmed the mass to be a well differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography showed a mass (5 cm 6 4 cm) within the right atrium protruding from the inferior vena cava (AV, aortic valve; LA, left atrium; RA, right atrium; T, tumour). A contrast enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scan of the upper abdomen showed that the tumour
We report a 22-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with worsening shortness of breath and chronic fever for 2 months. Physical examination was unremarkable except for raised jugular venous pressure and palpable liver. Echocardiogram showed a large right ventricular mass causing obstruction at tricuspid valve. A subsequent chest CT scan confirmed the presence of a large mass in the right ventricle. There were multiple enlarged lymph nodes and consolidation in the right upper lobe. Diagnosis of disseminated tuberculosis (TB) was made and later confirmed by histopathology of lymph node biopsy along with positive sputum culture for acid-fast bacilli. Remarkable recovery was observed on antituberculous therapy, with complete disappearance of the cardiac mass on echocardiogram, at 1-year follow-up. Although unusual and rare, myocardial involvement as a large mass should be kept in mind while treating patients with disseminated TB. ...
February 17, 2012. During the first 6 hours of resuscitation, the goals of initial resuscitation of sepsis-induced hypoperfusion should include all of the following as one part of a treatment protocol: Central venous pressure (CVP): 8-12 mm Hg Mean arterial pressure (MAP) , 65 mm Hg Urine output , 0.5 mL/kg/hour Central venous (superior vena cava) or mixed venous oxygen saturation ,70% or ,65%, respectively. Intensive Care Med 2008 Jan;34(1):17-60. ...
Thyroid cysts may appear spontaneously, and frequently the medical history includes heavy pressing or related activities, which result in an increase in intrathoracic pressure. Valsalva-like procedures increase central venous pressure. For example, playing high notes on a trumpet, which belongs to the group of high-resistance instruments that includes the vuvuzela, may increase intrathoracic pressure up to 200 cm H2O. Exposure to this degree of pressure can reversibly decrease cardiac silhouette by one-third and significantly decrease pulmonary vasculature signs on chest radiographs.1 The soccer World Cup in South Africa was dominated acoustically by the sound of the African horn, called the vuvuzela. Over the past 15 years this instrument, originally made from the kudu horn and later from plastic, has become much beloved by keen soccer supporters and also a symbol of hope and unity.2 Before the World Cup the hearing risks posed by the vuvuzela were reported.3 The maximum sound level produced ...
Methods All dogs were premedicated with methadone, 0.2 mg kg−1 intramuscularly 30 minutes prior to induction of anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol administered intravenously (IV) to effect, following administration of lidocaine 1 mg kg−1 IV and maintained with a continuous infusion of propofol at ≤0.4 mg kg−1 minute−1 during instrumentation and preparation and during movement of the animals to recovery. During surgery, anaesthesia was maintained using a continuous infusion of propofol at ≤0.4 mg kg−1 minute−1and alfentanil ≤1 μg kg−1 minute−1. Lidocaine was administered at 1 mg kg−1 IV immediately prior to extubation. Arterial blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were recorded prior to induction and every 5 minutes throughout preparation and surgery. Central venous pressure was recorded every 5 minutes throughout surgery ...
As for the PLE... we got the alpha 1 antitrypsan level back and it wasnt elevated. The doctors think it might not be in Mav because he probably doesnt have much circulating in his blood to lose in his stool. Basically, he still has PLE. His albumin level is still low, hes still losing his lymphocytes and his immunoglobulins. Its a pretty serious condition. They have been trying the treatment with meds and heparin, and the diarrhea has gotten better, but his protein levels arent nearly what they should be. Everyone kept saying that this usually happen after the Fontan surgery. I started researching fontan surgeries. It seems that fenestrated fontans dont usually have the issue with PLE - I kept thinking, "what does Mavs heart have in common with a fontan heart, and how could a fenestration help him?" I spoke to the cardiologist yesterday about making a fenestration in Mavs heart to help with his high central venous pressures and hopefully alleviate the PLE. He said, "Hmmm, it just might ...
Sepsis is associated with significant morbidity and mortality if not promptly recognized and treated. Since the development of early goal-directed therapy, mortality rates have decreased, but sepsis remains a major cause of death in patients arriving at the emergency department or staying in hospital. In this forum article, we asked clinicians and researchers with expertise in sepsis care to discuss the importance of rapid detection and treatment of the condition, as well as special considerations in different patient groups.
Twenty-five patients were enrolled; all presented cardiac index , 4 l/min/m2. The following parameters were evaluated: heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure (CVP), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (Pw), CO, systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) and diastolic pulmonary artery pressure (DPAP), systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI), left ventricular stroke work index (LVSWI) and right ventricular stroke work index (RVSWI). The determinations were performed before disconnection from mechanical ventilation, 30 min after disconnection and 4-6 hours after disconnection. ...
Studies that have examined the cardiopulmonary receptor control of circulation in hypertension have produced conflicting results. In 10 normotensive subjects and in age-matched essential hypertensive subjects without (n = 10) or with left ventricular hypertrophy (n = 12), as well as in seven subjects of the latter group restudied after 1 year of treatment that induced regression of cardiac hypertrophy, we examined the cardiopulmonary reflex by increasing central venous pressure and stimulating cardiopulmonary receptors through passive leg raising and by reducing central venous pressure and deactivating cardiopulmonary receptors through nonhypotensive lower body negative pressure. Reflex responses were measured as changes in forearm vascular resistance (mean blood pressure divided by plethysmographically measured blood flow), plasma norepinephrine concentration, and plasma renin activity. In hypertensive subjects without left ventricular hypertrophy, stimulation and deactivation of ...
Studies were performed in 16 adult mongrel dogs weighing 25 to 32 kg; additional dogs were used for preliminary studies as detailed in the text. The dogs were anesthetized (sodium pentobarbital, 30 mg/kg i.v.) and mechanically ventilated. In the supine position, the left femoral vein was cannulated for fluid infusion. Both femoral arteries were dissected for later cannulation. A micro-tipped manometer (Millar Instruments, Houston, TX) was inserted into the left ventricle through the right carotid artery to monitor left ventricular pressure. The left carotid artery was also cannulated with a micro-tipped manometer to measure aortic pressure (AoP). The right jugular vein was cannulated for central venous pressure measurement.. Through a midline laparotomy, both ureters were individually cannulated to quantify urine output and to obtain urine samples separately from each kidney. The abdominal wall was then tightly closed to prevent hypothermia and water loss.. Thereafter, the dog was repositioned ...
Vixiar Medical, Inc. announced today that it was awarded a $200,000 grant by the State of Maryland to accelerate the commercialization of its non-invasive congestive heart failure (CHF) device. The BioMaryland Center made the awards on a competitive basis to six life sciences companies, with preference given to projects that improve patient outcomes and reduce health care costs.. The Vixiar product, based on technology licensed from Johns Hopkins University, allows rapid and repetitive assessment of cardiac filling pressures - a critical measurement in the management of heart failure hospital readmissions. The inexpensive wireless device can be used at the point of care by a physician/nurse, or the patient can utilize a self-directed set of procedures to conduct the tests remotely and non-invasively over several minutes. The normal process for obtaining cardiac filling pressures requires an invasive catheterization procedure at a lab, in which a pressure catheter is run through the patients ...
In more severe heart failure, a diuretic is added. Even if diuretics alone controls a patients symptoms, they should be used in combination with an ACE inhibitor and often a beta-blocker. A thiazide diuretic may be sufficient -- if not, a loop diuretic is used.. Diuretic drugs are used in most heart failure patients because heart failure leads to retention of sodium and water by the kidneys, which can lead to fluid overload. Congestion in the lungs can interfere with their ability to exchange oxygen from the air and can be life-threatening. Doctors prescribe diuretic drugs for all patients with heart failure who have evidence of fluid overload, such as lung congestion, raised jugular venous pressure or peripheral edema, and most heart failure patients are eventually placed on a diuretic drug.. Doctors usually start patients on a low dose of a diuretic and increase the dose until the effective range is reached. When the diuretic is working effectively, the patient will lose weight because of ...
A 70 year old man presents to his general practitioner with a four week history of breathlessness on exertion. He currently takes bendroflumethiazide 2.5 mg daily for hypertension and uses inhalers for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He has no history of cardiac disease. His brother had a myocardial infarction in his 70s. The patient used to smoke 20 cigarettes a day but gave up smoking two years ago; he denied alcohol excess. On examination, his blood pressure was 150/95 mm Hg with a pulse of 90 beats/min. Heart sounds were normal and, on chest auscultation, he had bibasal inspiratory crepitations and scattered wheeze. His jugular venous pressure was not visible and he had mild bilateral ankle oedema. ...
Between January 1998 and January 2000, we recruited patients seen at the emergency department of or admitted to the Montreal Heart Institute with a primary diagnosis of congestive heart failure. The diagnosis required the presence of both signs (at least 1 of tachycardia, gallop rhythm, increased jugular venous pressure [, 10 cm] or pulmonary crackles) and symptoms (at least 1 of dyspnea at rest or minimal effort, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea or orthopnea). Patients also had either radiologic confirmation of their congestive heart failure or a known impaired left ventricular ejection fraction (, 45%). Echocardiography was conducted to document left ventricle function if it had not been performed within the previous 6 months. At discharge, all consecutive eligible patients were approached to participate in the study. In order to maximize the generalizability of the results, exclusion criteria were kept to a minimum: a primary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, discharge to a chronic care ...
The main clinical feature is a raised jugular venous pressure with a slow x descent. In sinus rhythm the jugular pulse may show a conspicuous a wave, and there may be presystolic hepatic pulsation, which represents a palpable a wave, There is a mid-diastolic murmur usually best heard at the lower left or right sternal edge; this usually higher pitched than the murmur of mitral stenosis ...
This campaign was initiated as a joint marketing effort by Eli Lilly and Edward Life Sciences to promote activated protein C (XIGRIS) and central venous catheters which measure the mixed venous oxygen saturation (yes, the same one Rivers held a patent for). The original backbone of the guidelines was the Rivers Trial.. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign has a track record of being sluggish to change based on the emergence of new data. For example, the Surviving Sepsis Campaign continued to recommend the use of central venous pressure and mixed venous oxygen saturation even after the PROCESS and ARISE trials demonstrated that these were non-beneficial. The campaign also has a history of making strong and arbitrary recommendations pulled out of thin air (e.g. 3-hour and 6-hour bundles of care involving fixed volumes of fluid resuscitation).. In 2018, the Surviving Sepsis Campaign issued an update recommending initiation of antibiotics and 30 cc/kg fluid bolus within sixty minutes of emergency ...
A centimetre of water (US spelling centimeter of water, abbreviated cm H2O or cm H2O) is a less commonly used unit of pressure derived from pressure head calculations using metrology. It may be defined as the pressure exerted by a column of water of 1 cm in height at 4 °C (temperature of maximum density) at the standard acceleration of gravity, so that 1 cmH2O (4°C) = 999.9720 kg/m3 × 9.80665 m/s2 × 1 cm = 98.063754138 Pa ≈ 98.0638 Pa, but conventionally a nominal maximum water density of 1000 kg/m³ is used, giving 98.0665 Pa. It is frequently used to measure the central venous pressure, the intracranial pressure while sampling cerebrospinal fluid, as well as determining pressures during mechanical ventilation or in water supply networks (then usually in metres water column). It is also a common unit of pressure in the speech sciences. This unit is commonly used to specify the pressure to which a CPAP machine is set after a polysomnogram. Inch of water Pressure head nist.gov - Guide for ...
Both bio-ADM and lactate were higher in 90-day non-survivors compared to survivors at all time points (P , 0.05 for all). Lactate showed good prognostic value during the initial 24 h (AUC 0.78 at admission and 0.76 at 24 h). Subsequently, lactate returned normal (≤2 mmol/L) in most patients regardless of later outcome with lower prognostic value. By contrast, bio-ADM showed increasing prognostic value from 48 h and beyond (AUC 0.71 at 48 h and 0.80 at 5-10 days). Serial measurements of either bio-ADM or lactate were independent of and provided added value to CardShock risk score (P , 0.001 for both). Ninety-day mortality was more than double higher in patients with high levels of bio-ADM (,55.7 pg/mL) at 48 h compared to those with low bio-ADM levels (49.1 vs. 22.6%, P = 0.001). High levels of bio-ADM were associated with impaired cardiac index, mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, and systolic pulmonary artery pressure during the study period. Furthermore, high levels of bio-ADM ...
Early goal-directed nutrition versus standard care In this icTV interview, Anders Perner describes the EAT-ICU trial, which compared early goal-directed nutrition versus standard of care in adult intensive care patients. Results from this trial were presented during the Clinical Trials Session at LIVES 2017 in Vienna and were recently published in Intensive Care Medicine. Read […]. Read More…. ...
Edema is considered the cardinal feature of cardiac failure for decades. It is one of the minor criteria of the Framingham protocol to diagnose cardiac failure. The mechanism of edema in cardiac failure is multifactorial . The major mechanism attributed is raised venous pressure. This is transmitted backwards into the circulation and resultant increase in hydrostatic…
Question - Having regular periods and spotting. Ultrasound for pelvis and abdomen normal. On gynae cvp. Missing periods. Whats wrong?. Ask a Doctor about when and why Blood test is advised, Ask an OBGYN, Gynecologic Oncology
In the acute normovolemic hemodilution group, intraoperative blood collection was performed to a target hemoglobin of 8.0 g/dL. Low central venous pressure anesthetic technique was used intraoperatively for both groups. A standardized transfusion protocol was applied to all patients intraoperatively and throughout the hospital stay.. The researchers randomized 63 patients to acute normovolemic hemodilution, and 67 to standard anesthetic management from 2004 to 2007.. Demographics, diagnoses, liver function, extent of resection, intraoperative blood loss, operative time, incidence and grade of complications, and length of hospital stay were similar between the 2 groups. The team found that acute normovolemic hemodilution reduced the overall allogeneic red cell transfusion rate by 50% compared with standard anesthetic management. Acute normovolemic hemodilution patients were less often transfused intraoperatively compared with the standard anesthetic management group.. The research team noted that ...
714 Relationship between serial measurements of N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide and ambulatory cardiac filling pressures in outpatients with chronic heart failure. Braunschweig, F.; Fahrleitner, A.; Mangiavacchi, M.; Ghio, S.; Fotuhi, P.; Hoppe, U.C.; Harrison, M.; Linde, C. // European Journal of Heart Failure. Supplements;Jun2004, Vol. 2 Issue 1, p149 An abstract of the study "Relationship Between Serial Measurements of N-Terminal Pro Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Ambulatory Cardiac Filling Pressures in Outpatients With Chronic Heart Failure," by F. Braunschweig and colleagues is presented. ...
A system for and method of treating a malfunctioning heart is based on hemodynamics. The mean arterial pressure (MAP) mean right atrial pressure (MRAP), mean right ventrical pressure (MRVP), mean left atrial pressure (MLAP), mean left ventrical pressure (MLVP) or mean central venous pressure (MCVP) is sensed. The long term mean baseline pressure is monitored and if the short term current mean pressure differs therefrom by a predetermined value, an indication of hemodynamic compromise, cardioversion/defibrillation is effected. In a second embodiment, the determination of whether the difference between mean baseline and mean current pressure is undertaken after a rate criteria (for example a heart rate above 155 b.p.m. has been met. In a third embodiment, the rate and pressure criteria both must exist at the same time, before cardioverting/defibrillation is initiated. In a fourth embodiment, a microprocessor is used. The system may be integrated with antitachycardia and/or antibradycardia pacemakers.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Hemodynamic and metabolic impairment in acute pancreatitis. AU - Di Carlo, Valerio. AU - Nespoli, Angelo. AU - Chiesa, Roberto. AU - Staudacher, Carlo. AU - Cristallo, Marco. AU - Bevilacqua, Giuseppe. AU - Staudacher, Vittorio. PY - 1981/5. Y1 - 1981/5. N2 - Twenty-one patients with acute pancreatitis underwent evaluation of cardiovascular function and oxygen consumption; 5 of those who were critically ill had a further study of hormonal metabolism. The evaluation of hemodynamic parameters was made using a computer-based cardiovascular program developed by Siegel et al. During the initial phase of the disease a reduction in vascular tone (relating cardiac index with total peripheral resistance) represented the basic abnormality seen in all patients, while a depression in ventricular function (relating left ventricular stroke work with central venous pressure) was observed in more than 40% of patients. With the progression of pancreatitis, cardiovascular monitoring identified a ...
Total body water is different in men than in women, and it decreases with aging (Table 21-1). Approximately 50-60% of total body weight is water; two-thirds (40% of body weight) is intracellular, while one-third (20% of body weight) is extracellular. One-fourth of extracellular fluid (5% of body weight) is intravascular. Water may be lost from either or both compartments (intracellular and extracellular). Changes in total body water content are best evaluated by documenting changes in body weight. Effective circulating volume may be assessed by physical examination (eg, blood pressure, pulse, jugular venous distention). Quantitative measurements of effective circulating volume and intravascular volume may be invasive (ie, central venous pressure or pulmonary wedge pressure) or noninvasive (ie, inferior vena cava diameter and right atrial pressure by echocardiography) but still require careful interpretation. ...
OBJECT: Human albumin is used to induce hypervolemia (central venous pressure [CVP] , 8 mm Hg) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Unfortunately, human albumin may increase the mortality rate in critically ill patients; because of this, its use became restricted in the authors hospital in May 1999. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of human albumin on outcome and cost in patients with SAH before and after this restriction was put into place. METHODS: All patients with aneurysmal SAH who were admitted to the authors institution between May 1998 and May 2000 were studied. Basic demographic information, dosage of human albumin given, length of stay, and the incidence of in-hospital deaths and complications were collected. The authors obtained Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 3 months after SAH (good outcome, GOS , or = 4). Data were analyzed using t-test and chi-square analysis. Logistic regression was used to identify independent associations between use of human albumin ...
A stainless steel catheter assembly for communicating between a lumen of a blood vessel of a patients body and a source or drain of fluid. A cannular termination is disposed at a distal portion of the catheter assembly and mechanically connected to respective distal ends of a wire-wound spring guide and a wire core which is disposed along an internal surface of the spring guide. A fitting for coupling to a source of intravenous fluid or a drainage device is disposed at a proximal portion of the catheter assembly and mechanically connected to the spring guide and wire core at respective proximal ends. Embodiments may be provided with a tapering distal termination which is disposed around a slidably retractable cannular needle for facilitating percutaneous access to the interior of a patients vein. In other embodiments, the catheter assembly is terminated at the distal end in a blunted manner so as to permit the taking of central venous pressures. Such a bluntly terminated embodiment may be slidably
She was given blood and fluids until the bedside ultrasound showed good central venous pressure (distended inferior vena cava), but she remained hypotensive and tachycardic, and the ST elevation did not resolve. Thus, we sedated her and electrically cardioverted at 200J (biphasic), but this was unsuccessful x 3. We then intubated her and started an infusion of amiodarone 300 mg IV, but with no improvement, and a subsequent cardioversion was again unsuccessful. We then loaded her with 500 mcg/kg of esmolol and started her on a 50 mcg/kg/min drip, after which a fifth cardioversion was successful, and resulted in the second ECG shown here ...
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In the 200 ml group, 10 min after the end of volume expansion, the increase in MSAP and CVP disappears, whereas ITBV, CI and SI increases remain unchanged and even shows for ITBV a trend toward increase. This suggest a post-expansion effect which is not observed on CVP values. In group 2 who had a higher baseline CVP and a lower volume expansion, the increases in MSAP, CVP, ITBV and SI observed at the end of volume expansion disappear 10 min later, suggesting the absence of a post-expansion effect when the baseline CVP is high and/or the volume infused is low. ...
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An intravenous administration set assembly (10) is disclosed which is capable of introducing fluid from a plurality of sources of intravenous fluids into a patient and which allows the various sources of fluid to be easily attached and detected from the assembly without the necessity for intravening safety steps, such as purging the system, and yet without any possibility of air or bacteria being introduced through the system into the patient. An air-eliminating filter (32) is attached to a manifold formed of fittings (26) which are connected through inlet adapters (28) to the sources of intravenous fluid. The air-eliminating filter (32) ensures that air or bacteria introduced into the assembly (10) through attaching or detaching sources to the assembly does not pass to the patient and also ensures that a head pressure is maintained relative to the venous pressure of the patient to prevent a back flow of blood from the patient into the assembly. Check valves are provided in each of the inlet adapters
When a tourniquet is left on too long, it can lead to hemoconcentration, which is a pooling of blood at the venipuncture site, according to MediaLab. A tourniquet is used to increase venous pressure...
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TY - JOUR. T1 - Measurement of episcleral venous pressure. AU - Sit, Arthur J. AU - McLaren, Jay W.. PY - 2011/9. Y1 - 2011/9. N2 - Episcleral venous pressure (EVP) is an important determinant of intraocular pressure (IOP) and can be measured by using various techniques. It has been measured non-invasively by estimating the pressure required to compress an episcleral vein to a predetermined endpoint. However, the lack of objective endpoints makes EVP measurement in humans uncertain, and a wide range of mean EVP has been reported in the literature. We review the evidence for physiologic regulation of EVP and its role in glaucoma therapy, techniques that have been used to measure EVP and the need for objective measurements, and reported values for EVP. We also review recent progress toward developing an objective technique for EVP measurement.. AB - Episcleral venous pressure (EVP) is an important determinant of intraocular pressure (IOP) and can be measured by using various techniques. It has ...
Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common disorder with rising incidence varying between 35 and 80 per 100,000 in Europe and the USA. About 15% of patients develop necrotizing pancreatitis (NP) with a mortality of up to 42% and frequently prolonged hospitalisation in the survivors. Despite a fulminant pathophysiology comparable to that of sepsis, the management of NP is still re-active, symptomatic and mainly based on paradigms with low grade evidence. In sepsis beneficial effects of early goal-directed fluid resuscitation resulting in reduced mortality have been clearly shown. With regard to these data and several studies of NP demonstrating the deleterious effects of fluid loss and haemoconcentration within the first 24h after admission, early goal-directed fluid resuscitation has the potential of improving outcome also in NP. Therefore, it is the aim of this RCT to demonstrate beneficial effects of early goal-directed resuscitation using an algorithm based on modern haemodynamic parameters such as ...
1. Animal studies have shown that arterial baroreflexes are modulated by reflexes originating from the cardiopulmonary volume receptors, and that this modulation consists of a reduction of the inhibitory influence exerted by arterial baroreceptors on the heart and peripheral circulation. This has not been confirmed in man, however, in whom no reduction in the bradycardic response to carotid baroreceptor stimulation has been observed after the mild increase in central venous pressure (right atrial catheter) and cardiopulmonary receptor activity provided by passive leg raising.. 2. In seven normotensive subjects carotid baroreceptors were gradedly stimulated by progressively increasing carotid transmural pressure through a neck chamber device, the resulting reflex lengthening in R-R interval being measured in the two-three cardiac cycles immediately after the baroreceptor stimulus. This manoeuvre was performed in control conditions and repeated during a head-out water immersion which increased ...
She is placed on 10 L·min−1 oxygen by face mask and is transported to the hospital. On examination after the arrival at the ED, her vital signs are: heart rate 113 beats per minute and irregular, respiration rate 31 breaths per minute, blood pressure 85/45 mm Hg, and SaO2 86%. She appears to be in severe respiratory distress and is unable to speak more than three to four words in one breath. She is morbidly obese with an estimated weight of over 137 kg (300 pounds) and is 151 cm (5 feet) tall with a body mass index (BMI) 60 kg·m−2. Chest auscultation reveals faint breath sounds with crackles over the entire lung fields, a significant decrease in air entry in both bases combined with mild wheezing. Other findings include 1+ bilateral ankle edema, S4 heart sound, and a grade III/VI systolic murmur radiating to the axilla. Her jugular venous pressure (JVP) cannot be assessed because of her marked obesity and short neck. Her electrocardiogram on admission to the ED reveals a pattern consistent ...
Breathlessness is not a prominent symptom as the lungs are seldom congested. A raised jugular venous pressure is present, with a rapid and transitory y descent. The arterial pulse tends to be rapid, of small volume, and pulsus paradoxus may be present. Hepatomegaly and ascites occur relatively early compared with peripheral oedema. The heart is usually not enlarged but chest radiography may show pericaridal calcification. The main differential diagnosis is from restrictive myopathy. In countries where constrictive pericarditis is common the diagnosis is usually be made clinically. Where both constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy are rare, and there is no pericardial calcification, cardiac catheterisation is indicated ...

Responsiveness of stroke volume variation and central venous pressure during acute normovolemic and hypervolemic hemodilution<...Responsiveness of stroke volume variation and central venous pressure during acute normovolemic and hypervolemic hemodilution<...

Ji, FH, Li, WJ, Li, J, Peng, K, Yang, JP & Liu, H 2013, Responsiveness of stroke volume variation and central venous pressure ... keywords = "Central venous pressure, Hemodilution, Stroke volume variation",. author = "Ji, {Fu Hai} and Li, {Wen Jing} and ... We compared the sensibility of SVV by Vigileo/Flotrac to central venous pressure (CVP) when volume changes in patients ... We compared the sensibility of SVV by Vigileo/Flotrac to central venous pressure (CVP) when volume changes in patients ...
more infohttps://ucdavis.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/responsiveness-of-stroke-volume-variation-and-central-venous-pres

Inferior vena cava diameter and central venous pressure correlation during cardiac surgery - Institutional Repository...Inferior vena cava diameter and central venous pressure correlation during cardiac surgery - Institutional Repository...

Inferior vena cava diameter and central venous pressure correlation during cardiac surgery ... and the central venous pressure (CVP) under different experimental conditions. Design: Prospective study. Setting: University ... and at different levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (0, 5, and 10 cmH(2)O). Measurements and Main Results: The ...
more infohttps://repository.uantwerpen.be/link/irua/102659

The efficacy of sonographic measurement of inferior vena cava diameter as an estimate of central venous pressure |...The efficacy of sonographic measurement of inferior vena cava diameter as an estimate of central venous pressure |...

Findings were inconsistent among mechanically ventilated patients, except in the absence of positive end-expiratory pressure. ... and right atrial pressure (RAP) are important parameters in the complete hemodynamic assessment of a patient. Sonographic ... Central venous pressure (CVP) and right atrial pressure (RAP) are important parameters in the complete hemodynamic assessment ... "ultrasound of inferior vena cava and central venous pressure" and "ultrasound of inferior vena cava and right atrial pressure" ...
more infohttps://cardiovascularultrasound.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12947-016-0076-1

GastroHep News StoryGastroHep News Story

Low central venous pressure anesthetic technique was used intraoperatively for both groups. ...
more infohttp://www.gastrohep.com/news/news.asp?id=105997

Central venous access devices for children with lysosomal storage disorders | Great Ormond Street HospitalCentral venous access devices for children with lysosomal storage disorders | Great Ormond Street Hospital

Procedures and treatments from Great Ormond Street Hospital on Central venous access devices for children with lysosomal ... The catheter is gently pulled out of the vein and a pressure dressing is put over the area to reduce bleeding and bruising. ... Central venous access devices for children with lysosomal storage disorders. Central venous access devices for children with ... A central venous access device (CVAD) is made from a non-irritating material such as silicon and titanium, which means that it ...
more infohttp://www.gosh.nhs.uk/medical-information-0/procedures-and-treatments/central-venous-access-devices-children-lysosomal-storage-disorders

Central venous pressure | Define Central venous pressure at Dictionary.comCentral venous pressure | Define Central venous pressure at Dictionary.com

Central venous pressure definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. ... The pressure of the blood within the superior and inferior vena cava, depressed in circulatory shock and deficiencies of ... central venous pressure. .css-7w6khc{padding-top:20px;}. .css-1oucjfz{list-style-type:none;line-height:22px;}. *central valley ... central venous pressure. .css-xojh1k{position:relative;height:auto;overflow:hidden;padding-bottom:0px;margin-bottom:0px;}. .css ...
more infohttps://www.dictionary.com/browse/central-venous-pressure

Central venous pressure legal definition of central venous pressureCentral venous pressure legal definition of central venous pressure

What is central venous pressure? Meaning of central venous pressure as a legal term. What does central venous pressure mean in ... Definition of central venous pressure in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. ... Related to central venous pressure: central venous catheter. pressure. noun anxiety, anxiousness, brunt, brute force, burden, ... Central venous pressure legal definition of central venous pressure https://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/central+ ...
more infohttps://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/central+venous+pressure

Central venous pressure - WikipediaCentral venous pressure - Wikipedia

Central Venous Pressure Monitoring Cardiovascular Physiology Concepts Central Venous Pressure and Pulmonary Capillary Wedge ... Central venous pressure (CVP) is the blood pressure in the venae cavae, near the right atrium of the heart. CVP reflects the ... Deep inhalation Distributive shock Hypovolemia Jugular venous pressure Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure "Central Venous ... Venous function and central venous pressure: a physiologic story - a technical discussion of the more modern understanding of ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_venous_pressure

Ultrasound Guided Noninvasive Measurement of Central Venous Pressure: Medicine & Healthcare Book Chapter | IGI GlobalUltrasound Guided Noninvasive Measurement of Central Venous Pressure: Medicine & Healthcare Book Chapter | IGI Global

Central venous pressure (CVP) is a measure of the mean pressure within the thoracic vena cava, which is the largest vein in the ... Ultrasound Guided Noninvasive Measurement of Central Venous Pressure: 10.4018/978-1-59904-889-5.ch167: ... Central venous pressure (CVP) is a measure of the mean pressure within the thoracic vena cava, which is the largest vein in the ... Central Venous Pressure (CVP): Mean pressure inside the thoracic vena cava, near the right atrium of the heart; primary ...
more infohttps://www.igi-global.com/chapter/ultrasound-guided-noninvasive-measurement-central/13081

Central venous pressure monitoring in Sacramento, CA | VCA Sacramento Veterinary Referral CenterCentral venous pressure monitoring in Sacramento, CA | VCA Sacramento Veterinary Referral Center

Get exceptional Central venous pressure monitoring services from highly experienced & loving pet care professionals in ... Central venous pressure monitoring. In our hospitals state-of-the-art ICU, we have the capability of doing intermittent or ... In our hospitals state-of-the-art ICU, we have the capability of doing intermittent or continuous central venous pressures to ... In our hospitals state-of-the-art ICU, we have the capability of doing intermittent or continuous central venous pressures to ...
more infohttps://vcahospitals.com/sacramento-veterinary-referral-center/services/emergency-critical-care/central-venous-pressure-monitoring

Peripheral venous pressure as a predictor of central venous pressure during orthotopic liver transplantation.Peripheral venous pressure as a predictor of central venous pressure during orthotopic liver transplantation.

... as a predictor of central venous pressure (CVP) in the setting of rapidly fluctuating hemodynamics during orthotopic liver ... To assess the reliability of peripheral venous pressure (PVP) ... Peripheral venous pressure as a predictor of central venous ... STUDY OBJECTIVE: To assess the reliability of peripheral venous pressure (PVP) as a predictor of central venous pressure (CVP) ... Central Venous Pressure / physiology*. Female. Humans. Liver Transplantation / physiology*. Male. Middle Aged. Monitoring, ...
more infohttp://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Peripheral-venous-pressure-as-predictor/16797425.html

Central Venous Pressure Monitoring in Kalamazoo, MI | VCA Southwest Michigan Animal Emergency and Referral CenterCentral Venous Pressure Monitoring in Kalamazoo, MI | VCA Southwest Michigan Animal Emergency and Referral Center

Get exceptional Central Venous Pressure Monitoring services from highly experienced & loving pet care professionals in ... Central Venous Pressure Monitoring. In our hospitals state-of-the-art ICU, we have the capability of doing intermittent or ... Central Venous Pressure Monitoring. While your general practice veterinarian can diagnose and treat many health problems and ... In our hospitals state-of-the-art ICU, we have the capability of doing intermittent or continuous central venous pressures to ...
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Significance of Early Postoperative Arterial Lactic Acid, Inferior Vena Cava Variability, and Central Venous Pressure in...Significance of Early Postoperative Arterial Lactic Acid, Inferior Vena Cava Variability, and Central Venous Pressure in...

We would like to know what role the arterial lactic acid, inferior vena cava variability, and CVP (central venous pressure) ... Z. L. Yang, J. Q. Zhou, B. L. Sun et al., "The influence of positive endexpiratory pressure on central venous pressure in ... changes in chest pressure from spontaneous breathing may also affect central venous pressure. These are the next steps that ... The central venous pressure is easily disturbed, and it has no obvious correlation with arterial blood lactic acid and cannot ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/emi/2019/6504916/

Pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect: a case for central venous pressure and oxygen saturation monitoring.Pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect: a case for central venous pressure and oxygen saturation monitoring.

Invasive arterial and central venous (CVP) pressure, pulse oximetric oxygen saturation (SpO2), and (from the tip of o ... pressure, pulse oximetric oxygen saturation (SpO2), and (from the tip of oximetric central venous catheter) central venous ... Central Venous Pressure*. Electrocardiography. Female. Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular / physiopathology*. Hemodynamics. ... Pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect: a case for central venous pressure and oxygen saturation monitoring. ...
more infohttp://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Pulmonary-atresia-with-ventricular-septal/9713951.html

Central Venous Pressure Monitoring-A Simple Device to Determine Zero Level | Anesthesiology | ASA PublicationsCentral Venous Pressure Monitoring-A Simple Device to Determine Zero Level | Anesthesiology | ASA Publications

Central Venous Pressure Monitoring-A Simple Device to Determine Zero Level You will receive an email whenever this article is ... Central Venous Pressure Monitoring-A Simple Device to Determine Zero Level. Anesthesiology 12 1975, Vol.43, 678. doi: ... JOHN C. SNOW, DUSAN B. DOBNIK; Central Venous Pressure Monitoring-A Simple Device to Determine Zero Level. Anesthesiology 1975; ...
more infohttp://anesthesiology.pubs.asahq.org/article.aspx?articleid=1961138

Central venous pressure monitoring in the ICU - Oxford MedicineCentral venous pressure monitoring in the ICU - Oxford Medicine

A useful approach to hypotension is to first determine if arterial pressure is low because of a decrease in vascular resistance ... Central venous pressure (CVP) is at the crucial intersection of the force returning blood to the heart and the force produced ... p. 613) Central venous pressure monitoring in the ICU. Chapter:. (p. 613) Central venous pressure monitoring in the ICU. Author ... Central venous pressure (CVP) is at the crucial intersection of the force returning blood to the heart and the force produced ...
more infohttps://oxfordmedicine.com/view/10.1093/med/9780199600830.001.0001/med-9780199600830-chapter-132

Most recent papers with the keyword Central Venous Pressure | Read by QxMDMost recent papers with the keyword Central Venous Pressure | Read by QxMD

Heart rate, blood pressure, central venous pressure, cardiac index, and renal blood flow were registered at baseline, 5, 15, 30 ... BACKGROUND: Central venous pressure (CVP) is an important factor affecting capillary blood flow, and it is associated with poor ... Central venous pressure (CVP) monitoring is used to assess the fluid status of patients in critical care settings. This article ... The primary objective of this study was to compare pressures at various flow rates for central venous access devices in an ex ...
more infohttps://www.readbyqxmd.com/keyword/4242

Central venous pressure at emergency room presentation predicts cardiac rehospitalization in patients with decompensated heart...Central venous pressure at emergency room presentation predicts cardiac rehospitalization in patients with decompensated heart...

CONCLUSION: Central venous pressure at ER presentation in patients with DHF is an independent predictor of cardiac ... CONCLUSION: Central venous pressure at ER presentation in patients with DHF is an independent predictor of cardiac ... Central venous pressure at emergency room presentation predicts cardiac rehospitalization in patients with decompensated heart ... AIMS: To investigate the relationship between central venous pressure (CVP) at presentation to the emergency room (ER) and the ...
more infohttps://www.zora.uzh.ch/id/eprint/33047/

Mean Arterial Pressure to Central Venous Pressure Ratio: A Novel Marker for Right Ventricular Failure After Left Ventricular...Mean Arterial Pressure to Central Venous Pressure Ratio: A Novel Marker for Right Ventricular Failure After Left Ventricular...

"Mean Arterial Pressure to Central Venous Pressure Ratio: A Novel Marker for Right Ventricular Failure After Left Ventricular ... Mean Arterial Pressure to Central Venous Pressure Ratio: A Novel Marker for Right Ventricular... Mohamedali, Burhan; Doukky, ... Mean Arterial Pressure to Central Venous Pressure Ratio: A Novel Marker for Right Ventricular Failure After Left Ventricular ... Mean Arterial Pressure to Central Venous Pressure Ratio: A Novel Marker for Right Ventricular Failure After Left Ventricular ...
more infohttps://www.deepdyve.com/lp/elsevier/mean-arterial-pressure-to-central-venous-pressure-ratio-a-novel-marker-4b2wHamiGT

Central venous pressureCentral venous pressure

... (CVP) is the blood pressure in the venae cavae, near the right atrium of the ... Venous function and central venous pressure: a physiologic story - a technical discussion of the more modern understanding of ... where central venous pressure increases, but right atrial pressure stays the same; VR = CVP − RAP). ... "Pulmonary artery occlusion pressure and central venous pressure fail to predict ventricular filling volume, cardiac performance ...
more infohttps://ipfs.io/ipfs/QmXoypizjW3WknFiJnKLwHCnL72vedxjQkDDP1mXWo6uco/wiki/Central_venous_pressure.html

Mini-epidemic of Erroneous Central Venous Pressure Measurements Resulting from the Malproduction of a Specific Part of a...Mini-epidemic of Erroneous Central Venous Pressure Measurements Resulting from the Malproduction of a Specific Part of a...

Venous Function and Central Venous Pressure: A Physiologic Story. Uppermost Blood Levels of the Right and Left Atria in the ... We report a mini-epidemic of erroneous central venous pressure measurements due to faulty pressure transducer manufacturing ... Implication for Measuring Central Venous Pressure and Pulmonary Artery Wedge Pressure ... Brisman R, Parks LC, Benson DW: Pitfalls in the clinical use of central venous pressure. Arch Surg 1967; 95:902-7Brisman, R ...
more infohttp://anesthesiology.pubs.asahq.org/article.aspx?articleid=1940973

Central venous pressure synonyms, central venous pressure antonyms - FreeThesaurus.comCentral venous pressure synonyms, central venous pressure antonyms - FreeThesaurus.com

Antonyms for central venous pressure. 85 synonyms for pressure: force, crushing, squeezing, compressing, weight, compression, ... heaviness, power, influence, force, obligation, constraint, sway.... What are synonyms for central venous pressure? ... Synonyms for central venous pressure in Free Thesaurus. ... central venous pressure (CVP). *central venous pressure above ... Central venous pressure synonyms, central venous pressure antonyms - FreeThesaurus.com https://www.freethesaurus.com/central+ ...
more infohttps://www.freethesaurus.com/central+venous+pressure

Optimal central venous pressure during partial hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma | Read by QxMDOptimal central venous pressure during partial hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma | Read by QxMD

Low central venous pressure reduces blood loss in hepatectomy. Wei-Dong Wang, Li-Jian Liang, Xiong-Qing Huang, Xiao-Yu Yin ... The role of central venous pressure and type of vascular control in blood loss during major liver resections. Vassilios ... Optimal central venous pressure during partial hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma. Cheng-Xin Lin, Ya Guo, Wan Yee Lau, ... BACKGROUND: Low central venous pressure (CVP) affects hemodynamic stability and tissue perfusion. This prospective study aimed ...
more infohttps://read.qxmd.com/read/24103283/optimal-central-venous-pressure-during-partial-hepatectomy-for-hepatocellular-carcinoma

Weaning patients with high cardiac output state: influence on central venous pressure and right ventricular stroke work index |...Weaning patients with high cardiac output state: influence on central venous pressure and right ventricular stroke work index |...

... central venous pressure (CVP), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (Pw), CO, systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) and ... Weaning patients with high cardiac output state: influence on central venous pressure and right ventricular stroke work index. ... The following parameters were evaluated: heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure, ... diastolic pulmonary artery pressure (DPAP), systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), pulmonary vascular resistance index ( ...
more infohttps://ccforum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/cc3188

Central venous pressure and impaired renal function in patients with acute heart failure  - edocCentral venous pressure and impaired renal function in patients with acute heart failure - edoc

Central venous pressure and impaired renal function in patients with acute heart failure. European journal of heart failure, ... Central venous pressure and impaired renal function in patients with acute heart failure ... To determine the relationship between central venous pressure (CVP) and renal function in patients with acute heart failure ( ...
more infohttps://edoc.unibas.ch/31027/
  • Findings were inconsistent among mechanically ventilated patients, except in the absence of positive end-expiratory pressure. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We compared the sensibility of SVV by Vigileo/Flotrac to central venous pressure (CVP) when volume changes in patients undergoing intraoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) and acute hypervolemic hemodilution (AHH). (elsevier.com)
  • Heart rate (range: 68-75 beat/min), mean arterial pressure (80-90 mmHg), CVP (7-10 mmHg), SpO2 (79-90 percent), ScvO2 (57-70 percent), and ExO2 (21-30 percent) remained stable during epidural anesthesia and transvaginal sterilization. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The systolic blood pressure (SBP) was maintained, if possible, at 90 mmHg or higher. (qxmd.com)
  • The purpose of the present study was to determine the central retinal venous pressure (CRVP) in patients with retinal vascular occlusions using a contact lens ophthalmodynamometer calibrated in mmHg. (arvojournals.org)
  • CRVP in central retinal vascular occlusions (CRAO and CRVO) was higher than in branch retinal vascular occlusions (BRAO and BRVO): 44.4±13.5 mmHg and 29.9±12.4mmHg respectively (P=0.026). (arvojournals.org)
  • Ultrasound of the IVC is a visual method to qualitatively track dynamic changes of the central venous pressure relative to the intra-abdominal pressure. (pulmccm.org)
  • MEASUREMENTS: Peripheral venous pressure and CVP were recorded every 5 minutes and/or during predetermined, well-defined surgical events (skin incision, venovenous bypass initiation, portal vein anastamosis, 5 minute post graft reperfusion, abdominal closure). (biomedsearch.com)
  • ELECTROMANOMETRIC blood pressure measurements are routine in critically ill patients, and many interventions are based on correct measurements. (asahq.org)
  • We report a mini-epidemic of erroneous central venous pressure measurements due to faulty pressure transducer manufacturing resulting in wrong therapeutic decisions. (asahq.org)
  • Central venous pressure and MAP measurements were taken during stage 1 and 2, immediately prior to pneumothorax induction (M1), immediately after pneumothorax induction (M2), after introducing the trocar (M3), after inserting the drain (M4) and after draining the cavity and restoring negative pressure (M5). (freethesaurus.com)
  • Predicting cardiac output responses to passive leg raising by a PEEP-induced increase in central venous pressure, in cardiac surgery patients. (qxmd.com)
  • Monitor screenshot of pulmonary arterial (PA) and central venous pressure (CVP) channels in a patient about to undergo coronary artery bypass surgery. (asahq.org)
  • We compared the sensibility of SVV by Vigileo/Flotrac to central venous pressure (CVP) when volume changes in patients undergoing intraoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) and acute hypervolemic hemodilution (AHH). (elsevier.com)
  • Stroke volume variation in hepatic resection: a replacement for standard central venous pressure monitoring. (qxmd.com)
  • 8) reveals this phenomenon when finding a scarce relationship of the values of central venous pressure and its variation with the systolic volume in healthy individuals. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Arterial and central venous pressure (CVP) monitoring allows for closer haemodynamic monitoring and regular blood gas analysis, although some centres will not routinely use invasive monitoring for smaller liver resections where blood loss is expected to be below one litre (Redai et al 2004). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • For invasive pressure monitoring in patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery, we use a color-coded multitransducer system with a single pressurized bag of normal saline for line rinsing. (asahq.org)
  • To determine the relationship between central venous pressure (CVP) and renal function in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) presenting to the emergency department. (unibas.ch)
  • Shock is best defined as a life-threatening, generalized form of acute circulatory failure associated with inadequate oxygen utilization by the cells, including mottled skin, acrocyanosis, slow capillary refill time, and an increased central-to-toe temperature gradient [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Central catheters are common in acute and critical care areas. (aacnjournals.org)
  • Central venous pressure (CVP) is a measure of the mean pressure within the thoracic vena cava, which is the largest vein in the body and responsible for returning blood from the systemic circulation to the heart. (igi-global.com)
  • Central venous pressure (CVP) is at the crucial intersection of the force returning blood to the heart and the force produced by cardiac function, which drives the blood back to the systemic circulation. (oxfordmedicine.com)
  • When the CVP falls below intra-abdominal pressure, the IVC will tend to collapse and when the CVP rises above the intra-abdominal pressure the IVC will tend to distend, both as a function of IVC compliance . (pulmccm.org)
  • On first blush, it may seem random, especially with waxing and waning intra-thoracic pressure, but the informed intensivist must make sense of this dance. (pulmccm.org)
  • Therapeutic plasma exchange is an apheresis modality in which plasma is separated from the blood cellular components ex vivo, discarded, and replaced with an isosmotic fluid (most commonly 5% albumin) to maintain appropriate oncotic pressure in the patient. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Low central venous pressure reduces blood loss in hepatectomy. (qxmd.com)
  • Intuitively, any intervention that improves cardiac function will favor ejection of blood from the thorax and lower CVP while any state that impairs cardiac function will encourage retention of blood within the central compartment and raise CVP. (pulmccm.org)