Trauma, Nervous System: Traumatic injuries to the brain, cranial nerves, spinal cord, autonomic nervous system, or neuromuscular system, including iatrogenic injuries induced by surgical procedures.Central Nervous System: The main information-processing organs of the nervous system, consisting of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges.Central Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of any component of the brain (including the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, brain stem, and cerebellum) or the spinal cord.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Nerve Regeneration: Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.Axons: Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.Astrocytes: A class of large neuroglial (macroglial) cells in the central nervous system - the largest and most numerous neuroglial cells in the brain and spinal cord. Astrocytes (from "star" cells) are irregularly shaped with many long processes, including those with "end feet" which form the glial (limiting) membrane and directly and indirectly contribute to the BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER. They regulate the extracellular ionic and chemical environment, and "reactive astrocytes" (along with MICROGLIA) respond to injury.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Nervous System: The entire nerve apparatus, composed of a central part, the brain and spinal cord, and a peripheral part, the cranial and spinal nerves, autonomic ganglia, and plexuses. (Stedman, 26th ed)Neuroprotective Agents: Drugs intended to prevent damage to the brain or spinal cord from ischemia, stroke, convulsions, or trauma. Some must be administered before the event, but others may be effective for some time after. They act by a variety of mechanisms, but often directly or indirectly minimize the damage produced by endogenous excitatory amino acids.Central Nervous System Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplastic processes that arise from or secondarily involve the brain, spinal cord, or meninges.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Trauma Centers: Specialized hospital facilities which provide diagnostic and therapeutic services for trauma patients.Peripheral Nervous System: The nervous system outside of the brain and spinal cord. The peripheral nervous system has autonomic and somatic divisions. The autonomic nervous system includes the enteric, parasympathetic, and sympathetic subdivisions. The somatic nervous system includes the cranial and spinal nerves and their ganglia and the peripheral sensory receptors.Vascular System Injuries: Injuries to blood vessels caused by laceration, contusion, puncture, or crush and other types of injuries. Symptoms vary by site and mode of injuries and may include bleeding, bruising, swelling, pain, and numbness. It does not include injuries secondary to pathologic function or diseases such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS.Central Nervous System Infections: Pathogenic infections of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges. DNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; RNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; BACTERIAL INFECTIONS; MYCOPLASMA INFECTIONS; SPIROCHAETALES INFECTIONS; fungal infections; PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS; HELMINTHIASIS; and PRION DISEASES may involve the central nervous system as a primary or secondary process.Multiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Enteric Nervous System: Two ganglionated neural plexuses in the gut wall which form one of the three major divisions of the autonomic nervous system. The enteric nervous system innervates the gastrointestinal tract, the pancreas, and the gallbladder. It contains sensory neurons, interneurons, and motor neurons. Thus the circuitry can autonomously sense the tension and the chemical environment in the gut and regulate blood vessel tone, motility, secretions, and fluid transport. The system is itself governed by the central nervous system and receives both parasympathetic and sympathetic innervation. (From Kandel, Schwartz, and Jessel, Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p766)Central Nervous System Viral Diseases: Viral infections of the brain, spinal cord, meninges, or perimeningeal spaces.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Autonomic Nervous System: The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.Trauma Severity Indices: Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.Nervous System Physiological Phenomena: Characteristic properties and processes of the NERVOUS SYSTEM as a whole or with reference to the peripheral or the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Vasculitis, Central Nervous System: Inflammation of blood vessels within the central nervous system. Primary vasculitis is usually caused by autoimmune or idiopathic factors, while secondary vasculitis is caused by existing disease process. Clinical manifestations are highly variable but include HEADACHE; SEIZURES; behavioral alterations; INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES; TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; and BRAIN INFARCTION. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp856-61)Sympathetic Nervous System: The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Reperfusion Injury: Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Central Nervous System Agents: A class of drugs producing both physiological and psychological effects through a variety of mechanisms. They can be divided into "specific" agents, e.g., affecting an identifiable molecular mechanism unique to target cells bearing receptors for that agent, and "nonspecific" agents, those producing effects on different target cells and acting by diverse molecular mechanisms. Those with nonspecific mechanisms are generally further classed according to whether they produce behavioral depression or stimulation. Those with specific mechanisms are classed by locus of action or specific therapeutic use. (From Gilman AG, et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p252)Craniocerebral Trauma: Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.Nervous System Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplastic processes arising from or involving components of the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems, cranial nerves, and meninges. Included in this category are primary and metastatic nervous system neoplasms.Central Nervous System Fungal Infections: MYCOSES of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges which may result in ENCEPHALITIS; MENINGITIS, FUNGAL; MYELITIS; BRAIN ABSCESS; and EPIDURAL ABSCESS. Certain types of fungi may produce disease in immunologically normal hosts, while others are classified as opportunistic pathogens, causing illness primarily in immunocompromised individuals (e.g., ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME).Neuroglia: The non-neuronal cells of the nervous system. They not only provide physical support, but also respond to injury, regulate the ionic and chemical composition of the extracellular milieu, participate in the BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER and BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER, form the myelin insulation of nervous pathways, guide neuronal migration during development, and exchange metabolites with neurons. Neuroglia have high-affinity transmitter uptake systems, voltage-dependent and transmitter-gated ion channels, and can release transmitters, but their role in signaling (as in many other functions) is unclear.Myelin Sheath: The lipid-rich sheath surrounding AXONS in both the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEMS and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The myelin sheath is an electrical insulator and allows faster and more energetically efficient conduction of impulses. The sheath is formed by the cell membranes of glial cells (SCHWANN CELLS in the peripheral and OLIGODENDROGLIA in the central nervous system). Deterioration of the sheath in DEMYELINATING DISEASES is a serious clinical problem.Nerve Tissue ProteinsDisease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Mice, Inbred C57BLBlood-Brain Barrier: Specialized non-fenestrated tightly-joined ENDOTHELIAL CELLS with TIGHT JUNCTIONS that form a transport barrier for certain substances between the cerebral capillaries and the BRAIN tissue.Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Leg Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Central Nervous System Bacterial Infections: Bacterial infections of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges, including infections involving the perimeningeal spaces.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.Neck Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the neck. It includes injuries to the skin, muscles, and other soft tissues of the neck.Demyelinating Diseases: Diseases characterized by loss or dysfunction of myelin in the central or peripheral nervous system.Oligodendroglia: A class of large neuroglial (macroglial) cells in the central nervous system. Oligodendroglia may be called interfascicular, perivascular, or perineuronal (not the same as SATELLITE CELLS, PERINEURONAL of GANGLIA) according to their location. They form the insulating MYELIN SHEATH of axons in the central nervous system.Brain Diseases: Pathologic conditions affecting the BRAIN, which is composed of the intracranial components of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. This includes (but is not limited to) the CEREBRAL CORTEX; intracranial white matter; BASAL GANGLIA; THALAMUS; HYPOTHALAMUS; BRAIN STEM; and CEREBELLUM.Tuberculosis, Central Nervous System: Tuberculosis of the brain, spinal cord, or meninges (TUBERCULOSIS, MENINGEAL), most often caused by MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS and rarely by MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS. The infection may be limited to the nervous system or coexist in other organs (e.g., TUBERCULOSIS, PULMONARY). The organism tends to seed the meninges causing a diffuse meningitis and leads to the formation of TUBERCULOMA, which may occur within the brain, spinal cord, or perimeningeal spaces. Tuberculous involvement of the vertebral column (TUBERCULOSIS, SPINAL) may result in nerve root or spinal cord compression. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp717-20)Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Encephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, Experimental: An experimental animal model for central nervous system demyelinating disease. Inoculation with a white matter emulsion combined with FREUND'S ADJUVANT, myelin basic protein, or purified central myelin triggers a T cell-mediated immune response directed towards central myelin. The pathologic features are similar to MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, including perivascular and periventricular foci of inflammation and demyelination. Subpial demyelination underlying meningeal infiltrations also occurs, which is also a feature of ENCEPHALOMYELITIS, ACUTE DISSEMINATED. Passive immunization with T-cells from an afflicted animal to a normal animal also induces this condition. (From Immunol Res 1998;17(1-2):217-27; Raine CS, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p604-5)Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Cerebrospinal Fluid: A watery fluid that is continuously produced in the CHOROID PLEXUS and circulates around the surface of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and in the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Spinal Injuries: Injuries involving the vertebral column.Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.Microglia: The third type of glial cell, along with astrocytes and oligodendrocytes (which together form the macroglia). Microglia vary in appearance depending on developmental stage, functional state, and anatomical location; subtype terms include ramified, perivascular, ameboid, resting, and activated. Microglia clearly are capable of phagocytosis and play an important role in a wide spectrum of neuropathologies. They have also been suggested to act in several other roles including in secretion (e.g., of cytokines and neural growth factors), in immunological processing (e.g., antigen presentation), and in central nervous system development and remodeling.Multiple Sclerosis: An autoimmune disorder mainly affecting young adults and characterized by destruction of myelin in the central nervous system. Pathologic findings include multiple sharply demarcated areas of demyelination throughout the white matter of the central nervous system. Clinical manifestations include visual loss, extra-ocular movement disorders, paresthesias, loss of sensation, weakness, dysarthria, spasticity, ataxia, and bladder dysfunction. The usual pattern is one of recurrent attacks followed by partial recovery (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, RELAPSING-REMITTING), but acute fulminating and chronic progressive forms (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, CHRONIC PROGRESSIVE) also occur. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p903)RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Brain Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).Encephalomyelitis: A general term indicating inflammation of the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD, often used to indicate an infectious process, but also applicable to a variety of autoimmune and toxic-metabolic conditions. There is significant overlap regarding the usage of this term and ENCEPHALITIS in the literature.Encephalitis: Inflammation of the BRAIN due to infection, autoimmune processes, toxins, and other conditions. Viral infections (see ENCEPHALITIS, VIRAL) are a relatively frequent cause of this condition.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Heart Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the heart.Blast Injuries: Injuries resulting when a person is struck by particles impelled with violent force from an explosion. Blast causes pulmonary concussion and hemorrhage, laceration of other thoracic and abdominal viscera, ruptured ear drums, and minor effects in the central nervous system. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Brain Chemistry: Changes in the amounts of various chemicals (neurotransmitters, receptors, enzymes, and other metabolites) specific to the area of the central nervous system contained within the head. These are monitored over time, during sensory stimulation, or under different disease states.Facial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.

*Paralympic Games

Hypertonia may result from injury, disease, or conditions which involve damage to the central nervous system (e.g. cerebral ... To increase blood pressure athletes will deliberately cause trauma to limbs below a spinal injury. This trauma can include ... e.g. achondroplasia, growth hormone deficiency, osteogenesis imperfecta) Hypertonia - Hypertonia is marked by an abnormal ... The classification systems differ from sport to sport and are intended to open up sports to as many athletes as possible who ...

*Neuroregeneration

Unlike peripheral nervous system injury, injury to the central nervous system is not followed by extensive regeneration. It is ... The environment within the CNS, especially following trauma, counteracts the repair of myelin and neurons. Growth factors are ... The nervous system is divided into two parts: the central nervous system, which consists of the brain and spinal cord, and the ... While the peripheral nervous system has an intrinsic ability for repair and regeneration, the central nervous system is, for ...

*Astrocyte

Nervous system repair: Upon injury to nerve cells within the central nervous system, astrocytes fill up the space to form a ... They did an experiment to attempt to repair trauma to the Central Nervous System of an adult rat by replacing the glial cells. ... failed to promote neuronal survival and support of axonal growth at the spot of the injury. One study done in Shanghai had two ... Astrocytes are a sub-type of glial cells in the central nervous system. They are also known as astrocytic glial cells. Star- ...

*Cyclopentenone prostaglandins

... and lung injury; injury due to ischemia in the heart, brain, kidney, and gut; and stress-induced central nervous system trauma ... 15d-Δ12,14-PGJ2 and its PGD2 precursor have been demonstrated to suppress hair growth in studies of mouse and human follicular ... 15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-PGG2's activation of PPARγ and the induction of paraptosis is responsible for inhibiting the growth of cultured ... and Insulin-like growth factor 1; and e) regulating agents such as HSP70, GPR78, Gadd153, Ubiquitin B, and Ubiquitin C which ...

*Axotomy

In contrast to the peripheral response, the axotomy response in central neurons (neurons in the Central Nervous System) almost ... Traumatic Brain Injuries[edit]. A traumatic brain injury is defined as a blunt non-missile penetrating or missile injury to the ... The inflammation response also recruits growth factors that aid in the repopulation of postsynaptic sites. The negative effects ... head.[10] It has been shown that the extent of the damage incurred after a head trauma correlates more directly with the amount ...

*Erythropoietin in neuroprotection

Epo has a lot of potential uses and could provide a therapeutic answer for nervous system injury. However, more studies need to ... The pathway for erythropoietin in both the central and peripheral nervous systems begins with the binding of Epo to EpoR. This ... Epo has a favorable response in brain and spinal cord injuries like mechanical trauma or subarachnoid hemorrhages. Research ... In EpoR knock-down animals, deletion of EpoR genes specific to the brain lead to a reduction in cell growth in the ...

*Collapsin response mediator protein family

Also, injury-induced CRMPs expression is found in sprouting fibers in both the central and peripheral nervous system. CRMP-4 ... products play a considerable role in the degeneration of axons as a result of trauma inflicted on the central nervous system ( ... expressed in the nervous system during development and play important roles in axon formation from neurites and in growth cone ... CRMPs' role in myelination or demyelination has been proposed in the central and peripheral adult nervous system. Antibodies ...

*Astrogliosis

Insults to neurons in the central nervous system caused by infection, trauma, ischemia, stroke, autoimmune responses, or other ... CNS injury responses have favored mechanisms that keep small injuries uninfected. Inhibition of the migration of inflammatory ... Molecular triggers that lead to this scar formation include epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), ... Reactive astrogliosis is a spectrum of changes in astrocytes that occur in response to all forms of central nervous system (CNS ...

*Astrocyte

Nervous system repair: Upon injury to nerve cells within the central nervous system, astrocytes fill up the space to form a ... They did an experiment to attempt to repair trauma to the Central Nervous System of an adult rat by replacing the glial cells. ... failed to promote neuronal survival and support of axonal growth at the spot of the injury.[58] ... Astrocytes are a sub-type of glial cells in the central nervous system. They are also known as astrocytic glial cells. Star- ...

*Axonotmesis

Assessment items include: Sensory fibers that send sensory information to the central nervous system. Motor fibers that allow ... Menorca, Ron M. G.; Fussell, Theron S.; Elfar, John C. (2017-05-05). "Peripheral Nerve Trauma: Mechanisms of Injury and ... Schwann cells provide the nerve with protection through the production of Nerve Growth Factors, and because these cells are ... Nervous plexus injuries create more signs and symptoms from sensory-motor problems (such as brachial plexus injuries). In these ...

*Central nervous system cyst

In adults cysts may also form due to a head injury or trauma, resulting in necrotic tissues (dead tissue), and can sometimes be ... Asymptomatic cysts, termed pseudocysts, normally require active monitoring with periodic scans for future growth. Symptomatic ( ... A central nervous system cyst is a type of cyst that presents and affects part of the central nervous system (CNS). They are ... They normally take over the neuraxis, the axis of the central nervous system that determines how the nervous system is placed, ...

*Neuroglia

Glia have a role in the regulation of repair of neurons after injury. In the central nervous system (CNS), glia suppress repair ... In the CNS, regrowth will only happen if the trauma was mild, and not severe. When severe trauma presents itself, the survival ... During early embryogenesis, glial cells direct the migration of neurons and produce molecules that modify the growth of axons ... and provide support and protection for neurons in the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the central nervous system, ...

*Chloride potassium symporter 5

Loss of KCC2 following neuronal damage (i.e. ischemia, spinal cord damage, physical trauma to the central nervous system) ... KCC2 is transcriptionally downregulated following central nervous system injury by the TrkB receptor signalling transduction ... Studies on hippocampal tissue in KCC2 knockout animals showed that neurons lacking KCC2 have stunted dendritic growth and ... downregulation may be the underlying mechanism by which KCC2 downregulation occurs following central nervous system injury. ...

*Neurodevelopmental disorder

... s are impairments of the growth and development of the brain or central nervous system. A narrower ... Brain trauma in the developing human is a common cause (over 400,000 injuries per year in the US alone, without clear ... The development of the nervous system including the brain is orchestrated, tightly regulated, and genetically encoded process ... It may be subdivided into two major categories, congenital injury (including injury resulting from otherwise uncomplicated ...

*Lesion

For example, a lesion in the central nervous system is called a central lesion, and a lesion in the peripheral nervous system ... A lesion is any abnormal damage or change in the tissue of an organism, usually caused by disease or trauma. Lesion is derived ... If there is an added significance to regions within the tissue - such as in neural injuries where different locations ... Cancerous lesions are sometimes classified by their growth kinetics, such as the Lodwick classification, which characterizes ...

*Protective autoimmunity

... following an injury to the central nervous system (CNS). Most of the studies on the phenomenon of protective autoimmunity were ... and by producing growth factors (such as insulin-like growth factor-1) that prevent neuronal death and induce axonal re-growth ... 2001). "Protective autoimmunity is a physiological response to CNS trauma". Journal of Neuroscience. 21 (11): 3740-3748. PMID ... CD25+ regulatory T cells suppress the ability to withstand injury to the central nervous system". PNAS. 99 (24): 15620-15625. ...

*Nerve allograft

Motor nerves, which carry the information from the central nervous system to peripheral organs, especially the muscles. Signals ... In a trauma or surgical resection, a nerve can be damaged, which is called a nerve defect. This defect needs to be repaired in ... Peripheral nerve injury is a major clinical problem and can result in neuropathic pain. Which is pain arising as a direct ... The donated nerve tissue is disinfected, by selectively removing cellular components and debris to cleave growth inhibitors and ...

*Astrocyte

Nervous system repair: Upon injury to nerve cells within the central nervous system, astrocytes fill up the space to form a ... They did an experiment to attempt to repair trauma to the Central Nervous System of an adult rat by replacing the glial cells. ... failed to promote neuronal survival and support of axonal growth at the spot of the injury.[50] ... Astrocytes are a sub-type of glial cells in the central nervous system. They are also known as astrocytic glial cells. Star- ...

*Hoarse voice

... in the central nervous system or peripheral nervous system); in contrast, structural dysphonia is defined as impacted ... Allergy Infections Reflux Smoking Trauma Voice abuse Neuromuscular: Disturbances in any of the components of the nervous system ... Note that this list is not exhaustive): Neoplastic/structural: Abnormal growths of the vocal fold tissue. Dysplasia Cysts ... Multiple Sclerosis Myasthenia Gravis Parkinson's disease Spasmodic Dysphonia Nerve injury Associated Systemic Diseases: ...

*Glial scar

TGFβ-1 has been observed to increase immediately after injury to the central nervous system, whereas TGFβ-2 expression occurs ... Following trauma to the CNS, axons begin to sprout and attempt to extend across the injury site in order to repair the damaged ... 1996). "Increased basic fibroblast growth factor expression following contusive spinal cord injury." Experimental Neurology 141 ... They are the nervous system analog of immune system macrophages. Microglia rapidly activate near the injury and secrete several ...

*Catecholamine

Extremely high levels of catecholamines (also known as catecholamine toxicity) can occur in central nervous system trauma due ... They have been shown to promote plant tissue growth, somatic embryogenesis from in vitro cultures, and flowering. CAs inhibit ... CAs have been implicated to have a possible protective role against insect predators, injuries, and nitrogen detoxification. ... Dopamine, which acts as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, is largely produced in neuronal cell bodies in two ...

*Tenascin C

TN-C is also present in central nervous system injuries and gliomas. Tenascin C is an oligomeric glycoprotein composed of ... TGF-β1, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1, nerve growth factor, and keratinocyte growth factor are factors that have been ... TN-C clearly plays a role in cell signaling as evidenced by its ability to be induced during events such as trauma, ... In the developing central nervous system, TN-C is involved in regulating the proliferation of both oligodendrocyte precursor ...

*Tetanus

In general, the farther the injury site is from the central nervous system, the longer the incubation period. The shorter the ... It usually occurs after trauma to the head area, including skull fracture, laceration, eye injury, dental extraction, and ... and the puncturing object can deliver endospores to a suitable environment for growth. Tetanus affects skeletal muscle, a type ... It is transported within the axon and across synaptic junctions until it reaches the central nervous system. There it becomes ...

*Günther K.H. Zupanc

... theoretical framework for better understanding tissue growth in the intact and the regenerating central nervous system. A ... of this taxon to regenerate nervous tissue and to recover behavioral function after brain lesions and spinal cord injury. By ... associates performed the first large-scale analysis in teleost fish of changes in global protein expression after brain trauma ... He and his team also demonstrated that the continued generation of new neurons in the adult central nervous system of teleost ...

*Thrombus

More recent research indicates that tPA could have toxic effects in the central nervous system. In cases of severe stroke, tPA ... injury to the endothelial cells that line enclosed spaces of the body, such as the inside of blood vessels) (e.g. trauma, ... Heparin and warfarin are often used to inhibit the formation and growth of existing thrombi; the former binds to and activates ... A thrombus is a healthy response to injury intended to prevent bleeding, but can be harmful in thrombosis, when clots obstruct ...

*Oligodendrocyte

Their main functions are to provide support and insulation to axons in the central nervous system of some vertebrates, ... Trauma to the body, e.g. spinal cord injury, can also cause demyelination. The immature oligodendrocytes, which increase in ... or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). In addition, the nervous system of mammals depends crucially on myelin sheaths, which ... Oligodendrocytes are found only in the central nervous system, which comprises the brain and spinal cord. These cells were ...

*Neural tissue engineering

... and peripheral nervous system (PNS) by an injury. The nervous system is divided into two subsections: the CNS and the PNS. The ... Forraz, N.; Wright, K. E.; Jurga, M.; McGuckin, C. P. (2013). "Experimental therapies for repair of the central nervous system ... CNS injuries can be caused by stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, trauma, or encephalopathy. A few methods currently being ... and they can be delivered into the injury site to promote the growth of the injured tissues. Currently, morphogen delivery has ...
We have long known that gluten intolerance, both celiac disease and gluten sensitivity, are highly associated with neurological symptoms. Migraines, ataxia (unstable gait), seizures, schizophrenia - the list is long. But a recent research study just published last month sheds some new light on exactly what the mechanism may be. Understanding why these debilitating symptoms occur as a result of a gluten intolerance will, hopefully, go a long way toward increased awareness among the lay public and clinicians alike. It is certainly true that too many millions of Americans suffer the effects of a gluten intolerance unknowingly. They only know that they feel unhealthy but have no idea that gluten is the culprit.
Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online The Human Brain During the Third Trimester: Volume 3 (Atlas of Human Central Nervous System Development) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with The Human Brain During the Third Trimester: Volume 3 (Atlas of Human Central Nervous System Development) book. Happy reading The Human Brain During the Third Trimester: Volume 3 (Atlas of Human Central Nervous System Development) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF The Human Brain During the Third Trimester: Volume 3 (Atlas of Human Central Nervous ...
Lateral Femoral Cutaneous Nerve Youtube Lateral Femoral Cutaneous Nerve Youtube pain medicine lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, pudendal nerve. lateral femoral cutaneous nerve youtube meralgia par
TY - JOUR. T1 - Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve palsy following shoulder surgery in the beach chair position. T2 - a report of 4 cases. AU - Satin, Alexander M.. AU - DePalma, Anthony A.. AU - Cuellar, John. AU - Gruson, Konrad I.. PY - 2014/9/1. Y1 - 2014/9/1. N2 - Neuropathy of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve can present as pain, decreased sensation, and/or burning or tingling on the anterolateral thigh. We present 4 cases of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve palsy following shoulder surgery in the beach chair position, all of which occurred in obese patients. This complication, to our knowledge, has never been reported in conjunction with the beach chair position. We believe that the neurapraxia was due to external compression by the patients abdominal pannus. Full resolution of symptoms can be expected within 6 months following conservative management. A preoperative discussion regarding this complication should occur with obese patients undergoing shoulder surgery in the beach chair ...
The territory of Washington became an organized, incorporated territory of the USA in 1853 and its legislature first met in 1854. One of their first rulings was to make counties responsible for caring for all poor, sick, and homeless people whose relatives could not support them. In 1877, King County opened a county poor farm just south of Seattle to meet this need. Harborview Medical Center began as King County Hospital, which was a six-bed facility operating within the poor farm, and patients were cared for by nuns from the Sisters of Charity of the House of Providence. In 1894, a new 125-bed county hospital was commissioned for $80 000 and was located in Seattles Georgetown neighborhood. A new wing was added in 1908 expanding to 225 beds. In 1928 there was a ballot measure to construct a 500-bed hospital for care of the indigent sick, injured, and maternity cases, and $2.75 million was allocated to construct the new hospital on First Hill in Seattle, which is the site of the facility ...
Atlas of human central nervous system development , Atlas of human central nervous system development , کتابخانه دیجیتالی دانشگاه علوم پزشکی و خدمات درمانی شهید بهشتی
Two aspects of cytokine therapy of intracerebral tumors are considered in this study: modulation of tumor growth in vivo and central nervous system toxicity. Coimplantation of RG-2 glioma cells and retroviral vector producer cell lines was performed to provide a local source of interleukin-2 (IL-2) or IFN-γ within the tumor and coinitiate an antitumor immune response. We demonstrated that local intratumoral production of IL-2 and IFN-γ generates a cell-mediated antitumor response in vivo. This response was manifest as a diffuse infiltration of monocytes/macrophages, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and activation of microglial OX42+ cells in intracerebral RG2 tumors. The cell-mediated antitumor immune response resulted in the early suppression of intracranial and subcutaneous tumor growth, but the effect was not sustained and there were no tumor regressions. The absence of increased survival of ...
This work concerns the roles of neuron glia interactions in the control of neuronal survival during Central Nervous System (CNS) development in Drosophila. The question of whether glia are required to maintain neuronal survival in insects was addressed. Firstly, the GAL4 system was used to achieve in vivo targeted genetic ablation of glia. Secondly, plasmid rescue and P-element excision were exploited to locate and mutate genes which might participate in neuron glia interactions. Targeted glial ablation did not affect pioneer neuron survival. However, increased apoptosis was observed among the FasII and 22C10 expressing subsets of the follower neurons. Targeted ablation only of the interface glia was sufficient to induce follower neuron apoptosis. This difference in the survival requirements of pioneer and follower neurons may be instructive in patterning of the CNS. Neuronal apoptosis was ...
The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN), composed of the L2/L3 branches of the lumbar plexus, is a pure sensory nerve. It emerges at the lateral border of the psoas major muscle and descends laterally and obliquely towards the pelvis. In the pelvis, the nerve lies within aduplication of the fascia iliaca and on top of the iliacus muscle. The nerve takes a remarkable sharp turn and courses inferiorly before it enters the thigh via the muscular space, lacuna musculorum, underneath or even through a gap of the inguinal ligament in variable distance to the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS). It then arrives on top of sartorius muscle (SM) in most cases, deep to the fascia lata. Importantly, the main trunk (the anterior branch or division) stays subfascial approximately 7-10 cm below ASIS (Figure 1 ...
The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN), composed of the L2/L3 branches of the lumbar plexus, is a pure sensory nerve. It emerges at the lateral border of the psoas major muscle and descends laterally and obliquely towards the pelvis. In the pelvis, the nerve lies within aduplication of the fascia iliaca and on top of the iliacus muscle. The nerve takes a remarkable sharp turn and courses inferiorly before it enters the thigh via the muscular space, lacuna musculorum, underneath or even through a gap of the inguinal ligament in variable distance to the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS). It then arrives on top of sartorius muscle (SM) in most cases, deep to the fascia lata. Importantly, the main trunk (the anterior branch or division) stays subfascial approximately 7-10 cm below ASIS (Figure 1 ...
The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) arises from L2-3. After emerging from the lateral border of the psoas major muscle, it courses inferiorly and laterally toward the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS). It then passes under the inguinal ligament and over the sartorius muscle into the thigh, where it divides into two branches (anterior and posterior). The LFCN, a small subcutaneous nerve located between the fascia lata and iliaca, provides sensory innervation to the lateral thigh. On occasion, its area of coverage can include the anterior thigh, normally covered by the femoral nerve. ...
The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve is a sensory nerve, L2 and L3, and is vulnerable to entrapment in the region of the proximal crest of the ASIS
posted on: 6/3/2016 4:28:47 PM. Pioneering Robotic Hernia Repair Technology A major complication associated with surgical procedures is the development of an incisional hernia. In fact, as high as 10% of abdominal operations will be complicated by the development of incisional hernias. An incisional hernia will occur when there is a weakness in the muscle of the abdomen that allows the tissues of the abdomen to protrude through the muscle. The hernia appears as a bulge under the skin, and it can be painful or tender to the touch. Dr. Jeremy Heffner, General Surgeon with Midwest Surgical Specialists and Medical Director of Lima Memorial Health Systems Trauma and Intensive Care Unit, recognized the significance of this complication and felt compelled to do something impactful about it. Four years of research, funded by the America Hernia Association, led to a patent of a new mesh for the treatment and prevention of hernias. With Dr. Heffners patent now ...
The blood-nerve barrier (BNB) is a dynamic and competent interface between the endoneurial microenvironment and the surrounding extracellular space or blood. It is localised at the innermost layer of the multilayered ensheathing perineurium and endoneurial microvessels, and is the key structure that controls the internal milieu of the peripheral nerve parenchyma. Since the endoneurial BNB is the point of entry for pathogenic T cells and various soluble factors, including cytokines, chemokines and immunoglobulins, understanding this structure is important to prevent and treat human immune mediated neuropathies such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein and skin changes) syndrome and a subset of diabetic neuropathy. However, compared with the blood-brain barrier, only limited knowledge has been accumulated regarding the function, cell biology and clinical significance of the BNB. This ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Imaging of peripheral nerve lesions. AU - Fahr, L. M.. AU - Sauser, Donald. PY - 1988. Y1 - 1988. N2 - The imaging of peripheral nerve lesions remains limited to the radiographic demonstration of secondary skeletal lesions in birth trauma, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, neuropathic arthropathy, leprosy, and congenital indifference to pain. Nerve root avulsions can be imaged directly and the newer imaging modalities now allow delineation of lesions that previously could not be studied using conventional radiography. The ability of ultrasound, CT, and MRI to differentiate soft tissue structures makes it possible, in many instances, to study the primary abnormality in trauma, nerve entrapment syndromes, and tumors. With fractures, the possibility of trauma to adjacent nerves can only be inferred on the radiographs, while the role that peripheral nerve injury plays remains controversial in other entities, such as amputation with replantation. ...
The epidemiology of stillbirth and fetal central nervous system (CNS) injury is described with some emphasis on maternal and feto-placental risk factors. To maximize utility of the discussion and because it also represents the classical manifestation
Neurobiologists at UC San Diego have discovered how signals that orchestrate the construction of the nervous system also influence recovery after traumatic injury. They also found that manipulating these signals can enhance the return of function.
Neurobiologists at UC San Diego have discovered how signals that orchestrate the construction of the nervous system also influence recovery after traumatic injury.
Acute inflammation is a self-limiting, complex biological response mounted to combat pathogen invasion, to protect against tissue damage, and to promote tissue repair should it occur. However, unabated inflammation can be deleterious and contribute to injury and pathology. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), a prototypical
... refers to the entrapment of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve at the level of the inguinal ligament. The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve - a purely sensory nerve - arises from the L2 and L3 spinal nerve roots, travels downward lateral to the psoas muscle, and .... ...
Professor. Dr. Hatton Kolpek, FCCM, FCCP, FNAP is a professor practicing and conducting research on the care of patients with neurologic injury. Following service as Department Chair (2007-2011), her clinical practice transitioned from neurological intensive care to rehabilitation and ambulatory care of patients with stroke, spinal cord and brain injury. Her collaborative research and practice partnerships with the Kentucky Appalachian Rural Rehabilitation Network (http://karrn.org/wordpress/ ) and The Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Hospital (http://www.cardinalhill.org/chrh), are targeting polypharmacy challenges after neurologic injury. Dr. Hatton-Kolpek continues pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic research projects with neurosurgery colleagues and the Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center (http://www.mc.uky.edu/scobirc/ ). Dr. Hatton Kolpeks research has been funded by NIH, private foundations, industry and by the University. She is a vice-chair of the University of Kentucky IRB. She ...
BACKGROUND: We have previously reported that sensory, motor neocortex, and hippocampus are selectively vulnerable to injury in an acute porcine model of HCA at 18 degrees C. This study was undertaken to assess whether further cooling to 10 degrees C
The Esmolol arm is defined as a 48-hour intravenous infusion of esmolol (Brevibloc 20mg/ml), which will be started on enrollment. The infusion rate will begin at 50 micrograms/kg/min and be adjusted to achieve heart rates between 80 and 100 beats/min with standard dosing regimens used in our Neuro intensive care unit. The infusion will be started at a rate of 0.05 milligrams/kg/min (50 micrograms/kg/min) for 5 minutes. After the 5 minutes of initial infusion, maintenance infusion may be continued at 0.05 mg/kg/min or increased stepwise (e.g. 0.1 mg/kg/min, 0.15 mg/kg/min to a maximum of 0.2 mg/kg/min) with each step being maintained for 4 or more minutes until the target heart rate is achieved ...
Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been shown to provide neuroprotection after transplantation into the injured nervous system. The present thesis investigates whether adult human and rat MSC differentiated along a Schwann cell lineage could increase their expression of neurotrophic factors and promote regeneration after transplantation into the injured peripheral nerve and spinal cord.. Human and rat mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC and rMSC) expressed characteristic stem cell surface markers, mRNA transcripts for different neurotrophic factors and demonstrated multi-lineage differentiation potential. Following treatment with a cocktail of growth factors, the hMSC and rMSC expressed typical Schwann cells markers at both the transcriptional and translational level and significantly increased production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).. ...
The posterior femoral cutaneous nerve provides innervation to the back side of the leg and thigh area, as well as to the perineal skin surface. It is a small sciatic nerve that originates partially from the dorsal and ventral divisions of the nerves in the sacrum.
Definition of posterior femoral cutaneous nerve. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and definitions.
The Florida Birth-Related Neurological Injury Compensation Association (NICA) was created by the Florida Legislature in 1988. NICA is a statutory organization that manages the Florida Birth Related Neurological Injury Compensation Plan used to pay for the care of infants born with certain neurological injuries. This Plan is available to eligible families statewide without litigation
Red ginseng, as an effective herbal medicine, has been traditionally and empirically used for the treatment of neuronal diseases. Many studies suggest that red ginseng and its ingredients protect the brain and spinal cord from neural injuries such as ischemia, trauma, and neurodegeneration. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of red ginseng and its ingredients. Ginsenoside Rb1 and other ginsenosides are regarded as the active ingredients of red ginseng; the anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidative actions of ginsenosides, together with a series of bioactive molecules relevant to the above actions, appear to account for the neuroprotective effects in vivo and/or in vitro. Moreover, in this review, the possibility is raised that more effective or stable neuroprotective derivatives based on the chemical structures of ginsenosides could be developed. Although further studies, including clinical trials, are necessary ...
The present invention identifies biomarkers that are diagnostic of nerve cell injury and/or neuronal disorders. Detection of different biomarkers of the invention are also diagnostic of the degree of severity of nerve injury, the cell(s) involved in the injury, and the subcellular localization of the injury.
Brain injury or damage is the destruction or degeneration of brain cells. Brain injury can be caused by a variety of internal and external factors. A common category is traumatic brain injury that occurs after head damage from an outside source. Mild traumatic brain injury may cause temporary dysfunction of brain cells. More serious traumatic brain injury can result in more extensive physical damage to the brain that can lead to long-term complications or death. Loss of brain function can also be caused by stroke, a temporary loss of blood supply to the brain, which deprives brain tissue of oxygen and food and causes consequent brain cell death.. Feinstein Institute researchers are studying different aspects of brain injury. They are developing "smart catheters," the next generation of monitoring devices that will allow clinicians to continuously measure functional parameters in the injured brain during surgery. They are studying recovery from ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Reduction of central nervous system ischemic injury in rabbits using leukocyte adhesion antibody treatment. AU - Clark, Wayne. AU - Madden, Ken P.. AU - Rothlein, Robert. AU - Zivin, Justin A.. PY - 1991. Y1 - 1991. N2 - Activated leukocytes appear to be directly involved in ischemic central nervous system injury. A surface glycoprotein (CD18) on the leukocyte is required for endothelial adherence and subsequent function and can be blocked with leukocyte adhesion antibody treatment. We used two animal models to determine the efficacy of anti-CD18 antibody treatment in preserving neurologic function after central nervous system ischemia. We gave a dose of 1 mg/kg anti-CD18 to treatment rabbits 30 minutes before inducing irreversible ischemia ...
Heterotopic ossification, defined as the formation of bone in abnormal anatomic locations, can be clinically insignificant or devastating and debilitating, depending on the site and duration of new bone formation. There are many causes of heterotopic ossification (HO), including soft tissue trauma, central nervous system injury, vasculopathies, arthropathies, and inheritance. One of the least understood components of HO is the interaction of the peripheral nervous system with the induction of this process. Recent work has shown that, upon traumatic injury, a cascade of events termed neurogenic inflammation is initiated, which involves the release of neuropeptides, such as substance P and calcitonin gene related peptide. Release of these peptides ultimately leads to the recruitment of activated platelets, mast cells, and ...
We report here a novel live imaging approach to study astrocyte response to ischemic injury in the brains of living mice. Our results revealed marked effects of sex and estrogen on astrocyte response to ischemic injury. We report here that: (1) bioluminescent signal intensities/GFAP induction were significantly higher in female mice (out of estrus) compared with males (confirmed by immunohistochemistry); (2) in female mice, astrocyte response to ischemia/GFAP upregulation was strongly dependent on the estrus cycle and serum estrogen level; and (3) contrary to the findings in male mice, there was no correlation between bioluminescent signal intensity/GFAP upregulation and size of the ischemic lesion in female GFAP-luc mice.. GFAP is a 50-kDa intermediate filament, predominantly expressed by mature astrocytes in the central nervous system.24,25 Reactive astrogliosis is a key component of the inflammatory cellular response to ...
Austin Groen, 18, of Scottsdale, Ariz., took second place with his photo titled "Mystery Beneath," taken in Santa María Mixistlán, Mexico, where he was an AMIGOS volunteer in summer 2013. Third-place honors went to Carmen Lugo, 17, of Carlsbad, Calif., whose untitled photo was taken in Tierra Blanca, Mexico, where she volunteered with AMIGOS in summer 2013.. Professional and amateur photographers from around the world submitted more than 200 photographs for the 2013 competition. Photos had to be original and taken in countries served by both United and AMIGOS: Colombia, Panama, Peru, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Ecuador, Costa Rica, and Nicaragua. A team of judges from the AMIGOS program and United selected the winners.. "We are thrilled to sponsor this photography contest, which highlights the amazing beauty and diversity of the people and landscapes of Latin America," said Maria Cristina Osorio, Uniteds director of communications - Latin America.. United operates more than 700 nonstop ...
Progesterone should be considered as a viable treatment option for head trauma and perhaps other types of central nervous system injuries, researchers urged.
Humans may sustain a variety of forms of acute central nervous system injury including ischemia, trauma, vasospasm, and perinatal hypoxemia. The Multidisciplinary Neuroprotection Laboratories is dedicated to examining the pathophysiology of acute brain and spinal cord injury with particular reference to disease states managed in the perioperative or neurointensive care
The work from Rutgers could be used to help people with Alzheimers, Parkinsons and other neurodegenerative diseases & central nervous system injuries.
As a response to central nervous system injury, astrocytes become reactive. Two cellular hallmarks of reactive gliosis are hypertrophy of astrocyte processes and upregulation of intermediate filament (nanofilament) proteins glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), vimentin, nestin, and synemin. Astrocytes in mice devoid of GFAP and vimentin (GFAP (-/-) Vim (-/-)) do not form cytoplasmic intermediate filaments. GFAP (-/-) Vim (-/-) mice develop larger infarcts after ischemic stroke (Li et al. in J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 28(3):468-481, 2008). Here, we attempted to analyze the underlying mechanisms using oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro ischemia model, examining a potential link between astrocyte intermediate filaments and reactive oxygen species (ROS). We observed a reorganization of the intermediate filament network in astrocytes exposed to OGD. ROS accumulation was higher in GFAP (-/-) Vim (-/-) than wild-type ...
Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the serious central nervous system injuries, which can lead to significant neurological impairments and a reduction in quality of life with loss in sensory and motor functions ...
article{ef532af8-d218-4166-9ec2-b39930c591ef, abstract = {,p,Following stroke, complete cellular death in the ischemic brain area may ensue, with remaining brain areas undergoing tissue remodelling to various degrees. Experience-dependent brain plasticity exerted through an enriched environment (EE) promotes remodelling after central nervous system injury, such as stroke. Post-stroke tissue reorganization is modulated by growth inhibitory molecules differentially expressed within the ischemic hemisphere, like chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans found in perineuronal nets (PNNs). PNNs in the neocortex predominantly enwrap parvalbumin-containing GABAergic (PV/GABA) neurons, important in sensori-information processing. Here, we investigate how extracellular matrix (ECM) proteases and their inhibitors may participate in the regulation of PNN integrity during stroke recovery. Rats were subjected to photothrombotic ...
Modern management of neurosurgical patients requires close cooperation between neurosurgeons and other specialists. The latter include internists, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants. This textbook aims to provide for these professionals a guide to the challenges associated with the medical management of these patients. It gives an overview of neurosurgical operations and procedures, seizure management, and preoperative risk stratification. It further discusses the intricacies of the management of fever, infection, electrolytes, bleeding disorders, and endocrine problems in the context of central nervous system injury. A particular emphasis is placed on the management of pressure injuries, pain management, and physical and occupational therapy, which are critical areas in the care of the neurosurgical patient. Finally, it reviews the types of contributions that palliative care can make to the care ...
Certain medical, traumatic and psychological conditions can cause incompetence and behavior that interferes with the ability of EMS personnel to care for the patient, or that threatens the physical well being and safety of the patient or others. These conditions include, but are not limited to: drugs, metabolic disturbances, central nervous system injury or insult, infections, hypo/hypertension, hypo/hyperthermia, hypoxia, psychological disorders, poisons and toxins. Minnesota law (609.06) authorizes the use of reasonable force upon or toward the person of another without the other s consent when the following circumstances exist or the actor reasonably believes them to exist: when used to restrain a mentally ill or mentally defective person from self injury or injury to another or when used by one with authority to do so to compel compliance with reasonable requirements for the person s control, conduct or ...
Minassian K, Hofstoetter U, Tansey K, Mayr WOne consequence of central nervous system injury or disease is the impairment of neural control of movement, resulti …
PKU is an autosomal recessive trait caused by the absence of phenylalanine hydroxylase. Phenylalanine hydroxylase is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of phenylalanine (Phe). When phenylalanine hydroxylase is absent or defective, Phe levels rise and toxic Phe metabolites accumulate, causing central nervous system injury. PKU is a treatable disease. Affected individuals must adhere to a diet low in Phe during childhood. Women with PKU should also adhere to a low Phe diet before and during pregnancy to avoid fetal damage. The offspring of women with untreated maternal hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) usually exhibit mental retardation, microcephaly, growth retardation, and other congenital anomalies. This study will examine the effect of a restricted Phe diet on reproductive outcome in women with maternal HPA.. Participants in this study will be women with HPA whose blood Phe values are persistently greater than ...
Slide set: Radiation Effects. What are the radiation risks for space travel? Radiation exposures during space travel may kill cells, weaken the immune system, cause mutations and have other effects that can lead to cancer, cataracts, cardiovascular and central nervous system injuries and other disorders. Learn about the latest research discoveries with Ann R. Kennedy, PhD, as she discusses the potential dangers and effects of radiation on space travelers, and ways in which the risks can be reduced. Companion slide set to the video, Radiation Effects.
Slide set: Radiation Effects. What are the radiation risks for space travel? Radiation exposures during space travel may kill cells, weaken the immune system, cause mutations and have other effects that can lead to cancer, cataracts, cardiovascular and central nervous system injuries and other disorders. Learn about the latest research discoveries with Ann R. Kennedy, PhD, as she discusses the potential dangers and effects of radiation on space travelers, and ways in which the risks can be reduced. Companion slide set to the video, Radiation Effects.
Meralgia paraesthetica. Yes, the chosen name for our baby. Psych!. The lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh (also known as the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve) sometimes gets entrapped or compressed between the upper front hip bone and the inguinal ligament (one of the hip ligaments).. Causes may include: obesity, pregnancy, ascites (fluid in the abdomen), tight garments, seat belts, braces, direct trauma, leg length changes, scoliosis, and muscle spasm. The nerve may also be damaged by lower abdominal and pelvic surgical incisions, or may be compressed or injured within the pelvis (eg. by tumours, abscesses and other nice things you dont want to think about when youre eating).. I laughed when I read that "the nerve may become painful over a period of time as weight gain makes underwear, belting or pants waistband exert higher levels of pressure". Weight gain - check. Tight waistband - check.. Clinically, it presents with altered sensation (pins-and-needles, numbness, sometimes pain) down ...
Meralgia paresthetica causes numbness and or pain in the upper leg. at muscles. Femoral Nerve Tingling welcome to be able to our website, with this time I will provide you with about Femoral nerve tingling.. And after this, this is the very first image, femoral nerve tingling, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve tingling :. ...
Dr. Namey responded: Yes, but carefully?. You can pull the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve during activity that tightens the inguinal area, compressing it. If chronic, o recurring, it is called "|a href="/topics/meralgia-paresthetica" track_data="{
femoral artery; femoral vein; pectineus muscle; sartorius muscle; rectus femoris muscle; iliac crest; gluteus maximus muscle; lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; v
... is a condition characterized by tingling, numbness and burning pain in the outer part of the thigh. Meralgia paresthetica is usually caused by the compression of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve.
... is a condition characterized by tingling, numbness and burning pain in the outer part of the thigh. Meralgia paresthetica is usually caused by the compression of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve.
Quality Living Inc. is a medical rehabilitation center specializing in traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, stroke & other neurologic injury. We focus on restoring health, physical function, & rebuilding lives. See the QLI difference!
ACCU CHEK FlexLink Plus Insulin System Lawyer - 866.757.6949 Call Toll Free 24 Hours. If you or someone you know has been injured by using the ACCU CHEK FlexLink Plus Insulin System, know that we are to help you. ACCU CHEK FlexLink Plus Insulin System injury cases can often be long and upsetting, its important to have an experienced ACCU CHEK FlexLink Plus Insulin System lawyer to represent you.
Neurologic complications of systemic lupus erythematous (neuro-SLE) are common. The most frequent manifestations of neuro-SLE are seizures, encephalopathy, and behavioral changes, but a wide variety of other neurologic abnormalities affecting the central and peripheral nervous system and muscle also occur. Although the prevalence of neuro-SLE is high, the diversity of clinical presentations, the multiple potential etiologies, and the absence of sensitive and specific diagnostic tests render diagnosis difficult. Recent advances in understanding mechanisms of neuronal dysfunction combined with advances in imaging techniques, including functional imaging, should help in diagnosis and management. The mechanisms of neurologic injury can be divided into three broad categories. First, neuronal dysfunction may result from direct effects of the immune system on brain ...
Neuroregeneration refers to the regrowth or repair of nervous tissues, cells or cell products. Such mechanisms may include generation of new neurons, glia, axons, myelin, or synapses. Neuroregeneration differs between the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and the central nervous system (CNS) by the functional mechanisms and especially the extent and speed. When an axon is damaged, the distal segment undergoes Wallerian degeneration, losing its myelin sheath. The proximal segment can either die by apoptosis or undergo the chromatolytic reaction, which is an attempt at repair. In the CNS, synaptic stripping occurs as glial foot processes invade the dead synapse. Nervous system injuries affect over 90,000 people every year. It is ...
I have been a trial lawyer for more than 20 years. I have been a nationally board certified trial lawyer since 1991, and I have tried more than 40 cases to juries all over the US, but primarily in the Midwest. I have helped families with brain injury cases, spinal cord injury cases, amputation injury cases, orthopedic and neurologic injury cases, and wrongful death cases.. My practice style: I limit the number of cases that I take at one time so that I can build a strong bond with each client. Getting to know people well and helping them is the reason that I became an attorney.. I am licensed in Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. I may be available to represent your family in other states in association with local lawyers.. ...
Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a disabling condition associated with neurologic injury, inflammation, and overactive bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. The inductive factors involved in lesion formation are unknown. We found that the expression of the neuro-inflammatory factor Substance P (SP) is dramatically increased in early lesional tissue in patients who have either fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) or acquired HO, and in three independent mouse models of HO. In Nse-BMP4, a mouse model of HO, robust HO forms in response to tissue injury; however, null mutations of the preprotachykinin (PPT) gene encoding SP prevent HO. Importantly, ablation of SP+ sensory neurons, treatment with an antagonist of SP receptor NK1r, deletion of NK1r gene, or genetic down-regulation of NK1r-expressing mast cells also profoundly inhibit injury-induced HO. These observations establish a potent neuro-inflammatory induction and amplification circuit for BMP-dependent HO lesion formation, and ...
Central neurologic injury (CNI) causes dysfunctions not only in limbs but also in cognitive ability. We applied a novel peripheral nerve rewiring (PNR) surgical procedure to restore limb function. Here, we conducted a prospective study to develop estimates for the extent of preattentive processes to cognitive function changes in CNI patients after PNR. Auditory mismatch negativity (MMN) was measured in CNI patients who received the PNR surgery plus conventional rehabilitation treatment. During the 2-year follow-up, the MMN was enhanced with increased amplitude in the PNR plus rehabilitation group compared to the rehabilitation-only group as the experiment progressed, and progressive improvement in behavioural examination tests was also observed ...
Dr. Peters primary area of expertise concerns neural correlates of motor impairment and recovery, with an emphasis on walking function, after neurologic injury such as stroke and spinal cord injury. Her research focuses on brain-behavior relationships by utilizing MRI (diffusion tensor imaging), quantitative measures of motor function (EMG, kinetics), and clinical measures of impairment and activity. Dr. Peters has additional interests in neurologic rehabilitation strategies and outcome measure assessment.
ECMO has been considered an effective means of therapy for the severe ARDS patients, and the efficiency rate has been between 53 and 76% [2-5]. Hypoxia is the main pathophysiological and physiological characteristic of ARDS that causes systemic organ injury. So ECMO therapy possibly improves high incidence of cerebral dysfunction in ARDS patients (70-100%) by increasing the oxygen supply to the brain tissue, which is most sensitive to hypoxia, theoretically. The recent successful application of ECMO therapy to cardiopulmonary and brain resuscitation procedures have proved that it may have a protective effect on brain function.. However, ECMO is associated with high risk of neurologic injury. Poor neurologic outcomes have been reported in as many as 10-60% of survivors [9]. The study reported that 58% patients developed clinical neurological syndrome including epilepsy, fatigue, pathological pupil and postpone sober [20], neuropsychological disorders and movement disorders ...
Introduction: Despite recent improvements in surgical technique and cerebral protection methods, surgical thoracic aortic repair is still an invasive procedure with a substantial rate of mortality and neurologic injury. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of surgical stroke on early and late outcomes including ADL and QOL as well as mortality after thoracic aortic surgery.. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed consecutive 500 cases (male: 350, mean age: 62.9±13.2 years) of open aortic repair from 1986 to 2008 performed in our institute. Urgent status was 20.6%. Type of aneurysm was atherosclerotic in 68%, dissected in 32%. Replacement segment was root and ascending (31%), arch (39%), extended arch (10%), descending and its distal (19%). Brain protection method was retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) (58%), antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) (26%), deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) (16%). Surgical stroke was defined as neurological deficit persist over 72 hours after ...
Dr. Crago is the primary instructor for the senior undergraduate course NUR1121 Advanced Clinical Decision Making at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. She also mentors DNP and PhD students as well as undergraduate students in the URMP program. Dr. Crago provides guest lectures to graduate/doctoral nursing students on acute neurological assessment and injury [Pathophysiology; Critical Care & Cardiopulmonary Clinical Emphasis (ACNP-DNP)].. She is adjunct faculty in the paramedic program at Mutual Aid Ambulance Service, where she provides instruction on pathophysiology topics including as neurologic injury, pulmonology, endocrinology, toxicology, hematology and anaphylaxis. Dr. Crago also provides lectures on neurologic problems in the Critical Care and Emergency courses at Excela Health and has helped design and implement Intracranial Pressure Monitoring Education as well as ongoing stroke education. As a certified instructor, she provides community and professional First Aid, ACLS, ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - The role of biomechanics in orthopedic and neurological rehabilitation. AU - Kulig, Kornelia. AU - Burnfield, Judith M.. PY - 2008/12/15. Y1 - 2008/12/15. N2 - Movement is fundamental to human well-being, function and participation in work and leisure activities. As a result, regaining optimal movement abilities and independence frequently become central foci of rehabilitation programs developed for individuals recovering from serious orthopedic and neurologic injuries. Further, preventing additional injury to the locomotor system becomes essential for effective long-term management of chronic medical conditions such as tendon dysfunction and diabetes. The primary aim of this perspective is to illustrate the role of biomechanics in orthopedics, musculoskeletal and neurological rehabilitation. Specifically, this paper discusses selected examples, ranging from the tissue to whole body biomechanics level, that highlight how ...
TY - CHAP. T1 - Neonatal encephalopathy and cerebral palsy. AU - Costantine, Maged. AU - DAlton, Mary E.. AU - Hankins, Gary. PY - 2012/1/4. Y1 - 2012/1/4. N2 - The incidence of cerebral palsy is 1-2 per 1000 births and has remained unchanged over the last 40 years. The occurrence of cerebral palsy is independent of either geographic or economic boundaries. It has also been remarkably resistant to eradication by the introduction of technology such as electronic fetal heart rate monitoring or the increase in cesarean delivery rates. Indeed, the great hope of electronic fetal heart rate monitoring was that intrapartum asphyxia would be promptly identified, delivery rapidly achieved, and neurologic injury of the infant averted. This would in fact parallel the thought processes advanced by the orthopedic surgeon Little, over a century ago, who taught that virtually all cerebral palsy was caused by intrapartum events, whether deprivation of oxygen, trauma, or the combination of the two. ...
Seeley et. al published a fascinating paper entitled "Unravelling Bolero: progressive aphasia, transmodal creativity and the right posterior neocortex" in Brain, 2008. I dont discuss a lot of papers as I think theyre dry and not everyone can get access, but I came across this one and found it curious. One way of approaching neurologic injury is to localize a disease process ("wheres the lesion?") and then see what deficits result. For example, a stroke in the motor strip of the brain will lead to contralateral weakness, and so it can be inferred that the affected anatomy has something to do with motor function. But the authors discuss an interesting idea: some lesions in the brain can stimulate new artistic or musical talents. Maurice Ravel was a French composer best known for his orchestral work "Bolero." Near the end of his career, he developed a progressive language and motor disorder. There are hypotheses that as his speech declined, his musical prowess heightened. The authors of this ...
Work in the Donald Shaffner Lab investigates several topics within critical care medicine. Our team conducts research on the mechanisms involved in neurologic injury from global ischemia as a result of cardiac arrest and resuscitation. We also study neurologic outcomes of pediatric patients who experience cardiac arrest.. Research Areas: hyperthermia, critical care medicine, cardiac arrest, resuscitation, ischemia, pediatrics, neurology ...
Neuroprotection is becoming an increasingly recognized and important part of critical care and perioperative medicine. As human beings survive increasingly severe life-threatening injuries and complex surgical interventions, it has become clear that neurologic injury and dysfunction is a primary driver of long-term outcome and disability.
Introduction: Pyruvate Dehydrogenase (PDH) activity has been shown to be inhibited in animal models of post-cardiac arrest. This depressed activity has been postulated to be directly related to neurologic injury secondary to aerobic metabolic dysfunction and accumulation of toxic metabolites. The objective of this study was to determine if PDH inhibition occurs after cardiac arrest (CA) in humans.. Methods: Patients were enrolled as part of a prospective observational trial of CA at a single urban academic medical center from 1/13 to 4/13. A blood sample was collected as early after ROSC as informed consent could be obtained (,24 hours). Our control group consisted of volunteers with no significant medical history. We used a novel method to measure PDH activity from peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from fresh blood. We quantified total PDH in 15mg / ml of isolated protein and determined overall PDH activity (PDH activity / total protein) and specific PDH activity (PDH activity / PDH ...
Monday 17th December 2012: A smarter epidural has won the 2nd annual Clinical Innovation Award, sponsored by Enterprise Ireland in association with Cleveland Clinic. The winner, Dr Peter Lee, a consultant anaesthetist with Cork University Hospital, collaborated with University College Cork under their Biomedical Design module to identify a solution for improved epidural delivery.. The purpose of the Clinical Innovation Award is to tap in to Irelands clinical community with a view to developing new healthcare products and services that will improve patient care and benefit both the health care system and Irelands medical technologies sector.. Dr Lee and his collaborators have developed a simple, cost effective and globally applicable solution to the problems associated with epidural administration. This procedure is technically difficult, and requires a clinician to blindly pass the needle into the epidural space for delivery of a local anaesthetic. Complications include ...
Capnography may be used as an adjunct to pulse oximetry and clinical assessment to detect hypoventilation and apnea earlier than pulse oximetry and/or clinical assessment alone. However, there is a lack of evidence that capnography reduces the incidence of serious adverse events (neurologic injury caused by hypoxia, aspiration, death) (ACEP Level B). [1] ...
Infants who undergo surgical procedures in the first few months of life are at a higher risk of death or subsequent neurodevelopmental abnormalities. Although the pathogenesis of these outcomes is multifactorial, an understanding of the nature and pathogenesis of brain injury in these infants may assist the anesthesiologist in consideration of their day-to-day practice to minimize such risks. This review will summarize the main types of brain injury in preterm and term infants and their key pathways. In addition, the review will address key potential pathogenic pathways that may be modifiable including intraoperative hypotension, hypocapnia, hyperoxia or hypoxia, hypoglycemia, and hyperthermia. Each of these conditions may increase the risk of perioperative neurological injury, but their long-term ramifications are unclear.. Read More. ...
Clinicians caring for patients are challenged by the task of protecting the brain and spinal cord in high-risk situations. These include following cardiac arrest, in critical care settings, and during complex procedural and surgical care. This book provides a comprehensive overview of various types of neural injury commonly encountered in critical care and perioperative contexts and the neuroprotective strategies used to optimize clinical outcomes. In addition to introductory chapters on the physiologic modulators of neural injury and pharmacologic neuroprotectants, the topics covered include: imaging assessment; tissue biomarker identification; monitoring; assessment of functional outcomes and postoperative cognitive decline; traumatic brain injury; cardiac arrest and heart-related issues such as valvular and coronary artery bypass surgery, aortic surgery and stenting, and vascular and endovascular surgery; stroke; intracerebral hemorrhage; mechanical circulatory support; sepsis and acute ...
Dear Pegah Tavakolkhah, , I have one more question. I have read in the description of some GOs , that they are involved in apoptosis or angiogenesis (which are the main , reasons of cancer). I wanted to know if apoptosis or angiogenesis are GO , themselves. And if they are, would their descendant GOs show the GOs , which are responsible for these two processes? If you do a search for terms either using GOOSE or using AmiGO (http://amigo.geneontology.org/), you can find the GO terms apoptosis (GO:0006915; http://amigo.geneontology.org/cgi-bin/amigo/term-details.cgi?term=GO:0006915) and angiogenesis (GO:0001525; http://amigo.geneontology.org/cgi-bin/amigo/term-details.cgi?term=GO:0001525). You can find the gene products that have been associated with these processes (and the more specific child processes), either by choosing the gene product associations link in AmiGO, or by using GOOSE to query the GO database. I hope that is helpful; if you have any more questions, please dont hesitate to ...
Despite the increasing incidents of brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases, a definitive clinical therapy for these conditions has not been found yet. Nervous system injuries result in loss of neural cells, causing loss of function in the neural circuitry. As mature neurons do not divide, it is not possible to tolerate the loss of neurons by the production of new ones. In the central nervous system, even though neural stem cells are present, their number and regenerative capacity are very low. In addition, inhibitory molecules are released at the degeneration site which hinders reconnection of the remaining cells. As the damage is due to the loss of neurons, cell therapy is considered as a promising option. Neural stem cells are capable of differentiating into the three major cell types in the central ...
Danny Kiranos is the singer, songwriter and banjo player behind his astonishing persona, Amigo the Devil. If you never met him, you might mistake Amigo the Devil for a monster. The murderfolk maudits most popular song is called "Perfect Wife." With gallows humor to make Marshall Mathers wince, it details gruesome spousal abuse that escalates until the wife rifle-blasts her husband. Two other beloved anthems are "Dahmer Does Hollywood" and "The Reluse," which was originally titled, "Ed Gein." The latter opens the self-released Diggers EP by loosely sketching the necrophiliac Wisconsin serial killer who once made a belt out of human nipples. Think Johnny Cash at his blackest, mixed with Father John Misty, if he exhumed graves at Hollywood Forever Cemetery. The Devil is far more than a folkie with a dark side. Theres a sepulchral beauty, acid wit and ingenious arrangements. Both his larynx and his lyrics make him one of the most unique voices in music -- even if he sticks only to songs of the ...
Prenota Hostel Amigo Suites Downtown, prezzi da US$13.30. Voto medio dei 64% da 3 recensioni dei clienti di Hostels.com. Visualizza le foto di Hostel Amigo Suites Downtown e non pagare nessuna tariffa di prenotazione.
Axonia Medical, an early stage company pioneering a revolutionary approach to repair and restore damaged peripheral and central nervous systems, announced today that the company has closed on $2.0 million in seed financing. The financing was led by Southwest Michigan First Life Science Venture Fund and included participation from Ann Arbor SPARK and Western Michigan University Research Foundation, Biosciences Research and Commercialization Center.. "We are very excited about our investment in Axonia Medical. The company has a number of the features we look for in an early-stage entity, including a talented and innovative team, world-class technology, an established intellectual property position and large market opportunity," said Patrick Morand, Managing Director, Southwest Michigan First Life Science Venture Fund. "We look forward to working closely with the company and helping Axonia Medical reach its potential and build ...
Sacral plexus acu-reflex points, 111 Sacroiliac joint dysfunction, and muscle acupuncture induced, case analyses in nervous system injuries, 260, 261
Promotes growth and fasciculation of neurites from cultured hippocampal neurons. May be involved in fasciculation as well as myelination of developing neural axons. May have a role in regeneration as well as neural plasticity in the adult nervous system. May mediate homophilic as well as heterophilic cell-cell interaction and contribute to signal transduction through its intracellular domain. Assembled with KCNB1 modulates the gating characteristics of the delayed rectifier voltage-dependent potassium channel KCNB1.
Title: los amigos de durutti, Description: a music blog. concerning a diverse array of music- alt hip hop, jazz, funk, soul, electronica, indie rock and more., By: Feedage Forager, ID: 377899, Grade: 89, Type: ATOM
Alpinestars Amigo Mens Trucker Adjustable Hats 40% Acrylic, 40% Polyester, 20% Wool Imported Hand Wash Internal and external labeling One size only Colors: Red
Theyre calling themselves The Four Amigos, making light of each other with inside digs in the familiar manner of lively, good-natured fraternity brothers. Lately, Jeff Mathis has been catching most of the flak, some of it self-directed. I feel like...
Introduce Spanish to your learning center with this 12 x 9 feet bilingual kids rug. Includes a teachers manual and fun learning games for home and school.
Cutaneous nerve of forearm may refer to: Lateral cutaneous nerve of forearm Medial cutaneous nerve of forearm Posterior cutaneous nerve of ...
When Florida parents have a baby who sustains a birth injury with permanent implications for his or her life, a medical malpractice suit is often one of their considerations if they believe the injury may have been due to negligence or...
The action of Mecholyl was tested in cats having lesions of the posterior sacral roots, of all the sacral roots, and of the spinal cord (either at lower lumbar or at upper thoracic levels).. Satisfactory contraction of the detrusor muscle, with evacuation of the bladder, occurred when only the sensory innervation of the bladder was interrupted, or when the animal had recovered from the stage of shock following motor lesions. Mecholyl failed to produce vesical contraction during the period of shock after neural injury.. ...
Considerable research has been conducted to evaluate the potential therapeutic effects of fish oils in numerous conditions, including arthritis, coronary artery disease, inflammatory bowel disease, asthma, and sepsis, all of which have inflammation as a key component of their pathology. Additional investigations into the use of supplementation with fish oils in patients with neural injury, cancer, ocular diseases, and critical illness have recently been conducted. The most commonly reported adverse effects of fish oil supplements are a fishy aftertaste and gastrointestinal upset ...
Located and Licensed in Arkansas and/or Kansas Summary of Position. The interpreting physician is a provider of real-time remote neurological supervision, interpretation, and diagnostic/ interventional recommendations during intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM). The interpreting physician is responsible for real-time interpretation of IONM data. The physician will use their skills to accurately interpret changes in waveform data, immediately report any threat to neural integrity, and suggest specific interventions regarding neural injury. Interpreting Physician shall not engage in other clinical or other distracting activities during IONM supervision.. Duties and Responsibilites. ...
Intuitive Control of Robotic Arm Using Thought The next generation of neuroprosthetics: more natural, effortless, intuitive movement achieved Paralyzed from the neck down after suffering a gunshot wound when he was 21, Erik G. Sorto now can move a robotic arm just by thinking about it and using his imagination. Through a clinical collaboration between […]. ...
Hello yall! I really dont have much of a question but I started on a follow-up 3yr study at my local clinical trial site last week and I thought about you guys and gals! Its great to see yall are...
I have been in Rad Tech school and havent kept up with your blog for quite while. Today was my last day of school till fall quarter. I have just spent quite a bit of time catching up on your writings and oh my goodness, Jess you are soooooo amazing!!!! And Dan you are such a blessing. You two are both brave, loving, positive, truly amazing people. Randy & I loved being at Friday Harbor with you, your freinds and family. We had so much fun & felt honored to be invited. Jess you have made so much progress, keep up the good work and positive thoughts. Love your daily pictures idea, sooo proud of your determination to enter the 2 marathons coming up and that you have started training ...
Comrade Koteswarlu was born on November 26, 1954 in Peddapalli town of Karimnagar district which has a legacy of the glorious Telangana armed struggle. He led the Indian revolutionary movement for nearly four decades. Comrade Koteswarlu was brought up by democratic thinking parents and imbibed patriotic feelings and love for the oppressed people since childhood. He was a top rank representative of the generation after the glorious Naxalbari rebellion. Though the Naxalbari rebellion which established Maoist Protracted Peoples War as the path for the Indian revolution was suppressed within a few years, it had a great impact all over the country. Peasant rebellions arose in many areas following its model. It awoke the students in colleges and universities. The slogan Naxalbari Ek Hi Rasta (The Only Way is Naxalbari) reverberated all over the country. It was this backdrop that turned Comrade Koteswarlu into a Maoist revolutionary. Firstly, at the end of 1970s, he organized the peasantry against ...
SEREMBAN - Hajat seorang anggota penguat kuasa Jabatan Pengangkutan Jalan (JPJ) untuk melakukan pemeriksaan ke atas sebuah lori berkecai apabila dia meninggal dunia selepas dirempuh sebuah kereta jenis Ford Laser dalam kejadian di Batang Benar, Mantin dekat sini semalam. ...
Where discount codes, offer codes or reductions of any type are offered, these will not be accepted in conjunction with any other offer or discount including discounts associated with member benefits. discounts are available at the discretion of Mole Valley Farmers on orders up to the maximum value of £500 inc vat. Discounts are not applicable to items which are booked to account. We reserve the right to limit the use of the codes to a single unit of each product purchased and a single use of each code. This ensures volume purchases do not prevent other customers from taking advantage of the offer. ...
I am a Collection of Donations, Through an intellectual musical work, and Delivering benefits to society in Morelos, México. Visit my website.
Seasoned ground beef, Monterey Jack cheese and onion rolled in a flour tortilla, smothered with enchilada sauce and cheddar cheese. Includes rice and beans. Garnished with lettuce & tomatoes. Add chips for $1. ...
Aku bosan gila duk dalam bilik ni. Asalnya semangat nak siapkan Projek Sarjana Muda aku tapi bila dah tak dapat cari solution, aku fed up kejap ...
... is a potentially dire health issue wherein the spinal column loses the natural ability to support itself. This can result in vertebral or neurological injury.
Amigo, no harm intended, and I certainly wasnt meaning to come across as "moan"ing. But really, my comment justifies being called a "sour, pedantic" blogger? Damn.. I did not mean to imply that you should post images of rappers with bling, I was just using that as an example of another prevailing visual cliche. I KNOW your blog is about literature, books, and writers, thats why I read it everyday. You do incredibly great stuff - Ill try to post more comments attesting to that.. But yes, the image of writers smoking IS irksome - to me and I imagine to others. It doesnt bother me to look at the photos, I just think that implicitly associating smoking with great writing is sort of, I dunno, dumb and irrelevant. You did title your post "Smoking makes you look cool" so, unless that was intended ironically (which, by the prickly nature of your response, I dont think it was), then my comment doesnt seem so out of bounds.. And just so you know, discovering Roberto Bolanos work was a major delight ...

Efficacy and Safety of Growth Hormone Treatment in Spinal Cord Injury - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.govEfficacy and Safety of Growth Hormone Treatment in Spinal Cord Injury - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Spinal Cord Injuries. Spinal Cord Diseases. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Trauma, Nervous System. ... Efficacy and Safety of Growth Hormone Treatment in Spinal Cord Injury (GHSCI). The safety and scientific validity of this study ... Efficacy and Safety of Growth Hormone (GH) Treatment in Spinal Cord Injury(SCI): A Triple-blinded, Randomised, Placebo- ... Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of one year treatment based on daily doses of exogenous growth hormone (GH) in ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01329757

Impact of Maternal Pomegranate Juice on Brain Injury in Infants With Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) - Full Text View -...Impact of Maternal Pomegranate Juice on Brain Injury in Infants With Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) - Full Text View -...

Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Craniocerebral Trauma. Trauma, Nervous System. Wounds and Injuries. ... CNS injury at term by MR Imaging [ Time Frame: 36 - 41 weeks (post delivery) ]. *Qualitative MRI injury- white matter injury ( ... Impact of Maternal Pomegranate Juice on Brain Injury in Infants With Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) (POM-1). The safety ... Impact of Maternal Pomegranate Juice on Brain Injury in Infants With Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR). ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00788866?term=pomegranate&rank=12

JCI -
FGF-2 regulates neurogenesis and degeneration in the dentate gyrus after traumatic brain injury in miceJCI - FGF-2 regulates neurogenesis and degeneration in the dentate gyrus after traumatic brain injury in mice

Neurotrophic factors in central nervous system trauma. J. Neurotrauma. 1995. 12:853-870. View this article via: PubMed Google ... Alterations in fibroblast growth factor receptor expression following brain injury. Exp. Neurol. 1996. 140:139-150. View this ... Wanaka, A, Johnson (Jr), EM, Milbrandt, J. Localization of FGF receptor mRNA in the adult rat central nervous system. Neuron. ... should provide a strategy for repair of CNS injury after trauma, and for other CNS injuries and disorders, such as cerebral ...
more infohttps://www.jci.org/articles/view/16618

A new pathway in axonal growth: first step to their regeneration after injury - Institut du CerveauA new pathway in axonal growth: first step to their regeneration after injury - Institut du Cerveau

Central nervous system (CNS) injury, such as spine lesion or neurodegeneration, have long-term consequences with more or less ... The principal issue is that severed connections fail to regenerate after trauma. Understanding the fundamental mechanisms of ... The Drosophila central nervous system shows strong similarities to mammals in all the key morphological, genetic and molecular ... A new pathway in axonal growth: first step to their regeneration after injury. Research Published April 19 2018 ...
more infohttps://icm-institute.org/en/actualite/a-new-pathway-in-axonal-growth-first-step-to-their-regeneration-after-injury/

Carbohydrate modifiers of neuronal growth - Kalovidouris, StaceyCarbohydrate modifiers of neuronal growth - Kalovidouris, Stacey

... central nervous system) and PNS (peripheral nervous system) disorders or damage, such as neurodegenerative disease, ischemic ... Traumatic injuries to nerves, including trauma to the spine and damage caused by ischemic cerebral stroke, can involve neuronal ... Growth of Neural Stem Cells Enhanced With Fuca(1-2)Gal The compositions of the invention are useful for stimulating the growth ... Cell growth can be stimulated in cells in culture or in cells within an animal or patient. Growth stimulation has application ...
more infohttp://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2006/0177413.html

Cancer Drug Taxol Promotes Nerve Growth within Central Nervous SystemCancer Drug Taxol Promotes Nerve Growth within Central Nervous System

... "although Taxol or similar drugs might be promising candidates for the treatment of injuries to the central nervous system, be ... it from stroke or trauma. While more studies are clearly needed, from the scientific standpoint we now have an additional ... Cancer »Drug Delivery »Neurologie »Neurology »Taxol »central nervous system »nerve fiber »nervous »nervous system »optic nerve ... central nervous system , nerve fiber , nervous , nervous system , optic nerve , spinal cord ...
more infohttp://www.innovations-report.com/html/reports/life-sciences/cancer-drug-taxol-promotes-nerve-growth-central-170253.html

Stem Cells: Innovations in Clinical ApplicationsStem Cells: Innovations in Clinical Applications

Central nervous system injury (CNS) situations can be caused by a stroke, trauma, or an underlying neurological condition. In ... which can ultimately result in lung injury modeled in Figure 5 [26, 38, 39]. MSCs have anti-inflammatory and growth promoting ... the central nervous system, the gastrointestinal track, and the circulatory system [1]. These properties could be helpful in ... the MSCs are infused systemically into the circulatory system [4]. New studies have shown that MSCs home to sites of injury and ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/sci/2014/516278/

Mesenchymal stem cells for repair of the peripheral and central nervous systemMesenchymal stem cells for repair of the peripheral and central nervous system

4. Neuroprotective and growth-promoting effects of bone marrow stromal cells after cervical spinal cord injury in adult rats. ... Transplanted MSC remained at the injection sites and in the trauma zone for several weeks and were often associated with ... Mesenchymal stem cells for repair of the peripheral and central nervous system. Brohlin, Maria Umeå University, Faculty of ... Treatment of MSC with growth factors (forskolin, basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet derived growth factor-AA and glial ...
more infohttp://umu.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2%3A444268

Frontiers | Traumatic Injuries in the Nervous System | NeurologyFrontiers | Traumatic Injuries in the Nervous System | Neurology

The symposium TRAUMATIC INJURIES IN THE NERVOUS SYSTEM was organized as a part of the 200-year anniversary of Karolinska ... the central and peripheral nervous system (CNS and PNS), share many injury response patterns. He also provided a detailed ... Swedens largest trauma center is now located at Karolinska sjukhuset in Solna. A new modern hospital building will replace the ... Research has not yet been able to drastically improve regeneration in the CNS, in spite of current knowledge regarding growth ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fneur.2012.00026/full

Summary of literature supporting bone marrow transplant treatment of spinal cord injurySummary of literature supporting bone marrow transplant treatment of spinal cord injury

Let me review the data supporting beneficial effects of bone marrow stem cells in spinal cord injury. 1. Bone marrow has ... Recovery in central nervous system disorders is hindered by the limited ability of the vertebrate central nervous system to ... suggesting that MSC support axonal growth after spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the amount of axon growth through the graft ... has renewed hope that repair and recovery from CNS trauma is possible. Based on results from several studies using bone marrow ...
more infohttp://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthread.php?21448-Summary-of-literature-supporting-bone-marrow-transplant-treatment-of-spinal-cord-injury&s=621453820bc4143ca93448e189b7f790

Summary of literature supporting bone marrow transplant treatment of spinal cord injurySummary of literature supporting bone marrow transplant treatment of spinal cord injury

Let me review the data supporting beneficial effects of bone marrow stem cells in spinal cord injury. 1. Bone marrow has ... Recovery in central nervous system disorders is hindered by the limited ability of the vertebrate central nervous system to ... suggesting that MSC support axonal growth after spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the amount of axon growth through the graft ... has renewed hope that repair and recovery from CNS trauma is possible. Based on results from several studies using bone marrow ...
more infohttp://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthread.php?21448-Summary-of-literature-supporting-bone-marrow-transplant-treatment-of-spinal-cord-injury&s=ed01c4668b9415e2966eb4be7ddf35d8

WO2007058982A2 - Mntf differentiation and growth of stem cells 
        - Google PatentsWO2007058982A2 - Mntf differentiation and growth of stem cells - Google Patents

The discovery of a regenerative capacity in the adult central nervous system holds out promise that it may eventually be ... as well as from brain and spinal cord injuries resulting from stroke or trauma. However, the non-invasive isolation and ... 1, 25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibits the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in rat central nervous system during ... generally refers to a partially-differentiated or fully-differentiated cell of the central nervous system (CNS) or peripheral ...
more infohttps://patents.google.com/patent/WO2007058982A2/en

Paralympic Games - WikipediaParalympic Games - Wikipedia

Hypertonia may result from injury, disease, or conditions which involve damage to the central nervous system (e.g. cerebral ... To increase blood pressure athletes will deliberately cause trauma to limbs below a spinal injury. This trauma can include ... e.g. achondroplasia, growth hormone deficiency, osteogenesis imperfecta) Hypertonia - Hypertonia is marked by an abnormal ... The classification systems differ from sport to sport and are intended to open up sports to as many athletes as possible who ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paralympic_Games

Changes in mRNA Expression of Class 3 Semaphorins and Their Receptors in the Adult Rat Retino-Collicular System after...Changes in mRNA Expression of Class 3 Semaphorins and Their Receptors in the Adult Rat Retino-Collicular System after...

... in the complex events that occur after injury to the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Greater knowledge about the ... CNS trauma will aid in the development of effective interventions to overcome intrinsic restrictions on regenerative growth. ... Sefton AJ Dreher B Harvey A. Visual system. In: Paxinos G ed. The Rat Nervous System . San Diego, CA: Elsevier Academic Press; ... in plasticity and repair in the injured mammalian central nervous system prompted us to characterize changes in Sema3 ...
more infohttp://iovs.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2165696

Neuroplasticity, Neuroregeneration, and Brain Repair | The New York Academy of SciencesNeuroplasticity, Neuroregeneration, and Brain Repair | The New York Academy of Sciences

... processes and identify strategies for translating knowledge into treatments for neurodegenerative diseases and nervous system ... professional career has been devoted to understanding the cell biology of injury and repair in the adult central nervous system ... However, when combined with retro-orbital optic nerve crush injury, lengthy growth of severed retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons ... Studies combine transgenic mouse models with experimental models of CNS trauma, degenerative disease and autoimmune ...
more infohttps://www.nyas.org/events/2017/neuroplasticity-neuroregeneration-and-brain-repair/

Spatial and temporal arrangement of neuronal intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms controlling axon regenerationSpatial and temporal arrangement of neuronal intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms controlling axon regeneration

Axon regeneration and neuronal tissue repair varies across animal lineages as well as in the mammalian central and p … ... the majority of axons in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) fail to reactivate intrinsic growth programs after ... Spinal cord injury Spinal cord injury My story Causes Consequences Prognosis Links About us What we do History Organization ... that include among others microtubule-based treatments to foster regeneration and functional connectivity after CNS trauma. ...
more infohttps://www.wingsforlife.com/us/latest/spatial-and-temporal-arrangement-of-neuronal-intrinsic-and-extrinsic-mechanisms-controlling-axon-regeneration-3040/

Traumatic Brain Injury and Bioidentical Hormones | Life ExtensionTraumatic Brain Injury and Bioidentical Hormones | Life Extension

A group of physicians has developed a novel way of reversing the symptoms of brain trauma by replenishing natural hormones on ... Sex hormones can function directly as neurotransmitters in the central nervous system.37 ... Growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor I and cognitive function in adults. Growth Horm IGF Res. 2000 Apr;10 Suppl B:S69-73 ... even apparently minor trauma, can damage the hypothalamic-pituitary system and have profound effects on hormonal function. ...
more infohttp://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2015/2/heal-traumatic-brain-injury-with-bioidentical-hormones/page-01

JoVE | Peer Reviewed Scientific Video Journal - Methods and ProtocolsJoVE | Peer Reviewed Scientific Video Journal - Methods and Protocols

Gene therapy for traumatic central nervous system injury and stroke using an engineered zinc finger protein that upregulates ... plays a role in angiogenesis and has been shown to be neuroprotective following central nervous system trauma. In the present ... Recent studies have identified anti-apoptotic functions for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the central nervous ... We used retinal trauma and ischemia models, and a cortical pial strip ischemia model to determine if VEGF upregulating ZFPs are ...
more infohttps://www.jove.com/visualize?author=Richard%20Surosky%20

Neuroregeneration - WikipediaNeuroregeneration - Wikipedia

Unlike peripheral nervous system injury, injury to the central nervous system is not followed by extensive regeneration. It is ... The environment within the CNS, especially following trauma, counteracts the repair of myelin and neurons. Growth factors are ... The nervous system is divided into two parts: the central nervous system, which consists of the brain and spinal cord, and the ... While the peripheral nervous system has an intrinsic ability for repair and regeneration, the central nervous system is, for ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuroregeneration

The Benefits Of Medical Massage Footnotes - Veterinary Practice NewsThe Benefits Of Medical Massage Footnotes - Veterinary Practice News

Stimulating the central nervous system to prevent intestinal dysfunction after traumatic brain injury. J Trauma 2010;68:1059- ... Insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) increase in preterm infants following massage therapy. Developmental and ... 3. Diego MA and Field T. Moderate pressure massage elicits a parasympathetic nervous system response. International Journal of ... 5. Diego MA and Field T. Moderate pressure massage elicits a parasympathetic nervous system response. International Journal of ...
more infohttps://www.veterinarypracticenews.com/the-benefits-of-medical-massage-footnotes/

Temperature Management Market by ApplicationTemperature Management Market by Application

Surface warming system would contribute to the growth of the temperature management market by applications. Brands like 3M ... It also prevents secondary neurological injuries after central nervous systems trauma in animals. ... Increasing aging population and development of technologically advanced intravascular systems are factors driving the growth of ... rising incidences of central nervous system disorders & cardiac arrest and awareness about temperature management systems ...
more infohttps://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/temperature-management-market

The role of transcription in axonal outgrowth and regeneration | Frontiers Research TopicThe role of transcription in axonal outgrowth and regeneration | Frontiers Research Topic

The reasons for this deficient axonal regeneration are the presence of a glial inhibitory environment that induces growth cone ... brain or spinal cord trauma, results in axonal degeneration, lack of regeneration and long-term neurological disability due to ... manipulation can be instrumental to promote axonal regeneration in rodents in a number of peripheral and CNS axonal injury ... Acute axonal injury in the central nervous system (CNS) such as following stroke, ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/research-topics/208/the-role-of-transcription-in-axonal-outgrowth-and-regeneration

RMoz Global Researchm - press releases - openPR.comRMoz Global Researchm - press releases - openPR.com

Central Nervous System) pipeline landscape. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is defined as damage or trauma caused to the spinal cord. ... "Allergy Diagnostics Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecast 2016 - 2024" The Report covers ... "Spinal Cord Injury - Pipeline Review, H2 2016" The Report covers current Market Trends, Worldwide Analysis, Global Forecast, ... Description- Global Markets Directs latest Pharmaceutical and Healthcare disease pipeline guide Spinal Cord Injury Pipeline ...
more infohttps://www.openpr.com/news/archive/141899/RMoz-Global-Researchm.html

Cyberounds CMECyberounds CME

... phase response that may be of particular relevance to the outcome of the regional injury response in the central nervous system ... A number of studies have shown that CGRP is expressed following various kinds of trauma and plays an important role in the ... a modulator of hormone release involved in growth and development, and a stimulator of sympathetic outflow, which is mediated ... as well as the neuroendocrine system, autonomic nervous system and immune system, are mediators of adaptation to challenges of ...
more infohttp://www.cyberounds.com/cmecontent/art259.html?pf=yes

Astrocytoma simultaneously present with Meningioma-a report of two cases and review of the literature | Chinese Neurosurgical...Astrocytoma simultaneously present with Meningioma-a report of two cases and review of the literature | Chinese Neurosurgical...

... autocrine growth factors and their pathogenic correlations. We describe two patients with simultaneous presentation of ... Central nervous system injury initiates reactive gliosis and angiogenesis. Fibroblast growth factor-2 is overexpressed in the ... A few cases of meningioma after trauma have been reported [27]. The occurrence of glioma has been reported after trauma [28]. ... Metastases of central nervous system neoplasms. Case report. J Neurosurg. 1988;68(5):811-6.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar. ...
more infohttps://cnjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s41016-016-0026-7
  • We have seen in previous Cyberounds ® in this series how the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters (EAA) and their receptors, representing the most highly expressed neurotransmitter system in the brain, play a key role in learning and memory and in the adaptive plasticity that is associated with acute adaptation to stress, as well as with the structural plasticity that accompanies repeated stress. (cyberounds.com)
  • For the children's study, the project will be coordinated through the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN), the only federally-funded pediatric emergency research network in the U.S. PECARN conducts high-priority, multi-institutional research on the prevention and management of acute illnesses and injuries in children and youth of all ages. (healthcanal.com)
  • Acute neurodegeneration is caused by cerebral ischemia (stroke and cardiac arrest), toxins, and trauma. (barnardhealth.us)
  • Humans may sustain a variety of forms of acute central nervous system injury including ischemia, trauma, vasospasm, and perinatal hypoxemia. (duke.edu)
  • The Multidisciplinary Neuroprotection Laboratories is dedicated to examining the pathophysiology of acute brain and spinal cord injury with particular reference to disease states managed in the perioperative or neurointensive care environments. (duke.edu)
  • Currently the only drug to treat acute spinal cord injury is methyl-prednisolone, administered in order to prevent secondary inflammatory neural damage, but with no further reparative effect. (scirp.org)
  • 15-d-Δ12,14-PGJ2, Δ12-PGJ2, and PGJ2 share a common mono-unsaturated cyclopentenone structure as well as a set of similar biological activities including the ability to suppress inflammation responses and the growth as well as survival of cells, particularly those of cancerous or neurological origin. (wikipedia.org)
  • It also prevents secondary neurological injuries after central nervous systems trauma in animals. (alliedmarketresearch.com)
  • A multi-center study on the use of progesterone for traumatic brain injury in adults is currently underway in the Neurological Emergencies Treatment Trials Network but it excludes children. (healthcanal.com)
  • An incurable neurological disorder that can develop even prior to birth, epilepsy causes the brain's electrical system to produce intense, intermittent bursts of electrical energy that adversely affect other brain functions. (yourlegalguide.com)
  • Neurological injury frequently interrupts connections while sparing nerve cells. (yale.edu)
  • TBI is caused by both primary and secondary injury. (lifeextension.com)
  • One of the secondary injury processes that may promote latent neuronal death is post-traumatic inflammation, which has been shown to increase blood-brain barrier permeability, cerebral edema, and intracranial pressure, resulting in neuronal dysfunction following TBI. (lifeextension.com)
  • The pathophysiology of SCI involves two stages: the primary and the secondary injury. (uab.cat)
  • GCV prevented growth of secondary multipotent neurospheres prepared after passage of primary transgenic neurospheres derived from all three of these developmental stages. (jove.com)
  • Spinal cord injury (SCI) is defined as damage or trauma caused to the spinal cord. (openpr.com)
  • Damage and even perforation of the septum may be a result of trauma, snorting cocaine or tobacco ('snuff'), inhaling organic and non-organic dust or granulomatous diseases. (healthhype.com)
  • It has been shown that the extent of the damage incurred after a head trauma correlates more directly with the amount of deformation incurred by the brain than the amount of stress per area applied to the head. (wikipedia.org)
  • Damage to sympathetic autonomic fibres that run in the cervical portions of the spinal cord may lead to drooping of the eyelid ( ptosis ) and a smaller pupil on the same side as the injury (Horner syndrome). (britannica.com)
  • Also known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), this type occurs after an illness or injury that didn't directly damage the nerves in your affected limb. (mayoclinic.org)
  • There are two types of traumatic brain injury that can result from damage to the head during an accident: open head injury and closed head injury. (yourlegalguide.com)
  • With a new $1.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, Deanna Thompson, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, will investigate a promising new method to heal traumatic nerve damage, using electrical stimulation to prime and pump neuronal growth. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Hypertonia may result from injury, illness, or conditions that involve damage to the central nervous system. (sjjif.com)
  • Damage to myelin and oligodendrocytes: a role in chronic outcomes following traumatic brain injury? (deepdyve.com)
  • c-Jun is a component of the heterodimeric AP-1 transcription factor, and c-Jun is highly expressed in response to neuronal trauma. (uzh.ch)
  • The cells migrated to the injury site and attached to the spinal surface without invading into the cord. (rutgers.edu)
  • Following pial strip of the forelimb motor cortex, brains treated with an adenovirus encoding VEGF ZFPs (AdV-ZFP) showed higher neuronal survival, accelerated wound contraction, and reduced lesion volume between 1 and 6 weeks after injury. (jove.com)
  • In contradistinction to low-impact or slowly progressive injuries (such as those caused by tumors), the first step in treatment must be decompression by removal of the offending lesion. (thejns.org)
  • In the event of preceding head trauma followed by nasal discharge, a CSF leak should be excluded. (healthhype.com)
  • Animal studies have shown that early administration of progesterone after experimental traumatic brain injury reduces cerebral edema, neuronal loss, and limits behavioral deficits in laboratory animals. (healthcanal.com)
  • Cerebral palsy can be traced to several causes, including infection, birth trauma, premature birth, inadequate oxygen or blood supply to the fetus, or diseases during infancy such as meningitis or encephalitis. (yourlegalguide.com)
  • To learn more about cerebral palsy, refer to our section on this subject, and contact a birth injury attorney to learn more about obtaining compensation for your child's injuries. (yourlegalguide.com)
  • Now, researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered a molecular process that controls the rate at which nerves grow both during embryonic development and recovery from injury throughout life. (newswise.com)
  • GCV applied in vitro eliminated growth of multipotent neurospheres from GZs of postnatal and adult transgenic mice but not early embryonic (embryonic day 12.5) transgenic mice. (jove.com)
  • experimental neuropathology The study of neurodegeneration in animal or cell culture model systems. (barnardhealth.us)
  • A nervous system disorder known as Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy or RSD, also known as complex regional pain syndrome or CRPS, often causes chronic pain in individuals who fall victim to it. (lahandsurgeon.com)
  • As many as 300,000 persons live with chronic disabilities related to SCI, and each year new SCIs affect 10,000-14,000 people (mean age at injury, 30 years).14 The annual cost to society is estimated to reach $8 billion, and the individual costs to patients can reach $1.35 million over their lifetime. (thejns.org)
  • Briefly, female Wistar rats--under cyclosporin immunosuppression--received a 35 g clip-compression injury and were administered AdV-ZFP-VEGF or AdV-eGFP at 24 hours post-SCI. (jove.com)
  • As an important neurotrophic factor, the secretion of endogenous basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) contributes to the protective effect of neuronal cells, but the mechanism of bFGF in reactive astrogliosis is still unclear. (mdpi.com)
  • In addition, Taxol abolishes growth cone sensitivity to growth-blocking molecules which are normally in their vicinity after injury. (innovations-report.com)
  • DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors. (innovations-report.com)
  • We discovered that one of the first things a nerve does after injury is switch on all these early developmental molecules that controlled how it grew in the first place," said Butler, who is a member of the UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center. (newswise.com)
  • These structurally diverse molecules strongly inhibit neurite outgrowth in vitro, and have been most extensively studied in the context of nervous system injury in vivo. (umich.edu)
  • The study, led by senior author Samantha Butler and published in the Journal of Neuroscience , used experiments with mice to show that it is possible to accelerate peripheral nerve growth by manipulating this molecular process. (newswise.com)
  • Using this funding, we hope to explore the idea of using electrical stimulation to both fuel and provide a directional cue for nerve repair by guiding and enhancing these helper cells, which are a known rate-limiting factor in peripheral nerve injury. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Tetanus is an infection of the nervous system with a type of bacteria that is potentially deadly, called Clostridium tetani (C tetani). (stlukes-stl.com)
  • The innate immune response in the brain is initiated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS) or danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPS) produced in response to central nervous system (CNS) infection or injury. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Recognizing that brain trauma triggers sex hormone deficiencies that can produce these worsening effects, some physicians are using an innovative sex hormone replacement technique that uses subcutaneous pellets to deliver bioidentical hormone replacement. (lifeextension.com)
  • Growth hormone deficiency means the pituitary gland does not make enough growth hormone. (stlukes-stl.com)
  • The nervous system becomes overactive, causing intense burning or aching pain, swelling, changes in skin color and moisture. (assh.org)