Central Nervous System Helminthiasis: Infections of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; or MENINGES caused by HELMINTHS (parasitic worms).Helminthiasis: Infestation with parasitic worms of the helminth class.Central Nervous System: The main information-processing organs of the nervous system, consisting of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges.Helminthiasis, Animal: Infestation of animals with parasitic worms of the helminth class. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Helminths: Commonly known as parasitic worms, this group includes the ACANTHOCEPHALA; NEMATODA; and PLATYHELMINTHS. Some authors consider certain species of LEECHES that can become temporarily parasitic as helminths.Neglected Diseases: Diseases that are underfunded and have low name recognition but are major burdens in less developed countries. The World Health Organization has designated six tropical infectious diseases as being neglected in industrialized countries that are endemic in many developing countries (HELMINTHIASIS; LEPROSY; LYMPHATIC FILARIASIS; ONCHOCERCIASIS; SCHISTOSOMIASIS; and TRACHOMA).Anthelmintics: Agents destructive to parasitic worms. They are used therapeutically in the treatment of HELMINTHIASIS in man and animal.Ascaris lumbricoides: A species of parasitic nematode that is the largest found in the human intestine. Its distribution is worldwide, but it is more prevalent in areas of poor sanitation. Human infection with A. lumbricoides is acquired by swallowing fully embryonated eggs from contaminated soil.Trichuris: A genus of nematode worms comprising the whipworms.Ascariasis: Infection by nematodes of the genus ASCARIS. Ingestion of infective eggs causes diarrhea and pneumonitis. Its distribution is more prevalent in areas of poor sanitation and where human feces are used for fertilizer.Hookworm Infections: Infection of humans or animals with hookworms other than those caused by the genus Ancylostoma or Necator, for which the specific terms ANCYLOSTOMIASIS and NECATORIASIS are available.Ancylostoma: A genus of nematode intestinal parasites that consists of several species. A. duodenale is the common hookworm in humans. A. braziliense, A. ceylonicum, and A. caninum occur primarily in cats and dogs, but all have been known to occur in humans.Cysticercosis: Infection with CYSTICERCUS, the larval form of the various tapeworms of the genus Taenia (usually T. solium in man). In humans they penetrate the intestinal wall and invade subcutaneous tissue, brain, eye, muscle, heart, liver, lung, and peritoneum. Brain involvement results in NEUROCYSTICERCOSIS.Seizures: Clinical or subclinical disturbances of cortical function due to a sudden, abnormal, excessive, and disorganized discharge of brain cells. Clinical manifestations include abnormal motor, sensory and psychic phenomena. Recurrent seizures are usually referred to as EPILEPSY or "seizure disorder."Neurocysticercosis: Infection of the brain, spinal cord, or perimeningeal structures with the larval forms of the genus TAENIA (primarily T. solium in humans). Lesions formed by the organism are referred to as cysticerci. The infection may be subacute or chronic, and the severity of symptoms depends on the severity of the host immune response and the location and number of lesions. SEIZURES represent the most common clinical manifestation although focal neurologic deficits may occur. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1998, Ch27, pp46-50)Taenia solium: Species of tapeworm in the genus TAENIA, that infects swine. It is acquired by humans through the ingestion of cured or undercooked pork.Edema: Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.Epilepsy: A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)Lymphedema: Edema due to obstruction of lymph vessels or disorders of the lymph nodes.Tension-Type Headache: A common primary headache disorder, characterized by a dull, non-pulsatile, diffuse, band-like (or vice-like) PAIN of mild to moderate intensity in the HEAD; SCALP; or NECK. The subtypes are classified by frequency and severity of symptoms. There is no clear cause even though it has been associated with MUSCLE CONTRACTION and stress. (International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd ed. Cephalalgia 2004: suppl 1)Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Complement Pathway, Classical: Complement activation initiated by the binding of COMPLEMENT C1 to ANTIGEN-ANTIBODY COMPLEXES at the COMPLEMENT C1Q subunit. This leads to the sequential activation of COMPLEMENT C1R and COMPLEMENT C1S subunits. Activated C1s cleaves COMPLEMENT C4 and COMPLEMENT C2 forming the membrane-bound classical C3 CONVERTASE (C4B2A) and the subsequent C5 CONVERTASE (C4B2A3B) leading to cleavage of COMPLEMENT C5 and the assembly of COMPLEMENT MEMBRANE ATTACK COMPLEX.Dictionaries, MedicalMigraine Disorders: A class of disabling primary headache disorders, characterized by recurrent unilateral pulsatile headaches. The two major subtypes are common migraine (without aura) and classic migraine (with aura or neurological symptoms). (International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd ed. Cephalalgia 2004: suppl 1)Complement System Proteins: Serum glycoproteins participating in the host defense mechanism of COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION that creates the COMPLEMENT MEMBRANE ATTACK COMPLEX. Included are glycoproteins in the various pathways of complement activation (CLASSICAL COMPLEMENT PATHWAY; ALTERNATIVE COMPLEMENT PATHWAY; and LECTIN COMPLEMENT PATHWAY).Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Peripheral Nervous System Agents: Drugs that act principally at one or more sites within the peripheral neuroeffector systems, the autonomic system, and motor nerve-skeletal system. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p75)Central Nervous System Agents: A class of drugs producing both physiological and psychological effects through a variety of mechanisms. They can be divided into "specific" agents, e.g., affecting an identifiable molecular mechanism unique to target cells bearing receptors for that agent, and "nonspecific" agents, those producing effects on different target cells and acting by diverse molecular mechanisms. Those with nonspecific mechanisms are generally further classed according to whether they produce behavioral depression or stimulation. Those with specific mechanisms are classed by locus of action or specific therapeutic use. (From Gilman AG, et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p252)Respiratory System Agents: Drugs used for their effects on the respiratory system.Anaplasma centrale: A species of gram-negative bacteria causing mild ANAPLASMOSIS in CATTLE. It also can infect SHEEP and GOATS. It is transmitted by TICKS.Sensory System Agents: Drugs that act on neuronal sensory receptors resulting in an increase, decrease, or modification of afferent nerve activity. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p367)Central Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of any component of the brain (including the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, brain stem, and cerebellum) or the spinal cord.Toxocariasis: Infection by round worms of the genus TOXOCARA, usually found in wild and domesticated cats and dogs and foxes, except for the larvae, which may produce visceral and ocular larva migrans in man.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Tropical Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with diseases, mainly of parasitic origin, common in tropical and subtropical regions.Toxocara: A genus of ascarid nematodes commonly parasitic in the intestines of cats and dogs.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Soccer: A game in which a round inflated ball is advanced by kicking or propelling with any part of the body except the hands or arms. The object of the game is to place the ball in opposite goals.Anniversaries and Special Events: Occasions to commemorate an event or occasions designated for a specific purpose.Skin DiseasesTravel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.BrazilPsychology, Experimental: The branch of psychology which seeks to learn more about the fundamental causes of behavior by studying various psychologic phenomena in controlled experimental situations.ArchivesGnathostomiasis: Infections with nematodes of the genus GNATHOSTOMA, superfamily THELAZIOIDEA. Gnathostomiasis is a food-borne zoonosis caused by eating undercooked or raw fish or meat.Gnathostoma: A genus of parasitic nematodes that occurs in mammals including man. Infection in humans is either by larvae penetrating the skin or by ingestion of uncooked fish.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Spirurida Infections: Infections with nematodes of the order SPIRURIDA.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Praziquantel: An anthelmintic used in most schistosome and many cestode infestations.Schistosomicides: Agents that act systemically to kill adult schistosomes.Parasite Egg Count: Determination of parasite eggs in feces.Schistosomiasis mansoni: Schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma mansoni. It is endemic in Africa, the Middle East, South America, and the Caribbean and affects mainly the bowel, spleen, and liver.Schistosoma haematobium: A species of trematode blood flukes of the family Schistosomatidae which occurs at different stages in development in veins of the pulmonary and hepatic system and finally the bladder lumen. This parasite causes urinary schistosomiasis.Schistosomiasis haematobia: A human disease caused by the infection of parasitic worms SCHISTOSOMA HAEMATOBIUM. It is endemic in AFRICA and parts of the MIDDLE EAST. Tissue damages most often occur in the URINARY TRACT, specifically the URINARY BLADDER.Ascaridoidea: A superfamily of polymyarian nematode worms. An important characteristic of this group is the presence of three prominent lips around the mouth of the organism.Raccoons: Carnivores of the genus Procyon of the family PROCYONIDAE. Two subgenera and seven species are currently recognized. They range from southern Canada to Panama and are found in several of the Caribbean Islands.Ascaridida Infections: Infections with nematodes of the order ASCARIDIDA.Larva Migrans: Infections caused by nematode larvae which never develop into the adult stage and migrate through various body tissues. They commonly infect the skin, eyes, and viscera in man. Ancylostoma brasiliensis causes cutaneous larva migrans. Toxocara causes visceral larva migrans.Toxocara canis: A species of parasitic nematode found in the intestine of dogs. Lesions in the brain, liver, eye, kidney, and lung are caused by migrating larvae. In humans, these larvae do not follow normal patterns and may produce visceral larva migrans (LARVA MIGRANS, VISCERAL).Raccoon Dogs: The lone species in the genus Nyctereutes, family CANIDAE. It is found in the woodland zone from southeastern Siberia to Vietnam and on the main islands of Japan.Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense: A hemoflagellate subspecies of parasitic protozoa that causes Rhodesian sleeping sickness in humans. It is carried by Glossina pallidipes, G. morsitans and occasionally other species of game-attacking tsetse flies.Trypanosomiasis, African: A disease endemic among people and animals in Central Africa. It is caused by various species of trypanosomes, particularly T. gambiense and T. rhodesiense. Its second host is the TSETSE FLY. Involvement of the central nervous system produces "African sleeping sickness." Nagana is a rapidly fatal trypanosomiasis of horses and other animals.Trypanosoma brucei gambiense: A hemoflagellate subspecies of parasitic protozoa that causes Gambian or West African sleeping sickness in humans. The vector host is usually the tsetse fly (Glossina).Trypanosoma brucei brucei: A hemoflagellate subspecies of parasitic protozoa that causes nagana in domestic and game animals in Africa. It apparently does not infect humans. It is transmitted by bites of tsetse flies (Glossina).Trypanocidal Agents: Agents destructive to the protozoal organisms belonging to the suborder TRYPANOSOMATINA.Melarsoprol: Arsenical used in trypanosomiases. It may cause fatal encephalopathy and other undesirable side effects.Trypanosomiasis: Infection with protozoa of the genus TRYPANOSOMA.International Classification of Diseases: A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.Clinical Coding: Process of substituting a symbol or code for a term such as a diagnosis or procedure. (from Slee's Health Care Terms, 3d ed.)Chronology as Topic: The temporal sequence of events that have occurred.Genetic Code: The meaning ascribed to the BASE SEQUENCE with respect to how it is translated into AMINO ACID SEQUENCE. The start, stop, and order of amino acids of a protein is specified by consecutive triplets of nucleotides called codons (CODON).Current Procedural Terminology: Descriptive terms and identifying codes for reporting medical services and procedures performed by PHYSICIANS. It is produced by the AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION and used in insurance claim reporting for MEDICARE; MEDICAID; and private health insurance programs (From CPT 2002).Insurance Claim Review: Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Apiaceae: A large plant family in the order Apiales, also known as Umbelliferae. Most are aromatic herbs with alternate, feather-divided leaves that are sheathed at the base. The flowers often form a conspicuous flat-topped umbel. Each small individual flower is usually bisexual, with five sepals, five petals, and an enlarged disk at the base of the style. The fruits are ridged and are composed of two parts that split open at maturity.Acorus: A plant genus of the family ACORACEAE, order Arales, subclass Arecidae most notable for Acorus calamus L. root which contains asarone and has been used in TRADITIONAL MEDICINE.Pimenta: A plant genus in the family MYRTACEAE, order Myrtales, subclass Rosidae. It is best known for allspice from the dried berry of Pimenta diocia.Piper nigrum: A plant species in the PIPERACEAE plant family. It is a common spice on foods and is used medicinally to increase gastrointestinal assimilation of other supplements and drugs. Piperine is a key component. Black pepper is picked unripe and heaped for a few days to ferment. White Pepper is the ripe fruit dehulled by maceration in water.Myrtaceae: The myrtle plant family of the order Myrtales. It includes several aromatic medicinal plants such as EUCALYPTUS.Acoraceae: A plant family of the order Arales, subclass Arecidae, class Liliopsida (monocot).Black Pepper: A common spice from fruit of PIPER NIGRUM. Black pepper is picked unripe and heaped for a few days to ferment. White Pepper is the ripe fruit dehulled by maceration in water. Piperine is a key component used medicinally to increase gastrointestinal assimilation of other supplements and drugs.LaosCentral Nervous System Infections: Pathogenic infections of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges. DNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; RNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; BACTERIAL INFECTIONS; MYCOPLASMA INFECTIONS; SPIROCHAETALES INFECTIONS; fungal infections; PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS; HELMINTHIASIS; and PRION DISEASES may involve the central nervous system as a primary or secondary process.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Geobacillus stearothermophilus: A species of GRAM-POSITIVE ENDOSPORE-FORMING BACTERIA in the family BACILLACEAE, found in soil, hot springs, Arctic waters, ocean sediments, and spoiled food products.Streptococcus pyogenes: A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria isolated from skin lesions, blood, inflammatory exudates, and the upper respiratory tract of humans. It is a group A hemolytic Streptococcus that can cause SCARLET FEVER and RHEUMATIC FEVER.Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the SUPERIOR SAGITTAL SINUS or the inferior sagittal sinus. Sagittal sinus thrombosis can result from infections, hematological disorders, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; and NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES. Clinical features are primarily related to the increased intracranial pressure causing HEADACHE; NAUSEA; and VOMITING. Severe cases can evolve to SEIZURES or COMA.Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CRANIAL SINUSES, large endothelium-lined venous channels situated within the SKULL. Intracranial sinuses, also called cranial venous sinuses, include the superior sagittal, cavernous, lateral, petrous sinuses, and many others. Cranial sinus thrombosis can lead to severe HEADACHE; SEIZURE; and other neurological defects.Cranial Sinuses: Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of DURA MATER, the endosteal and the meningeal layers. They are devoid of valves and are parts of the venous system of dura mater. Major cranial sinuses include a postero-superior group (such as superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and occipital) and an antero-inferior group (such as cavernous, petrosal, and basilar plexus).Superior Sagittal Sinus: The long large endothelium-lined venous channel on the top outer surface of the brain. It receives blood from a vein in the nasal cavity, runs backwards, and gradually increases in size as blood drains from veins of the brain and the DURA MATER. Near the lower back of the CRANIUM, the superior sagittal sinus deviates to one side (usually the right) and continues on as one of the TRANSVERSE SINUSES.Budd-Chiari Syndrome: A condition in which the hepatic venous outflow is obstructed anywhere from the small HEPATIC VEINS to the junction of the INFERIOR VENA CAVA and the RIGHT ATRIUM. Usually the blockage is extrahepatic and caused by blood clots (THROMBUS) or fibrous webs. Parenchymal FIBROSIS is uncommon.Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CAVERNOUS SINUS of the brain. Infections of the paranasal sinuses and adjacent structures, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, and THROMBOPHILIA are associated conditions. Clinical manifestations include dysfunction of cranial nerves III, IV, V, and VI, marked periorbital swelling, chemosis, fever, and visual loss. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p711)Lateral Sinus Thrombosis: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the LATERAL SINUSES. This condition is often associated with ear infections (OTITIS MEDIA or MASTOIDITIS) without antibiotic treatment. In developed nations, lateral sinus thrombosis can result from CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; BRAIN NEOPLASMS; NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES; THROMBOPHILIA; and other conditions. Clinical features include HEADACHE; VERTIGO; and increased intracranial pressure.Parasitic Diseases: Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. They are often contracted through contact with an intermediate vector, but may occur as the result of direct exposure.Contact Tracing: Identification of those persons (or animals) who have had such an association with an infected person, animal, or contaminated environment as to have had the opportunity to acquire the infection. Contact tracing is a generally accepted method for the control of sexually transmitted diseases.Skin Diseases, Parasitic: Skin diseases caused by ARTHROPODS; HELMINTHS; or other parasites.Protozoan Infections: Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa.Antiparasitic Agents: Drugs used to treat or prevent parasitic infections.Schistosomiasis: Infection with flukes (trematodes) of the genus SCHISTOSOMA. Three species produce the most frequent clinical diseases: SCHISTOSOMA HAEMATOBIUM (endemic in Africa and the Middle East), SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI (in Egypt, northern and southern Africa, some West Indies islands, northern 2/3 of South America), and SCHISTOSOMA JAPONICUM (in Japan, China, the Philippines, Celebes, Thailand, Laos). S. mansoni is often seen in Puerto Ricans living in the United States.Amoebida: An order of ameboid protozoa that is commonly uninucleate and possess mitochondria. Most organisms are nonpathogenic.

Radiologic-pathologic findings in raccoon roundworm (Baylisascaris procyonis) encephalitis. (1/23)

A 13-month-old boy developed eosinophilic meningoencephalitis, retinitis, and a protracted encephalopathy with severe residual deficits. The initial MR examination revealed diffuse periventricular white matter disease, and follow-up images showed atrophy. Brain biopsy, serology, and epidemiologic studies lead to the diagnosis of Baylisascaris procyonis infection, a parasitic disease contracted through exposure to soil contaminated by the eggs of a common raccoon intestinal roundworm. The pathologic, epidemiologic, and imaging features of this disease are herein reviewed.  (+info)

MR imaging findings in cerebrospinal gnathostomiasis. (2/23)

Human gnathostomiasis is an infection caused mainly by Gnathostoma spinigerum, a nematode. Infected humans can present with various clinical manifestations. Serology is the criterion standard for diagnosing gnathostomiasis, whereas MR imaging represents a complementary tool for assessing severity and extent of disease. We report two definite cases of gnathostomiasis that were confirmed by the immunoblotting technique. MR imaging of the cervical cords showed cord enlargement and diffuse high signal intensity, mainly of the gray-white matter regions. MR imaging of the brain showed hemorrhagic tract and scattered deep intracerebral hemorrhage with diffuse, fuzzy white matter lesions with nodular enhancement. Severe gnathostomiasis was unresponsive to treatment.  (+info)

Toxocariasis of the central nervous system: with report of two cases. (3/23)

Clinical involvement of the nervous system in visceral larva migrans due to Toxocara is rare, although in experimental animals the larvae frequently migrate to the brain. A review of the literature from the early 50's to date found 29 cases of brain involvement in toxocariasis. In 20 cases, various clinical and laboratory manifestations of eosinophilic meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis or radiculopathy were reported. We report two children with neurological manifestations, in which there was cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis with marked eosinophilia and a positive serology for Toxocara both in serum and CSF. Serology for Schistosoma mansoni, Cysticercus cellulosae, Toxoplasma and cytomegalovirus were negative in CSF, that was sterile in both cases. Improvement of signs and symptoms after specific treatment (albendazole or thiabendazole) was observed in the two cases. A summary of data described in the 25 cases previously reported is presented and we conclude that in cases of encephalitis and myelitis with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and eosinophilia, parasitic infection of the central nervous system should be suspected and serology should be performed to establish the correct diagnosis and treatment.  (+info)

Raccoon roundworm encephalitis. (4/23)

The raccoon roundworm, Baylisascaris procyonis, is increasingly recognized as a cause of zoonotic visceral, ocular, and neural larva migrans and, in particular, of devastating encephalitis in young children. Exposure occurs mainly at raccoon latrines, where large numbers of infective eggs may be accidentally ingested. Risk factors for infection include contact with raccoon latrines, pica/geophagia, age of <4 years, and male sex. The severity of central nervous system (CNS) disease depends on the number of eggs ingested, the extent and location of larval migration, and the severity of ensuing inflammation and necrosis. Diagnosis of Baylisascaris encephalitis is based on clinical CNS disease, peripheral and cerebrospinal fluid eosinophilia, deep white matter lesions visible by magnetic resonance imaging, and positive results of serologic tests. Treatment efficacy in clinical cases is poor, but albendazole prevents disease if given promptly after infection. Considering the seriousness of this disease and limitations of diagnosis and treatment, prevention of infection with eggs is of utmost importance.  (+info)

Upregulation of MMP-9/TIMP-1 enzymatic system in eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis. (5/23)

Proteolysis depends on the balance between the proteases and their inhibitors. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and its specific inhibitors, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP), contribute to eosinophilic inflammatory reaction in the subarachnoid space of the Angiostrongylus cantonensis-infected mice. The expression of MMP-9 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was significantly increased in mice with eosinophilic meningitis, compared to that in uninfected ones. However, the TIMP-1 levels were unchanged and remained at basal levels at all time points, even in uninfected mice. Elevated MMP-9 mRNA expression coincided with protein levels and proteolytic activity, as demonstrated by means of positive immunoreactivity and gelatin zymography. CSF protein contents correlated significantly with MMP-9 intensity and CSF eosinophilia. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated MMP-9 and TIMP-1 localization in eosinophils and macrophages. When the specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was added, MMP-9 enzyme activity was reduced by 45.4%. The percentage of eosinophil increased significantly upon the establishment of infection, but subsided upon inhibition. These results show that MMP-9/TIMP-1 imbalance in angiostrongyliasis may be associated with eosinophilic meningitis.  (+info)

Surgical removal of a live worm by stereotactic targeting in cerebral sparganosis. Case report. (6/23)

A 64-year-old man presented with generalized tonic clonic convulsion followed by weakness of the right lower extremity. He had a medical history of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and right cerebellar infarction. Computed tomography (CT) showed a small high density nodule with an enhanced perifocal low density area in the left occipital lobe. T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed a ring-shaped and partial string-like nodule with enhancement by gadolinium. T2-weighted MR imaging showed the white matter of the left occipital lobe as high intensity. CT and MR imaging seemed to indicate metastatic brain tumors, although cortical atrophy and ventricular dilation were recognized. Left parietal craniotomy was performed under stereotactic targeting to obtain a definitive diagnosis. During manipulation at the center of the targeted lesion, a white, tape-like body was found and recognized to be a live worm. Serological testing revealed strong immunopositivity against Spirometra mansoni. The infection route in the present case was probably through eating raw chicken meat. Cerebral sparganosis is extremely rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of metastatic brain tumors, especially in endemic areas.  (+info)

Cerebral toxocariasis after consumption of raw duck liver. (7/23)

Human toxocariasis is usually contracted by exposure to contaminated soil. This disease is rarely transmitted by raw meat or giblets of paratenic animals, such as chickens, lambs, or cows. We present a case of isolated cerebral toxocariasis presumably caused by the consumption of raw duck liver. This 55-year-old woman had sudden-onset hemiparesis of the right leg, eosinophilia of 30%, and markedly elevated total serum IgE levels. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated multiple cerebral hyperintense lesions on T2-weighed images. Tests for antibodies to Toxocara in serum and cerebrospinal fluid yielded highly positive results. Repeated courses of albendazole and corticosteroids led to significant clinical improvement.  (+info)

Primary spinal intradural extramedullary hydatid cyst in a child. (8/23)

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Spinal hydatid cyst is a serious form of hydatid disease affecting less than 1% of the total cases of hydatid disease. We present a case of pathologically confirmed primary intradural spinal cyst hydatid in an otherwise healthy patient who showed no other evidence of systemic hydatid cyst disease. CASE REPORT: An 8-year-old boy presented with back pain, left leg pain, and difficulty in walking. The patient had no other signs of systemic hydatid cyst disease. An intradural extramedullary cystic lesion was identified with magnetic resonance imaging and was shown to be a hydatid cyst by histopathologic examination after the surgical removal. CONCLUSION: Although extremely rare, primary intradural extramedullary hydatid cyst pathology might be the cause of leg pain and gait disturbance in children living in endemic areas.  (+info)

*List of MeSH codes (C10)

... central nervous system parasitic infections MeSH C10.228.228.205.250 --- central nervous system helminthiasis MeSH C10.228. ... central nervous system MeSH C10.228.140.300.850.125 --- aids arteritis, central nervous system MeSH C10.228.140.300.850.250 ... central nervous system MeSH C10.500.190.600 --- central nervous system venous angioma MeSH C10.500.190.800 --- sinus pericranii ... central nervous system MeSH C10.114.875.350 --- lupus vasculitis, central nervous system MeSH C10.114.875.700 --- temporal ...

*Helminthiasis

Immune-mediated inflammatory changes occur in the skin, lung, liver, intestine, central nervous system, and eyes. Signs of the ... These substances then enter the circulatory and lymphatic systems of the host body. Chronic immune responses to helminthiasis ... Areas with the highest prevalence of helminthiasis are tropical and subtropical areas including sub-Saharan Africa, central and ... Chronic helminthiasis may cause severe morbidity. Helminthiasis has been found to result in poor birth outcome, poor cognitive ...

*Strongyloidiasis

Finally, the hyperinfection syndrome causes symptoms in many organ systems, including the central nervous system. Frequently ... Strongyloidiasis is a type of soil-transmitted helminthiasis. It is thought to affect 30-100 million people worldwide, mainly ... Gastrointestinal system symptoms include abdominal pain and diarrhea. Pulmonary symptoms (including Löffler's syndrome) can ...

*Neglected tropical diseases

... additionally found that there was a 13-fold greater chance of a drug entering the marking being for central-nervous-system ... The three major worm species responsible for soil-transmitted helminthiasis are Ascaris (roundworms), Trichuris (whipworm), the ... Neurocystocercosis, or the parasitic infection of the nervous system, can be fatal. Taeniasis is not fatal. It is usually ... Helminth infections, as the most common infection of humans, are often found to be in multi-infection systems. For example, in ...

*ICD-10 Chapter I: Certain infectious and parasitic diseases

... of central nervous system NOS Syphilis (late) of central nervous system NOS Syphiloma of central nervous system NOS (A52.7) ... Helminthiasis, unspecified (B85) Pediculosis and phthiriasis (B85.0) Pediculosis due to Pediculus humanus capitis (B85.1) ... Atypical virus infection of central nervous system, unspecified Prion disease of central nervous system NOS (A82) Rabies (A83) ... Other tuberculosis of nervous system (A17.9) Tuberculosis of nervous system, unspecified (A18) Tuberculosis of other organs ( ...
Synonyms for Central nervous system helminthiasis in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for Central nervous system helminthiasis. 3 words related to helminthiasis: infestation, hookworm disease, hookworm. What are synonyms for Central nervous system helminthiasis?
Sparganosis is an infection of sparganum, a plerocercoid larva of the genus Spirometra tapeworm. The first sparganosis case was described by Patick Mansonin China in 1882. The disease is most...
Photo 1. Edible frog and sea food on a Thai market stall. Sparganum occur in a variety of amphibious animals including frogs, and these also may be infective to man if ingested. They are the larvae of tapeworms of the genus Spirometra that are common in various canines and felines. The first stage larvae are formed as procercoids in Cyclops. Ingestion of these larvae produces sparganosis in man, since the larvae cannot mature in this abnormal host.. ...
People acquire sparganosis mainly by ingesting larvae contained in raw or undercooked animal meat infected with spargana, such as amphibians, reptiles, birds, pigs and other wild mammals. People who drink contaminated water are also at risk.
The prevention of sparganosis, please change the bad eating habits,In October 2009, a 17 year old girl in Anhui, accompanied by her parents, came to our center for a slow response in January. The girl at the
Baylisascaris procyonis, predominantly found in raccoons, is a ubiquitous roundworm found throughout North America. Although raccoons are typically asymptomatic when infected with the parasite, the larval form of Baylisascaris procyonis can result in fatal human disease or severe neurologic outcomes if not treated rapidly. In the United States, Baylisascaris procyonis is more commonly enzootic in raccoons in the midwestern and northeastern regions and along the West Coast (1). However, since 2002, infections have been documented in other states (Florida and Georgia) and regions (2). Baylisascariasis is not a nationally notifiable disease in the United States, and little is known about how commonly it occurs or the range of clinical disease in humans. Case reports of seven human baylisascariasis cases in the United States diagnosed by Baylisascaris procyonis immunoblot testing at CDC are described, including review of clinical history and laboratory data. Although all seven patients survived, ...
Would you please be so kind to take your raccoon off my table or do I have to suffer an early death? Ahhh, the infamous raccoon roundworm. Pretty wides...
B. procyonis roundworms can cause potentially fatal neural larva migrans in many species, including humans. However, the clinical spectrum of baylisascariasis is not completely understood, according to researchers in a new study published in the CDC journal, Emerging Infectious Diseases.. Wildlife rehabilitators may represent a population at risk for subclinical baylisascariasis due to frequent contact with raccoons and their feces, which may contain infectious larvated B. procyonis eggs.. During 2012-2015, serum samples were collected and analyzed for B. procyonis IgG using a recombinant B. procyonis repeat antigen 1 protein Western blot. A questionnaire was also administered to determine current involvement in rehabilitation activities.. Nine out of 10 of the 347 participants reported current involvement in rehabilitation activities.. Twenty-four, or 7 percent of participants tested positive for B. procyonis antibodies.. Based on their findings, researchers suggest that exposure to B. ...
Baylisascaris shroederi, common name giant panda roundworm, is a roundworm (nematode), found ubiquitously in giant pandas of central China, the definitive hosts. Baylisascaris larvae in paratenic hosts can migrate, causing visceral larva migrans (VLM). Baylisascariasis is characterized by the zoonotic infection of Baylisascaris roundworm humans, no cases have ever been reported globally. It is extremely dangerous to the host due to the ability of the parasites larvae to migrate into brain tissue and cause damage. Concern for human infection is minimalized as there are very few giant pandas living today and most people do not encounter giant pandas in their everyday activities. There is growing recognition that the infection of Baylisascaris shroederi is one of the major causes of death in the species This is confirmed by a report stating that during the period of 2001 to 2005; about 50% of deaths in wild giant pandas were caused by the parasite infection. In central China, B. shroederi ...
The extraordinary heteroxenosity (ability to use many hosts in its life cycle) of Baylisascaris procyonis is of particular concern not only to wildlife biologists but also to public health professionals and medical practitioners. To understand why there is an increasing human risk for infection with B. procyonis, a discussion of the biology and behavior of raccoons is prerequisite to subsequent discussions of epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment. B. procyonis is the large ascarid parasite of raccoons. The biology, morphology, and ecology of B. procyonis are similar to those of other ascarid parasites of carnivores, such as the common canine roundworm, Toxocara canis. Humans become infected with B. procyonis just as these other hosts do and become accidental hosts following inadvertent ingestion of eggs containing infective larvae. Without question, the biggest contributing factor to the poor response to B. procyonis neural larva migrans (NLM) therapy is treatment delay
Also known as the raccoon roundworm, Baylisascaris is a parasite that can be deadly if ingested. If it makes its way to your brain it can cause blindness, paralysis and even death.
A raccoon latrine in King County is very likely to contain roundworm eggs that can be hazardous to human health. The adult stage of the raccoon roundworm (Baylisascaris procyonis) lives in the raccoons intestine and produces microscopic eggs that are shed in the raccoons feces. One raccoon roundworm can produce more than 100,000 eggs a day. A raccoon can pass millions of eggs in its feces everyday, depending on how many worms are in its intestines. Once deposited in the environment, the eggs develop into the infectious form in 2-4 weeks, and can survive in the soil for several years.. If these infectious eggs are inadvertently swallowed by humans, other mammals, or birds, larvae (immature stage of worms) hatch out of the eggs and move into the organs of the body. The larvae travel throughout the body and may cause serious eye disease, spinal cord or brain damage, or death. Discouraging raccoons from living around people and cleaning up raccoon latrines reduces the chance that people will get ...
Over the period of January 2012 to January 2014, 17 raccoons were submitted to the Animal Health Centre in Abbotsford, [British Columbia] for necropsy. 9 were juvenile, 5 were adult, and 3 were of undocumented age. The animals were free ranging and had been found either dead, injured, or weak and disoriented, by members of the public or employees of provincial agencies. Of the 17 raccoons, 12 carried patent roundworm infections (7/9 juvenile, 3/5 adults, and 2/3 of undocumented age).. The raccoon roundworm, Baylisascaris procyonis, is widespread throughout North America and commonly affects free ranging raccoons. In our 2 year review, 12/17 raccoons (71 per cent) were carrying the parasite. This agrees with other published infection rates, including those previously found in BC. This parasite has a fecal-oral life cycle. The raccoon ingests infective eggs from the environment which hatch to larvae. The larvae migrate into the intestinal wall and then emerge as adults into the intestine. Adults ...
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Complications of Toxocariasis including hidden complications, secondary medical conditions, symptoms, or other types of Toxocariasis complication.
Summary The first case of sparganosis in Colombia has been found, being the third in South America. This seems to be the first of ocular localization to be reported in the Western Hemisphere. Investigations directed toward finding the adult parasite and larvae of Diphyllobothrium species in several animal hosts were negative.
Breaking news warns against consumption of popular food that can seriously affect your health. The thing is this food can contain the tapeworm Spirometra erinaceieuropaei, which causes Sparganosis, a life-threatening parasitic infection.. CNN published a story of a man infected with the tapeworm Spirometra erinaceieuropaei after travelling to Asia. Countries such as China, Thailand, Japan and South Korea have the highest prevalence of this infection. After being given different medical treatments for his chronic headache for a year, all of which failed to give results, a British man underwent an MRI, only to be diagnosed with tapeworm living inside his brain tissue. Doctors were in complete disbelief, especially after confirming that the tapeworm may have been living there for four years.. ...
DI-fusion, le Dépôt institutionnel numérique de lULB, est loutil de référencementde la production scientifique de lULB.Linterface de recherche DI-fusion permet de consulter les publications des chercheurs de lULB et les thèses qui y ont été défendues.
Nervous system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.: In a retrospective analysis of 80 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) seen over a 10-y
Long-term follow-up of imported gnathostomiasis shows frequent treatment failure. - Christophe Strady, Paron Dekumyoy, Marina Clement-Rigolet, Martin Danis, François Bricaire, Eric Caumes
Em symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatment information for Em (Eosinophilic meningitis) with alternative diagnoses, full-text book chapters, misdiagnosis, research treatments, prevention, and prognosis.
Reader Question: How to Treat Dog Roundworms We have a six week old puppy we took today and had its first shots and wormed. Tonight she has a bit of diarrhea
Summary In the Netherlands East Indies Diphyllobothrium ranarum is common in dogs but especially in cats. The sparganum stage is frequently present in frogs, less frequent in toads. A local Cyclops acts as first intermediate host. Under experimental conditions it is easy to infect Cyclops, but it is very difficult to infect adult frogs or toads with infected Cyclops. On the other hand, there are no difficulties in obtaining this infection when the frog is still in its tadpole stage. Spargana from tadpoles develop into Diphyllobothrium tapeworms in the same way as spargana from adult frogs. In nature, however, infected tadpoles have not been discovered. The question arises whether the feeding habits of tadpoles in tiny laboratory dishes are comparable to those in nature. Experimental infections of mice, monkeys and other animals, not suitable as host for the adult Diphyllobothrium tapeworm, are possible with infected Cyclops and with spargana from frogs or tadpoles. The animals develop sparganosis under
The clinical stages of eosinophilic meningitis include a latent stage lasting 3 to 36 d (average 15 d), with no obvious clinical signs. The symptoms of the following prodromal stage are mild, and may include fever, headache, dizziness, abdominalgia, diarrhea and lack of strength. In some patients, the symptoms can resolve without any treatment. At the next, acute stage, patients have severe fever and headache with nausea, vomiting and abnormal sensations of the skin (e.g., numbness, pain, tingling, burning). Some patients have stiff neck, numbness of face or limbs, photophobia and diplopia. Symptoms at the acute stage may last from one week to 2 months or even longer. In the recovery stage, symptoms start to resolve and patients gradually regain normal status. Recovery can last for several weeks, depending on the individual. Some measurements (such as eosinophils counts, CSF pressure, positive head MRI signals and lung shadow) and mildly abnormal sensations could last longer.. Angiostrongyliasis ...
Gnathostomiasis and skin - Gnathostomiasis: An Emerging Imported Disease - Volume 9 .... Revitol Skin Brightener Cream is your safe, herbal-based solution for a beautiful, glowing complexion.
Revolution is the first feline topical roundworm treatment approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Selamectin, its active ingredient, is responsible for its action against roundworms and ...
will roundworms be expelled in feces when given waxine17? I gave it to my chickens last night and finished up this am. When I inspected the feces this...
A common roundworm widely studied for its developmental biology and neuroscience, also might be one of the most surprising examples of the eat-local movement. Princeton University researchers have found that the organisms ...
As a mother, you want to give your child nothing but the best. And as a new mother, what better can you give, than breast milk. However, to a new mother who is physically and emotionally fatigued, breast feeding can sometimes seem like be an overwhelming task. The key is to take your time, stay calm, spend time with your newborn and devise a technique that works for you and your baby. Get as much support as you can from your spouse, family, doctors and nursing staff during the initial few days t ...
Commercial firms specify ATCC strains as controls for rapid identification, minimum inhibitory concentration of antibiotics and antibiotic susceptibility panels.

Central nervous system helminthiasis synonyms, Central nervous system helminthiasis antonyms - FreeThesaurus.comCentral nervous system helminthiasis synonyms, Central nervous system helminthiasis antonyms - FreeThesaurus.com

Antonyms for Central nervous system helminthiasis. 3 words related to helminthiasis: infestation, hookworm disease, hookworm. ... What are synonyms for Central nervous system helminthiasis? ... Synonyms for Central nervous system helminthiasis in Free ... Central nervous system helminthiasis synonyms, Central nervous system helminthiasis antonyms - FreeThesaurus.com https://www. ... helminthiasis. (redirected from Central nervous system helminthiasis). Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Encyclopedia. # ...
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Central nervous system helminthiasis | definition of Central nervous system helminthiasis by Medical dictionaryCentral nervous system helminthiasis | definition of Central nervous system helminthiasis by Medical dictionary

Central nervous system helminthiasis explanation free. What is Central nervous system helminthiasis? Meaning of Central nervous ... system helminthiasis medical term. What does Central nervous system helminthiasis mean? ... Looking for online definition of Central nervous system helminthiasis in the Medical Dictionary? ... Central nervous system helminthiasis , definition of Central nervous system helminthiasis by Medical dictionary https://medical ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Central+nervous+system+helminthiasis

A Pilot Study of Neurocysticercosis Treatment - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.govA Pilot Study of Neurocysticercosis Treatment - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Helminthiasis. Central Nervous System Infections. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Albendazole. ... Central Nervous System Helminthiasis. Central Nervous System Parasitic Infections. Parasitic Diseases. Cestode Infections. ...
more infohttps://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00283699

Brain Tissue Swelling and Seizure Activity in Inactive Cysticercosis - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.govBrain Tissue Swelling and Seizure Activity in Inactive Cysticercosis - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Central Nervous System Helminthiasis. Central Nervous System Parasitic Infections. Central Nervous System Infections. ... Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Neurologic Manifestations. Signs and Symptoms. Cestode Infections. ...
more infohttps://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00001912

Advanced Search Results - Public Health Image Library(PHIL)Advanced Search Results - Public Health Image Library(PHIL)

Categories: Central Nervous System Helminthiasis Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ...
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Advanced Search Results - Public Health Image Library(PHIL)Advanced Search Results - Public Health Image Library(PHIL)

Categories: Central Nervous System Helminthiasis Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ...
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List of MeSH codes (C10) - WikipediaList of MeSH codes (C10) - Wikipedia

... central nervous system parasitic infections MeSH C10.228.228.205.250 --- central nervous system helminthiasis MeSH C10.228. ... central nervous system MeSH C10.228.140.300.850.125 --- aids arteritis, central nervous system MeSH C10.228.140.300.850.250 ... central nervous system MeSH C10.500.190.600 --- central nervous system venous angioma MeSH C10.500.190.800 --- sinus pericranii ... central nervous system MeSH C10.114.875.350 --- lupus vasculitis, central nervous system MeSH C10.114.875.700 --- temporal ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_MeSH_codes_(C10)

Pediatric Trichinosis: Background, Pathophysiology, EpidemiologyPediatric Trichinosis: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology

Neghina R, Iacobiciu I, Neghina AM, Marincu I. Trichinellosis, another helminthiasis affecting the central nervous system. ... When the larval load is significant, these microvasculature changes cause cardiovascular, lung, and central nervous system (CNS ... expelled in the feces due to the response of the hosts immune system. The hosts T-cell immune response is especially ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1000156-overview

A Double-Blind, Randomized Parallel Group Study Comparing Procysteine to Placebo in HIV-Infected Patients Who Are Taking...A Double-Blind, Randomized Parallel Group Study Comparing Procysteine to Placebo in HIV-Infected Patients Who Are Taking...

HELMINTHIASIS; and PRION DISEASES may involve the central nervous system as a primary or secondary process. ... Central Nervous System Infections in Denmark. The Danish Study Group of Infections of the Brain is a collaboration between all ... Central Nervous System Infections. Pathogenic infections of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges. DNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; RNA ... A New Scoring System to Predict Blood Stream Infections in Patients with Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections: Experience ...
more infohttps://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/trial/126987/A-Double-Blind-Randomized-Parallel-Group-Study-Comparing-Procysteine-to-Placebo-in.html

A Randomized, Double Blind, Comparative Study of Dideoxycytidine (ddC) Alone or ddC/AZT Combination Versus Zidovudine (ZDV)...A Randomized, Double Blind, Comparative Study of Dideoxycytidine (ddC) Alone or ddC/AZT Combination Versus Zidovudine (ZDV)...

HELMINTHIASIS; and PRION DISEASES may involve the central nervous system as a primary or secondary process. ... Central Nervous System Infections. Pathogenic infections of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges. DNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; RNA ... A New Scoring System to Predict Blood Stream Infections in Patients with Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections: Experience ... especially in patients with central venous catheters (CVC), as well as centr... ...
more infohttps://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/trial/127885/A-Randomized-Double-Blind-Comparative-Study-of-Dideoxycytidine-ddC-Alone-or-ddC.html

Neuroschistosomiasis | CTDNeuroschistosomiasis | CTD

Central Nervous System Infections ← Central Nervous System Parasitic Infections ← Central Nervous System Helminthiasis ← ... Central Nervous System Parasitic Infections ← Central Nervous System Helminthiasis ← Neuroschistosomiasis 2.. Diseases ← ... Diseases ← Nervous System Diseases ← Central Nervous System Diseases ← ... Central Nervous System Schistosomiasis , Myelitis, Schistosomal , Myelopathies, Schistosomal , Myelopathy, Schistosomal , ...
more infohttp://ctdbase.org/detail.go?type=disease&acc=MESH%3AD020818

Helminthiasis - WikipediaHelminthiasis - Wikipedia

Immune-mediated inflammatory changes occur in the skin, lung, liver, intestine, central nervous system, and eyes. Signs of the ... These substances then enter the circulatory and lymphatic systems of the host body. Chronic immune responses to helminthiasis ... Areas with the highest prevalence of helminthiasis are tropical and subtropical areas including sub-Saharan Africa, central and ... Chronic helminthiasis may cause severe morbidity. Helminthiasis has been found to result in poor birth outcome, poor cognitive ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminthiasis

Search Articles | University of Toronto LibrariesSearch Articles | University of Toronto Libraries

Central Nervous System Helminthiasis - diagnosis , Evidence-Based Medicine , Echinococcosis, Hepatic - surgery , Echinococcosis ... Central Nervous System Helminthiasis - surgery , Echinococcosis, Pulmonary - complications , Kidney Diseases - surgery , ... Central Nervous System Helminthiasis - complications , Echinococcosis - complications , Echinococcosis, Hepatic - diagnosis , ...
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Scegli la categoria - lookformedical.comScegli la categoria - lookformedical.com

HELMINTHIASIS; and PRION DISEASES may involve the central nervous system as a primary or secondary process. ... Malattie Del Sistema Nervoso 21 domande Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the ... Brucellosi 0 domande Infection caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA mainly involving the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM. This ... Malattie Del Sistema Ematico E Linfatico 8 domande Hematologic diseases and diseases of the lymphatic system collectively. ...
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TENSION HEADACHE DICTIONARYTENSION HEADACHE DICTIONARY

... helminthiasis; and prion diseases may involve the central nervous system as a primary or secondary process. [NIH]. ... Central Nervous System: The main information-processing organs of the nervous system, consisting of the brain, spinal cord, and ... Peripheral Nervous System: The nervous system outside of the brain and spinal cord. The. ... peripheral nervous system has autonomic and somatic divisions. The autonomic nervous. system includes the enteric, ...
more infohttp://benjamin.lisan.free.fr/AssoLutteContreCephalee/TENSION_HEADACHE_DICTIONARY.htm

Central nervous system leukemia | definition of central nervous system leukemia by Medical dictionaryCentral nervous system leukemia | definition of central nervous system leukemia by Medical dictionary

... central nervous system leukemia explanation free. What is central nervous system leukemia? Meaning of central nervous system ... Looking for online definition of central nervous system leukemia in the Medical Dictionary? ... Central nervous system helminthiasis. *Central nervous system helminthiasis. *Central nervous system helminthiasis ... central nervous system leukemia. central nervous system leukemia. Involvement of the CNS by leukemia CNS leukemia. -per ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/central+nervous+system+leukemia

Central nervous system infections | Article about Central nervous system infections by The Free DictionaryCentral nervous system infections | Article about Central nervous system infections by The Free Dictionary

Find out information about Central nervous system infections. see nervous system nervous system, network of specialized tissue ... that controls actions and reactions of the body and its adjustment to the environment.... Explanation of Central nervous system ... Central nervous system helminthiasis. *Central nervous system helminthiasis. *Central nervous system helminthiasis ... central nervous system:. see nervous systemnervous system,. network of specialized tissue that controls actions and reactions ...
more infohttp://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Central+Nervous+System+Infections

The defeat of worms, which helminths affect, the symptoms, which organs can be affected by helminthiasis? - Treat simplyThe defeat of worms, which helminths affect, the symptoms, which organs can be affected by helminthiasis? - Treat simply

The defeat of the central nervous system, the cardiovascular system by worms, can provoke a fatal outcome. Helminthiasis of the ... negatively affects the nervous system, reduces efficiency. It is noted that the presence of helminthic invasions reduces the ... The defeat of worms, which helminths affect, the symptoms, which organs can be affected by helminthiasis?. If diagnostic ... studies confirm worm infection, a helminthiasis is diagnosed. The routes of infection are well known. Helminths get into the ...
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Helminth induced suppression of macrophage activation is correlated with inhibition of calcium channel activity<...Helminth induced suppression of macrophage activation is correlated with inhibition of calcium channel activity<...

Neurocysticercosis (NCC), a disease of the central nervous system (CNS) caused by the cestode Taenia solium, has a long ... Neurocysticercosis (NCC), a disease of the central nervous system (CNS) caused by the cestode Taenia solium, has a long ... Neurocysticercosis (NCC), a disease of the central nervous system (CNS) caused by the cestode Taenia solium, has a long ... Neurocysticercosis (NCC), a disease of the central nervous system (CNS) caused by the cestode Taenia solium, has a long ...
more infohttps://scholars.uthscsa.edu/en/publications/helminth-induced-suppression-of-macrophage-activation-is-correlat

Aspidium. U. S. (Br.). Aspidium. | Henriettes Herbal HomepageAspidium. U. S. (Br.). Aspidium. | Henriette's Herbal Homepage

In smaller quantities these principles are stimulant to the central nervous system and may cause even tetanic convulsions. ... As to its value in other forms of helminthiasis there is difference of opinion. Schultz (J. A. M. A., 1911, lvii) reports 75 ...
more infohttps://www.henriettes-herb.com/eclectic/usdisp/aspidium.html

Recent questions in Parasitic Diseases - lookformedical.comRecent questions in Parasitic Diseases - lookformedical.com

asked Sep 18, 2014 in Central Nervous System Protozoal Infections by anonymous ... Helminthiasis (0) * Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic (1) * Liver Diseases, Parasitic (0) * Lung Diseases, Parasitic (0) ...
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Central nervous system agents synonyms, Central nervous system agents antonyms - FreeThesaurus.comCentral nervous system agents synonyms, Central nervous system agents antonyms - FreeThesaurus.com

Antonyms for Central nervous system agents. 2 synonyms for central nervous system: CNS, systema nervosum centrale. What are ... Synonyms for Central nervous system agents in Free Thesaurus. ... Central nervous system helminthiasis. *Central nervous system ... central nervous system. (redirected from Central nervous system agents). Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Encyclopedia. # ... Synonyms for central nervous system. the portion of the vertebrate nervous system consisting of the brain and spinal cord. ...
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Neglected tropical diseases - WikipediaNeglected tropical diseases - Wikipedia

... additionally found that there was a 13-fold greater chance of a drug entering the marking being for central-nervous-system ... The three major worm species responsible for soil-transmitted helminthiasis are Ascaris (roundworms), Trichuris (whipworm), the ... or the parasitic infection of the nervous system, can be fatal. Taeniasis is not fatal.[57][58] It is usually contracted after ... The effect of each worm weakens the immune system of those infected, making infection from the other easier and more severe. ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neglected_Tropical_Diseases
  • It includes a system of closely interrelated groups of nerve cells (ganglia) in invertebrates and of the spinal cord and the brain in vertebrates, including humans. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 1989). In addition, these active ingredients have been shown to affect gastric motility and potentially have an antispasmodic effect on the gastrointestinal system (Hashimoto et al. (aphios.com)