An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.
Specific practices for the prevention of disease or mental disorders in susceptible individuals or populations. These include HEALTH PROMOTION, including mental health; protective procedures, such as COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL; and monitoring and regulation of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS. Primary prevention is to be distinguished from SECONDARY PREVENTION and TERTIARY PREVENTION.
Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
The prevention of recurrences or exacerbations of a disease or complications of its therapy.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.
The activated center of a lymphoid follicle in secondary lymphoid tissue where B-LYMPHOCYTES are stimulated by antigens and helper T cells (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER) are stimulated to generate memory cells.
Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.
Facilities which provide care for pre-school and school-age children.
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Efforts and designs to reduce the incidence of unexpected undesirable events in various environments and situations.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
A nuclear RNA-protein complex that plays a role in RNA processing. In the nucleoplasm, the U1 snRNP along with other small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (U2, U4-U6, and U5) assemble into SPLICEOSOMES that remove introns from pre-mRNA by splicing. The U1 snRNA forms base pairs with conserved sequence motifs at the 5'-splice site and recognizes both the 5'- and 3'-splice sites and may have a fundamental role in aligning the two sites for the splicing reaction.
Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.
Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.
Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Immunologic tests for identification of HIV (HTLV-III/LAV) antibodies. They include assays for HIV SEROPOSITIVITY and HIV SERONEGATIVITY that have been developed for screening persons carrying the viral antibody from patients with overt symptoms of AIDS or AIDS-RELATED COMPLEX.
Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.
Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
A nuclear RNA-protein complex that plays a role in RNA processing. In the nucleoplasm, the U4-U6 snRNP along with the U5 snRNP preassemble into a single 25S particle that binds to the U1 and U2 snRNPs and the substrate to form mature SPLICEOSOMES. There is also evidence for the existence of individual U4 or U6 snRNPs in addition to their organization as a U4-U6 snRNP.
Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
Programs of disease surveillance, generally within health care facilities, designed to investigate, prevent, and control the spread of infections and their causative microorganisms.
Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
A medical facility which provides a high degree of subspecialty expertise for patients from centers where they received SECONDARY CARE.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Specialized hospital facilities which provide diagnostic and therapeutic services for trauma patients.
Management of public health organizations or agencies.
Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.
The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.
Facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.
The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous insects through chemical, biological, or other means.
Diseases that are underfunded and have low name recognition but are major burdens in less developed countries. The World Health Organization has designated six tropical infectious diseases as being neglected in industrialized countries that are endemic in many developing countries (HELMINTHIASIS; LEPROSY; LYMPHATIC FILARIASIS; ONCHOCERCIASIS; SCHISTOSOMIASIS; and TRACHOMA).
Restriction of freedom of movement of individuals who have been exposed to infectious or communicable disease in order to prevent its spread; a period of detention of vessels, vehicles, or travelers coming from infected or suspected places; and detention or isolation on account of suspected contagion. It includes government regulations on the detention of animals at frontiers or ports of entrance for the prevention of infectious disease, through a period of isolation before being allowed to enter a country. (From Dorland, 28th ed & Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)
Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.
An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.
Diseases due to or propagated by sexual contact.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
The use of biological agents in TERRORISM. This includes the malevolent use of BACTERIA; VIRUSES; or other BIOLOGICAL TOXINS against people, ANIMALS; or PLANTS.
The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.
The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).
Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.
The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.
The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens. When transmission is within the same species, the mode can be horizontal or vertical (INFECTIOUS DISEASE TRANSMISSION, VERTICAL).
Notification or reporting by a physician or other health care provider of the occurrence of specified contagious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV infections to designated public health agencies. The United States system of reporting notifiable diseases evolved from the Quarantine Act of 1878, which authorized the US Public Health Service to collect morbidity data on cholera, smallpox, and yellow fever; each state in the US has its own list of notifiable diseases and depends largely on reporting by the individual health care provider. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
Reduction of high-risk choices and adoption of low-risk quantity and frequency alternatives.
A nuclear RNA-protein complex that plays a role in RNA processing. In the nucleoplasm, the U5 snRNP along with U4-U6 snRNP preassemble into a single 25S particle that binds to the U1 and U2 snRNPs and the substrate to form SPLICEOSOMES.
A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.
Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.
The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
Facilities which provide information concerning poisons and treatment of poisoning in emergencies.
Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.
Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort such as in a geographic area or population subgroup to estimate trends in a larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The use of chemical compounds to prevent the development of a specific disease.
Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
A medical specialty primarily concerned with prevention of disease (PRIMARY PREVENTION) and the promotion and preservation of health in the individual.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.
The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.
Sexual activities of humans.
Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.
An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.
Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.
Use of antibiotics before, during, or after a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure to prevent infectious complications.
The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from one generation to another. It includes transmission in utero or intrapartum by exposure to blood and secretions, and postpartum exposure via breastfeeding.
Used for general articles concerning statistics of births, deaths, marriages, etc.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).
Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.
Sudden outbreaks of a disease in a country or region not previously recognized in that area, or a rapid increase in the number of new cases of a previous existing endemic disease. Epidemics can also refer to outbreaks of disease in animal or plant populations.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.
Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.
Graphic displays of height and weight showing development over time.
A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.
Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.
The branch of medicine concerned with diseases, mainly of parasitic origin, common in tropical and subtropical regions.
A center in the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE which is primarily concerned with the collection, analysis, and dissemination of health statistics on vital events and health activities to reflect the health status of people, health needs, and health resources.
Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.
Protein complexes that take part in the process of PHOTOSYNTHESIS. They are located within the THYLAKOID MEMBRANES of plant CHLOROPLASTS and a variety of structures in more primitive organisms. There are two major complexes involved in the photosynthetic process called PHOTOSYSTEM I and PHOTOSYSTEM II.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
Agencies established under PL93-641 to coordinate, conduct, and implement state health planning activities. Two primary responsibilities are the preparation of an annual State Health Plan and giving assistance to the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.
Procedures outlined for the care of casualties and the maintenance of services in disasters.
Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.
Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.
A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Facilities for collecting and organizing information. They may be specialized by subject field, type of source material, persons served, location, or type of services.
The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.
Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.
A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
Professionals, technicians, and assistants staffing LABORATORIES.
A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.
Infectious diseases that are novel in their outbreak ranges (geographic and host) or transmission mode.
The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)
Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.
The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.
The interactions between members of a community and representatives of the institutions within that community.
Sexual attraction or relationship between males.
Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.
The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.
The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.
Diagnostic procedures involving immunoglobulin reactions.
The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.
The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.
Development of neutralizing antibodies in individuals who have been exposed to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/HTLV-III/LAV).
The segregation of patients with communicable or other diseases for a specified time. Isolation may be strict, in which movement and social contacts are limited; modified, where an effort to control specified aspects of care is made in order to prevent cross infection; or reverse, where the patient is secluded in a controlled or germ-free environment in order to protect him or her from cross infection.
Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.
Programs and activities sponsored or administered by local, state, or national governments.
Educational institutions.
A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)
A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
The ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of health-related data with the purpose of preventing or controlling disease or injury, or of identifying unusual events of public health importance, followed by the dissemination and use of information for public health action. (From Am J Prev Med 2011;41(6):636)
Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.
Any of the infectious diseases of man and other animals caused by species of MYCOBACTERIUM.
Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.
Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.
The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.
Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.
Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.
Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)
Aspects of health and disease related to travel.
Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)
Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.
The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.
Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.
The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.
Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.
Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.
The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.
A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.
Organizations and individuals cooperating together toward a common goal at the local or grassroots level.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.
Organized services to administer immunization procedures in the prevention of various diseases. The programs are made available over a wide range of sites: schools, hospitals, public health agencies, voluntary health agencies, etc. They are administered to an equally wide range of population groups or on various administrative levels: community, municipal, state, national, international.
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
Suspensions of killed or attenuated microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa), antigenic proteins, synthetic constructs, or other bio-molecular derivatives, administered for the prevention, amelioration, or treatment of infectious and other diseases.
Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.
A subfamily of assassin bugs (REDUVIIDAE) that are obligate blood-suckers of vertebrates. Included are the genera TRIATOMA; RHODNIUS; and PANSTRONGYLUS, which are vectors of TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI, the agent of CHAGAS DISEASE in humans.
Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.
Techniques used to carry out clinical investigative procedures in the diagnosis and therapy of disease.
Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.
Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)
An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
All deaths reported in a given population.
Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.
Organized groups of users of goods and services.
An organizational enterprise between a public sector agency, federal, state or local, and a private sector entity. Skills and assets of each sector are shared to deliver a service or facility for the benefit or use of the general public.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Data & Statistics". Center. Retrieved 19 June 2018.. ... Prevention, CDC - Centers for Disease Control and. "CDC2 - Babesiosis" (PDF). www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2018-09-20.. ... "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Archived from the original on December 6, 2017. Retrieved 19 June 2018.. ... Prevention, CDC - Centers for Disease Control and. "CDC - Babesiosis". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2015-10-25.. ...
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Summary Report for the Vieques Heart Study Expert Panel Review." . Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. 2001. Retrieved on ... The irradiated steel is still unaccounted for by the US Navy, the EPA, and the Centers for Disease Control. Studies and site ... which is the main symptom of vibroacoustic disease. This disease is said to lead to heart arrhythmia, or even death. The claim ... Now the United States Fish and Wildlife Service controls 3,100 acres (13 km²) of this land - about half of the formerly owned ...
"La Crosse virus disease cases reported to CDC by state, 2004-2013" (PDF). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved ... "Prevention". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 11 April 2016. Retrieved 6 December 2016. McJunkin, JE (October 2011 ... Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (January 2009). "Possible Congenital Infection with La Crosse Encephalitis ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 4 December 2016. " ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2012). "Ch. 16: Pneumococcal Disease". In Atkinson W; Wolfe S; Hamborsky J. ... "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.. *^ "Pneumococcal vaccines WHO position paper--2012" (PDF). Wkly Epidemiol Rec. 87 ... Diseases and symptoms[edit]. Pneumonia is the most common of the S. pneumoniae diseases which include symptoms such as fever ... Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases (12th ed.). Washington DC: Public Health Foundation. pp. 233-248. ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Occupational Health Psychology (OHP). [1] *^ a b Everly, G.S., Jr. (1986). An ... Demand-control-support model[edit]. The most influential model in OHP research has been the original demand-control model.[1] ... Cardiovascular disease[edit]. Main articles: Occupational stress and Cardiovascular disease. Research has identified health- ... In a case-control study, Link, Dohrenwend, and Skodol found that, compared to depressed and well control subjects, ...
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention believed at the time that Speaker was suffering from extensively drug-resistant ... It was reported that Speaker's father-in-law, Robert C. Cooksey, works for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2007-06-03. "Odd twist in TB alert: Patient is TB researcher's son-in-law ... On July 4, 2007 the National Jewish Medical and Research Center announced, and the CDC confirmed, that Mr. Speaker's earlier ...
"Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2005-10-13. Archived from the original on 2008-11-14. Retrieved 2008-10-20.. ... According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Stringent procedures for cleaning and inspecting eggs were ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.[18] An article entitled "The pros and cons of cages" published in the World's ... Center for Infectious Diseases & Vaccinology, Arizona State University, and Craig Reed, DVM, Former Deputy Administrator, Food ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. April 4, 2011. Archived from the original on July 26, 2014. Retrieved November 18, ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.. *^ "Quantification of Ozone Levels in Indoor Environments Generated by Ionization ...
ISBN 0-309-05230-0. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2007. Preventing Smoking and Exposure to Secondhand Smoke ... Center for Disease Control. Retrieved 22 September 2016. Engebretson, Joan (2013). Materinity Nursing Care. Canada: Nelson ... There is evidence that breastfeeding offers protection against many infectious diseases, especially diarrhea. Even in babies ... Krotz, Stephan; Fajardo, Javier; Ghandi, Sanjay; Patel, Ashlesha; Keith, Louis G. (2002). "Hypertensive Disease in Twin ...
"CDC: Genital Herpes Rates Still High". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2011-02-03. "UPDATE: CDC Stands ... "STD Facts - Genital Herpes". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2007-09-03. "Herpes". Stanford University ... Lyttle PH (1994). "Surveillance report: disease trends at New Zealand sexually transmitted disease clinics 1977-1993". ... This information provides population prevalence of HSV viral infections in individuals with or without active disease. It has ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Unintentional Injury ... A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study in 2012 of United States data from 2005-2009 indicated that each year an ... The American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends swimming lessons for children from 1-4, along with other ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 18 August 2014. Hong Nguyen, B (2003). "Swimming lessons for infants and ...
"Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Atlanta. Retrieved February 25, 2014.. *^ "Keith James Rothfus". The Washington ... "Center for Technology & Innovation. Archived from the original on February 26, 2015. Retrieved February 26, 2015.. ... Endicott is best known as the "Birthplace of IBM".[5][6] The Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company (CTR) was founded in ... IBM's own expansion in this period was the construction of large research and development centers in the Glendale section of ...
"Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 7 August 2012.. *^ "Occupational Safety and Health Administration". U.S. ... and prevention and control of infectious and chronic diseases. The great positive impact of public health programs is widely ... disease including cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes and chronic lung disease (Shah, 2014). ... treating a disease or controlling a pathogen can be vital to preventing it in others, such as during an outbreak. Vaccination ...
"Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2018-12-07.. *^ "Allergic Conjunctivitis". familydoctor.org. Archived ... Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases. U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease Control ... "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2 October 2017. Retrieved 18 October 2017.. ... Prevention[edit]. The most effective prevention is good hygiene, especially avoiding rubbing the eyes with infected hands. ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (9 April 2010). "2009 H1N1 Flu:Situation Update". Centers for Disease Control and ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 21 April 2009. MacKenzie, Debora (27 May 2009). "Deadly new flu virus in US and ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. May 8, 2009. Retrieved 2009-11-08. "Some immunity to novel H1N1 flu found in ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 22 April 2009. Emma Wilkinson (1 May 2009). "What scientists know about swine flu ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 31 (23): 305-7. PMID 6811844. Retrieved 2008-06-15. Elliott, Stuart (November 19, ... Centers for Disease Control (CDC) (1982-06-18). "A Cluster of Kaposi's Sarcoma and Pneumocystis carinii Pneumonia among ... The first indication these devices were used for birth control, rather than disease prevention, is the 1605 theological ... In this case, the judge ruled that condoms could be legally advertised and sold for the prevention of disease.[dubious - ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2008. Archived (PDF) from the original on 13 May 2013. Retrieved 2 January 2013.. ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Archived from the original on 20 December 2012. Retrieved 30 December 2012.. ... and Prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease. pp. 9-17.. ... Craven, V; Everard, ML (January 2013). "Protracted bacterial bronchitis: reinventing an old disease". Archives of Disease in ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 24 December 2015.. *^ "Cases infected with the outbreak strain of ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 24 December 2015.. *^ Fox, Maggie (July 31, 2008). "FDA says Salmonella ... "US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 28 August 2008. Retrieved 23 December 2015.. ... The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) investigation determined that jalapeño peppers imported from Mexico ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. State Definitions and Reporting Requirements (PDF) (1997 Revision ed.). National ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention collects statistical information on "live births, fetal deaths, and induced ... Worldwide prevention of most stillbirths is possible with improved health systems.[2][9] About half of stillbirths occur during ... Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period / fetal disease (P, 760-779) ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Birth Defects Prevention Network. Retrieved October 1, 2014. ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. *^ a b "Facts about Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate , Birth Defects , NCBDDD , CDC". www ... "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 7 December 2014.. *^ "Hydrocephalus". Mayo Clinic. Retrieved 7 December ... "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 7 September 2017. Retrieved 8 December 2017.. ...
"Prevention of Specific Infectious Diseases: Rabies". Traveler's Health:Yellow Book. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2010-12-23.. *^ a b Cynthia M. Kahn, ed. (2010). The Merck Veterinary ... Most cases of rabies in rodents reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the U.S.A. have been found among ... "Diseases Transmissible From Monkeys To Man - Monkey to Human Bites And Exposure". www.2ndchance.info. Retrieved 2016-12-04.. ...
"Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2006-02-23. Archived from the original on 2012-05-02. Retrieved 2009-11-03 - via ... shutting off ventilation or climate control systems, and prepare an area for pets to eliminate waste that does not require ...
"Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (cdc.gov). 16 November 2011. Archived from the original on 4 February 2015. ... US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Varicella Treatment Questions & Answers". CDC Guidelines. CDC. Archived from ... "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Archived from the original on 25 February 2017.. ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Archived from the original on 5 March 2016.. ...
"Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. November 21, 2006. Archived from the original on April 3, 2008.. ... This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ... Wikipedia articles incorporating text from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ... Clinical Infectious Diseases; Vol. 31 Issue 4 (10/1/2000), p1079. *^ DuPont, H (2007). "Therapy for and Prevention of ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on ... Centers for Disease Control & Prevention Fact Sheets". Retrieved 8 September 2014.. *^ a b IARC Working Group on the Evaluation ...
"Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Archived from the original on 17 March 2018. Retrieved 19 November 2013.. ... according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), bariatric surgery for youth has become increasingly common.[49][ ... "Intestinal Sleeve May Improve Glycemic Control". medpagetoday.com. 16 November 2009.. *^ a b Stanczyk M, Martindale RG, Deveney ... It has been observed that the rate of leaks was greater in low volume centres whereas high volume centres showed a lesser leak ...
"Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2018-02-05. Retrieved 2018-04-06.. ...
Other diseases, listed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, include infectious diseases (such as Epstein-Barr ... US Department of Health and Human Services/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 65 (50): 51.. ... The United States Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guide for the management of CFS states that while there is ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) definition (1994),[77] the most widely used clinical and research description ...
US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "Bioterrorism Agents/Diseases" *↑ The Australia Group. "List of Biological ... US Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "National Select ... "Ebola virus disease" , *↑ 2.0 2.1 2.2 M. P. Kiley, E. T. Bowen, G. A. Eddy, M. Isaäcson, K. M. Johnson, J. B. McCormick, F. A. ... US National Institutes of Health (NIH), US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). "Biodefense - NIAID ...
Centers for Disease Control (Endocrine pathology). *ADA's Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2019 ... Prevention. Main article: Prevention of type 2 diabetes. Onset of type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented through proper ... Diseases of the endocrine system (ICD-10 Chapter IV: Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases - Endocrine diseases, E00- ... "A Roadmap on the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Among People Living With Diabetes". Global Heart. 14 (3): 215-240. doi: ...
Centers for Disease Control Prevention (CDC) (9 July 2004). "Lead Poisoning Associated with Ayurvedic Medications - Five States ... Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Institute of Medicine, US National Academies (2005). Complementary and ... "Intercessory Prayer and Cardiovascular Disease Progression in a Coronary Care Unit Population: A Randomized Controlled Trial". ... later National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, currently National Center for Complementary and Integrative ...
"About Ebola Virus Disease". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Archived from the original on 16 October 2014. ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization (1998). Infection Control for Viral Haemorrhagic ... "Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Transmission". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 5 November 2014. Archived from the ... "Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever Prevention". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 31 July 2014. Archived from the original ...
a b c d e Eugene Kiely, Medicaid Estate Recovery Program, FactCheck.org, Annenberg Public Policy Center, University of ... through the End Stage Renal Disease Program) people of all ages with end-stage renal disease. The Medicare Program provides a ... Certain states in which there is a Republican-controlled legislature may be forced to expand Medicaid in ways extending beyond ... is a mandatory Medicaid program for children that focuses on prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.[ ...
... a charity dedicated to research into the prevention and treatment of blindness and eye disease,[39] and was a member of the ... Above the roundel is a white label of three points, the centre one charged with an anchor.[125][126] ... Authority control * WorldCat Identities. *GND: 122804732. *ISNI: 0000 0001 1495 4495. *LCCN: n79128351 ... In December he underwent various sporting tests and examinations at the Aircrew Selection Centre, at RAF Biggin Hill, along ...
U.S. Centers for Disease Control Published 2001-05-11.. *^ a b c Wackym,, James B. Snow,... P. Ashley (2009). Ballenger's ... Prevention[edit]. Application of a topical antibiotic ointment to the nasal mucosa has been shown to be an effective treatment ... Connective tissue disease. *Drugs-aspirin, fexofenadine, warfarin, clopidogrel, prasugrel, isotretinoin, desmopressin and ... The elderly are also more prone to prolonged nose bleeds as their blood vessels are less able to constrict and control the ...
Initially, the Control of Diarrheal Diseases (CDD) Program began in 1982; and the Control of Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI ... and all ages through the control of general malnutrition and the prevention and control of micronutrient deficiency disorders ... Immunization services can be obtained at free of cost from EPI clinics in hospitals, other health centers, mobile and outreach ... Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorder (IDD) d) Control of Vitamin A Deficiency (VAD) e) Control of Iron Deficiency Anaemia (IDA ...
... contributions to physiological control and the mechanisms of disease". Physiol. Rev. 94 (1): 265-301. doi:10.1152/physrev. ... The vomiting center in the medulla called the Area Postrema, contains high concentrations of substance P and its receptor, in ... Diemunsch P, Joshi GP, Brichant JF (Jul 2009). "Neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists in the prevention of postoperative nausea and ... SP concentrations cannot yet be used to diagnose disease clinically or gauge disease severity. It is not yet known whether ...
The immunosuppressive agents employed in allogeneic transplants for the prevention or treatment of graft-versus-host disease ... a b Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center , Blood & Marrow Stem Cell Transplantation , The Graft-versus-Tumor Effect Archived ... To cryopreserve HSC, a preservative, DMSO, must be added, and the cells must be cooled very slowly in a controlled-rate freezer ... Graft-versus-host disease[edit]. Main article: Graft-versus-host disease. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is an inflammatory ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Artikel bertopik bakteri ini adalah sebuah rintisan. Anda dapat membantu Wikipedia ...
Disease prevention and control activities follow guidelines established by technical experts in the Ministry of Public Health. ... In 1999, quality control of the transfused blood consisted of 26 coordinating centers and by 44 regional centers. ... indigenous health and disease control components. With US 600 million dollars from a World Bank loan, efforts are being made to ... In the non-tertiary care centers, which make up the majority of hospitals in the country, emergency department physicians are ...
listen)) is the science and practice of the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.[4][5] The word "medicine" is ... These include trauma centers, burn treatment centers, advanced neonatology unit services, organ transplants, high-risk ... Education and legal controls[edit]. Main articles: Medical education and Medical license ... Medicine is the science and practice of the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. Medicine encompasses a variety of ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coordinating Center for Health Promotion, National Center for Chronic Disease ... For example, one study listed on the website of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that New York's ... Centers for Disease Control Prevention (CDC) (12 November 2004). "Indoor Air Quality in Hospitality Venues Before and After ... Secondhand Smoke Fact Sheet, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 6 August 2007. ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). *^ "Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi) 2011 case definition". U.S. Centers ... "Lyme disease rashes and look-alikes". Lyme Disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 21 December 2018. Archived from ... "Lyme Disease Data and surveillance". Lyme Disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 5 February 2019. Archived from ... "Lyme Disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 8 March 2019. Archived from the original on 15 June 2019. Retrieved ...
... and disease prevention/early screening advice.[72] A 2010 study describing Belgium chiropractors and their patients found ... Using Alternative Medicine to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 26-. ISBN 978-0-89789-747-1 ... "National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Dept. of Education. Retrieved 2009-06-05.. ... subluxation is the sole cause of disease and manipulation is the cure for all diseases of the human race.[4][41] A 2003 ...
diagnosis, prevention, monitoring, treatment or alleviation of disease,. *diagnosis, monitoring, treatment, alleviation of or ... "General Controls for Medical Devices". Medical Devices. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Retrieved 2010-10-15.. ... Diana Zuckerman and Paul Brown of the National Center for Health Research, and Dr. Steven Nissen of the Cleveland Clinic, ... Intended for use in the diagnosis of disease or other conditions, or in the cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of ...
doi:10.1021/cen-v037n022.p050.. *^ a b c d Butterman, William C.; Brooks, William E.; Reese, Jr., Robert G. (2003). "Mineral ... 1999). Pollution Prevention: The Waste Management Approach to the 21st Century. CRC Press. p. 15 Section 27. ISBN 978-1-56670- ... Potassium hydroxide is a very strong base, and is used to control the pH of various substances.[203][204] Potassium nitrate and ... "Global burden of blood-pressure-related disease, 2001" (PDF). Lancet. 371 (9623): 1513-1518. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(08)60655-8 ...
Hourigan CS (2006). "The molecular basis of coeliac disease". Clin Exp Med (Review). 6 (2): 53-59. doi:10.1007/s10238-006-0095- ... "MD Anderson Cancer Center. Archived from the original on 5 October 2008. Retrieved 5 June 2012.. ... Most of the brain is separated from the blood by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which exerts a restrictive control as to which ... Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention. 15 (22): 9871-73. doi:10.7314/apjcp.2014.15.22.9871. PMID 25520120.. ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Lassa Fever, Signs and Symptoms" Archived 9 July 2017 at the Wayback Machine. ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Lassa Fever" Archived 23 September 2016 at the Wayback Machine. ... and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention". Hypertension. 63 (4): 878-85. doi:10.1161/HYP.0000000000000003. PMID ... Other efforts to control the spread of disease include having a cat to hunt vermin, and storing food in sealed containers.[1] ...
High Value Care Task Force of the American College of Physicians and for the Centers for Disease Control and,first4=Prevention, ... Advice for High-Value Care From the American College of Physicians and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,url=, ... ref name="CMAJ2014",{{cite journal,last1=Allan,first1=GM,last2=Arroll,first2=B,date=18 February 2014,title=Prevention and ... ref name="NelsonWilliams2007",{{citation,author1=Kenrad E. Nelson,author2=Carolyn Masters Williams,title=Infectious Disease ...
Enhanced global actions for the prevention and control of non-communicable diseases, endorsed in 2011[8] ... "Media centre. World Health Organization. n.d. Retrieved 9 February 2020.. *^ "61st World Health Assembly: guidelines and ... "first severe new disease of the 21st century." She observed that the two new diseases WHO is dealing with in 2013 are the novel ... She announced the emergence of global action plans for noncommunicable diseases, mental health, and the prevention of avoidable ...
"Infectious Diseases Related to Travel". Yellow Book. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Archived from the original on ... Archived 2013-09-21 at the Wayback Machine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. March 30, 2011. ... Mitchell misdiagnosed the disease that he observed and treated, and the disease was probably Weil's disease or hepatitis. See: ... WHO Division of Emerging and other Communicable Diseases Surveillance and Control.. *^ Monath, T. P. (1989). "The absence of ...
... although there is no voluntary control and no inhibition or facilitation from higher centers. Some paraplegic patients train ... When the sacral dorsal roots are cut in experimental animals or interrupted by diseases of the dorsal roots such as tabes ... "Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Prevention - Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)". Urologychannel.com. Retrieved 10 February 2013.. ... Brain centers that regulate urination include the pontine micturition center, periaqueductal gray, and the cerebral cortex. In ...
United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). April 19, 2013. Retrieved December 26, 2015.. ... Basically, the brain loses control over the body's muscles. It cannot make the muscles relax. This leads to many of the unique ... Urination: As the brain loses control over the body's muscles, the person will involuntarily urinate ... University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. September 5, 2013. Retrieved February 9, 2016.. ...
A controlled study with moclobemide and phenelzine". Br J Psychiatry. 161 (3): 353-60. doi:10.1192/bjp.161.3.353. PMID 1393304. ... Heinonen EH, Myllylä V (July 1998). "Safety of selegiline (deprenyl) in the treatment of Parkinson's disease". Drug Saf. 19 (1 ... Isacsson G, Holmgren P, Druid H, Bergman U (August 1997). "The utilization of antidepressants--a key issue in the prevention of ... a double-blind multi-centre study". Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 7 (3-4): 141-7. doi:10.1097/00004850-199300730-00004. PMID ...
Nordoff Robbins Music Therapy Centre *^ "History - Nordoff-Robbins Center for Music Therapy - NYU Steinhardt". steinhardt.nyu. ... Heart diseaseEdit. According to a 2013 Cochrane review, listening to music may improve heart rate, respiratory rate, and blood ... "Calls to suicide prevention hotline spike after VMA performance". CNN. Retrieved December 14, 2017.. ... Using a control group that consisted of wait-listed clients, and employing the Behavior Rating Index for Children and the ...
In healthy temperate forests, dead wood comprises up to thirty per cent of all woody biomass. In recent British studies, woods ... Coarse woody debris comes from natural tree mortality, disease, and insects, as well as catastrophic events such as fires, ... "Factors Controlling Long- and Short-Term Sequestration of Atmospheric CO2 in a Mid-latitude Forest". Science. 294 (5547): 1688- ... amount of CWD left standing or lying is determined by what may be considered safe in the course of reasonable fire prevention. ...
... CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. ... Diseases & Conditions*. Coronavirus Disease 2019ADHDCancerCOPDDiabetesFlu (Influenza)Heart DiseaseSexually Transmitted Diseases ... Injury, Violence & SafetyEnvironmental HealthWorkplace Safety & HealthGlobal HealthState, Tribal, Local & TerritorialDisease or ...
It also provides national leadership in the development, implementation, and evaluation of evidence-based HIV prevention ... and surveillance and the development and testing of effective biomedical interventions to reduce transmission and HIV disease ... National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People ...
... CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. ... Diseases & Conditions*. Coronavirus Disease 2019ADHDCancerCOPDDiabetesFlu (Influenza)Heart DiseaseSexually Transmitted Diseases ... TerritorialDisease or Condition of the Week ... Coronavirus Disease 2019. CDC is responding to the coronavirus ...
Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Office of Public Health Scientific Services (OPHSS). Center for ... control, and prevent about 120 diseases. These diseases are important to monitor nationwide and include infectious diseases ... monitoring of shifts in disease patterns, and evaluation of disease control activities. ... Diseases & Conditions Search Search for current and historical notifiable diseases and conditions ...
Latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention News. The Latest: S Korea concerned as new cases spike above 100. Aug. 13, ... One of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports looked at children with COVID-19 who needed hospitalization. ... the Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. Experts are eager to know the real... ... and officials are expressing concern that infections are getting out of control in the capital of Seoul and other major cities ...
Commentary and archival information about the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from The New York Times. ... Commentary and archival information about the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from The New York Times. ... News about the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ... News about the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ... News about Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, including commentary and archival articles published in The New York ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia [5]. Numbers of primates being used & held. *Centers for Disease ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is one of the major divisions of the Department of Health and Human ... About, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, July 2009 *↑ Peter Montaque Birth Defects: Part 1, Rachels Environment & ... Research Facilities: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, Humane Society of the United States, ...
Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. United States. Dept. of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and ... Centers for disease control and prevention. Etats-Unis. Department of health and human services. Centers for disease control ... Public Health Service Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Spojené státy americké Centers for Disease Control and ... Disease)--Prevention--Government policy Biological weapons Bioterrorism--Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a useful and informative website that explains the risks and benefits. ... ... according to a report last year by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ... In the aftermath of a 2015 occurrence of Legionnaires disease at the aging Quincy Veterans Home, state officials moved to ... Candida auris, a fungus, is striking vulnerable patients and raising new alarms about the rise of drug-resistant diseases. ...
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News for Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continually updated from thousands of sources on the web : Amid Criticism, ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention News Centers for Disease Control and Prevention News. News on Centers for Disease ... New CDC research links Scott County syringe program With HIV testing, prevention Monday Mar 19 , KPC Media Group, Inc. , ... Control and Prevention continually updated from thousands of sources around the net. ...
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National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention DESCRIPTION: ABCs is an active, population- ... AGENCY/PROGRAM: National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ... AGENCY/PROGRAM: National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ... AGENCY/PROGRAM: National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Scholia has an organization profile for Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ... "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.. *^ "About the Division of Select Agents and Toxins , CDC". Centers for Disease ... "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved September 27, 2016.. *^ "Epidemiologic Assistance". Centers for Disease ... "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Salary Statistics". federalpay.org. Retrieved July 4, 2019. The Centers for Disease ...
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Topics Diseases and Illnesses U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ... U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Opioid Overdose Epidemic. The opioid epidemic is on the rise. According to ... According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 91 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose - that includes ... Related "U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention" Articles. Paid Post ...
... as well as the increases for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We applaud portions of the omnibus bill that support the nations research, ...
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  • This issue of the ECDC Communicable Disease Threats Report (CDTR) covers the period from 12-18 May 2019 and includes updates on poliomyelitis, chikungunya virus disease and dengue, measles, monkeypox, dengue, Ebola virus disease, influenza, Rift Valley fever, Crimean-Congo haemmorhagic fever and Legionnaires' disease. (europa.eu)
  • This issue of the ECDC Communicable Disease Threats Report (CDTR) covers the period from 17-23 March 2019 and includes updates on Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), chikungunya virus disease and dengue, Ebola virus disease, influenza, Rift Valley fever and dengue in Réunion. (europa.eu)
  • Through the vision of Dr. Joseph W. Mountin, the Communicable Disease Center was created in 1946 as the successor to Malaria Control in War Areas (MCWA), a division of the Public Health Service based in Atlanta. (goodreads.com)
  • The Communicable Disease Center was founded July 1, 1946, as the successor to the World War II Malaria Control in War Areas program [6] of the Office of National Defense Malaria Control Activities. (wikipedia.org)
  • [10] The agency changed names (see infobox on top) before adopting the name Communicable Disease Center in 1946. (wikipedia.org)
  • It became the National Communicable Disease Center (NCDC) effective July 1, 1967, and the Center for Disease Control (CDC) on June 24, 1970. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1946 - The Communicable Disease Center is organized in Atlanta, Georgia on July 1 1947 - In San Francisco, CDC took over the Public Health Service Plague Laboratory, thus acquiring an Epidemiology Division. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1952 - Surgeon General Dr. Leonard A. Scheele reported that the Communicable Disease Center was ready to combat possible biological warfare. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1970 - The Communicable Disease Center became the Center for Disease Control. (wikipedia.org)
  • More than 130 people died due to Salmonella infection in Europe in 2016, according to a report from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). (foodsafetynews.com)
  • The fifth meeting of the Standing Committee for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Division of Strategic National Stockpile will take place on July 18 (1:00-5:00pm) and July 19 (8:30am-3:00pm), 2016 at the Keck Center (Room 103) in Washington, DC. (nationalacademies.org)
  • There were only minor fluctuations in reported cases of three main zoonotic diseases in the European Union (EU) last year compared with 2016. (europa.eu)
  • Requests for assistance to international team of the Emergency Operations Center, October 12, 2001-January 2, 2002 (n=130). (cdc.gov)
  • It contains events related to the event 11:16 a.m. September 11, 2001: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Reportedly Prepare Teams . (historycommons.org)
  • Successful in addressing a wide array of health emergencies--including polio, measles, influenza, Legionnaires' disease, toxic shock syndrome, and the Ebola virus--one of the CDC's crowning achievements was its role in the global eradication of smallpox. (goodreads.com)
  • 1. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had many key audiences it was required to communicate with during the Ebola outbreak. (bartleby.com)
  • This issue of the ECDC Communicable Disease Threats Report (CDTR) covers the period 14 May - 20 May 2017 and includes updates on influenza, measles, hepatitis A, cholera, polio, Ebola virus disease and Legionnaires' disease. (europa.eu)
  • This issue of the ECDC Communicable Disease Threats Report (CDTR) covers the period 30 September-6 October 2018 and includes updates on poliomyelitis, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), influenza A(H5N6), West Nile virus, Ebola virus disease and Legionnaires' disease. (europa.eu)
  • This issue of the ECDC Communicable Disease Threats Report covers the period 16-22 November 2014, and includes updates on West Nile virus, influenza, Legionnaires' disease, chikungunya, avian influenza, Ebola virus, polio and MERS. (europa.eu)
  • Facebook is stepping up its efforts to fight Ebola by adding a button designed to make it easier for its users to donate to charities battling the disease. (phys.org)
  • August 4, 2014 Outbreak Update The World Health Organization, in partnership with the Ministries of Health in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Nigeria announced a cumulative total of 1603 suspect and confirmed cases of Ebola virus disease (EVD). (blogtopsites.com)
  • This issue of the ECDC Communicable Disease Threats Report (CDTR) covers the period 28 September - 4 October 2014, and includes updates on chikungunya, Ebola virus, enterovirus, measles, MERS, polio, rubella and West Nile fever. (europa.eu)
  • This issue of the ECDC Communicable Disease Threats Report (CDTR) covers the period 26 July - 1 August 2015, and includes updates on anthrax, cutaneous diphtheria, louse-born relapsing fever, West Nile fever, measles, rubella and Ebola virus. (europa.eu)
  • The CDC's stated mission is to protect health and promote "quality of life through the prevention and control of disease, injury, and disability. (sourcewatch.org)
  • Project Proposal Description I will be evaluating the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) One & Only Campaign. (bartleby.com)
  • CDC's National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) plans, directs, and coordinates a national program to maintain and improve the health of the American people by promoting a healthy environment and by preventing premature death and avoidable illness and disability caused by non-infectious, non-occupational environmental and related factors. (healthfinder.gov)
  • Almost 85% of CDC's domestic funding is provided directly to state and local entities to detect and control disease, prevent the leading causes of death, and prepare for health threats. (federallabs.org)
  • The Administration's request for CDC's infectious disease program includes an increase of $15 million for new and reemerging infectious diseases and $10 million for its' role in foodborne disease prevention as outlined in the Presidential Food Safety Initiative. (asm.org)
  • With me today is Dr. Kiren Mitruka, a medical officer with the Tuberculosis Outbreak Investigations team here at CDC, and co-author of a paper in the March 2011 issue of CDC's journal, Emerging Infectious Diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • I've been talking with CDC's Dr. Kiren Mitruka about a paper that appears in the March 2011 issue of CDC's journal, Emerging Infectious Diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • Following the potential anthrax exposure affecting an estimated 84 workers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC) in Atlanta, head of the CDC's Bioterror Rapid Response and Advanced Technology Laboratory, Michael Farrell, has been reassigned, Reuters reported. (biospace.com)
  • Increasing and improving access to CDC's chronic disease and health promotion data and indicators is a key component of addressing the burden of chronic diseases in the United States. (socrata.com)
  • Prescriptions, scans and time spent with the doctor also became increasingly concentrated on those middle aged and older, according to data from the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics. (getbetterhealth.com)
  • Discover how a bad batch of polio vaccine brought a nationwide immunization campaign to a standstill, how the mysterious Legionnaires' disease sparked nationwide panic and how, today, CDC scientists are at the forefront of prevention research. (goodreads.com)
  • An LA Fitness club near the Hunter's Creek neighborhood tested positive for the bacteria that causes Legionnaires' disease while state health investigators await results from another club location. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • The Florida Department of Health is investigating a Clermont retirement community and whether a resident's death is a result of Legionnaires' disease, a department official said Thursday. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • 1968 - CDC investigated an unidentified, highly infectious respiratory disease in Pontiac, Michigan, later identified as Legionellosis (also known by its two forms, Legionnaires' disease and Pontiac fever). (wikipedia.org)
  • Drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline plans to resume operations at a North Carolina plant that closed after discovery of bacteria that cause Legionnaires' disease, a potentially fatal form of pneumonia. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Known today as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it is recognized as the nation's premier health promotion, prevention, and preparedness agency and a global leader in public health. (goodreads.com)
  • They are our nation's prevention agency and have a long reach all over the world. (bartleby.com)
  • This request represents the minimum level of resources needed by the CDC to improve the nation's public health capacity to combat infectious diseases. (asm.org)
  • To what extent these infectious diseases are rising is still unknown due to the lack of a comprehensive needs assessment and evaluation of the nation's surveillance capabilities. (asm.org)
  • ATLANTA, Nov. 16 The nation's premier public health agency, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), has signed a two-year contract with Georgia Power to purchase renewable energy for its centers nationwide. (medindia.net)
  • The CDC is the nation's disease prevention and wellness promotion agency, protecting people's health and safety, providing credible information to enhance health decisions, and improving health through strong partnerships. (medindia.net)
  • Chronic diseases are responsible for 7 out of 10 deaths each year, and treating people with chronic diseases accounts for 86 percent of our nation's health care costs. (socrata.com)
  • The CDC Division of Health Informatics and Surveillance (DHIS) supports NNDSS by receiving, securing, processing, and providing nationally notifiable infectious diseases data to disease-specific CDC programs. (cdc.gov)
  • The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) is used to disseminate weekly provisional data on nationally notifiable infectious diseases. (hhs.gov)
  • It remains at the forefront of public health efforts to prevent and control infectious and chronic diseases, injuries, workplace hazards, disabilities, and environmental health threats" (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2013). (bartleby.com)
  • Dr. Frieden has worked to control infectious diseases threats to public health, respond to emergencies, and has fought the major causes of suffering and death whether in the United States or around the world. (bartleby.com)
  • CDC works 24/7(https://www.cdc.gov/24-7/index.html) to protect America from health, safety and security threats, both foreign and in the U.S. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are chronic or acute, curable or preventable, human error or deliberate attack, CDC fights disease and supports communities and citizens to do the same. (federallabs.org)
  • The CDC has been recognized for its efforts to combat the continuing threats of new and reemerging infectious diseases, and the ASM recommends that Congress continue its support and adopt the Administration's request for new and reemerging infectious diseases. (asm.org)
  • Whether we are protecting the American people from public health threats, researching emerging diseases, or mobilizing public health programs with our domestic and international partners, we rely on our employees to make a real difference in the health and well-being of people here and around the world. (careercast.com)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection, 2017. (ahrq.gov)
  • More than a quarter of a million confirmed Campylobacter cases were reported in Europe in 2017, according to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). (foodsafetynews.com)
  • Children up to four years old accounted for almost one-third of confirmed Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) cases in 2017, according to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). (foodsafetynews.com)
  • In honor of Independence Day, NFID is celebrating the right of all individuals to be free of vaccine-preventable diseases. (nfid.org)
  • Since graduating from the 2-year EIS program, Denise has worked as a behavioral scientist in the Division of HIV/AIDS (2003-2007), the Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria (2007-2015), and, more recently, the Division of Global Health Protection (2015 to present). (hhs.gov)
  • ECDC is a European Union agency established in 2005 to help strengthen Europe's defences against infectious diseases, such as influenza, food and waterborne diseases and HIV/AIDS. (who.int)
  • This device has potential as an important tool for regional incidence measurements, which can aid targeting of prevention activities and allocation of resources by HIV/AIDS prevention programs, as well as serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of intervention strategies. (federallabs.org)
  • 1981 - The first diagnosis of the fatal disease later known as AIDS was described in the June 5, 1981, issue of MMWR. (wikipedia.org)
  • New and reemerging infectious diseases continue to proliferate and many chronic diseases and conditions have now been proven to have infectious origins (ulcers, cervical cancer, chronic liver disease. (asm.org)
  • This report presents the main findings of an ECDC project to assess the burden of infectious diseases among migrants in the EU/EEA based on available data for specific diseases: human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), tuberculosis (TB), hepatitis B, hepatitis C, gonorrhoea, syphilis, measles and rubella, malaria and Chagas disease. (europa.eu)
  • The Influenza Branch of the Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, CDC, uses these data as part of its influenza surveillance efforts. (hhs.gov)
  • To protect Americans from serious disease, the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) helps public health monitor, control, and prevent about 120 diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • Notifiable disease surveillance begins at the level of local, state, and territorial public health departments (also known as jurisdictions). (cdc.gov)
  • Case-specific (person-level) data and aggregate summary data (information about a group of cases) are transmitted to CDC/EPO via the National Electronic Telecommunications System for Surveillance (NETSS) to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS). (hhs.gov)
  • In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding year), and selected low frequency diseases are displayed. (healthdata.gov)
  • Babesiosis to Coccidioidomycosis - 2014.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding year), and selected low frequency diseases are displayed. (healthdata.gov)
  • Despite having eliminated measles in the US nearly two decades ago, the US is once again seeing record-setting cases of the vaccine-preventable disease. (nfid.org)
  • CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Weam Khadim PBHE501-American Public University May 21, 2013 Dr. Shalah Watkins-Bailey Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Center for Disease Control and Prevention is a national public health federal agency under Department of Health and Human Services headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia. (bartleby.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (or CDC ) is an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services based in the Metro Atlanta area, adjacent to the campus of Emory University and northeast of downtown Atlanta. (phys.org)
  • FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Free Press Release Submitted by StopRxAbuseInGA.org Press Release Distribution Atlanta, Georgia - According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2014, "46 people die fro. (blogtopsites.com)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (DHHS/PHS), Atlanta, GA. (ed.gov)
  • This position is located in the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Office of the Director (OD), Office of the Chief Operating Officer (OCOO), Office of Safety, Security and Asset Management (OSSAM) in Atlanta, GA ~This is an Open Continuous announcement: The first cut-off for you to be referred will be 04/01/2021. (careercast.com)
  • These diseases are important to monitor nationwide and include infectious diseases such as Zika, foodborne outbreaks such as E. coli , and noninfectious conditions such as lead poisoning. (cdc.gov)
  • DHIS and the CDC programs publish statistical data based on NNDSS to support recognition of outbreaks, monitoring of shifts in disease patterns, and evaluation of disease control activities. (cdc.gov)
  • These provisional data are used for program planning and evaluation, monitoring trends in incidence, and detecting disease outbreaks. (hhs.gov)
  • In addition, it allows us to focus TB prevention and control strategies on the specific groups of people most likely to be involved in outbreaks. (cdc.gov)
  • CDC responds only to TB outbreaks when state and local public health departments request assistance in conducting epidemiologic investigations and identifying key control measures. (cdc.gov)
  • Generally, health departments ask for help with outbreaks that are particularly challenging to control and for which health departments might feel they've exceeded their surge capacity. (cdc.gov)
  • In the United States, it is the cause of about half of all foodborne disease outbreaks. (wikipedia.org)
  • FoodNet consists of active surveillance for foodborne diseases and related epidemiologic studies designed to help public health officials better understand the epidemiology of foodborne disease in the United States. (hhs.gov)
  • FoodNet provides a network for responding to new and emerging foodborne diseases and identifying the source of specific foodborne diseases. (hhs.gov)
  • The ASM supports the Administration's request for an additional $25 million to combat new and reemerging infectious diseases, including foodborne diseases. (asm.org)
  • It is one of the country's biggest daily jumps in months, and officials are expressing concern that infections are getting out of control in the capital of Seoul and other major cities as Koreans increasingly venture out in. (ap.org)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there are now 39 confirmed cases in 7 states of human Campylobacter infections . (kmuw.org)
  • Prevention and control of infections with hepatitis viruses in correctional settings. (nih.gov)
  • This report consolidates previous recommendations and adds new ones for preventing and controlling infections with hepatitis viruses in correctional settings. (nih.gov)
  • When fungal diseases go undiagnosed, the infections can become more serious and even result in death. (emsl.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is a leader in nationwide efforts to ease the burden of cancer. (healthfinder.gov)
  • However, these are only estimates due to the lack of information and data on the actual national, state and local surveillance capabilities, the total infectious disease burden, and the economic and social costs of infectious diseases to the nation. (asm.org)
  • This website is designed to provide education to the public and healthcare professionals about the burden, causes, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases across the lifespan. (nfid.org)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified Missouri as one of seven states with a "substantial rural burden" - noting that it has more than 75 cases and 10 percent or more of diagnoses in rural areas. (stlpublicradio.org)
  • U.S. agencies that fund animal testing include the Center for Disease Control (CDC). (sourcewatch.org)
  • Through the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC), CDC works with national cancer organizations, state health agencies, and other key groups to develop, implement, and promote effective strategies for preventing and controlling cancer. (healthfinder.gov)
  • Many Federal agencies have developed public awareness and education campaigns to address HIV prevention, treatment, care, and research. (hiv.gov)
  • The COVID-19 data released by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services includes numbers of people who've died of the disease as reported by doctors, medical examiners, hospitals and local health agencies. (stlpublicradio.org)
  • Recommendations for Prevention and Control of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection and HCV-Related Chronic Disease. (coursehero.com)
  • The CDC also conducts research and provides information on non-infectious diseases , such as obesity and diabetes , and is a founding member of the International Association of National Public Health Institutes . (wikipedia.org)
  • As part of the federal government's National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Eye Institute's mission is to "conduct and support research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of the blind. (nih.gov)
  • It especially focuses its attention on infectious disease , food borne pathogens , environmental health , occupational safety and health , health promotion , injury prevention and educational activities designed to improve the health of United States citizens . (wikipedia.org)
  • The CDC focuses national attention on developing and applying disease prevention and control (especially infectious diseases), environmental health, occupational safety and health, health promotion, prevention and education activities designed to improve the health of the people of the United States. (phys.org)
  • In her role as a CDC Behavioral Scientist, she has drawn upon her anthropological training to help develop the formative research guidelines for the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System and provided technical support to studies that examined community perceptions and use of malaria prevention and treatment interventions in Southeast Asia and East and West Africa. (hhs.gov)
  • 5 years of age who were included in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance System. (aappublications.org)
  • The same year, the PHS transferred its San Francisco based plague laboratory into the CDC as the Epidemiology Division, and a new Veterinary Diseases Division was established. (wikipedia.org)
  • This report describes the epidemiology of invasive bacterial diseases due to Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria meningitidis in the European Union Member States in 2008 and 2009. (europa.eu)
  • The European Scientific Conference on Applied Infectious Disease Epidemiology (ESCAIDE) is going online. (eurosurveillance.org)
  • Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, 19(6), 445. (coursehero.com)
  • In addition, it will enable two-way data transmission between the KCDC center and investigators by utilizing a 3G wireless network, thereby enhancing the efficiency of various data transmissions such as reserving inspection times and checking investigation feasibility. (qualcomm.com)
  • For over 60 years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has worked tirelessly to address infectious diseases and other health hazards. (goodreads.com)
  • These slogans are part a toolkit which aims to support infection prevention in schools, with a focus on gastrointestinal diseases, by assisting EU/EEA countries in their communication initiatives for disease prevention in school settings. (europa.eu)
  • The authors highlight antimicrobial, preoperative hygiene, glycemic control, and skin preparation procedures to prevent infection. (ahrq.gov)
  • Due to the possibility of infection, CDC employees who may have been exposed to the deadly disease have been forced to receive a vaccine and powerful antibiotics as a protective measure. (biospace.com)
  • Guidelines for infection control in health care personnel. (coursehero.com)
  • In an effort to emphasize the importance of recognizing serious fungal diseases at the beginning stages of a patient's illness, the CDC is encouraging healthcare providers and patients to "Think Fungus" especially when symptoms of an infection are not improving with treatment. (emsl.com)
  • About 3,000 public health departments gather and use data on these diseases to protect their local communities. (cdc.gov)
  • Toxic trailers : have the Centers for Disease Control failed to protect public health? (worldcat.org)
  • Today, CDC is the nation′s premier health promotion, prevention, and preparedness agency and a global leader in public health. (bartleby.com)
  • The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) mission is to improve public health. (amazon.com)
  • A study by a group of researchers associated with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the national public health agency of the United. (rediff.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( CDC ) is a national public health institute in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its main goal is to protect public health and safety through the control and prevention of disease, injury, and disability in the US and internationally. (wikipedia.org)
  • Under Joseph Walter Mountin , the CDC continued to advocate for public health issues and pushed to extend its responsibilities to many other communicable diseases . (wikipedia.org)
  • The mission of CDC expanded beyond its original focus on malaria to include sexually transmitted diseases when the Venereal Disease Division of the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) was transferred to the CDC in 1957. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public health professionals use the data to identify and track cancer trends, strengthen cancer prevention and control activities, and prioritize the use of resources. (healthfinder.gov)
  • CDC develops communication campaigns and materials designed to teach health professionals, policy makers, the media, and the public about cancer prevention and control. (healthfinder.gov)
  • CDC develops materials designed to teach health professionals, policy makers, the media, and the public about cancer prevention and control. (healthfinder.gov)
  • They are mainly intended for public health professionals and policymakers involved in disease prevention and control programmes. (europa.eu)
  • It's important to remember that in public health the term outbreak is used to describe any emergence of a disease in larger numbers or in different places than we would expect to see it. (cdc.gov)
  • The international team included physicians, microbiologists, epidemiologists, and other public health officials with expertise in international affairs and infectious diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • Peter Lurie, director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest was also against Redfield's appointment. (allgov.com)
  • CDPC of Latvia goals are to strengthen Latvia's public health system, prevent diseases, including infectious and rare diseases. (eurohealthnet.eu)
  • CDPC of Latvia goals are to implement national public health policy in the field of epidemiological safety and disease prevention, to ensure the implementation and coordination of health promotion policies. (eurohealthnet.eu)
  • Want to stay abreast of changes in prevention, care, treatment or research or other public health arenas that affect our collective response to the HIV epidemic? (hiv.gov)
  • The annual survey is conducted by the KCDC to promote public health and prevent disease. (qualcomm.com)
  • Through Qualcomm's Wireless Reach initiative, which uses 3G to empower local communities, we look forward to working with the KCDC to apply Qualcomm's advanced technology toward the enhancement of public health and prevention of disease in Korea. (qualcomm.com)
  • These data will be added to regular CDC reports to the public on smoking prevalence among youth and adults, total and per-capita cigarette consumption, and progress on tobacco control policies. (cdc.gov)
  • The health departments work with healthcare providers, laboratories, hospitals, and other partners to obtain the information needed to monitor, control, and prevent the occurrence and spread of these health conditions. (cdc.gov)
  • The Department of Health and Human Services played down a report that officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were told not to use several words in budget documents. (nytimes.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is one of the major divisions of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). (sourcewatch.org)
  • Their job is 24 hours a day and 7 days a week, in which they work to protect people from injuries, disabilities, diseases and other health problems that comes with natural diseases and bioterrorism attacks. (bartleby.com)
  • The content of this joint guidance was developed by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) with the support of a technical advisory group composed of policy makers, service providers, civil society representatives and preventative health experts from throughout the EU/EEA. (europa.eu)
  • The CDC Coalition members, over a 100 in number, are committed to improving the public's health through cost effective prevention and control strategies. (asm.org)
  • At a cost of $120 billion each year, recognized infectious diseases account for one out of every six health care dollars and a quarter of all physician office visits. (asm.org)
  • In 1987, the National Center for Health Statistics became part of CDC. (wikipedia.org)
  • The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. (medindia.net)
  • 1971 - The National Center for Health Statistics conducted the first National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, taking a snapshot of the health status of Americans. (wikipedia.org)
  • In January 2015, the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion at the CDC launched Chronic Disease and Health Promotion Data & Indicators that aims to enable quick access to data and indicators across health areas such as tobacco use, reproductive health, oral health, cancer, legislative actions, and behavioral risk factors - to name only a few. (socrata.com)
  • As an early adopter in the Center, the Office on Smoking and Health migrated the current and historical state-level data on tobacco use prevention and control housed in the State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System to the new data Tobacco Use Portal and opened the door to using a new technology portfolio to reinvent the STATE System for 2015. (socrata.com)
  • To learn from other countries' experiences in rabies prevention and control and obtain expert advice, the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MOHW) and the Council of Agriculture (COA) have co-organized the International Expert Meeting - Challenges and Opportunities in the Prevention and Control of Rabies to be held at the NTUH (National Taiwan University Hospital) International Convention Center on August 30, 2013. (gov.tw)
  • The state health department is investigating a potential connection between recent cases of lung disease in Texas teens and e-cigarette use. (keranews.org)
  • State health officials say they learned last week of cases of lung disease in Texas adolescents. (keranews.org)
  • As Texas braces for a possible Zika virus outbreak among local mosquito populations, Gov. Greg Abbott asked federal health officials Wednesday to review the state's plan to combat the disease linked to serious birth defects. (keranews.org)
  • Centre is supervised by Ministry of Health ( www.vm.gov.lv ). (eurohealthnet.eu)
  • monitor non-infectious diseases, as well as to evaluate the environmental factors which may affect the health of the population. (eurohealthnet.eu)
  • Respected All, We are writing today so that you can learn about your risks for heart disease and stroke and stay "heart health" for yourself and your loved ones. (blogtopsites.com)
  • So far the U.S. has only one confirmed case, but the CDC (Centers For Disease Control And Prevention) and WHO (World Health. (blogtopsites.com)
  • A Utah man in his 70s has died after contracting the plague, bringing to four the number of deaths from the disease reported in the United States this year, health officials said Thursday. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Find information about upcoming webinars, workshops and more hosted by The Center or Rural Health Innovations. (ruralcenter.org)
  • This is cautiously good news," says Dr. James Hill, director of the Center for Human Nutrition at the University of Colorado and founder of America on the Move, a program that encourages Americans to make small changes that will improve their health. (clubindustry.com)
  • Qualcomm Incorporated (Nasdaq: QCOM), a leading developer and innovator of advanced wireless technologies, products and services, has signed a memorandum of understanding with the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) to provide high-tech applications and smartphones that will contribute to improving the convenience and efficiency of the national health survey. (qualcomm.com)
  • A report by the National Center for Health Statistics found that more than a quarter of adults had low-back pain in the past three months, and it's the second most common neurological ailment in the U.S., trailing only headaches, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke . (chiroeco.com)
  • In the first revision in 30 years of its criteria document on workers' exposure to heat and hot environments, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention removed ceiling limit recommendations for acclimatized and un-acclimated workers, but has left untouched its recommended exposure and alert limits. (jacksonlewis.com)
  • To assess progress toward the Healthy People 2020 objective, the Office on Smoking and Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will now track and report annually on tobacco use imagery in youth-oriented movies as a core surveillance indicator by using the methods described in previous CDC publications (3,4). (cdc.gov)
  • In the United States, the death rate from infectious diseases rose 58 percent between 1980 and 1992, claiming approximately 166,000 lives annually. (asm.org)
  • It was renamed the Centers for Disease Control effective October 14, 1980. (wikipedia.org)
  • News about Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, including commentary and archival articles published in The New York Times. (nytimes.com)
  • News on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continually updated from thousands of sources around the net. (topix.com)
  • The growth in funding for the Food and Drug Administration, fueled in part by the common-sense return of the 2013 user fees, as well as the increases for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the National Science Foundation are welcome news. (researchamerica.org)
  • Sign up for email alerts on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) products, news, and offers. (gpo.gov)
  • The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) has set up a dedicated webpage for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) updates and risk assessments with a focus on Europe. (eurosurveillance.org)
  • Clearly, the use of prescriptions as well as many over-the-counter pain products is not only out-of-control, but is also having deadly consequences. (chiroeco.com)
  • Additional research is needed to explore the cause of the trend observed and to find effective strategies for overweight prevention beginning in the preschool years. (aappublications.org)
  • The meeting will include the review, discussion, and evaluation of applications received in response to Centers for Agricultural Disease and Injury Research, Education and Prevention, Program Announcement Number 06-057. (federalregister.gov)
  • Media Release) In July 2014, long forgotten vials of smallpox left in a cardboard box were discovered at a research centre near Washington. (blogtopsites.com)
  • solving many viral disease problems along the way. (cdc.gov)
  • 1 Division of Viral Hepatitis, National Center for Infectious Diseases, USA. (nih.gov)
  • Deaths' relating to cardiovascular disease have slightly dropped annually since the 1980's. (bartleby.com)
  • Infectious diseases remain the world's leading cause of death, accounting for over half of the 50 million deaths annually. (asm.org)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported an additional 16 flu deaths among children, bringing the nationwide total this season for youngsters to 53. (keranews.org)
  • Norovirus results in about 685 million cases of disease and 200,000 deaths globally a year. (wikipedia.org)
  • 31 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion (2003). (coursehero.com)
  • The Director, Management Analysis and Services Office, has been delegated the authority to sign Federal Register notices pertaining to announcements of meetings and other committee management activities, for both CDC and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. (federalregister.gov)
  • GAO was directed to review the indirect costs the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) paid the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (unt.edu)
  • The Haemophilus Influenzae System at NIP compiles information on all U.S. Haemophilus influenzae invasive disease cases reported to CDC via NETSS since 1991 (managed by EPO and NIP), or via active surveillance in several locales since 1989 (managed by NCIP). (hhs.gov)
  • In 2015, 3 162 confirmed cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae (H. influenzae) disease were reported by 30 EU/EEA Member States to ECDC. (europa.eu)
  • While Americans continue to battle back pain with sophisticated and expensive drugs, diagnostics, physical therapies, and surgical techniques, they are now re-examining the safety of these high-tech, invasive medical interventions - which are often worse than the disease and don't seem to be getting individuals any closer to relief than they were decades ago," says Gerard W. Clum, DC, spokesperson, F4CP. (chiroeco.com)
  • Although Lyme disease accounts for the majority of known tick borne diseases, the CDC has recently detected the emergence of a new tick borne disease, Ehrlichiosis, which can cause life threatening illness and sometimes death if not treated properly and quickly. (asm.org)
  • Lyme disease to Meningococcal - 2014In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000 cases but less than or equals 10,000 cases will be displayed (��� 1,000 and ��_ 10,000). (healthdata.gov)
  • For over 35 years, the Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program (NSQAP) at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has helped NBS laboratories ensure that their testing does not delay diagnosis, minimizes false-positive reports, and sustains high-quality testing performance. (mdpi.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program (NSQAP) helps NBS laboratories ensure that testing accurately detects these disorders, does not delay diagnosis, minimizes false-positive reports, and sustains high-quality testing performance [ 3 ]. (mdpi.com)
  • By spreading awareness about fungal diseases, the CDC anticipates that it will help increase early discovery, diagnosis and treatment. (emsl.com)
  • Also included is information about campaigns related to the prevention and diagnosis of hepatitis B and C. (hiv.gov)
  • Several topics of mutual interest were explored, notably the prevention of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), global rabies control in dog populations, leading to a drastic decrease in human cases, as well as animal disease information systems, including zoonosis. (thepigsite.com)
  • California's Heat Illness Prevention Regulations require that employers develop and implement written procedures for addressing heat illness prevention, train employees and supervisors, and provide adequate water and shade. (jacksonlewis.com)