Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Primary Prevention: Specific practices for the prevention of disease or mental disorders in susceptible individuals or populations. These include HEALTH PROMOTION, including mental health; protective procedures, such as COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL; and monitoring and regulation of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS. Primary prevention is to be distinguished from SECONDARY PREVENTION and TERTIARY PREVENTION.United StatesCommunicable Disease Control: Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Secondary Prevention: The prevention of recurrences or exacerbations of a disease or complications of its therapy.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Germinal Center: The activated center of a lymphoid follicle in secondary lymphoid tissue where B-LYMPHOCYTES are stimulated by antigens and helper T cells (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER) are stimulated to generate memory cells.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Child Day Care Centers: Facilities which provide care for pre-school and school-age children.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Accident Prevention: Efforts and designs to reduce the incidence of unexpected undesirable events in various environments and situations.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Ribonucleoprotein, U1 Small Nuclear: A nuclear RNA-protein complex that plays a role in RNA processing. In the nucleoplasm, the U1 snRNP along with other small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (U2, U4-U6, and U5) assemble into SPLICEOSOMES that remove introns from pre-mRNA by splicing. The U1 snRNA forms base pairs with conserved sequence motifs at the 5'-splice site and recognizes both the 5'- and 3'-splice sites and may have a fundamental role in aligning the two sites for the splicing reaction.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.AIDS Serodiagnosis: Immunologic tests for identification of HIV (HTLV-III/LAV) antibodies. They include assays for HIV SEROPOSITIVITY and HIV SERONEGATIVITY that have been developed for screening persons carrying the viral antibody from patients with overt symptoms of AIDS or AIDS-RELATED COMPLEX.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Ribonucleoprotein, U4-U6 Small Nuclear: A nuclear RNA-protein complex that plays a role in RNA processing. In the nucleoplasm, the U4-U6 snRNP along with the U5 snRNP preassemble into a single 25S particle that binds to the U1 and U2 snRNPs and the substrate to form mature SPLICEOSOMES. There is also evidence for the existence of individual U4 or U6 snRNPs in addition to their organization as a U4-U6 snRNP.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Infection Control: Programs of disease surveillance, generally within health care facilities, designed to investigate, prevent, and control the spread of infections and their causative microorganisms.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Tertiary Care Centers: A medical facility which provides a high degree of subspecialty expertise for patients from centers where they received SECONDARY CARE.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Trauma Centers: Specialized hospital facilities which provide diagnostic and therapeutic services for trauma patients.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Laboratories: Facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Communicable DiseasesHealth Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Insect Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous insects through chemical, biological, or other means.Neglected Diseases: Diseases that are underfunded and have low name recognition but are major burdens in less developed countries. The World Health Organization has designated six tropical infectious diseases as being neglected in industrialized countries that are endemic in many developing countries (HELMINTHIASIS; LEPROSY; LYMPHATIC FILARIASIS; ONCHOCERCIASIS; SCHISTOSOMIASIS; and TRACHOMA).Quarantine: Restriction of freedom of movement of individuals who have been exposed to infectious or communicable disease in order to prevent its spread; a period of detention of vessels, vehicles, or travelers coming from infected or suspected places; and detention or isolation on account of suspected contagion. It includes government regulations on the detention of animals at frontiers or ports of entrance for the prevention of infectious disease, through a period of isolation before being allowed to enter a country. (From Dorland, 28th ed & Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Diseases due to or propagated by sexual contact.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Bioterrorism: The use of biological agents in TERRORISM. This includes the malevolent use of BACTERIA; VIRUSES; or other BIOLOGICAL TOXINS against people, ANIMALS; or PLANTS.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).MaineGuideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Disease Transmission, Infectious: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens. When transmission is within the same species, the mode can be horizontal or vertical (INFECTIOUS DISEASE TRANSMISSION, VERTICAL).Disease Notification: Notification or reporting by a physician or other health care provider of the occurrence of specified contagious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV infections to designated public health agencies. The United States system of reporting notifiable diseases evolved from the Quarantine Act of 1878, which authorized the US Public Health Service to collect morbidity data on cholera, smallpox, and yellow fever; each state in the US has its own list of notifiable diseases and depends largely on reporting by the individual health care provider. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Risk Reduction Behavior: Reduction of high-risk choices and adoption of low-risk quantity and frequency alternatives.Ribonucleoprotein, U5 Small Nuclear: A nuclear RNA-protein complex that plays a role in RNA processing. In the nucleoplasm, the U5 snRNP along with U4-U6 snRNP preassemble into a single 25S particle that binds to the U1 and U2 snRNPs and the substrate to form SPLICEOSOMES.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Poison Control Centers: Facilities which provide information concerning poisons and treatment of poisoning in emergencies.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Sentinel Surveillance: Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort such as in a geographic area or population subgroup to estimate trends in a larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Chemoprevention: The use of chemical compounds to prevent the development of a specific disease.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Pregnancy Complications, Infectious: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Preventive Medicine: A medical specialty primarily concerned with prevention of disease (PRIMARY PREVENTION) and the promotion and preservation of health in the individual.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.IndiaRisk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Antibiotic Prophylaxis: Use of antibiotics before, during, or after a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure to prevent infectious complications.Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from one generation to another. It includes transmission in utero or intrapartum by exposure to blood and secretions, and postpartum exposure via breastfeeding.Vital Statistics: Used for general articles concerning statistics of births, deaths, marriages, etc.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)WisconsinQuality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Epidemics: Sudden outbreaks of a disease in a country or region not previously recognized in that area, or a rapid increase in the number of new cases of a previous existing endemic disease. Epidemics can also refer to outbreaks of disease in animal or plant populations.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Insect Vectors: Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.Growth Charts: Graphic displays of height and weight showing development over time.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Tropical Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with diseases, mainly of parasitic origin, common in tropical and subtropical regions.National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.): A center in the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE which is primarily concerned with the collection, analysis, and dissemination of health statistics on vital events and health activities to reflect the health status of people, health needs, and health resources.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complex Proteins: Protein complexes that take part in the process of PHOTOSYNTHESIS. They are located within the THYLAKOID MEMBRANES of plant CHLOROPLASTS and a variety of structures in more primitive organisms. There are two major complexes involved in the photosynthetic process called PHOTOSYSTEM I and PHOTOSYSTEM II.BrazilMultivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.State Health Planning and Development Agencies: Agencies established under PL93-641 to coordinate, conduct, and implement state health planning activities. Two primary responsibilities are the preparation of an annual State Health Plan and giving assistance to the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Disaster Planning: Procedures outlined for the care of casualties and the maintenance of services in disasters.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Information Centers: Facilities for collecting and organizing information. They may be specialized by subject field, type of source material, persons served, location, or type of services.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Laboratory Personnel: Professionals, technicians, and assistants staffing LABORATORIES.United States Public Health Service: A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.EuropeCommunicable Diseases, Emerging: Infectious diseases that are novel in their outbreak ranges (geographic and host) or transmission mode.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Community-Institutional Relations: The interactions between members of a community and representatives of the institutions within that community.Homosexuality, Male: Sexual attraction or relationship between males.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Serologic Tests: Diagnostic procedures involving immunoglobulin reactions.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.HIV Seropositivity: Development of neutralizing antibodies in individuals who have been exposed to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/HTLV-III/LAV).Patient Isolation: The segregation of patients with communicable or other diseases for a specified time. Isolation may be strict, in which movement and social contacts are limited; modified, where an effort to control specified aspects of care is made in order to prevent cross infection; or reverse, where the patient is secluded in a controlled or germ-free environment in order to protect him or her from cross infection.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Government Programs: Programs and activities sponsored or administered by local, state, or national governments.Schools: Educational institutions.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Poisoning: A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Public Health Surveillance: The ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of health-related data with the purpose of preventing or controlling disease or injury, or of identifying unusual events of public health importance, followed by the dissemination and use of information for public health action. (From Am J Prev Med 2011;41(6):636)National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Tuberculosis: Any of the infectious diseases of man and other animals caused by species of MYCOBACTERIUM.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Disease Vectors: Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)New York CityTravel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)GeorgiaNational Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Lead PoisoningCommunity Networks: Organizations and individuals cooperating together toward a common goal at the local or grassroots level.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Immunization Programs: Organized services to administer immunization procedures in the prevention of various diseases. The programs are made available over a wide range of sites: schools, hospitals, public health agencies, voluntary health agencies, etc. They are administered to an equally wide range of population groups or on various administrative levels: community, municipal, state, national, international.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Vaccines: Suspensions of killed or attenuated microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa), antigenic proteins, synthetic constructs, or other bio-molecular derivatives, administered for the prevention, amelioration, or treatment of infectious and other diseases.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Triatominae: A subfamily of assassin bugs (REDUVIIDAE) that are obligate blood-suckers of vertebrates. Included are the genera TRIATOMA; RHODNIUS; and PANSTRONGYLUS, which are vectors of TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI, the agent of CHAGAS DISEASE in humans.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Clinical Laboratory Techniques: Techniques used to carry out clinical investigative procedures in the diagnosis and therapy of disease.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Consumer Organizations: Organized groups of users of goods and services.Public-Private Sector Partnerships: An organizational enterprise between a public sector agency, federal, state or local, and a private sector entity. Skills and assets of each sector are shared to deliver a service or facility for the benefit or use of the general public.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.

*Centers for Disease Control and Prevention timeline

1970 - The Communicable Disease Center became the Center for Disease Control. 1971 - The National Center for Health Statistics ... The following is a timeline of events relating to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1946 - The Communicable ... 1988 - CDC established the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 1989 - CDC reported the 100,000 ... Leonard A. Scheele reported that the Communicable Disease Center was ready to combat possible biological warfare. 1953 - CDC ...

*Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention

The Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CCDC; Chinese: 中国疾病预防控制中心) is an agency of the Ministry of Health of the ... For similar agencies please see the list of national public health agencies "Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention( ... "Centers Disease Control Prevention". globalhealth.gov. Retrieved 9 March 2014. www.chinacdc.cn. ... The CCDC focuses national attention on developing and applying disease prevention and control (especially infectious diseases ...

*Hellenic Centre for Diseases Control and Prevention

Hellenic Centre for Infectious Diseases Control) up to 2005. "Hellenic Centre for Diseases Control and Prevention". HCDCP ... HCDCP is an acronym and stands for "Hellenic Centre for Diseases Control and Prevention". The organization is in Athens, Greece ... Mexico Border Infectious Disease Surveillance Project National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. ...

*Macau Centre for Disease Control and Prevention

Hong Kong Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) European ... The Macau Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (Chinese: 疾病預防控制中心) was created in 2001 and is under the Health Bureau of ... Union Centres for Disease Control (CDC) United States Health Protection Agency (HPA) United Kingdom Institut de veille ...

*European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control

The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) is an independent agency of the European Union (EU) whose mission ... European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control is monitoring the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Other ... European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. 19 February 2013. Official website Eurosurveillance Eurovaccine. ... While the idea of creating a European centre for disease control had been discussed previously by public health experts, the ...

*Health promotion

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a Coordinating Center for Health Promotion who mission is "Prevent disease, ... Accessed 2009 Feb 4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About CDC's Coordinating Center for Health Promotion. 2008 Jul ... According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), "Regular physical activity is one of the most effective ... Accessed 2009 Feb 4. Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and. "CDC - Workplace Health - Implementation - Physical Activity ...

*Musculoskeletal disorder

Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and. "CDC - Workplace Health - Implementation - Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders ... Cincinnati, OH: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute ... For example, improving job satisfaction can reduce 17-69 per cent of work-related back disorders and improving job control can ... Employers can also utilize engineering controls and administrative controls to prevent injury happening on the job. ...

*Antibiotic resistance in gonorrhea

Centers for Disease Control Prevention (CDC). (Aug 10, 2012). "Update to CDC's Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment ... The bacteria was first identified in 1879, although some Biblical scholars believe that references to the disease can be found ...

*Gardasil

Centers for Disease Control. 56 (RR-2): 1-24. PMID 17380109. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2010). "FDA ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (May 2010). "FDA licensure of bivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV2, ... Markowitz, L. E.; Dunne, E. F.; Saraiya, M.; Lawson, H. W.; Chesson, H.; Unger, E. R.; Centers for Disease Control Prevention ( ... "Information from FDA and CDC on Gardasil and its Safety (Archived)". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). July 22 ...

*Oxymorphone

Centers for Disease Control Prevention (CDC) (2013). "Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP)-like illness associated with ... Conrad, C; Bradley, H. M.; Broz, D; Buddha; Centers for Disease Control Prevention (CDC); et al. (2015). "Community Outbreak of ... In January 2013, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported an illness associated with intravenous (IV) abuse of ... "Drug Overdose in the United States: Fact Sheet". Centers for Disease Control. Retrieved 12 September 2013. Rudd, Rose A.; Seth ...

*HPV vaccines

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the FDA, the rate of adverse side effects related to ... The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) has recommended all European teenage girls to be vaccinated; ... "HPV Vaccines". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 2010-10-15. Archived from the original on 2015-10-04. ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention repealed all HPV vaccination directives for immigrants effective December 14, ...

*List of antibiotic resistant bacteria

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 53 (45): 1063-6. PMID 15549020. "Medscape abstract on Acinetobacter baumannii ... Centers for Disease Control Prevention (CDC). (2004). "Acinetobacter baumannii infections among patients at military medical ... On November 5, 2004, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported an increasing number of Acinetobacter ... annual summary of data reported to the National Healthcare Safety Network at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ...

*Ingestion

Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. 2004. Retrieved 2007-04-17. "Dracunculiasis". Centers for Disease Control & ... Diseases transmitted via the fecal-oral route include hepatitis A, polio, and cholera. Some pathogenic organisms are typically ... Prevention. 2005. Retrieved 2007-04-17. Schroeder, Carl M. (2005). et al.. "Estimate of Illnesses from Salmonella Enteritidis ...

*Pin prick attack

"Internet Archive Wayback Machine". Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. 2000-06-19. Archived from the original on 2000-06- ... However, the American Center for Disease Control has stressed on numerous occasions that it has yet to confirm a single case of ... Despite immediate medical attention and the "one in 200" chance of being infected, Pearce tested positive for the disease a few ... assault on another person with a needle or syringe tainted with the blood of somebody carrying a blood-borne disease, such as ...

*United States Navy in Vieques, Puerto Rico

Summary Report for the Vieques Heart Study Expert Panel Review." . Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. 2001. Retrieved on ... The irradiated steel is still unaccounted for by the US Navy, the EPA, and the Centers for Disease Control. Studies and site ... which is the main symptom of vibroacoustic disease. This disease is said to lead to heart arrhythmia, or even death. The claim ... Now the United States Fish and Wildlife Service controls 3,100 acres (13 km²) of this land - about half of the formerly owned ...

*Entamoeba histolytica

Centers for Disease Control. Retrieved 24 October 2017. "Entamoeba histolytica". Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. CDC. ... Center for Disease Control & Prevention. Retrieved 24 October 2017. American Water Works Association (June 2006). Waterborne ... Entamoeba histolytica image library Entamoeba histolytica - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC DPDx Parasitology ... PLoS neglected tropical diseases, 4(6), e716. Caler, E & Lorenzi, H (2010). "Entamoeba histolytica: Genome Status and Web ...

*Orthopoxvirus

ISBN 3 8055 4818 4. Centers for Disease Control Prevention (CDC) (2003). "Update:Multistate Outbreak of Monkeypox - Illinois, ... Diseases associated with this genus include smallpox, cowpox, horsepox, and monkeypox. The most famous member of the genus is ... VIG is recommended for severe generalized vaccinia if the patient is extremely ill or has a serious underlying disease. VIG ... Martinez, Mark; Michael P. Bray; John W. Huggins (2000). "A Mouse Model of Aerosol-Transmitted Orthopoxviral Disease". 124: 362 ...

*Third-hand smoke

Centers for Disease Control Prevention (CDC) (2011). "State smoke-free laws for worksites, restaurants, and bars--United States ... The term third-hand smoke or "THS" is a neologism coined by a research team from the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. The ' ... It is important to acknowledge the biomarkers of third-hand smoke because they indicate the severity and presence of disease. ... Adhami, Neema; Chen, Yuxin; Martins-Green, Manuela (2017). "Biomarkers of disease can be detected in mice as early as 4 weeks ...

*Chelation

Centers for Disease Control Prevention (CDC) (2006). "Deaths associated with hypocalcemia from chelation therapy--Texas, ... According to the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO), a metal amino acid chelate is defined as the product ...

*Sexually transmitted infection

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for HIV, STD, and TB Prevention "WHO Disease and injury country ... Centers for Disease Control Prevention; Workowski, K. A; Berman, S. M (2006). "Sexually transmitted diseases treatment ... Centers for Disease Control Prevention (2012). "Update to CDC's Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines, 2010: Oral ... "How You Can Prevent Sexually Transmitted Diseases". cdc.gov. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 31 May 2016. Archived ...

*Leptospirosis

"Leptospirosis (Infection)". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Archived from the original on 11 October 2014. ... "Leptospirosis". U.S. Disease Control and Prevention Center. "Leptospira". NCBI Taxonomy Browser. 171. ... The disease was first described by Adolf Weil in 1886 when he reported an "acute infectious disease with enlargement of spleen ... Edward Rhodes Stitt; Richard Pearson Strong (1944). Stitt's Diagnosis, prevention and treatment of tropical diseases (7th ed ...

*Trichinella spiralis

Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC). Web. 1 Dec. 2014. Gottstein, Bruno; Pozio, Edoardo; Nöckler, Karsten (2009-01- ... "Trichina life cycle". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Trichina agent". Washington University. Fluorescence image ... "Trichinellosis Surveillance --- United States, 1997--2001." Center for Disease Control National Pork Board. Trichinae Herd ... In order to control Trichinella infection, the European Union has condemned 190 million pigs, leading to a substantial economic ...

*Trichinosis

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Parasitic Diseases (2004-07-15). "Parasitic Disease Information - ... Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC). Web. 1 Dec. 2014. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-12-20. ... ISBN 978-0-7020-5101-2. "Trichinellosis Fact Sheet - Division of Parasitic Diseases". Centre for Disease Control, US Government ... "Trichinellosis Fact Sheet - Division of Parasitic Diseases". Centre for Disease Control, US Government. 2004. Archived from the ...

*Cronobacter sakazakii

Centers for Disease Control Prevention (CDC) (April 2002). "Enterobacter sakazakii infections associated with the use of ... Bowen AB, Braden CR (August 2006). "Invasive Enterobacter sakazakii disease in infants". Emerging Infectious Diseases. 12 (8): ... The disease is associated with a rare cause of invasive infection infants with historically high case fatality rates (40-80%). ... Joseph & Forsythe (2011). "Association of Cronobacter sakazakii ST4 with neonatal infections". Emerging Infectious Diseases. ...

*Chikungunya

Centers for Disease Control Prevention (CDC) (29 September 2006). "Chikungunya fever diagnosed among international travelers- ... "Chikungunya-Fact sheet". European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). Archived from the original on 19 December ... Even with a vaccine, mosquito population control and bite prevention will be necessary to control chikungunya disease. ... European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. 23 January 2008. Archived from the original on 5 August 2009. Retrieved 20 ...

*University of the Nations

Member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Global Smallpox Eradication Team - Ghana & Nigeria, Faculty at Johns ... There are also five interdisciplinary centers: the Community Development Center; the Center for Discipleship Training Schools; ... the Family Resource Center; the Student Mobilization Center; and the GENESIS Center. Its core program is the Discipleship ... referenced 8/JUL/2006 UofN Visiting Faculty Profile page CARE profile page University of Rochester Medical Center Christian ...
The Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) is a collaborative network established in cooperation with the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions Emerging Infections Program; the state health departments in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota, New York, Oregon, and Tennessee; the Food and Drug Administrations Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition; and the United States Department of Agricultures Food Safety Inspection Service. The FoodNet Population Survey was conducted by telephone in the nine population-based FoodNet sites (CA, CO, CT, GA, MD, MN, NY, OR, and TN) from March 2002 through February 2003. The total population of these nine sites, according to the 2002 United States Census Bureau estimates, was 37,961,688 persons. The 2002 Population Survey was the fourth 12-month FoodNet Population Survey. Previous surveys were conducted in 1996, 1998, and 2000. With the ...
Sue Flocke, associate director of the Prevention Research Center for Health Neighborhoods, gave the keynote address for Tobacco-Related Cancer: Prevention and Care, a day-long program held April 21.. The Oregon Prevention Research Center at Oregon Health & Science University hosted the event.. Flockes presentation was titled "Addressing Tobacco Cessation in the Primary Care Setting: Opportunities and Evidence-based Strategies.". ...
Its not the years in your life that count. Its the life in your years." Abraham Lincoln. Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) have one fundamental function the prevention of sudden unexpected arrhythmic cardiac death.. As Americans age and more baby boomers become "eligible" for a primary prevention ICD, it is important to ensure that treatments are appropriately and effectively applied to this growing segment of the population. Yet, enrollment of patients older than age 65 years in major primary prevention ICD trials is limited. A surprising 28% of Americans suitable for an ICD by conventional criteria are over age 79 years.1 Over 40% of primary prevention ICDs in the United States are placed in patients ≥70 years old. A review of over 115,000 Medicare patients in the National Cardiovascular Database ICD Registry revealed a mean age of 75 years at the time of ICD implantation, a trend that did not change between 2006 and 2010.2,9 ...
Indiana recognizes that every Hoosier deserves to live in a safe and supportive environment where he/she can flourish. To this end, the ISDH Office of Womens Health has made a strong commitment to the primary prevention of sexual violence. Primary prevention focuses on stopping first time sexual violence victimization and perpetration. In 2010, the state developed its first comprehensive plan to address sexual violence, entitled Indianas Commitment to Primary Prevention: A State Free of Sexual Violence 2010-2015. This plan provided guidance for advocacy agencies across the Hoosier state to find a role in stopping sexual violence.. In 2015, the ISDH Office of Womens Health, along with nearly 30 community-based and governmental partner agencies, recommitted to ending sexual violence in Indiana. The Sexual Violence Primary Prevention Council (SVPPC) worked together to develop a comprehensive primary prevention plan under which ...
Heart Failure clinical trial. Clinical trial for CarDiac MagnEtic Resonance for Primary Prevention Implantable CardioVerter DebrillAtor ThErapy: an International Registry (DERIVATE).
Considering the scarcity of health care resources and the high costs associated with cardiovascular diseases, we investigated the spending on cardiovascular primary preventive activities and the prescribing behaviour of primary preventive cardiovascular medication (PPCM) in Dutch family practices (FPs). A mixed methods design was used, which consisted of a questionnaire (n = 80 FPs), video recordings of hypertension- or cholesterol-related general practitioner visits (n = 56), and the database of Netherlands Information Network of General Practice (n = 45 FPs; n = 157,137 patients). The questionnaire and video recordings were used to determine the average frequency and time spent on cardiovascular primary preventive activities per FP respectively. Taking into account the annual income and full time equivalents of general practitioners, health care assistants, and practice nurses as well as the practice costs, the total spending on cardiovascular primary preventive activities in Dutch FPs was ...
Wonder. What an interesting word. You hear the word wonder or its associative wonderful frequently during the holiday season. So I looked it up to see exactly what it meant, and this is the following definition that I found on http://www.thefreedictionary.com/wonder:. As a Noun - 1.. a. The emotion aroused by something awe-inspiring, astounding, or surprising: gazed with wonder at the northern lights.. b. The quality that arouses such emotion: "Her long fair hair was girlish, and touched with the wonder of mortal beauty, her face" (James Joyce).. 2.. a. One that arouses awe, astonishment, surprise, or admiration; a marvel: Given all his unhealthy habits, its a wonder hes lived this long. She was a wonder in that movie.. b. often Wonder A monumental human creation regarded with awe, especially one of seven monuments of the ancient world that appeared on various lists of late antiquity.. 3.. a. An extraordinary or remarkable act or achievement: That teacher has worked wonders with these ...
The Michigan Prevention Research Center (MPRC) is dedicated to a program of prevention research on the problems of employment, economic stress, and well-being throughout the life course. MPRC seeks to extend scientific understanding of the links between conditions of employment and mental and physical health, while at the same time, expanding the policy and practice options available to both the public and private sector ...
The Michigan Prevention Research Center (MPRC) is dedicated to a program of prevention research on the problems of employment, economic stress, and well-being throughout the life course. MPRC seeks to extend scientific understanding of the links between conditions of employment and mental and physical health, while at the same time, expanding the policy and practice options available to both the public and private sector ...
Foster Youth project:. The University of Maryland Prevention Research Center (UMD-PRC) and its Community Health Education and Research (CHEAR) student organization is embarking on a sexual health project for foster care youth and parents. Sexual and reproductive health may be sensitive topics for parent-youth discussion but they are extremely important topics for the mental and physical well-being of youth, and youths healthy transitioning to adulthood. The foster care system may not adequately assist foster parents to address the sexual health needs of foster youth, and foster youth may age out of the foster care system before their sexual development needs are fully met. Foster youths transition to adulthood may thus be more sexually risky than that of youth with ongoing family support. The goal of this project is to improve foster parents and youths knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to sexual and reproductive health, and assist youth in establishing relationships that will ...
This issues team spotlight is on Linda Ellis-Johnson, co-chair of the Tulane Prevention Research Centers Community Advisory Board (CAB). Linda is a retired educator previously employed by Computer Science Corporation in Indianapolis, Indiana, Indianapolis Public Schools, Orleans Parish Schools, and Jefferson Parish Public Schools. Linda holds an Associate of Arts Degree, Bachelors of English Degree, and a Masters in Guidance and Counseling. In addition to leading the Tulane PRCs CAB, she presently serves as President…. Read More. ...
This issues team spotlight is on Linda Ellis-Johnson, co-chair of the Tulane Prevention Research Centers Community Advisory Board (CAB). Linda is a retired educator previously employed by Computer Science Corporation in Indianapolis, Indiana, Indianapolis Public Schools, Orleans Parish Schools, and Jefferson Parish Public Schools. Linda holds an Associate of Arts Degree, Bachelors of English Degree, and a Masters in Guidance and Counseling. In addition to leading the Tulane PRCs CAB, she presently serves as President…. Read More. ...
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Results 900 patients (87% men, mean age 64±10 years) were included in the analysis. During a median follow-up of 669 days (IQR 363-1322 days), 150 patients (17%) died and 191 (21%) patients received appropriate device therapy. 114 (13%) patients died without prior appropriate therapy. Stratification of the risk for death without prior appropriate therapy resulted in risk categorisation of patients as low, intermediate or high risk. NYHA ≥III, advanced age, diabetes mellitus, left ventricular ejection fraction ≤25% and a history of smoking were significant independent predictors of death without appropriate ICD therapy. 5-year cumulative incidence for death without prior appropriate therapy ranged from 10% (95% CI 6% to 16%) in low-risk patients to 41% (95% CI 33% to 51%) in high-risk patients. ...
Our study found that in both older women and men with HF and reduced LVEF, implantation or prescription of a primary prevention ICD on discharge was associated with improved survival. Relative to those not receiving an ICD, those receiving (or prescribed) an ICD had similarly improved survival in both women and men, with no significant sex-based interactions. These HRs are similar to those seen overall in the Sudden Cardiac Death in Heart Failure Trial (SCD-HeFT; HR for mortality in ICD versus placebo groups, 0.77), which, among the landmark randomized clinical trials of primary prevention ICDs, most closely resembles the population studied here.1. Despite the survival benefits of primary prevention ICDs in patients with HF demonstrated in randomized clinical trials, benefit in the subgroup of women from these trials has not been definitively proved.7-9 This uncertainty on survival benefit may be one of several contributing factors to the lower rates of ICD ...
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On April 17, 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published its annual report: Incidence and Trends of Infections with Pathogens Transmitted Commonly Through Food - Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network, 10 U.S. Sites, 2006-2013 (http://bit.ly/041814report). CDC publishes this report to summarize data generated by the FoodNet surveillance program. FoodNet, established in 1996, monitors reported foodborne illnesses in 10 states. From this data, CDC tracks illness trends for major pathogens and provides estimates on foodborne illnesses in the United States. More information on . . .
Definition of Primary prevention in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. What is Primary prevention? Meaning of Primary prevention as a legal term. What does Primary prevention mean in law?
To keep weight in check, maintain a nutritious diet and eat plenty of meals high in fiber, that are filling and also will assist alleviate constipation. In case your luteal part (the time between ovulation and your next interval, throughout which your BBT ought to be barely elevated) is shorter than eleven days, that will imply that any potential pregnancy may have issue sticking, explains Ringland Murray, M. Since hCG isnt usually detected in the urine cdc guidelines for hiv in pregnancy a non-pregnant woman, a urine hCG is enough to cdc guidelines for hiv in pregnancy a pregnancy This can also be achieved with a best fertility period for pregnancy blood hCG take a look at. When do I need to go to the hospital. Braxton Hicks contractions - Short, fairly painless uterine contractions throughout pregnancy that may be mistaken for labor pains. Now he advocates home birth to anyone who will pay attention. You booking tests pregnancy look forward to a little bit of an vitality increase in your ...
Cryptosporidium parvum leaped to the attention of the United States following the 1993 outbreak in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which sickened 400,000 people. Other outbreaks in the United States have been associated with drinking and recreational water, consumption of contaminated foods, contact with animals, and childcare attendance. Despite its public health importance, the number of people who become infected each year is not known. In 1997, active surveillance for C. parvum was added to the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), a collaborative effort among the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, selected state health departments, the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Food and Drug Administration. During the first 2 years of surveillance, 1,023 laboratory-confirmed cases of cryptosporidiosis were detected in FoodNet (Connecticut, Minnesota, Oregon, and selected counties in California, Georgia, ...
This paper describes the design of the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study WOSCOPS which is a primary prevention trial involving men aged 45-64 yr with raised plasma cholesterol levels. The principal aim is to test the hypothesis that reduction of serum cholesterol by treatment with pravastatin a competitive inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-...
The primary purpose of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is to monitor antimicrobial resistance among enteric bacteria isolated from humans. Other components of the interagency NARMS program include surveillance for resistance in enteric bacteria isolated from retail meats, conducted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administrations Center for Veterinary Medicine (FDA-CVM), and for resistance in enteric bacteria isolated from food-producing animals, conducted by the U.S. Department of Agricultures Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) and Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS). Many NARMS activities are conducted within the framework of two CDC programs: the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), which is part of CDCs Emerging Infections Program (EIP), and the Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity (ELC) Program. In ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease with statins. T2 - Assessing the evidence base behind clinical guidance. AU - Grundy, Scott M. PY - 2016/2/1. Y1 - 2016/2/1. N2 - Statins and other cholesterol-lowering drugs are increasingly being used for primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Three lines of evidence inform the development of therapeutic goals for both drug and lifestyle intervention. This evidence reveals the following principles for cholesterol lowering in primary prevention: (a) the more (lowering), the better for relative risk reduction, (b) the lower, the better for absolute risk reduction, and (c) the earlier, the better for lifetime risk reduction. From these general axioms, treatment can be adjusted to guide therapies in individual patients. There is no one size fits all for primary prevention and simplicity is not the final word for the management ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vital signs: incidence and trends of infection with pathogens transmitted commonly through food - foodborne diseases active surveillance network, 10 US Sites, 1996-2010. MMWR 2011;60(22):749-55. A Guh, Q Phan, R Nelson, K Purviance, E Milardo, S Kinney, P Mshar, W Kasacek, M Cartter. Outbreak of Escherichia coli O157 associated with raw milk, Connecticut, 2008. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2010;51(12):1411-7. R Marcus, S Hurd, L Mank, P Mshar, Q Phan, K Jackson, K Watarida, Y Salfinger, S Kim, ML Ishida, B Kissler. Chicken salad as the source of a case of Listeria monocytogenes infection in Connecticut. Journal of Food Protection 2009;72(12):2602-6. JM Nelson, R Bednarczyk, J Nadle, P Clogher, J Gillespie, A Daniels, M Plantenga, A Ingram, K Edge, JP Furuno, E Scallan, G FoodNet Emerging Infections Program Working. FoodNet survey of food use and practices in ...
Diarrheal disease is a major health care problem and causes about 2 billion cases worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) ranks diarrheal disease as 2nd most common cause of child deaths among children under 5 years globally, particularly in developing countries. About 1.9 million children younger than 5 years of age perish from diarrhea each year, more than AIDS, malaria and measles combined. Common causes of bacterial diarrheal disease are Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp. and Y. enterocolitica.. Campylobacter species are one of the most common causes of bacterial diarrhea worldwide, responsible for 400 million - 500 million cases annually. The disease caused by the genus Campylobacter is called campylobacteriosis. More than 80% of Campylobacter infections are caused by C. jejuni. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates more than 2 million ...
Our researchers employ cross-cutting, interdisciplinary research techniques, ranging from basic longitudinal, developmental studies to randomized clinical trials and quasi-experimental designs, and dissemination, scaling and community engagement strategies to address risk and resiliency factors in behavioral health outcomes. A priority of our work is to better understand and ameliorate the effects of stress and adversity (e.g., child maltreatment, poverty, family dysfunction, health disparities) that often lead to negative outcomes, such as homelessness, deviant peer networks, academic failure, substance abuse, violence, dropping out of school, and teenage pregnancy. In tandem, we also work to improve child well-being, parenting practices, teaching practices, and parent-child relationships through rigorous prevention research and evidence-based programs. A growing area of emphasis is estimating the economic benefits of prevention programs through our ...
Breast Cancer & the Environment Research Program. NIEHS and the National Cancer Institute co-fund the Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program (BCERP), which supports multidisciplinary scientists, clinicians, and community partners studying environmental exposures that occur throughout a womans life and could predispose her to breast cancer.. Childrens Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers. Since 1998, the NIEHS/EPA Childrens Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers have studied individual, regional, national, and global environmental exposures and their effects on childrens health.. Deepwater Horizon Research Consortia. NIEHS is leading this five-year, $25.2 million program, which created community-university partnerships aimed at addressing the health effects stemming from the oil spill.. Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers. ...
IPRC Associate Director Carri Casteel led the meeting to discuss recommendations developed by the John Hopkins Center for Injury Research (JHCIRP) and based on evidenced-based strategies for reducing the opioid epidemic in several areas: prescription monitoring programs, prescribing guidelines, pharmacy benefit managers, overdose education/ Naloxone distribution, addiction treatment, and community-based prevention. One goal of the meeting was to review these strategies and compare them to what is happening in Iowa.. "It was an opportunity for those working in fields affected by opioids to take an inventory of our successes and to identify gaps specific to Iowa that need to be addressed to move forward on this issue," Casteel said.. Those participating in the meeting represented law enforcement, psychiatry, emergency medicine, public health, nursing, non-profit/advocacy, poison control, treatment, pharmacy, insurance, drug control policy, and more. ...
Texas state data from the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) show that 52% of high school students have had sexual intercourse, and that among sexually active teens, 42% did not use a condom during the last time having sex. On the basis of the YRBSS data and findings from other studies, the UTPRC estimates that in Texas, more than 825,000 students in grades 6 to 12 are having sex each year.. These data prompted researchers at the UTPRC to find ways to support community education about teen pregnancy prevention. One result of their efforts-and the cornerstone of the support the center offers-is an effective intervention called Its Your Game: Keep It Real, which combines in-class instruction with lessons students can access online. In a middle school study reported in the Journal of Adolescent Health, students who did not participate in Its Your Game were 1.29 times more likely to start having sex by the 9th grade than students who received the program. Lessons include ...
From April 2007 to April 2008, 80 adults with epilepsy and clinically significant depression were recruited into the study and randomized to receive usual care or PEARLS. Usual care included a letter to the patients physician reporting the depression diagnosis and encouraging depression treatment as appropriate; no additional services were provided, but participants could seek mental health care. During the first 19 weeks, people in the PEARLS group received eight, 50-minute in-home sessions delivered by a PEARLS therapist (weeks 1-3, 5, 7, 11, 15, and 19), which were followed by monthly telephone calls assessing participants use of PST through the 12th month. No further intervention occurred after the 12th month.. Supervised by a team psychiatrist, PEARLS therapists (masters-level social workers) received training on PST and epilepsy. The home sessions included PST and emphasized social and physical activation, because physical activity can improve seizure control and mood. After the ...
Definition of one-day wonders in the Idioms Dictionary. one-day wonders phrase. What does one-day wonders expression mean? Definitions by the largest Idiom Dictionary.
This study aims to prevent childhood obesity with early life (pregnancy) intensified counselling. The recruited intervention group is pregnant mothers who are at risk to get gestational diabetes. Lifestyle intervention (nutritional and physical activity) begins during pregnancy in maternity clinics and continues in child wellfare clinics until the child is 5 years of age ...
This is a large, randomized trial of a Lyme disease primary prevention program for passengers on ferry boats going to Nantucket Island for the period from Memorial Day until Labor Day. Boats are randomized to experimental or control interventions.. The experimental intervention is a performance-based educational program on Lyme disease prevention, and uses supplemental materials. An entertainment troupe delivers the intervention using comedy, theater, and vaudevillian techniques. The entertainers present three shows in different locations on the boat. Each show is about 10 minutes and covers the severity and likelihood of acquiring Lyme disease and the benefits of tick avoidance and search and removal behaviors. When people on experimental boats enroll in the study they receive the following free materials: a wallet-sized tick ID card, a laminated shower card with tick-removal instructions, a map showing ...
A debate within the public health community surrounding CDC recommendations for treatment of exposed individuals during last years fungal meningitis outbreak was highlighted recently.
Jean Clare Smith, MD 80, MPH, completed a one-year fellowship in India between her second and third years at UCLA that left her with a deep interest in public health. She worked in maternal/child health in Cambodia before joining the Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) program - a two-year field-epidemiology training program for physicians based at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Upon completion of EIS, Dr. Smith was recruited by the CDC to take long-term assignments in India and Nepal with the World Health Organization (WHO). She also worked in Myanmar, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Maldives, North Korea, Sri Lanka and Thailand before she returned to the CDC, where she has served, since 2006, as a medical officer with the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for the United States. The transition from being a practicing internist to a fledgling EIS officer was not an easy one, but after visiting the CDC in 1991, I knew ...
Repeated at 12:15 pm, Cherkasky Auditorium, Montefiore Medical Center. Dr. Amanda Castel is an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and in Pediatrics at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health and School of Medicine. She also co-directs the Masters of Science in Public Health Microbiology and Emerging Infectious Diseases program. Dr. Castel completed medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, her residency in general pediatrics at Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, and a masters of public health at Johns Hopkins University. Following her residency, she was a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) Officer where she was assigned to the Communicable Disease Control Program at the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. After EIS, she went on to complete her residency in ...
Iran has arrested an opposition figure who had been "directed by Frances intelligence service" and he is now in custody in the Islamic republic, the Revolutionary Guards said on Monday.. Ruhollah Zam has been detained in a sophisticated and professional operation by the IRGCs intelligence organization, the Guards said in a statement.. Zam reportedly lived in exile in Paris, but the Guards statement did not specify when or where he was arrested.. The Guards said he was trapped by its intelligence organization.. It said this was despite the fact he had been "directed by Frances intelligence service and supported by intelligence services of America and the Zionist regime.". The Guards said they managed to "deceive" foreign services and arrest him by "using modern intelligence methods and innovative tactics".. It said the operation showed Irans enemies were "lagging behind" its own intelligence services.. Source: Agencies ...
The American Heart Association (AHA) CEO Roundtable today releases Resilience in the Workplace, an evidence review report with practical guidance for employers looking to implement resilience training programs. With two-thirds ...
MUMBAI, (GNI): Security And Intelligence Services (India) Limited ("Company" or "Issuer") proposes to open on Monday, July 31, 2017, an Initial Public Offering of Equity Shares of Face Value of Rs. 10 each ("Equity Shares") for Cash (the "Offer") comprising a fresh issue of Equity Shares aggregating up to Rs. 3,622.50 million (The "Fresh Issue") and an offer for sale of up to 5,120,619 Equity Shares by the Selling Shareholders, comprising an offer for sale of up to 3,402,764 Equity Shares by Theano Private Limited; an offer for sale of up to 68,336 Equity Shares by AAJV Investment Trust (together, the "Investor Selling Shareholders"); an offer for sale of up to 786,517 Equity Shares by Ravindra Kishore Sinha; an offer for sale of up to 524,345 Equity Shares by Rituraj Kishore Sinha (together, the "Promoter Selling Shareholders"), and an offer for sale of 338,657 Equity Shares by the Other Selling Shareholders (defined hereinafter) (together, the "Offer For Sale").. The Price Band for the Offer ...
We examined outbreak investigations conducted around the world from 1988 to 1999 by the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions Epidemic Intelligence Service. In 44 (4.0%) of 1,099 investigations, identified causative agents had bioterrorism potential. In six investigations, intentional use of infectious agents was considered. Healthcare providers reported 270 (24.6%) outbreaks and infection control practitioners reported 129 (11.7%); together they reported 399 (36.3%) of the outbreaks. Health departments reported 335 (30.5%) outbreaks. For six outbreaks in which bioterrorism or intentional contamination was possible, reporting was delayed for up to 26 days. We confirmed that the most critical component for bioterrorism outbreak detection and reporting is the frontline healthcare profession and the local health departments. Bioterrorism preparedness should emphasize education and support of this frontline as well as ...
Congress has used cost-effectiveness analyses in deciding that Medicare should cover selected secondary prevention services, such as screening for breast cancer and colon cancer. But the measure of cost per QALY is routinely ignored in decisions both about treatment for demonstrated disease and about primary prevention of disease. It is ignored, though, in entirely different ways. Medical treatments are paid for even if they are cost-ineffective; in fact, the Medicare program has been blocked from even considering cost-effectiveness in determining whether to cover the costs of treatment. For example, treatment of metastatic lung cancer may cost $800,000 per QALY, but it is typically provided. In sharp contrast, primary preventive services are often withheld even if they are highly cost-effective. For example, the Diabetes Prevention Program, a lifestyle-training program focused on exercise and nutrition that costs only ...
National Health InsuranceIndividual Plans at Group Rates! Great Coverage/Options!. LIFE presents The Seven Wonders of Life Insurance. As part of this years Life Insurance Awareness Month, LIFE (The Life and Health Insurance Foundation for Education, a non-profit organization dedicated to educating the public about life, health, disability and long term care insurance) has produced a great piece about the importance of life insurance and the way it provides security for families. Visit www.lifehappens.org if you would like to see the original article, The Seven Wonders of Life Insurance, and some great supporting videos. In the meantime, here are the key points made in the article:. Many people purchase life insurance to pay for funeral and other final expenses. With proper planning, life insurance can provide much more for your family. Here is what life insurance can do for you:. Life insurance can buy time.It affords your family and loved ones the time they need to grieve. Without life ...
David L. Katz, MD, FACP, MPH, FACPM, is an internationally renowned authority on nutrition, weight management, and the prevention of chronic disease, and an internationally recognized leader in integrative medicine and patient-centered care. He is a board certified specialist in both Internal Medicine, and Preventive Medicine/Public Health, and Associate Professor (adjunct) in Public Health Practice at the Yale University School of Medicine. He is the Director and founder (1998) of Yale Universitys Prevention Research Center; Director and founder of the Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital (2000) in Derby, Conn.; founder and president of the non-profit Turn the Tide Foundation; and formerly the Director of Medical Studies in Public Health at the Yale School of Medicine for eight years. This post originally appeared on his blog at The Huffington Post ...
Wonder Drain Made for Tile Molded Polyurethane Shower Base (Common: 36-in W x 36-in L; Actual: 36-in W x 36-in L) at Lowes. Wonder Drain shower pans feature a square tileable drain top that makes the drain invisible; all you see is your beautiful tiled shower floor! Choose from
UAM Boll Weevils sink ATU Wonder Boys - MONTICELLO - When it rains it pours. But the Arkansas Tech Wonder Boys simply drowned Saturday at Convoy Leslie Cotton Boll Stadium. Things couldnt have gotten much worse for ATU which suffered four turnove...
Senior Project Advisor, Guinea Worm Eradication Program Dr. James A. Zingeser is an epidemiologist who has worked at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and The Carter Center since 1989. Zingeser trained in clinical veterinary medicine at Michigan State University and public health epidemiology at the University of Michigan. He began his career at CDC in 1989 as an Epidemic Intelligence Service officer and subsequently worked throughout Africa, Europe, and Asia on projects ranging from Guinea worm and polio eradication to trachoma and meningococcal meningitis control. In the course of his career, Zingeser has been posted to one ministry of agriculture, two African ministries of health, and the World Health Organization. He participated in the first Guinea Worm Eradication Program mission to Togo in 1989 and joined the Centers Guinea worm efforts full time in 1995, as the resident technical advisor in the ...
David L. Katz, MD, FACP, MPH, FACPM, is an internationally renowned authority on nutrition, weight management, and the prevention of chronic disease, and an internationally recognized leader in integrative medicine and patient-centered care. He is a board certified specialist in both Internal Medicine, and Preventive Medicine/Public Health, and Associate Professor (adjunct) in Public Health Practice at the Yale University School of Medicine. He is the Director and founder (1998) of Yale Universitys Prevention Research Center; Director and founder of the Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital (2000) in Derby, Conn.; founder and president of the non-profit Turn the Tide Foundation; and formerly the Director of Medical Studies in Public Health at the Yale School of Medicine for eight years. This post originally appeared on his blog at The Huffington Post ...
For patients taking statins for prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), extended care with nurse-led cardiovascular risk-factor counseling improves statin adherence and reduces anxiety, with improvements seen in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol for primary prevention patients.
Environmental public health indicators are measures that provide information (quantitative data) regarding a populations health status in respect to environmental factors. CSTE was involved in the beginning stages of identifying and developing the first environmental public health indicators for CDCs Environmental Public Health Tracking Program. Since 2000, CDCs Tracking Program has enhanced environmental health surveillance capacity both nationally and among state health departments by encouraging the linkage of environmental exposure data and public health monitoring data through standardized, systematic methods.. Members maintain CSTEs environmental health indicators to support and supplement environmental public health surveillance and assessments occurring at the state, territorial, local, and tribal level. These indicators utilize relevant existing data sources to summarize the health effects of environmental exposures and are geared for universal applicability - each state should be ...
With the publication of MADIT II in 2002 and SCD-HeFT in 2004, primary device implant indications have expanded; and with the COMPANION trial in 2005 supporting the benefit of biventricular devices, the number of ICD implants has increased further. Since these trials, data on implant patterns in a large group of patients from multiple centers has not been reported. The Advancements in ICD Therapy (ACT) prospective implant registry is a non-consecutive patient study developed to track such a group undergoing device implantation. Data on device and lead performance, arrhythmic events and mortality are tracked.. Methods: Over a 19 month period from November 2004.to June, 2006, 5454 devices were implanted at 286 centers in 38 states in the United States. Patients where enrolled within 2 weeks of implant. Patients are being followed for a period of 2 years at 6 month intervals with device interrogations performed at each visit. Primary prevention patients are ...
In response to the need to develop their public health capabilities and infrastructure, several countries developed field-based training programs in applied epidemiology and public health. The primary goal of these training programs was to foster the development of field-trained epidemiologists who are competent in the practical application of epidemiologic methods to a wide range of public health problems in their respective areas.. Various models of field-based training programs exist, e.g. the Epidemic Intelligence Service of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Field Epidemiology Training Programs (FETPs), Public Health Schools Without Walls (PHSWOWs) and the European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training (EPIET). Regardless of the model, all of them subscribe to the maxim of "training through service." Each program is adapted to meet the health needs of the country or region in which it functions.. TEPHINET ...
Liu is a Professor of Epidemiology at Brown University School of Public Health and Professor of Medicine (Endcrinology) at the Brown University Alpert Medical School, and director of the Center for Global Cardiometabolic Health (CGCH). His research is broadly concerned with the etiology of cardio-metabolic diseases, with special emphasis on identifying nutritional and molecular strategies that could be used for the prediction and prevention of these phenotypes in human populations. He earned his medical degree from Jinan University in China in 1991. He then earned his M.S in epidemiology from State University of New York at Albany in 1993. Liu then received his masters in public health (MPH) and doctoral degrees (ScD) in both epidemiology and nutrition from Harvard University in 1998. Liu also completed a fellowship in public health and preventive medicine in the Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) program at the Centers for Disease ...
Prevention Research Center - Ottumwa Community-wide Assessment Survey; Ottumwa Community Advisory Board to address obesity; Ottumwa Middle Schools Planet Health Physical Education Program; Evaluation services for Mahaska Wapello Early Childhood Iowa (MWECI) Survey of parents; Iowa Cancer Consortium Latino Cancer Summit Community Leader Participation; Ottumwa Community Gardens Technical Assistance; Community Transformation Grant (CTG) Meetings/Technical Assistance; Healthy Options Restaurant Toolkit; Evaluation of Community Health Needs Assessment and Health Improvement ...
Martin J. Blaser(born 1948) is the Muriel G. and George W. Singer Professor of Translational Medicine, Director of the NYU Human Microbiome Program, former Chair of the Department of Medicine, and Professor of Microbiology at New York University School of Medicine. In 2013 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is an established researcher in microbiology and infectious diseases. Blasers work has focused on Helicobacter pylori, Campylobacter species, Salmonella, Bacillus anthracis, and more recently on the human microbiome. Blaser obtained his undergraduate education from the University of Pennsylvania in 1969, graduated from the New York University School of Medicine in 1973, and did his post-graduate training at the University of Colorado School of Medicine from 1973 to 1979. Blaser was an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 1979 to 1981. In ...
The statistics were calculated from an assortment of sources, some of them new. One of the most promising, the Food-borne Disease Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), is a collaborative effort of the CDC, the Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration, specifically designed to measure these illnesses. Yet FoodNet tracks only seven out of the 28 pathogens included in these numbers, and those 28 represent only a fraction of the 200 known diseases transmitted through food. PulseNet, another innovation, can compare strains genetically, thus linking apparently random cases that may be part of wider outbreaks.. Tracking food-borne disease is also complicated by the number of illnesses thought to be caused by unknown pathogens. For example, only 20 years ago Listeria, E. coli O157:H7, Campylobacter and Cyclospora, all of which have caused recent outbreaks, were not known to cause foodborne illness. New pathogens also emerge as people change ...
TUESDAY, Nov. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Over the past year, nearly 2,300 Americans have been sickened -- and 47 have died -- from a mysterious and severe lung illness tied to vaping.. Now, a study of lung illnesses in Minnesota supports the notion that a compound known as vitamin E acetate, present in many "black market" vape products, could be to blame.. The study found that while vitamin E acetate was not found in most illicit vape products tested in Minnesota in 2018, a year later -- coinciding with the recent illness outbreak -- nearly all such samples contained the chemical.. This chemical analysis of these before-and-after samples "support a potential role for vitamin E acetate in the [illness] outbreak," according to a team led by Joanne Taylor, of the Epidemic Intelligence Service at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.. The illnesses that are affecting vapers can be sudden and severe. Symptoms include cough, ...
Environmental Public Health Tracking Abstract: This web portal is part of a national network created in cooperation with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to provide health, exposure, environmental hazard data and information that communities can use to improve their health. **Click below to visit the EPHT Portal** Visit the CDC National Environmental Public Health Tracking portal for data on environments, health effects, and population health in the United States. ...
PEPH is a network of scientists, community members, educators, healthcare providers, public health officials, and policymakers who share the goal of increasing the impact of environmental public health research at the local, regional, and national level. PEPH defines environmental public health as the science of conducting and translating research into action to address environmental exposures and health risks of concern to the public.. Grantees: for information on how to access the PEPH Resource Center, please contact Liam OFallon or Lynn Albert. You can also visit the NIEHS Research Partners page to access the Resource Center and other NIEHS shared datasets and applications.. ...
Despite the growing number of options for treating type 2 diabetes, clinicians wanting to prevent the disease in high-risk patients have few good choices. Lifestyle changes that lead to weight loss can prevent diabetes (1, 2) but are difficult to adopt and maintain (3). Drugs used to treat diabetes are often expensive, and testing has only recently begun on their efficacy as primary preventive agents. Two large trials in 2002 showed that metformin (1) and acarbose (4) effectively prevent diabetes in participants with impaired glucose tolerance, but neither drug has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for prevention and their use has not become part of routine practice ...
Jessica Wakelee supervises all phases of the data collection process including research design, instrument development and administration, database management, data analysis, and reporting. As an evaluation leader, Wakelee currently assists with the evaluation of a number of health-related programs, including the UAB Center for the Study of Community Health (a CDC-funded Prevention Research Center), the Jefferson County Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW) grant, and the UAB Center for Clinical and Translational Science (an NIH/HCRR-funded Clinical and Translational Science Award). She also serves as the Evaluation Coordinator for the South Central Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center (SCPERLC), South Central Public Health Training Center (SCPHTC), and Alabama Public Health Training Center (AL PHTC). Early in her career, Wakelee assisted in the evaluation of the Arizona Center for Public Health Preparedness during her tenure as the Assistant Director ...
Dr. Kevin Volpp is the founding Director of the Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics at the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics (LDI CHIBE), Director of the NIH-funded Penn CMU Roybal P30 Center in Behavioral Economics and Health and the Penn CDC Prevention Research Center, Vice Chairman for Health Policy for the Department of Medical Ethics and Policy, and a Professor of Medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Health Care Management at the Wharton School. He is a board certified practicing physician at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center. Dr. Volpp has received numerous awards for his work, including career achievement awards from the US National Institutes of Health and the Association of Clinical and Translational Science, the John Thompson Prize from the Association of University Programs in Health Administration; the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the Alice S. Hersh Award from ...
Serenade Garden Serenade Garden Disease Control. 32 fl oz Serenade Garden Disease Control Ready to Use (RTU) is a broad spectrum, preventative biofungicide recommended for the control or suppression of many important plant diseases. Serenade Garden Disease Control RTU may be used on vegetables, fruits, and nuts including tomatoes, peppers, melons, carrots, broccoli, lettuce, onions, apples, pears, and walnuts in addition to annual and perennial bedding plants and flowers, roses, potted flowers, foliage plants, trees and shrubs located in residential greenhouses and residential and commercial landscapes. Serenade Garden Disease Control RTU can be applied up to and including the day of harvest. Serenade Garden: Serenade Garden Disease Control. 32 fl oz [IN125] - Pest & Disease ...
臨床研究,如Framingham Heart Study, Coronary Primary Prevention Trial 等發現,「好膽固醇」的水平每提高 0.03 mmol/L,患上心臟病... ...
This project is a community based participatory research collaboration among two universities and two research networks that will enable increased Informed Decision Making (IDM) for prostate cancer screening in Hispanic and African American men. Our collaborating universities are the University of Texas Health Science center at Houston, Texas Prevention Research Center (TPRC), Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), and the University of South Carolina (USC). Our collaborating networks are the Latinos in a Network for Cancer Control (LINCC), and the South Carolina Cancer Research Network (SC-CRN). Through the LINCC and the SCCRN, we have been able to link to the Cancer and Chronic Disease Consortium (CCDC, El Paso) which is working with Hispanic communities and the South Carolina Baptist Education and Missionary Convention (BEMC) which is a network of African American churches. Following the quality criteria for inclusion in evidence reviews conducted by the ...
HARARE - Zimbabwes HIV prevalence rate has increased to 15 percent from 14,26 percent in 2011, amid fears gains made so far could go to waste given the rising poverty levels pushing more and more people into prostitution to make ends meet.. According to statistics from National Aids Council (Nac), the total number of people infected by the virus has increased by 0,74 percent.. At least 1,2 million Zimbabweans are living with HIV, but the figures could be higher as most men are shunning testing and counselling centres.. In 2011, Zimbabwe had recorded a decline in HIV prevalence rate to 13,7 percent down from 18 percent in 2003 which represented over 1,6 million Zimbabweans above the age of 15 being positive.. Sinatra Nyathi, Bulawayo provincial Aids coordinator told a workshop held for Bulawayo City Council (BCC) councillors this week that early marriages; spousal separation and low risk perception were the major drivers of the swell and compounding efforts to eradicate HIV and Aids.. The ...
Summary. This Health Advisory describes the identification of emerging Shigella strains with elevated minimum inhibitory concentration values for ciprofloxacin and outlines new recommendations for clinical diagnosis, management, and reporting, as well as new recommendations for laboratories and public health officials. Current interpretive criteria provided by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) categorize these strains as susceptible to ciprofloxacin, which is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic and a key agent in the management of Shigella infections.. However, recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state and local public health partners show that these strains often have a quinolone resistance gene that may lead to clinically significant reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Clinicians treating patients with multidrug-resistant shigellosis for whom antibiotic treatment is ...
Bread is a habit in the U.S.A. In many other countries, its a deeply rooted ritual. Bread has caused riots in France. Its a religion in Greece, a symbol of Christ (both of them rise). In Germany, its a national treasure. And on and on. It never got beyond routine here. Wonder Bread, which in its 90th year, gets blamed for that.
89(4):780-5. Kurtz S, Lau E, Watson H, Schmier JK, Parvizi J. Economic burden of periprosthetic joint infection in the United States. J Arthroplasty. 2012;27(suppl 8):61-5. Magill SS, Edwards JR, Bamberg W, et al. Multistate point-prevalence survey of health care-associated infections. N Engl J Med. 2014;370(13):1198-208. Magill SS, Hellinger W, Cohen J, et al. Prevalence of healthcare-associated infections in acute care hospitals in Jacksonville, Florida. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2012;33(3):283-91. Mangram AJ, Horan TC, Pearson ML, Silver LC, Jarvis WR. Guideline for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection, 1999. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee. Am J Infect Control. 1999;27(2):97-132. Shallwani H, Shakir HJ, Aldridge AM, Donovan MT, Levy EI, Gibbons KJ. Mandatory change from surgical skull caps to ...
This document provides interim guidance for state and local health departments, hospitals, and clinicians in regions with few or no reported cases of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) (S-OIV) regarding which patients to evaluate for possible infection with swine influenza A (H1N1). As of April 29 1:00 PM, there were 91 laboratory confirmed cases of S-OIV infection identified in 14 states in the United States. Human cases of S-OIV infection also have been identified internationally. Based on the rapid spread of the S-OIV thus far, public health officials believe that more cases will be identified over the next several weeks, including in regions that currently have few or no reported cases ...
https://www.precisionbusinessinsights.com/market-reports/global-foodborne-diseases-treatment-market/#ulp-14mlyhjMGhVjZqa3. Geographically Foodborne Diseases Treatment Market has been segmented into following regions viz. North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and Middle East & Africa. North America foodborne diseases treatment market is expected to grow at notable rates due to increase in the prevalence of foodborne diseases such as botulism and toxoplasmosis, and increase in R&D investment by companies on antibiotics and vaccines. Asia Pacific and Africa regions are projecting lucrative opportunity for foodborne diseases treatment market owing to increase in the incidence of foodborne diseases in these regions. According to WHO estimates 2015, Africa and South East Asia regions have the highest incidence and death rates, including children under the age of 5 years. Europe is expected to show ...
Research topic: "An Analysis of a Questionnaire Survey on Healthcare Workers (HCWs) knowledge on Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) Prevention Guidelines at Oslo University Hospital (OUH). Background MRSA is a type of staphylococcus bacteria that is resistant to antibiotics called beta-lactams antibiotics and other more common antibiotics such as oxacillin, penicillin and amoxicillin [Center for Disease Prevention and Control, CDC (2006)]. In spite intensive fight against MRSA, MRSA cases are soaring across nations and regions. Effective prevention measures require knowledge of and compliance to infection prevention and control guidelines by Healthcare workers (HCW). Objective: The objective of the study was to assess and analyses the knowledge of relevant HCWs on MRSA and MRSA prevention guidelines at OUH. Method: The study used a questionnaire survey that ...
Until 2005 the rural community managed on its own, with the augmentation funding due it from the state and county. For more than half of a century it fended for itself with regard to the provision of basic fire protection service, utilizing a paid call firefighting staff working out of its traditional Wonder Valley Fire Station. After the community voted to become a special county fire district tax zone, the volunteer fire department was subsumed by the county fire department a little more than a decade ago. The San Bernardino County Fire Department operated Station 45, located at 80526 Amboy Road, manned with both on-call firefighters and volunteers along with two professional, full-time firefighters, serving under the command of a county fire division commander, in this case Captain Mike Bilheimer, who was formerly a senior officer with the San Bernardino City Fire Department until that entity was annexed into the county fire division in 2015. Earlier this year, there was some concern that the ...
Did Newton unweave the rainbow by reducing it to its prismatic colors, as Keats contended? Did he, in other words, diminish beauty? Far from it, says acclaimed scientist Richard Dawkins; Newtons unweaving is the key to much of modern astronomy and to the breathtaking poetry of modern cosmology. Mysteries dont lose their poetry because they are solved: the solution often is more beautiful than the puzzle, uncovering deeper mysteries. With the wit, insight, and spellbinding prose that have made him a best-selling author, Dawkins takes up the most important and compelling topics in modern science, from astronomy and genetics to language and virtual reality, combining them in a landmark statement of the human appetite for wonder. This is the book Richard Dawkins was meant to write: a brilliant assessment of what science is (and isnt), a tribute to science not because it is useful but because it is uplifting.
As a retired Ottawa college professor of marketing and management, Defayette recognizes the value of his products. He sells beeswax for candles, honeycomb, pollen (which sells out quickly), raw, unpasteurized honey and propolis. Honey is not only tasty; it also works as an antiseptic for infected wounds. Bee pollen is considered a wonder food by the health food community because it is very high in protein. It contains 18 amino acids as well as a long list of vitamins and minerals such as vitamin B complex and iron. But thats not all. Defayette says if you consider pollen, wax and honey in terms of what a human needs to survive, "youve got three of the most important elements of life: the protein, the fat and the carbohydrate ...
I train sex and relationship education on a regular basis and often have discussions with parents, carers and professionals alike about the subject of puberty. I always said that when Boy Wonder starts with this, I will blog about it as one of those subjects that until you live it you cannot do it justice, I know that now!. Boy Wonder is a ten and a half year old boy with a diagnosis of high functioning autism, ADHD, sensory processing disorder, severe anxiety, PDA traits and Chiari Malformation type 1. He is looked after by a range of clinicians in paediatrics and CAMHS who between them have diagnosed this collection of difficulties. Boy Wonder is described by many as a complex child.. It all started in January of this year, however it has taken until now to fully realise that this is it!! We had, had a pretty uneventful Christmas in terms of meltdowns and emotional turmoil which was very unusual for Boy Wonder. Usually we would be battling with the Santa thing (strange man coming into ...
The conquest of the Greece Kingdom to the various other hemisphere causing an easy access of journey to various regions such as the local colony of Egyptians, Persians, and Babylonians. This is led to the great knowledge of people to some great many buildings in the conquered areas which is then recorded in a summary book (Compendium). The book summary then is entitled "theamata" which means "things that must be seen" or "Things to be seen" or "must-sees." From the original Greek word "Efta thaumata kosmou tou" which means "Seven Wonders of the World" or "Seven Miracles of the world". This book is a summary guide (Guidebook) to have some kind of journey at that time. Every adventurer / explorer at that time has itheor own version of book, but one of the most popular enough is a summary of the book which is written in the form of poetry, is "Antipater of Sidon," which was made around year 140 BC (BCE ...
Everyone dreams to include beauty to the beautiful planet when you are beautiful themselves. The wonder natural home remedies offer an chance to become beautiful naturally. Additionally, the wonder products available for sale their very own negative effects since theyre filled with chemicals. Also, these chemicals can offer instant result however when these items can be used for lengthy time, they end up being very dangerous. Furthermore, its also discovered that many products contains such chemicals that can lead to sever illnesses, for example when a substandard cream can be used for several years, it may arise cancer of the skin. Such conditions when one is not aware concerning the chemicals utilized in beauty items are dangerous as much as what level, the wonder natural home remedies will end up being greatly reliable, and free of any hazardous chemicals.. It really is very unfortunate we have overlooked and sidelined the wonder natural home remedies. The glamorous models within the ...
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It is time that parents and physicians seek safe, natural and effective alternatives to potentially harmful drugs for children, according to homeopathic expert, Dana Ullman, MPH. Dr. Ullman shows why homeopathic medicine is one such alternative and may be effective for colic, teething, hyperactivity, earaches and other childrens physical and emotional upsets.
A wealth of literature has shed light on religious, philosophical, scientific and medical concepts of extraordinary bodies, wonders and monsters in the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Lorraine Daston and Katharine Park have been tremendously influential with their Wonders and the order of nature (1998) and in many ways contributed to our understanding of emotions and the monstrous before 1750. One of their suggestions is that there was no disenchantment, or clear pattern of naturalization, of monsters in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Monstrous births were explained by natural causes, such as a narrow womb or an excess of seed, already by medieval writers whereas they could still be read as divine signs in the late seventeenth century. No linear story took monsters from an older religious framework to a newer naturalistic one or from prodigies to wonders to naturalized objects. Wonders eventually lost their position as cherished elements in European elite culture but ...
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As a result of increasing knowledge about the Zika virus, the CDC updated their recommendations. The changes are based on declining trends in the number of reported cases of Zika virus infection in the Americas, emerging evidence on prolonged detection of Zika IgM antibodies, and new limitations for interpreting serologic tests during pregnancy. IgM is most likely to be detected in the first 12 weeks after infection but may persist beyond 12 weeks in some infected individuals, limiting the ability of testing to determine whether an infection occurred during or prior to pregnancy. False positive results and cross-reactivity with other flaviviruses can occur with IgM assays. Therefore, it is important to ascertain whether a woman had exposure to flaviviruses other than Zika virus before the current pregnancy because a positive IgM result might have been caused by cross-reactivity from a previous flavivirus exposure. Given the possibility of a false positive result, laboratory test results should ...
The 3+2 Environmental Public Health Program allows eligible students to receive a bachelors degree in Coastal Environmental Science with a concentration in Environmental Health and a masters degree in Public Health in five years, instead of six. ...
Given the recent flourish of new vaccines, concerns about vaccine supply and distribution, and financial ramifications, family physicians must have a better understanding of the process by which new vaccines come into routine use. Following appropriate phase 3 clinical trials for evaluation of a vaccines safety and effectiveness, manufacturers submit a biologic license application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Often during this period, a working group of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) is formed to address the underlying epidemiology and need; review the clinical data for safety, immunogenicity, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness; and draft a recommendation for use. Following licensure, if sufficient need exists, a recommendation is typically brought to ACIP for discussion and vote at its next meeting.. Once a new recommendation has been approved by ACIP, it becomes a provisional CDC recommendation and is posted on the ACIP Web site ...
Environmental Public Health Tracking is the ongoing collection, integration, analysis, interpretation and dissemination of data from environmental monitoring and data from human exposure and health effects surveillance. The goal of EPHT is to protect communities by providing information to plan, apply and evaluate public health actions to prevent and control environmentally-related diseases.. The environment is important in human development and health. Researchers have linked exposures to some environmental hazards with specific diseases. For example, exposure to secondhand smoke has been linked to lung cancer and exposure to lead-based paint has been linked to decreased mental function in children. Other suspected links remain unproven. Tracking environmentally-related exposures and health effects may help to link hazards with illness.. National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network. The Centers for Disease ...
Ethicon Plus Sutures are the only globally available sutures coated with triclosan that inhibit bacteria from colonizing the suture.. Somerville, NJ - May 10, 2017 - Ethicon*, a trusted leader in suture technology, supports the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions (CDC) updated Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection, 2017. Recently revised, the CDC guideline now includes a recommendation that health care professionals "consider the use of triclosan-coated sutures for the prevention of SSI [surgical site infection]." The guideline appeared in the May 3 edition of JAMA Surgery online.. This announcement adds to the growing support from other prestigious organizations, including the World Health Organization, the American College of Surgeons and the Surgical Infection Society, on the positive impact of triclosan-coated sutures in reducing the risk for SSI.. Suture selection provides an ...
Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) announced on Monday that is looking to develop mosquito insecticides from locally grown pyrethrum flowers. This is good news to Kenyas pyrethrum farmers in the country who are set to be the first hand beneficiaries of the project.. In her bid to contain the deadly malaria disease that claims nearly 23,000 lives in the East African, plans to replace the synthetic insecticides available in the country with pyrethrum-based insecticide.. KEMRI announced plans for the study after the countrys health ministry discovered from a research that the synthetic pyrethroids cannot kill 60% of the malaria-causing mosquitos. The study is also aimed and providing a lasting solution to the mosquito menace that is increasingly becoming resistant towards the available synthetic pyrethrum.. Kenyas pyrethrum farmers are set to be the major benefactors as if the study and trials are success it will mean that a Pyrethrum plant will be established by the Kenya Pyrethrum ...
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Officials from the United Nations Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS report that Cambodia now has the highest HIV prevalence rate in Asia, with about 1.5% of the nations population infected with the virus, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. Among female sex workers in the country, the prevalence rate is estimated to be 40%. Government officials have launched a multifaceted campaign to fight HIV in the country, including a national law requiring sex workers in brothels, which are legal in the country, to use condoms. About 20 Cambodians become infected with HIV every day. ...
The Oregon State Public Health Laboratory supports state and local infectious disease control efforts, works to prevent metabolic disorders detectable at birth, and assures the quality of testing in clinical and environmental laboratories.
CDCs Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) met on October 25-26 in Atlanta to discuss the latest information on vaccines and immunization practices.
National Aids Research Institute in Pune -Contact details and more information from National Aids Research Institute in Pune. Search through over 7564, NGOs database by State, City or Pincode.
This report published in Communicable Diseases Intelligence, Volume 28, Number 2 provides and analysis of foodborne disease outbreaks in Australia from 1995 to 2000. Health agencies are increasingly conducting systematic reviews of foodborne disease outbreak investigations to develop strategies to prevent future outbreaks.
A new study shows life expectancy is on the decline for most working-age Americans. Those between the ages of 25 and 64 are now less likely to reach the age of retirement than at any point in recent history. For many of us, this news may come as a bit of a shock. Were used to going to work every day, collecting a paycheck, and saving up for retirement, but reaching the age of retirement may not be as attainable as we once thought.. As a healthcare provider, discover whats causing this trend and how you can help your patients live a long, healthy life.. Understanding the Results of the Study. We may like to assume that recent medical advances are helping us live longer, healthier lives, but as this new study confirms, thats not always the case. The study was conducted by Dr. Steven Woolf and Dr. Heidi Schoomaker. They collected life expectancy data from the U.S. Mortality Database and cause-specific mortality rates from the CDC WONDER database.. According to their findings, U.S. life ...
to the editor: The article1 and editorial2 on care of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the January 15, 2006, issue of American Family Physician emphasized the important medical services that family physicians can provide for patients infected with HIV, including health care maintenance, baseline evaluation and laboratory studies, and monitoring to guide the initiation of antiretroviral therapy and prophylaxis against opportunistic infections.. The role of family physicians will need to shift toward routine HIV screening for nearly all of our patients. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released new guidelines that recommend making HIV testing routine.3 The new federal guidelines will recommend one-time HIV testing for everyone between 13 and 64 years of age, with annual testing for those with risk factors. The new CDC guidelines are not consistent ...
300510405 - EP 0757987 B1 2000-07-19 - Pyrazole-carboxylic acid derivatives as plant disease control agents - [origin: EP0757987A1] The present invention provides a plant disease control agent containing as active ingredient one or more compounds of the formula Ä1Ü A-COOR 1 wherein R 1 represents a hydrogen atom or a C1-C4 alkyl group, and A represents a group of the formula (A-1) or (A-2) CHEM R 2 represents a C1-C4 alkyl group, R 3 represents a C1-C4 alkyl group, R 4 represents a halogen atom or a C1-C4 alkyl group, and R 5 represents a C1-C4 alkyl group. Further, the compound of A-1 in the formula Ä1Ü in which R 3 is a halogen atom is also included in the present invention.[origin: EP0757987A1] The present invention provides a plant disease control agent containing as active ingredient one or more compounds of the formula Ä1Ü A-COOR 1 wherein R 1 represents a hydrogen ...
CSTE is pleased to announce the onboarding of Class XIII, featuring a record-breaking class of 35 fellows. Beginning in 2003, the CDC/CSTE Applied Epidemiology Fellowship has focused on providing a high-quality training experience. Growing steadily from 10 fellows in Class I to approximately 30 fellows each year since 2009, CSTEs goal of placing fellows in local and state health departments under the guidance of two experienced mentors has helped to develop the careers of over 300 epidemiologists. The 35 fellows placed in 30 different jurisdictions is exciting news for the organizations staff, partners and funders. On August 31, 2015, CSTE welcomed the 35 epidemiologists to Atlanta, GA for a week-long training geared toward preparing them for the next two years and a future career in epidemiology. The training featured sessions delivered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on surveillance, effective communication ...
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius awarded as much as $137 million, to the states funded in part by the Affordable Care Act (ACA), with the goal of strengthening the public health infrastructure and provide jobs in core areas of public health. Awarded in almost all 50 states, the grants enhance state, tribal, local and territorial efforts to provide tobacco cessation services, reinforce public health laboratory and immunization services, prevent healthcare-associated infections, and provide comprehensive substance abuse prevention and treatment programs. "More than ever, it is important to help states fight disease and protect public health," Sebelius said. "These awards are an important investment and will enable states and communities to help Americans quit smoking, get immunized and prevent disease and illness before they start.". The grants will fund vital state and local public health programs supported through the ...
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  • CDC works 24/7(https://www.cdc.gov/24-7/index.html) to protect America from health, safety and security threats, both foreign and in the U.S. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are chronic or acute, curable or preventable, human error or deliberate attack, CDC fights disease and supports communities and citizens to do the same. (federallabs.org)
  • This device has potential as an important tool for regional incidence measurements, which can aid targeting of prevention activities and allocation of resources by HIV/AIDS prevention programs, as well as serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of intervention strategies. (federallabs.org)
  • 1981 - The first diagnosis of the fatal disease later known as AIDS was described in the June 5, 1981, issue of MMWR. (wikipedia.org)
  • care safe-siting initiatives to protect children from health risks caused by Sclerosis (ALS) disease burden placing child care and early learning facilities in hazardous locations. (cdc.gov)
  • Developed guidelines, tools, and · Expand ATSDR's capacity to be able to respond to a greater number resources to help ensure child care of requests and petitions for investigations of harmful exposures in centers are located where chemical communities and recommend actions to protect health. (cdc.gov)
  • Laboratories that conduct tick testing are not required to have the high standards of quality control used by clinical diagnostic laboratories. (cdc.gov)
  • Positive results showing that the tick contains a disease-causing organism do not necessarily mean that you have been infected. (cdc.gov)
  • Humans, because of their recent accessability due to parts of rural America becoming suburban, have become the "new" hosts for many tick borne diseases. (asm.org)
  • Although Lyme disease accounts for the majority of known tick borne diseases, the CDC has recently detected the emergence of a new tick borne disease, Ehrlichiosis, which can cause life threatening illness and sometimes death if not treated properly and quickly. (asm.org)
  • The purpose is to collect brain autopsy material from persons with hemophilia and other bleeding disorders who died and who had received care in treatment centers anywhere in the U.S. This material is then examined for the purpose of CJD to help determine whether the disease can be transmitted through blood or blood products. (hhs.gov)
  • The Haemophilus Influenzae System at NIP compiles information on all U.S. Haemophilus influenzae invasive disease cases reported to CDC via NETSS since 1991 (managed by EPO and NIP), or via active surveillance in several locales since 1989 (managed by NCIP). (hhs.gov)
  • The disease is named after Norwalk, Ohio where an outbreak occurred in 1972. (wikipedia.org)
  • On December 7, 2006, an initial investigation attributed the outbreak to green onions, which had been supplied to the Taco Bell restaurants by a single McLane Company distribution center in Burlington Township, New Jersey. (wikipedia.org)
  • The same year, the PHS transferred its San Francisco based plague laboratory into the CDC as the Epidemiology Division, and a new Veterinary Diseases Division was established. (wikipedia.org)
  • The International Classification of Diseases 9th Revision (ICD 9) codes are used to specify underlying cause of death for the years 1995 - 1998. (cdc.gov)
  • Beginning in 1999, cause of death is specified with the International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision (ICD 10) codes. (cdc.gov)