Behavioral Medicine: The interdisciplinary field concerned with the development and integration of behavioral and biomedical science, knowledge, and techniques relevant to health and illness and the application of this knowledge and these techniques to prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.United StatesResearch Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Social Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.United States Department of Veterans Affairs: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to VETERANS. It was established March 15, 1989 as a Cabinet-level position.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Ethnology: The comparative and theoretical study of culture, often synonymous with cultural anthropology.Decision Making, Organizational: The process by which decisions are made in an institution or other organization.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.United States Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE established in 1990 to "provide indexing, abstracting, translating, publishing, and other services leading to a more effective and timely dissemination of information on research, demonstration projects, and evaluations with respect to health care to public and private entities and individuals engaged in the improvement of health care delivery..." It supersedes the National Center for Health Services Research. The United States Agency for Health Care Policy and Research was renamed Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) under the Healthcare Research and Quality Act of 1999.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Administrative Personnel: Individuals responsible for the development of policy and supervision of the execution of plans and functional operations.Contract Services: Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Hospitals, Veterans: Hospitals providing medical care to veterans of wars.Directories as Topic: Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Ethics Committees, Research: Hospital or other institutional committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects. Federal regulations (the "Common Rule" (45 CFR 46)) mandate the use of these committees to monitor federally-funded biomedical and behavioral research involving human subjects.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Community Mental Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of psychologic and psychiatric services to people living in a neighborhood or community.Great BritainChild Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Diffusion of Innovation: The broad dissemination of new ideas, procedures, techniques, materials, and devices and the degree to which these are accepted and used.Medical Informatics: The field of information science concerned with the analysis and dissemination of medical data through the application of computers to various aspects of health care and medicine.Deinstitutionalization: The practice of caring for individuals in the community, rather than in an institutional environment with resultant effects on the individual, the individual's family, the community, and the health care system.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Comparative Effectiveness Research: Conduct and synthesis of systematic research comparing interventions and strategies to prevent, diagnose, treat, and monitor health conditions. The purpose of this research is to inform patients, providers, and decision-makers, responding to their expressed needs, about which interventions are most effective for which patients under specific circumstances. (hhs.gov/recovery/programs/cer/draftdefinition.html accessed 6/12/2009)Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Clinical Coding: Process of substituting a symbol or code for a term such as a diagnosis or procedure. (from Slee's Health Care Terms, 3d ed.)Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Insurance, Psychiatric: Insurance providing benefits to cover part or all of the psychiatric care.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Capitation Fee: A method of payment for health services in which an individual or institutional provider is paid a fixed, per capita amount without regard to the actual number or nature of services provided to each patient.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Nursing Research: Research carried out by nurses, generally in clinical settings, in the areas of clinical practice, evaluation, nursing education, nursing administration, and methodology.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).New MexicoPublishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Risk Sharing, Financial: Any system which allows payors to share some of the financial risk associated with a particular patient population with providers. Providers agree to adhere to fixed fee schedules in exchange for an increase in their payor base and a chance to benefit from cost containment measures. Common risk-sharing methods are prospective payment schedules (PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM), capitation (CAPITATION FEES), diagnosis-related fees (DIAGNOSIS-RELATED GROUPS), and pre-negotiated fees.GermanyInternational Classification of Diseases: A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.NebraskaChild Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Nurse Administrators: Nurses professionally qualified in administration.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Accountable Care Organizations: Organizations of health care providers that agree to be accountable for the quality, cost, and overall care of Medicare beneficiaries who are enrolled in the traditional fee-for-service program who are assigned to it. Assigned means those beneficiaries for whom the professionals in the organization provide the bulk of primary care services. (www.cms.gov/OfficeofLegislation/Downloads/Accountable CareOrganization.pdf accessed 03/16/2011)Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Family Planning Services: Health care programs or services designed to assist individuals in the planning of family size. Various methods of CONTRACEPTION can be used to control the number and timing of childbirths.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.VermontInsurance Benefits: Payments or services provided under stated circumstances under the terms of an insurance policy. In prepayment programs, benefits are the services the programs will provide at defined locations and to the extent needed.Insurance Claim Review: Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Crisis Intervention: Brief therapeutic approach which is ameliorative rather than curative of acute psychiatric emergencies. Used in contexts such as emergency rooms of psychiatric or general hospitals, or in the home or place of crisis occurrence, this treatment approach focuses on interpersonal and intrapsychic factors and environmental modification. (APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 7th ed)Reimbursement Mechanisms: Processes or methods of reimbursement for services rendered or equipment.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)United States Public Health Service: A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Capacity Building: Organizational development including enhancement of management structures, processes and procedures, within organizations and among different organizations and sectors to meet present and future needs.New JerseyWorld Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).OregonHealth Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Cultural Competency: Cultural and linguistic competence is a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, agency, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations. Competence implies the capacity to function effectively as an individual and an organization within the context of the cultural beliefs, behaviors, and needs presented by consumers and their communities.Tertiary Healthcare: Care of a highly technical and specialized nature, provided in a medical center, usually one affiliated with a university, for patients with unusually severe, complex, or uncommon health problems.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.United States Indian Health Service: A division of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that is responsible for the public health and the provision of medical services to NATIVE AMERICANS in the United States, primarily those residing on reservation lands.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Videoconferencing: Communications via an interactive conference between two or more participants at different sites, using computer networks (COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS) or other telecommunication links to transmit audio, video, and data.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.National Library of Medicine (U.S.): An agency of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to advancement of medical and related sciences. Major activities of this institute include the collection, dissemination, and exchange of information important to the progress of medicine and health, research in medical informatics and support for medical library development.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Mandatory Testing: Testing or screening required by federal, state, or local law or other agencies for the diagnosis of specified conditions. It is usually limited to specific populations such as categories of health care providers, members of the military, and prisoners or to specific situations such as premarital examinations or donor screening.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: An Act prohibiting a health plan from establishing lifetime limits or annual limits on the dollar value of benefits for any participant or beneficiary after January 1, 2014. It permits a restricted annual limit for plan years beginning prior to January 1, 2014. It provides that a health plan shall not be prevented from placing annual or lifetime per-beneficiary limits on covered benefits. The Act sets up a competitive health insurance market.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.PhiladelphiaFinancing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.EnglandHealth Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.PrisonersEnvironmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Ethics, Research: The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.Cuba: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies, south of Florida. With the adjacent islands it forms the Republic of Cuba. Its capital is Havana. It was discovered by Columbus on his first voyage in 1492 and conquered by Spain in 1511. It has a varied history under Spain, Great Britain, and the United States but has been independent since 1902. The name Cuba is said to be an Indian name of unknown origin but the language that gave the name is extinct, so the etymology is a conjecture. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p302 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p132)United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.MichiganFamily Therapy: A form of group psychotherapy. It involves treatment of more than one member of the family simultaneously in the same session.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Personal Health Services: Health care provided to individuals.Behavioral Research: Research that involves the application of the behavioral and social sciences to the study of the actions or reactions of persons or animals in response to external or internal stimuli. (from American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed)Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Student Health Services: Health services for college and university students usually provided by the educational institution.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Motivational Interviewing: It is a client-centered, directive method for eliciting intrinsic motivation to change using open-ended questions, reflective listening, and decisional balancing. This nonjudgmental, nonconfrontational interviewing style is designed to minimize a patient's resistance to change by creating an interaction that supports open discussion of risky or problem behavior.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Financing, Organized: All organized methods of funding.Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry): The co-existence of a substance abuse disorder with a psychiatric disorder. The diagnostic principle is based on the fact that it has been found often that chemically dependent patients also have psychiatric problems of various degrees of severity.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.
  • These edited books cover a range of evidence-based treatments, such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), compassion-focused therapy (CFT), dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT), and mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) therapy. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • Our center embraces the bio-psychosocial-spiritual approach to integrative care. (hackensackumc.org)
  • We were recognized as the second care facility in the country to achieve a Joint Commission Certification in Depression and as such, are a nationally recognized center of excellence in the care of depressed patients. (hackensackumc.org)
  • An essential resource every psychologist, psychiatrist, primary care physician, health care provider, and health educator should own, Mindfulness and Acceptance in Behavioral Medicine presents a series of chapters that feature the latest findings on the efficacy of ACT and other mindfulness therapies for specific conditions and populations and guidance for introducing these therapies to patients. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • Hospitalization, however, is viewed as only one link in the chain of services available to patients and their families at Hackensack University Medical Center. (hackensackumc.org)
  • Patients may enter the system via a variety of means - through the Emergency Department, the Consultation Liaison Service, our Outpatient Division, attending physician's office or other hospitals. (hackensackumc.org)
  • Once in the system, patients and their families may access a spectrum of services, specifically tailored to meet their individualized needs. (hackensackumc.org)
  • Clinicians and researchers working in the field of behavioral medicine are in a unique position to help patients access a range of mindfulness and acceptance-based treatment methods for preventing disease, managing symptoms, and promoting overall health. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • Evidence-based mindfulness approaches such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) can form a critical component of treatment, helping patients become active partners in improving or maintaining their health and daily functioning. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • As mindfulness and acceptance-based therapies gain momentum in the field of mental health, it is increasingly important for professionals to understand the full range of their applications. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • Evaluation related activities have included running focus groups and interviews with stakeholder advisory groups, developing research measurement tools for providers and then training hundreds of providers in their use, validating measures in clinical settings with consumers, and reporting and dissemination of research results to providers and the community. (ucsd.edu)
  • While integration is a broad term used to refer to services, programs, policies, payments, and administrative structures, this report focuses on the clinical integration of behavioral health and physical health services and the systems level changes states put in place to achieve it. (chrt.org)
  • 2 Psychologists, licensed clinical social workers, other licensed mental health professionals (psychiatric social workers, psychiatric nurse practitioners, family therapists, and other licensed master's degree-prepared clinicians). (biomedcentral.com)
  • According to the NIH Institute on Randomized Clinical Trials website ( https://obssr.od.nih.gov/training/training-institutes/institute-on-randomized-clinical-trials/ ) this training will provide thorough grounding in the conduct of randomized clinical trials to researchers interested in developing competence in the planning, design, and execution of randomized clinical trials involving behavioral interventions. (uky.edu)
  • Identify the unique challenges posed by behavioral randomized clinical trials (RCTs). (uky.edu)
  • Applicants should possess good clinical documentation skills, experience working with and assessing mental health illnesses, and the ability to work within a. (simplyhired.com)
  • The increasing prevalence of substance abuse among adolescents obligates dental personnel to identify behaviors characteristic of active use, recognize clinical signs and symptoms of active use or withdrawal, modify dental treatment accordingly, and facilitate referral to medical providers or behavioral addiction specialists. (aapd.org)
  • Research: We propose an initial vision for "practice-based translational behavior change research," defined as multi-level clinical and public health practice-embedded research on the implementation, optimization, and fundamental mechanisms of behavioral interventions. (deepdyve.com)
  • Behavioral medicine should be a bedrock in clinical and public health practice because unhealthy lifestyle behaviors such as smoking, poor diet, physical inactivity, and lack of sleep are rampant, and they contribute to major chronic conditions and the growing multimorbidity epidemic [1, (deepdyve.com)
  • Arguably, translational behavioral medicine spanning theories of behavior change, clinical and translational behavioral research, and real-world implementation of proven behavioral interventions is an ideal discipline in which to incubate a vision for both population health and precision medicine through behavior change, or what we call "practice-based translational behavior change research. (deepdyve.com)
  • The translational promise of basic behavioral research in clinical medicine and implementation science is increasingly recognized with more targeted funding support by federal sponsors. (deepdyve.com)
  • Dr. Beck is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Albert Lasker Clinical Medical Research Award, the American Psychological Association (APA) Lifetime Achievement Award, the American Psychiatric Association Distinguished Service Award, the Robert J. and Claire Pasarow Foundation Award for Research in Neuropsychiatry, and the Institute of Medicine's Sarnat International Prize in Mental Health and Gustav O. Lienhard Award. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • Complementary clinical and public health interventions could be instituted to increase awareness and target people who are high risk. (cdc.gov)
  • Investigators who conduct original and innovative social, behavioral, clinical, health services or policy research directed toward eliminating health disparities are invited to apply to this FOA. (nih.gov)
  • Students who conducted research with human subjects (or on material of human origin, such as tissues, specimens and cognitive phenomena), including clinical trials. (mayo.edu)
  • Results suggest that these providers play a multifaceted role in delivering clinical services to Veterans while also acting as an interdependent component of the larger VA behavioral health and primary care systems. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Psychological conditions, such as depression, distress and stress, serious psychological distress, fatalism, self-efficacy, and social support influence diabetes-related self-management and outcomes and should be incorporated into clinical care practices, addressed in research interventions, and considered in policy implementations. (springer.com)
  • The extramural General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) program has been funded for more than 50 years, first by the National Center for Research Resources, NIH, and more recently as part of the Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) program through the newly formed National Center for Advancing Translation Sciences (NCATS). (jci.org)
  • The GCRCs represent the federally funded laboratories that employ a highly trained cadre of research nurses, dietitians, and other support staff and in which generations of clinical investigators trained and performed groundbreaking human studies that advanced medical science and improved clinical care. (jci.org)
  • The CRCs included the only federally supported beds (~600 nationwide) and outpatient human research "laboratories" in academic medical centers dedicated to support all clinical investigators. (jci.org)
  • The defunding of the CRCs, the home of federally funded clinical research for more than 50 years, including the space that they occupy and their highly trained research staff, has occurred with virtually no discussion in the scientific community. (jci.org)
  • The first American hospital entirely devoted to clinical research was created at Rockefeller University in 1910, where a score or so of beds were surrounded by basic research laboratories. (jci.org)
  • While I enjoy working in the field of mental health, I am committed to broadening my clinical skills and gaining hands on experience with the latest medical innovations, and continuing to gain knowledge of the diverse patient populations that I hope to serve. (livecareer.com)
  • I want to continue my health care career in a fast-paced, diverse environment, where I can utilize the critical thinking and clinical skills that I have already acquired, and build a solid foundation in caring for patients with medically complex illnesses. (livecareer.com)
  • He is a board-certified physician with over 30 years front-line clinical experience treating patients in emergency and internal medicine, and he is on the faculty at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and at the University of Maryland Medical School. (drugpolicy.org)
  • CADER's role will be to provide guidance and support in developing clinical education and training for primary care providers in identifying behavioral health concerns in order to understand the appropriate steps necessary to ensure patients receive the care they need. (bu.edu)
  • To critically analyze current practice patterns, updates from emerging clinical research and evidence-based practice guidelines and translate into clinical practice. (stanford.edu)
  • In a clinical trial involving over 100 stroke survivors who exhibited symptoms of PSD, Dr. Mitchell's research team compared LWWS against usual post-stroke care. (nih.gov)
  • The partnership between Banner Health and the University of Arizona brings clinical care delivery, education and research to the forefront of the patient experience. (bannerhealth.com)
  • Outcomes research provides the data to help solve critical problems that are faced in everyday clinical practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to offering clinical expertise in the most advanced treatment of all the possible manifestations of TSC, the Herscot Center supports collaborative research and educational programs for medical students, advanced trainees, and practicing physicians. (massgeneral.org)
  • The Herscot Center has an active clinical research program with a research focus on the neurological aspects of TSC. (massgeneral.org)
  • These Centers promote collaborative basic, translational and clinical research and provide important resources that can be used by the national muscular dystrophy research communities. (nih.gov)
  • Our experienced therapists combine exceptional clinical skills with sound, research-based treatment options. (psychologytoday.com)
  • With a multidisciplinary clinical staff of over 50 healthcare professionals, we offer a wide range of services including diagnostic evaluations, medication management, individual, couples, and family psychotherapy, psychological & neuropsychological testing, addictions treatment, art therapy, equine therapy and more. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Clinical settings/provider organizations -This term is used broadly to include clinics, practices, large health systems, medical homes, community settings, schools, jails, and other sites where psychosocial interventions are rendered. (nap.edu)
  • The Seaver Autism Center is a major player in the field at every stage, from laboratory and clinical research to training and community outreach. (mountsinai.org)
  • Our main areas of research include genetics, autism model systems, and experimental therapeutics (clinical trials, behavioral interventions, and neuroimaging). (mountsinai.org)
  • The Home Health Patient Care Manager RN is responsible for the overall supervision and coordination of clinical services. (careerbuilder.com)
  • The Clinical and Translational Science Institute is seeking applications from new and established investigators for its 2010 Pilot & Collaborative Grants in Clinical and Translational Research. (marquette.edu)
  • The Public Policy Forum and the Milwaukee Regional Research Forum, with assistance from the Wauwatosa Chamber of Commerce, will explain the Clinical and Translational Science Institute , Monday, Oct. 25, at 11:45 a.m. at the Crowne Plaza Hotel Milwaukee West, 10499 Innovation Drive, Wauwatosa. (marquette.edu)
  • A better balance is needed between the clinical approach to disease, presently the dominant public health model for most risk factors, and research and intervention efforts that address generic social and behavioral determinants of disease, injury, and disability. (nap.edu)
  • The health psychology residency program operates on a scientist-practitioner model with the goal of preparing clinical and counseling psychologists for entry-level professional practice in a health setting. (mcw.edu)
  • Clinical supervision will be the core training modality used, with the residents having the opportunity to directly observe and receive feedback from experienced health psychologists, engage in direct one-on-one teaching that is bi-directional and conversational in nature, and receive direct feedback about written and psychotherapeutic work from an experienced practicing academic health psychologist. (mcw.edu)
  • Residents will have training on providing supervision through didactic seminar training on supervision and acting as a clinical supervisor to an advanced practicum students in the Behavioral Medicine and Primary Care (BMPC) clinic. (mcw.edu)
  • ICT provides wrap-around clinical services to help people identify healthy recovery goals and progress toward stable, productive independence. (thenationalcouncil.org)
  • These staff members provide direct clinical care, ensure that health information systems are operational and functional and help guide the overall direction of the program. (thenationalcouncil.org)
  • Association of Clinicians for the Underserved provide training, tools, and other resources on clinical workforce recruitment and retention for health centers. (hrsa.gov)
  • A growing number of states are implementing new strategies to better integrate these services and provide holistic care-particularly for Medicaid beneficiaries-with the ultimate goals of improving care coordination and patient outcomes and, in some cases, lowering health care expenses as well. (chrt.org)
  • Non-profit funding sources include the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Johnson & Johnson Grant/Society for the Arts, the Graham Foundation, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and the Kresge Foundation. (healthdesign.org)
  • The Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research examines the organization, financing, delivery and outcomes of behavioral health services (e.g., alcohol, drug abuse and mental disorders), providing practical and empirical contributions to, and explaining the implications for, the broader behavioral health field. (springer.com)
  • Population health is defined as "the health outcomes of a group of individuals, including the distribution of such outcomes within the group . (deepdyve.com)
  • YORK, Pennsylvania and TEL AVIV, Israel, Oct. 31, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Sweetch, the first AI digital therapeutics solution that helps predict, prevent and improve outcomes among people with diabetes is partnering with integrated health care system WellSpan Health. (wn.com)
  • Students who conducted research in epidemiology, behavioral health, outcomes and health services. (mayo.edu)
  • As the VA is the nation's largest health care system, a transformation of this nature presents considerable challenges, but also a wealth of opportunity to discover what strategies and techniques result in the most optimal implementation outcomes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Recent federal legislation targets access to mental health services, and there have been education reforms focused on outcomes, early intervention, and flexible learning supports. (theconversation.com)
  • Surgical Outcomes Analysis & Research, SOAR, is a research laboratory of the Department of Surgery at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center with expertise in outcomes research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Outcomes Research evaluates the impact of health care on the health outcomes of patients and populations (see AHRQ for further details). (wikipedia.org)
  • This research may also include the evaluation of economic impacts linked to health outcomes, such as cost effectiveness and cost utility. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are a wide range of outcomes to study including mortality, morbidity, functional status, mental well-being, and other aspects of health-related quality of life. (wikipedia.org)
  • Outcomes research is a multidisciplinary field of inquiry that examines the use, quality, delivery, and financing of health care services to increase knowledge and understanding of the structure, processes, and effects of health services for individuals and populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • SOAR members hope, as part of the surgical outcomes research community, to improve overall outcomes for patients with surgical diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pancreatic cancer and pancreatic disease Other gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary malignancies Vascular disease Transplant surgery and transplant psychology Investigating factors that affect surgical outcomes for diverse specialties including colorectal, cardiovascular, transplant, plastic and reconstructive, and minimally invasive surgery Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in Boston, Massachusetts is a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. (wikipedia.org)
  • See also: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center website SOAR researchers use national health services and administrative databases as well as prospective institutional tissue-linked databases to investigate factors contributing to disease outcomes for pancreatic cancer, hepato biliary disease, vascular disease, colorectal disease, plastic and reconstructive surgery, and transplant medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • As Project Director, Gail manages the day-to-day activities of our National Family Support Technical Assistance Center (NFSTAC) and is responsible for all grant required reports, assurances, outcomes, and documentation demonstrating that project goals and objectives have been met. (ffcmh.org)
  • His current research focuses on understanding how social structures and processes influence economic outcomes. (emory.edu)
  • Given difficulties accessing timely specialty behavioral health care, this approach could increase adolescent treatment initiation and improve outcomes. (ajmc.com)
  • Our core MCH faculty have primary appointments in the departments of Epidemiology and Health Services. (washington.edu)
  • These projects are under development with the use of the following databases: AHRQ Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) SEER Medicare Additionally, individual research groups have access to and have expertise in disease- and specialty-specific databases. (wikipedia.org)
  • A hub focused on population health, biostatistics, bioethics and epidemiology research. (mcw.edu)
  • In 2016, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey found that approximately 22.0 million (8.9 percent) of adults residing in the United States and 8.1 percent of children from thirty-one states reported currently having asthma. (lung.org)
  • In 2016, The Center served more than 34,000 clients and provided more than 890,000 distinct services. (thenationalcouncil.org)
  • SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 13, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Gemini Health today announced a new initiative to help lower prescription drug costs by working with Surescripts, the nation's largest health information network, to deliver price transparency at the time of prescribing. (wn.com)
  • Pinkston High School was the nation's first high school to offer comprehensive care provided by nurse practitioners, physicians, social workers, nutritionists, and health educators. (wikipedia.org)
  • With support from CHIP IN, these pilots provide family-centered care plans and coordinated case management for participating children aged 18-48 months diagnosed with autism, developmental delay or other special health care needs. (iu.edu)
  • The Study to Explore Early Development (SEED), a multisite investigation addressing knowledge gaps in autism phenotype and etiology, aims to: (1) characterize the autism behavioral phenotype and associated developmental, medical, and behavioral conditions and (2) investigate genetic and environmental risks with emphasis on immunologic, hormonal, gastrointestinal, and sociodemographic characteristics. (springer.com)
  • Freestanding autism centers in the community may offer some services that benefit kids with ASD. (kidshealth.org)
  • People with TSC may also develop learning disabilities and mental health and behavioral problems, such as attention deficit, depression, and autism. (massgeneral.org)
  • Dr. Kenny works with our counselors for medication assistance for clients that need medication supplementing counseling services or Autism services. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Hear the industry's leading behavioral health facility design experts share how design is making a difference in the lives of children and adults faced with behavioral and mental health conditions. (healthdesign.org)
  • 1,959 healthy adults completed a survey that assessed behavioral risk factors, family history, causal attributions of eight diseases, and health information preferences. (springer.com)
  • However, few reports exist on what proportion of adults are aware of health risks from uncontrolled hypertension. (cdc.gov)
  • Longitudinal association between depressive symptoms and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus in older adults: the cardiovascular health study. (springer.com)
  • This grant is to examine a new Massachusetts acute community care program - a collaboration between the EasCare ambulance service provider and Commonwealth Care Alliance, which serves adults who have both Medicare and Medicaid coverage. (bu.edu)
  • This program will focus on understanding and addressing the behavioral health needs of older adults by developing a blended training program (online and in-person) for diverse clergy in Massachusetts. (bu.edu)
  • Health Care Utilization and Expenditures Attributable to Cigar Smoking Among US Adults, 2000-2015. (ucsf.edu)
  • Sociodemographic Differences Among U.S. Children and Adults Exposed to Secondhand Smoke at Home: National Health Interview Surveys 2000 and 2010. (ucsf.edu)
  • The Carol and James Herscot Center for Children and Adults with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex at Massachusetts General Hospital delivers specialized care for individuals suffering from Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. (massgeneral.org)
  • Clarity Clinic specializes in Adults, Pediatric, Couples/Families Psychotherapy Services serving clients throughout Northwest Indiana. (psychologytoday.com)
  • 1 Recent analysis of National Survey on Drug Use and Health data found a dramatic increase in behavioral health conditions among adolescents and young adults. (ajmc.com)
  • Psychologists evaluate and treat emotional and behavioral problems, and provide psychotherapy. (epnet.com)
  • Medicaid beneficiaries with behavioral health diagnoses and chronic physical comorbidities-hypertension, coronary heart disease, and diabetes-have significantly higher medical (non-behavioral health) costs than those without a behavioral health diagnosis. (chrt.org)
  • He is a board certified practicing physician at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center. (upenn.edu)
  • Regional medical centers. (bipc.com)
  • Mediware Information Systems, Inc., a portfolio company of TPG Capital and a leading supplier of software solutions in health care and human services, and Rock-Pond Solutions, a business intelligence and analytics software provider for the home infusion, home medical equipment (HME), and specialty pharmacy industries, are pleased to announce that Mediware has acquired Rock-Pond Solutions. (benzinga.com)
  • CHIP IN provides practice support, a quality improvement learning community, medical direction and other services to each of these evaluation hubs. (iu.edu)
  • Our team of scientists, mental health specialists, and medical experts are leading the charge to identify, promote, and extend the reach of the best care for kids with ADHD. (cdc.gov)
  • At St. Vincent Charity Medical Center, our skilled doctors and nurses treat patients with the latest technologies. (stvincentcharity.com)
  • An effort will be made to provide a two to four week rotation in an orthopaedic/trauma service with podiatrists or orthopaedic surgeons not presently on the staff of the Medical Center. (stvincentcharity.com)
  • The Medical Center will be responsible for the reimbursement of all pre-approved expenses including, but not limited to, transportation, housing and meals. (stvincentcharity.com)
  • In celebration of the national observance of Doctors' Day, two St. Vincent Charity medical residents visited the Bingham Early Learning Center. (stvincentcharity.com)
  • and as a member of the American Medical Association's Advocacy Research Center. (issuu.com)
  • The Center also emphasizes the needs and experiences of individuals living with HIV/AIDS and other co-occurring medical conditions. (uic.edu)
  • The Firearms Research Database is a database of social science, criminology, law reviews, medical and public health research concerning firearms (2000-2009). (astho.org)
  • I'm proud to work with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to advance an appropriations bill that ensures funding for medical research, increases opportunities for students to access higher education, and supports national service programs," said Coons. (doverpost.com)
  • SOAR was founded in 2007 and relocated to Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA in 2012. (wikipedia.org)
  • Electronic medical record: research tool for pancreatic cancer? (wikipedia.org)
  • The Herscot Center is committed to improving education about TSC on all levels including educating families affected by TSC, their communities, and medical professionals. (massgeneral.org)
  • Her research interests extend to wellness and to the intersection of chronic medical problems, including pain, with alcohol and drug use and misuse. (brandeis.edu)
  • The CTSI is a partnership of all of the major academic institutions in the region - Marquette, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee School of Engineering and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, as well as Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Zablocki VA Medical Center and Blood Center of Wisconsin. (marquette.edu)
  • In addition, health care expenditures on chronic and preventable diseases and injury account for nearly 70% of all medical care spending (Fries et al. (nap.edu)
  • This guide provides information and practices that behavioral health providers can implement in their daily practice with patients or clients who are involved in the criminal justice system. (boisestate.edu)
  • Health-related direct-to-consumer genetic tests: A public health assessment and analysis of practices related to Internet-based tests for risk of thrombosis. (springer.com)
  • The Children's Health Improvement Partnership of Indiana, also known as CHIP IN, implements evidenced-based quality improvements in pediatric practices across the state of Indiana. (iu.edu)
  • CHIP IN also works in tandem with the Pediatric and Adolescent Comparative Effectiveness Research group in the Department of Pediatrics to manage the implementation and dissemination of effective, evidence-based practices throughout Indiana. (iu.edu)
  • The research enterprise can only benefit from such an alliance because this will be an assurance that scientific data are not unduly confounded by extraneous variables resulting from species-inadequate husbandry practices of the research subjects. (awionline.org)
  • Our involvement also makes our findings more credible and more useable to stakeholders who ultimately make or are affected by decisions regarding mental health services or strategies. (ucsd.edu)
  • We are a leader in the dissemination of research-based findings through multiple avenues, and we have facilitated advances in implementation science, and worked to identify and assess effective evidence-based programs. (dsgonline.com)
  • Symptoms of depression as a risk factor for incident diabetes: findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Epidemiologic Follow-up study, 1971-1992. (springer.com)
  • Many also earn the opportunity to participate in the development of academic posters and publications to disseminate research findings. (ucsd.edu)
  • Original research findings and policy analyses from leading institutions and academic centers, focused on minimizing the burden of injury and violence through surveillance, evaluation, dissemination, and training. (astho.org)
  • Approximately one-quarter of all behavioral health spending nationally is by Medicaid, which is the single largest payer for behavioral health services. (chrt.org)
  • Medicaid beneficiaries with behavioral health diagnoses account for almost half (48 percent) of total Medicaid expenditures, yet represent only 20 percent of the total Medicaid population. (chrt.org)
  • This brief provides an overview of behavioral health integration strategies in state Medicaid programs, and includes case studies that explore integration in five states that have recently engaged in major Medicaid integration initiatives: Arizona, Arkansas, Michigan, New York, and North Carolina. (chrt.org)
  • Among our services are helping with Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement issues, Stark law, Anti-Kickback fraud and abuse cases and whistleblower claims. (bipc.com)
  • The enactment of Medicaid in 1965 was indicative of a perception in the public policy community that there was a need to develop programs in service of better health care for low-income individuals, including children. (wikipedia.org)
  • With Medicaid Analytic Extract (MAX) data, an interrupted time-series analysis with control series design was performed to assess changes in service utilization in the 18 months (January 2008-June 2009) after a BH screening policy was implemented in Massachusetts and to compare service utilization with California's. (populationmedicine.org)