Enumerations of populations usually recording identities of all persons in every place of residence with age or date of birth, sex, occupation, national origin, language, marital status, income, relation to head of household, information on the dwelling place, education, literacy, health-related data (e.g., permanent disability), etc. The census or "numbering of the people" is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. Among the Romans, censuses were intimately connected with the enumeration of troops before and after battle and probably a military necessity. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed; Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, p66, p119)
Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.
A method of analyzing the variation in utilization of health care in small geographic or demographic areas. It often studies, for example, the usage rates for a given service or procedure in several small areas, documenting the variation among the areas. By comparing high- and low-use areas, the analysis attempts to determine whether there is a pattern to such use and to identify variables that are associated with and contribute to the variation.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.
Computer systems capable of assembling, storing, manipulating, and displaying geographically referenced information, i.e. data identified according to their locations.
Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.
All deaths reported in a given population.
A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.
Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.
A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.
Living facilities for humans.
The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.
The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)
The status of health in urban populations.
Number of individuals in a population relative to space.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
The absence of certain expected and acceptable cultural phenomena in the environment which results in the failure of the individual to communicate and respond in the most appropriate manner within the context of society. Language acquisition and language use are commonly used in assessing this concept.
Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.
The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.
Used for general articles concerning statistics of births, deaths, marriages, etc.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Creating a representation of areas of the earth or other celestial bodies, for the purpose of visualizing spatial distributions of various information.
Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.
The state of not being engaged in a gainful occupation.
Representations, normally to scale and on a flat medium, of a selection of material or abstract features on the surface of the earth, the heavens, or celestial bodies.
Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.
Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.
Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.
A statistically significant excess of cases of a disease, occurring within a limited space-time continuum.
Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Standards or regulations for construction which are designed to ensure safety against electrical hazards, fires, etc.
The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.
The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
A distribution function used to describe the occurrence of rare events or to describe the sampling distribution of isolated counts in a continuum of time or space.
An arrangement of wires distributing electricity.
Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.
The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)
The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Techniques which study entities using their topological, geometric, or geographic properties.
The creation and maintenance of medical and vital records in multiple institutions in a manner that will facilitate the combined use of the records of identified individuals.
The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.
The number of births in a given population per year or other unit of time.
The absence of appropriate stimuli in the physical or social environment which are necessary for the emotional, social, and intellectual development of the individual.
Size and composition of the family.
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
The systematic surveying, mapping, charting, and description of specific geographical sites, with reference to the physical features that were presumed to influence health and disease. Medical topography should be differentiated from EPIDEMIOLOGY in that the former emphasizes geography whereas the latter emphasizes disease outbreaks.
Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.
The structuring of the environment to permit or promote specific patterns of behavior.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
A measure of inpatient health facility use based upon the average number or proportion of beds occupied for a given period of time.
A center in the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE which is primarily concerned with the collection, analysis, and dissemination of health statistics on vital events and health activities to reflect the health status of people, health needs, and health resources.
Groups of persons whose range of options is severely limited, who are frequently subjected to COERCION in their DECISION MAKING, or who may be compromised in their ability to give INFORMED CONSENT.
Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.
The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.
A large or important municipality of a country, usually a major metropolitan center.
Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.
Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.
An excessive number of individuals, human or animal, in relation to available space.
Skills in the use of language which lead to proficiency in written or spoken communication.
The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.
A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.
The commitment in writing, as authentic evidence, of something having legal importance. The concept includes certificates of birth, death, etc., as well as hospital, medical, and other institutional records.
The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous rodents through chemical, biological, or other means.
The status of health in rural populations.
The total number of individuals inhabiting a particular region or area.
The inhabitants of peripheral or adjacent areas of a city or town.
People who leave their place of residence in one country and settle in a different country.
Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.
Substances used to destroy or inhibit the action of rats, mice, or other rodents.
Increase, over a specific period of time, in the number of individuals living in a country or region.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.
Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.
Differential treatment or unequal access to opportunities, based on group membership such as origin or ethnicity.
Any deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such deviation. Bias can result from several sources: one-sided or systematic variations in measurement from the true value (systematic error); flaws in study design; deviation of inferences, interpretations, or analyses based on flawed data or data collection; etc. There is no sense of prejudice or subjectivity implied in the assessment of bias under these conditions.
Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.
The social institution involving legal and/or religious sanction whereby individuals are joined together.
Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.
The statistical manipulation of hierarchically and non-hierarchically nested data. It includes clustered data, such as a sample of subjects within a group of schools. Prevalent in the social, behavioral sciences, and biomedical sciences, both linear and nonlinear regression models are applied.
The killing of one person by another.
The production and movement of food items from point of origin to use or consumption.
The legal relation between an entity (individual, group, corporation, or-profit, secular, government) and an object. The object may be corporeal, such as equipment, or completely a creature of law, such as a patent; it may be movable, such as an animal, or immovable, such as a building.
The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.
The geographic area of the southeastern region of the United States in general or when the specific state or states are not included. The states usually included in this region are Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, West Virginia, and Virginia.
A violation of the criminal law, i.e., a breach of the conduct code specifically sanctioned by the state, which through its administrative agencies prosecutes offenders and imposes and administers punishments. The concept includes unacceptable actions whether prosecuted or going unpunished.
The confinement of a patient in a hospital.
Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.
The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.
A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.
Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.
Methods for controlling genetic SEX of offspring.

Differential mortality in New York City (1988-1992). Part One: excess mortality among non-Hispanic blacks. (1/448)

To determine the distribution of mortality for non-Hispanic blacks and non-Hispanic whites in New York City, death certificates issued in New York City during 1988 through 1992, and the relevant 1990 US census data for New York City, have been examined. Age-adjusted death rates for blacks and whites by gender and cause of death were computed based on the US population in 1940. Also, standard mortality ratios and excess mortality were calculated using the New York City mortality rate as reference. The results showed that New York City blacks had higher age-adjusted death rates than whites regardless of cause, including stroke, AIDS, homicide, and diabetes. The rate for New York City blacks was also higher than the US total for both genders. Using New York City mortality rates as a reference, more than 80% of excess deaths in blacks occurred before age 65. Injury/poisoning was the leading cause of excess death (20.1%) in black males, while in black females, cardiovascular disease was the largest single cause of excess deaths (24.8%). The higher death rates, especially premature death, of blacks in New York City are related to conditions such as violence, substance abuse, and AIDS, for which prevention rather than medical care is the more likely solution, as well as to cardiovascular diseases, where both prevention through behavioral change, and health and medical care, can influence outcome.  (+info)

Differential mortality in New York City (1988-1992). Part Two: excess mortality in the south Bronx. (2/448)

To display the extent of variations in mortality according to geographic regions in New York City, we have compared mortality in New York City as a whole with that of the South Bronx. Mortality records for 1988 to 1992 and 1990 US census data for New York City were linked. The 471,000 residents of the South Bronx were younger, less educated, and more likely to lack health insurance than other New Yorkers. Using age- and gender-stratified populations and mortality in New York City as standards, age-adjusted death rates and excess mortality in the South Bronx were determined. All-cause mortality in the South Bronx was 26% higher than the city as a whole. Mortality for AIDS, injury and poisoning, drug and alcohol abuse, and cardiovascular diseases were 50% to 100% higher in the South Bronx than in New York City; years of potential life lost before age 65 in the South Bronx were 41.6% and 44.2% higher for men and women, respectively, than in New York City; AIDS accounted for the largest single share of excess premature deaths (21.8%). In summary, inequalities in health status, reflected by higher mortality rates in the South Bronx, are consistent with, and perhaps caused by, lower socioeconomic status and deficient medical care among residents of this inner-city community.  (+info)

The census-based, impact-oriented approach: its effectiveness in promoting child health in Bolivia. (3/448)

This paper describes the effectiveness for child health of a primary health care approach developed in Bolivia by Andean Rural Health Care and its colleagues, the census-based, impact-oriented (CBIO) approach. Here, we describe selected achievements, including child survival service coverage, mortality impact, and the level of resources required to attain these results. As a result of first identifying the entire programme population through visits at least biannually to all homes and then targeting selected high-impact services to those at highest risk of death, the mortality levels of children under five years of age in the established programme areas was one-third to one-half of mortality levels in comparison areas. Card-documented coverage for the complete series of all the standard six childhood immunizations among children 12-23 months of age was 78%, and card-documented coverage for three nutritional monitorings during the previous 12 months among the same group of children was 80%. Coverage rates in comparison areas for similar services was less than 21%. The local annual recurring cost of this approach was US $8.57 for each person (of all ages) in the programme population. This cost includes the provision of primary care services for all age groups as well as targeted child survival services. This cost is well within the affordable range for many, if not most, developing countries. Manpower costs for field staff in Bolivia are relatively high, so in countries with lower salary scales, the overall recurring cost could be substantially less. An Expert Review Panel reviewed the CBIO approach and found it to be worthy of replication, particularly if stronger community involvement and greater reliance on volunteer or minimally paid staff could be attained. The results of this approach are sufficiently promising to merit implementation and evaluation in other sites, including sites beyond Bolivia.  (+info)

Counting the uninsured using state-level hospitalization data. (4/448)

OBJECTIVE: To assess the appropriateness of using state-level data on uninsured hospitalizations to estimate the uninsured population. METHODS: The authors used 1992-1996 data on hospitalizations of newborns and of appendectomy and heart attack patients in Florida to estimate the number of people in the state without health insurance coverage. These conditions were selected because they usually require hospitalization and they are common across demographic categories. RESULTS: Adjusted for the gender and ethnic composition of the population, the percentages of uninsured hospitalizations for appendectomies and heart attacks produced estimates of the state's uninsured population 1.6 percentage points lower than those reported for 1996 in the US Census March Current Population Survey. CONCLUSION: Data reported by hospitals to state agencies can be used to monitor trends in health insurance coverage and provides an alternative data source for a state-level analysis of the uninsured population.  (+info)

Validity of reported age and centenarian prevalence in New England. (5/448)

INTRODUCTION: the age reported by or on behalf of centenarians may be suspect unless proven correct. We report the validity of age reports in a population-based sample of centenarians living in New England and the prevalence of centenarians in an area within the North Eastern USA. METHODS: cohort study. All centenarians in a population-based sample detected by local censuses. Ages were confirmed by birth certificate. Type of residence and whether the subject was living independently were also recorded. RESULTS: from a population of about 450,000 people, 289 potential centenarians were reported by the censuses of the eight towns participating in the study. Of these, 186 (64%) had died at the time centenarian prevalence was determined. Of the 80 still alive, 13 (16%) had incorrect birth years recorded by the censuses. The specificity of the censuses for stating the number of centenarians alive and living in the sample was 28-31%. Using additional sources, only four more centenarians were located, indicating that the sensitivity of the censuses approached 100%. We had an 83% success rate in obtaining proof of age in those families we interviewed. In all instances, age and birth order of children were an important source of corroborative evidence and in no case did we detect inconsistencies with the families' reported ages of the centenarian subjects. Therefore, there were at least 46 centenarians or approximately 1 centenarian per 10,000 people. CONCLUSIONS: age validation can be performed for most centenarians in the North Eastern USA. Self or family reports of those between the ages of 100 and 107 years were dependable.  (+info)

Poverty, time, and place: variation in excess mortality across selected US populations, 1980-1990. (6/448)

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To describe variation in levels and causes of excess mortality and temporal mortality change among young and middle aged adults in a regionally diverse set of poor local populations in the USA. DESIGN: Using standard demographic techniques, death certificate and census data were analysed to make sex specific population level estimates of 1980 and 1990 death rates for residents of selected areas of concentrated poverty. For comparison, data for whites and blacks nationwide were analysed. SETTING: African American communities in Harlem, Central City Detroit, Chicago's south side, the Louisiana Delta, the Black Belt region of Alabama, and Eastern North Carolina. Non-Hispanic white communities in Cleveland, Detroit, Appalachian Kentucky, South Central Louisiana, Northeastern Alabama, and Western North Carolina. PARTICIPANTS: All black residents or all white residents of each specific community and in the nation, 1979-1981 and 1989-1991. MAIN RESULTS: Substantial variability exists in levels, trends, and causes of excess mortality in poor populations across localities. African American residents of urban/northern communities suffer extremely high and growing rates of excess mortality. Rural residents exhibit an important mortality advantage that widens over the decade. Homicide deaths contribute little to the rise in excess mortality, nor do AIDS deaths contribute outside of specific localities. Deaths attributable to circulatory disease are the leading cause of excess mortality in most locations. CONCLUSIONS: Important differences exist among persistently impoverished populations in the degree to which their poverty translates into excess mortality. Social epidemiological inquiry and health promotion initiatives should be attentive to local conditions. The severely disadvantageous mortality profiles experienced by urban African Americans relative to the rural poor and to national averages call for understanding.  (+info)

Identifying disability: comparing house-to-house survey and rapid rural appraisal. (7/448)

This study compared house-to-house survey and rapid rural appraisal as methods used to identify people with disabilities in a sample rural population in South India. The research showed that by using these methods, two distinctly different populations were identified. The factors that influenced the identification processes were: local perceptions and definitions of disability; social dynamics, particularly those of gender and age; relationships within the rapid rural appraisal groups and between the health auxiliary and the respondents in the house-to-house survey; and the type of disability and the associated social implications and stigma of that disability. While a few more people were identified through the house-to-house survey, the rapid rural appraisal was a better approach for identifying disability in the community because of the greater community participation. The researchers believe that this community participation provided a greater understanding of the complex contextual dynamics influencing the identification of disability, thereby increasing the validity of the study findings. Another advantage of the rapid rural appraisal was the methodological and analytical simplicity. Both methods, however, failed to identify some individuals with disabilities who were later identified on the follow-up verification visits. Taking into account the factors discussed above, the researchers conclude that no single method could be used to comprehensively identify people with disability in a community. They suggest that a judicious combination of methods which takes into account local perceptions and priorities, includes more specific screening techniques, and facilitates informed voluntary referrals, would be the most effective approach.  (+info)

Quality of death rates by race and Hispanic origin: a summary of current research, 1999. (8/448)

OBJECTIVES: This report provides a summary of current knowledge and research on the quality and reliability of death rates by race and Hispanic origin in official mortality statistics of the United States produced by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). It also provides a quantitative assessment of bias in death rates by race and Hispanic origin. It identifies areas for targeted research. METHODS: Death rates are based on information on deaths (numerators of the rates) from death certificates filed in the states and compiled into a national database by NCHS, and on population data (denominators) from the Census Bureau. Selected studies of race/Hispanic-origin misclassification and under coverage are summarized on deaths and population. Estimates are made of the separate and the joint bias on death rates by race and Hispanic origin from the two sources. Simplifying assumptions are made about the stability of the biases over time and among age groups. Original results are presented using an expanded and updated database from the National Longitudinal Mortality Study. RESULTS: While biases in the numerator and denominator tend to offset each other somewhat, death rates for all groups show net effects of race misclassification and under coverage. For the white population and the black population, published death rates are overstated in official publications by an estimated 1.0 percent and 5.0 percent, respectively, resulting principally from undercounts of these population groups in the census. Death rates for the other minority groups are understated in official publications approximately as follows: American Indians, 21 percent; Asian or Pacific Islanders, 11 percent; and Hispanics, 2 percent. These estimates do not take into account differential misreporting of age among the race/ethnic groups.  (+info)

Acute wounds and injuries are those that occur suddenly and heal within a relatively short period of time, usually within a few days or weeks. Examples of acute wounds include cuts, scrapes, and burns. Chronic wounds and injuries, on the other hand, are those that persist over a longer period of time and may not heal properly, leading to long-term complications. Examples of chronic wounds include diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, and chronic back pain.

Wounds and injuries can be caused by a variety of factors, including accidents, sports injuries, violence, and medical conditions such as diabetes or circulatory problems. Treatment for wounds and injuries depends on the severity of the injury and may include cleaning and dressing the wound, applying antibiotics, immobilizing broken bones, and providing pain management. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair damaged tissues or restore function.

Preventive measures for wounds and injuries include wearing appropriate protective gear during activities such as sports or work, following safety protocols to avoid accidents, maintaining proper hygiene and nutrition to prevent infection, and seeking medical attention promptly if an injury occurs.

Overall, wounds and injuries can have a significant impact on an individual's quality of life, and it is important to seek medical attention promptly if symptoms persist or worsen over time. Proper treatment and management of wounds and injuries can help to promote healing, reduce the risk of complications, and improve long-term outcomes.

Neoplasm refers to an abnormal growth of cells that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Neoplasms can occur in any part of the body and can affect various organs and tissues. The term "neoplasm" is often used interchangeably with "tumor," but while all tumors are neoplasms, not all neoplasms are tumors.

Types of Neoplasms

There are many different types of neoplasms, including:

1. Carcinomas: These are malignant tumors that arise in the epithelial cells lining organs and glands. Examples include breast cancer, lung cancer, and colon cancer.
2. Sarcomas: These are malignant tumors that arise in connective tissue, such as bone, cartilage, and fat. Examples include osteosarcoma (bone cancer) and soft tissue sarcoma.
3. Lymphomas: These are cancers of the immune system, specifically affecting the lymph nodes and other lymphoid tissues. Examples include Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
4. Leukemias: These are cancers of the blood and bone marrow that affect the white blood cells. Examples include acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).
5. Melanomas: These are malignant tumors that arise in the pigment-producing cells called melanocytes. Examples include skin melanoma and eye melanoma.

Causes and Risk Factors of Neoplasms

The exact causes of neoplasms are not fully understood, but there are several known risk factors that can increase the likelihood of developing a neoplasm. These include:

1. Genetic predisposition: Some people may be born with genetic mutations that increase their risk of developing certain types of neoplasms.
2. Environmental factors: Exposure to certain environmental toxins, such as radiation and certain chemicals, can increase the risk of developing a neoplasm.
3. Infection: Some neoplasms are caused by viruses or bacteria. For example, human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common cause of cervical cancer.
4. Lifestyle factors: Factors such as smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, and a poor diet can increase the risk of developing certain types of neoplasms.
5. Family history: A person's risk of developing a neoplasm may be higher if they have a family history of the condition.

Signs and Symptoms of Neoplasms

The signs and symptoms of neoplasms can vary depending on the type of cancer and where it is located in the body. Some common signs and symptoms include:

1. Unusual lumps or swelling
2. Pain
3. Fatigue
4. Weight loss
5. Change in bowel or bladder habits
6. Unexplained bleeding
7. Coughing up blood
8. Hoarseness or a persistent cough
9. Changes in appetite or digestion
10. Skin changes, such as a new mole or a change in the size or color of an existing mole.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Neoplasms

The diagnosis of a neoplasm usually involves a combination of physical examination, imaging tests (such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans), and biopsy. A biopsy involves removing a small sample of tissue from the suspected tumor and examining it under a microscope for cancer cells.

The treatment of neoplasms depends on the type, size, location, and stage of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health. Some common treatments include:

1. Surgery: Removing the tumor and surrounding tissue can be an effective way to treat many types of cancer.
2. Chemotherapy: Using drugs to kill cancer cells can be effective for some types of cancer, especially if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.
3. Radiation therapy: Using high-energy radiation to kill cancer cells can be effective for some types of cancer, especially if the cancer is located in a specific area of the body.
4. Immunotherapy: Boosting the body's immune system to fight cancer can be an effective treatment for some types of cancer.
5. Targeted therapy: Using drugs or other substances to target specific molecules on cancer cells can be an effective treatment for some types of cancer.

Prevention of Neoplasms

While it is not always possible to prevent neoplasms, there are several steps that can reduce the risk of developing cancer. These include:

1. Avoiding exposure to known carcinogens (such as tobacco smoke and radiation)
2. Maintaining a healthy diet and lifestyle
3. Getting regular exercise
4. Not smoking or using tobacco products
5. Limiting alcohol consumption
6. Getting vaccinated against certain viruses that are associated with cancer (such as human papillomavirus, or HPV)
7. Participating in screening programs for early detection of cancer (such as mammograms for breast cancer and colonoscopies for colon cancer)
8. Avoiding excessive exposure to sunlight and using protective measures such as sunscreen and hats to prevent skin cancer.

It's important to note that not all cancers can be prevented, and some may be caused by factors that are not yet understood or cannot be controlled. However, by taking these steps, individuals can reduce their risk of developing cancer and improve their overall health and well-being.

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Alberta Municipal Affairs: Municipal Census & Population Lists Statistics Canada: Census Profile (2011 Census) (Use mdy dates ... "Census 2015: Overall Results" (PDF). Strathcona County. p. 4. Retrieved June 1, 2016. "The Municipal Census 2015 Report" (PDF ... Municipal Census Manual: Requirements and Guidelines for Conducting a Municipal Census (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. ... The following presents the results of this count for comparison with its concurrent municipal census results. No censuses were ...
Alberta Municipal Affairs: Municipal Census & Population Lists Statistics Canada: Census Profile (2011 Census) (Use mdy dates ... Municipal Census Manual: Requirements and Guidelines for Conducting a Municipal Census (PDF) (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. ... "2013 Civic Census Results" (PDF) (PDF). City of Calgary. July 2013. p. 3. Retrieved July 22, 2014. "MD of Bonnyville 2014 ... "2013 Civic Census Results Revised 2014 July" (PDF) (PDF). City of Calgary. July 2014. pp. 3 & 9. Retrieved July 22, 2014. " ...
"Municipal Census Manual: Requirements and Guidelines for Conducting a Municipal Census" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. ... "Lac La Biche County 2019 Municipal Census Report". Lac La Biche County. April 17, 2019. p. 13. Retrieved July 1, 2021. "Lac La ... The following summarizes the results of the numerous municipal censuses conducted in 2019. The following is a list of hamlet ... Mamta Lulla (June 24, 2019). "2019 census results: Red Deer loses 3rd largest city title to Lethbridge". Red Deer Advocate. ...
"2021 Census". Town of Blackfalds. Retrieved May 5, 2022. "Municipal Census Report" (PDF). Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo ... Municipal Census Manual: Requirements and Guidelines for Conducting a Municipal Census (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. ... 349 on May 1 and the Village of Hythe on July 1. Of these, the only two municipalities to conduct a municipal census in 2021 ... "census2018 Municipal Census Report" (PDF). Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo. Retrieved May 5, 2022. "Order in Council 817/ ...
"Civic Census 2020: City Suspends 2020 Census Collection". City of Calgary. Retrieved November 30, 2020. "Census". City of ... "2019 Census Report". Town of Raymond. February 12, 2020. Retrieved November 30, 2020. "Municipal Census". City of Red Deer. ... "Morinville Census 2020: Municipal Census Report" (PDF). Town of Morinville. p. 3 of 10. Retrieved January 8, 2021. "Municipal ... Municipal Census Manual: Requirements and Guidelines for Conducting a Municipal Census (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. ...
The Village of Rosemary indicated it was going to conduct a municipal census in 2017, though no completion of this census was ... "Municipal Census Manual: Requirements and Guidelines for Conducting a Municipal Census" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. ... Alberta Municipal Affairs: Municipal Census & Population Lists Statistics Canada: Census Program (Use mdy dates from February ... That census counted 421 people in the Village of Rosemary compared to 396 people recorded by Statistics Canada in 2016. "We are ...
"Census 2015: Overall Results" (PDF). Strathcona County. p. 4. Retrieved June 1, 2016. "The Municipal Census 2015 Report" (PDF ... Municipal Census Manual: Requirements and Guidelines for Conducting a Municipal Census (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. ... "census2018 Municipal Census Report" (PDF). Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo. Retrieved March 9, 2019. "Census 2018 Results ... Alberta Municipal Affairs: Municipal Census & Population Lists Statistics Canada: Census Program (Use mdy dates from July 2018 ...
A Russian census is a census of the population of Russia. Such a census has occurred at various irregular points in the history ... Demographics of Russia Soviet Census The first census in Russian history. The first and only census of the Russian Empire. The ... The last census of the Soviet Union. The first census after the breakup of the USSR indicating a marked decline after the ... The first census carried out by UN standards. The first post-Soviet census to include Crimea. Postponed in 2020 due to the ...
Alberta Municipal Affairs: Municipal Census & Population Lists Statistics Canada: Census Profile (2011 Census) (Use mdy dates ... Municipal Census Manual: Requirements and Guidelines for Conducting a Municipal Census (PDF) (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. ... Albert Census". City of St. Albert. Retrieved December 28, 2013. "2012 Municipal Census Report" (PDF) (PDF). Strathcona County ... No censuses were conducted among Alberta's 3 special areas and 8 improvement districts. The Fort McMurray and Sherwood Park ...
Municipal Census Manual: Requirements and Guidelines for Conducting a Municipal Census (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. ... "Strathcona County Census Results". Strathcona County. October 7, 2022. Retrieved October 11, 2022. "Census population results ... Of these, at least three municipalities are conducting a municipal census in 2022, including the City of Cold Lake, the Town of ... The following summarizes the results of the three municipal censuses conducted in 2022. The following is a list of hamlet ...
... hoax on 2001 UK census from ONS. U.S. Census Press Release on 1930 Census. U.S. Census Press Release on Soundex and WPA. ... This term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include censuses of ... Censuses are mentioned in the Bible. God commands a per capita tax to be paid with the census for the upkeep of the Tabernacle ... Another census was held in AD 144. The oldest recorded census in India is thought to have occurred around 330 BC during the ...
The current census now includes household information. The most recent census (as of 2011) emphasized reaching rural and remote ... National Institute of Statistics and Census). The census in Ecuador is conducted every 10 years, and its objective is to obtain ... The 2010 census was conducted in November and December, and its results were published January 27, 2011. The following table ... The Ecuadorian census is conducted by the governmental institution known as INEC, Instituto Nacional de Estadisticas y Censos ( ...
"Census Taker [Original Soundtrack] - The Residents , Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. "The Census Taker - Historical - The ... The Census Taker is the soundtrack to the 1984 movie of the same name, released in 1985. The soundtrack was composed by The ... " "The Census Taker" "Talk" "End of Home" "Emotional Music" "Secret Seed" "Easter Woman/Simple Song" "Hellno" "Where Is She" " ... " "The Census Taker Returns" The Residents: Performance Sandy Sandwich: Guitar " ...
... intervals 2000 Estonia Census Indonesia 2000 census 2000 Panamanian census 2000 Turkish census 2000 United States Census, the ... Fifth National Population Census of the People's Republic of China Costa Rica 2000 Census, the ninth federal census, conducted ... 22nd decennial federal census This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title 2000 Census. If an internal ... The following countries conducted a census of the general population in 2000: ...
... may refer to: 2022 census of Ireland 2022 Census of Pakistan 2022 Romanian census 2022 Scottish census 2022 South ... African census This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title 2022 census. If an internal link led you here ...
Census geographic units of Canada Statistics Canada United States Census Bureau census regions and divisions "Census Geography ... The census divisions of Canada are second-level census geographic unit, below provinces and territories, and above "census ... In the United States, the Census Bureau divides the country into four census regions and nine census divisions. The bureau also ... "Census Divisions Cartographic Boundary Files Descriptions and Metadata - U.S. Census Bureau". Archived from the original on ...
... may refer to: Alberta municipal censuses, 2012 2012 Bolivian census 2012 Zimbabwe census This disambiguation page ... lists articles associated with the title 2012 census. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to ...
... may refer to: 2004 Moldovan census 2004 Moroccan census 2004 Transnistrian census This disambiguation page lists ... articles associated with the title 2004 census. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point ...
Example of census transform The census transform (CT) is an image operator that associates to each pixel of a grayscale image a ... The census transform is related to the rank transform, that associates to each pixel the number of neighbouring pixels with ... The most common version of the census transform uses a 3x3 window, comparing each pixel p {\displaystyle p} with all its 8- ... "Census Transform Algorithm Overview". Intel. Retrieved 2019-06-05. Stein (2004). Hafner, David; Demetz, Oliver; Weickert, ...
The Argentina census (Spanish: Censo Nacional de Población, Hogares y Viviendas en la Argentina) is a census mandated by the ... The first census was taken in 1869, under Domingo Faustino Sarmiento; there have been 11 federal censuses since that time. The ... the National Institute of Statistics and Census of Argentina is the public body responsible of conducting the census. Adapted ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Censuses in Argentina. v t e (CS1 Spanish-language sources (es), Use dmy dates from ...
... may refer to: Belarus Census (2009) 2009 Vanuatu Census This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the ... title 2009 census. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article ...
... may refer to: Belarus Census (1999) Belarus Census (2009) Belarus Census (2019) This disambiguation page lists ... articles associated with the title Belarus Census. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point ...
Census in Australia#2001 2001 Bangladesh census 2001 Bolivian census Canada 2001 Census 2001 census of Croatia 2001 Census of ... Lithuanian census of 2001 2001 Nepal census 2001 New Zealand census South African National Census of 2001 Ukrainian Census ( ... 2001 census may refer to a census covered by: ... page lists articles associated with the title 2001 Census. If ...
... s covering the entire country were introduced with the 1990 census. Before that, back to the 1940 census, only ... "2010 Census Tallies of Census Tracts, Block Groups & Blocks". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 21, 2019 ... for the 2010 Census was 11,155,486. Census blocks are grouped into block groups, which are grouped into census tracts. There ... A census block is the smallest geographic unit used by the United States Census Bureau for tabulation of 100-percent data (data ...
The Compton Census was a census of the population of England and Wales held in 1676 to determine their religious affiliation. ... Anne Whiteman (ed.) The Compton Census of 1676: A Critical Edition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986). (1676 in England, ... Danby devised an ecclesiastical census of the population to demonstrate the numerical inferiority of Nonconformists. As the ... Censuses in the United Kingdom, Demographics of England, Demographics of Wales, History of Christianity in England, History of ...
... may refer to: Alberta municipal censuses, 2016 2016 Australian census 2016 Canadian Census Great Elephant Census ... This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title 2016 census. If an internal link led you here, you may wish ...
The 1931 Census or census of 1931 may refer to: Canada 1931 Census 1931 Cuba census 1931 census of India 1931 census of ... Palestine Polish census of 1931 United Kingdom census, 1931 Yugoslav census of 1931 1931 population census in Bosnia and ... Herzegovina This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title 1931 Census. If an internal link led you here, ...
... may refer to: 1993 North Korea Census 1993 Peru Census This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the ... title 1993 census. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article ...
QuickStats: Percentage* of Residential Care Communities† That Use Electronic Health Records,§ by Census Region¶ - United States ... The United States Census Bureau defines four regions comprising the following states: Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, ... by Census Region - United States, 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2018;67:730. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6725a8 ...
The 2020 Census will incorporate a new way to protect your identity. This technique, called differential privacy, will ... The 2020 Census will incorporate a new way to protect your identity. This technique, called differential privacy, will ... Census 2020 Differential Privacy. The 2020 Census will incorporate a new way to protect your identity. This technique, called ... In past censuses the Census Bureau has used various forms of disclosure avoidance to ensure that privacy is protected while ...
When the Census released its reapportionment totals in December, much of the focus was on the new seats in red states, and how ... Census Bureau director Robert Groves summed it up best Thursday: "We are increasingly metropolitan today, our country is ... The data released by Census on Thursday, though, shows how those same population shifts are creating new challenges for the GOP ...
Historic Census records note:. Individual Census forms remain confidential for 100 years. Records from the 1911 Census have ... Key information resources from the 2011 Census for Bristol.. 2011 Census Interactive Mapping Tools. *2011 Census Statistics ... 2011 Census Profiles. Profiles for a variety of geographies are available using our downloadable spreadsheet 2011 Census ... 2011 Census briefing notes and summary statistics. * pdf Key statistics about Bristol local authority area (. 206 KB. ) ...
What is the purpose of the Student Equity Census? Data collected through the Equity Censuses will assist the university in ... Is the Student Equity Census mandatory? This voluntary Equity Census provides the university with the necessary data to help us ... What information is the Student Equity Census seeking? The Census covers several dimensions of self-identification, including ... The UCalgary Student Census is for undergraduate and graduate students, and the Employment Equity Census is for senior ...
c)Economic Census - Puerto Rico data are not comparable to U.S. Economic Census data ... QuickFacts data are derived from: Population Estimates, American Community Survey, Census of Population and Housing, Current ... Economic Census, Survey of Business Owners, Building Permits. ...
Edward VIIs proclamation as king is approved by the Privy Council after some initial confusion as to whether he will adopt the regnal title of Albert I as, it is rumoured, his mother wished. ...
Ancestry.com - U.S. Federal Census Collection Browse by census year, state, county, township. Census images available with fee- ...
The valuable information found on census records helps you to understand your family in their time and place. Voter Lists serve ... A census is an official list of the people in a particular area at a given time, while voter lists show those who were ... as a confirmation of residence in between the years that the census was taken. ... Census records can be rich with details about your ancestor. Be sure to look at each and every question that was asked and ...
Ancestry.com - U.S. Federal Census Collection Browse by census year, state, county, township. Census images available with fee- ...
1920 Census Table of Contents Genealogy: Census Records Microfilm Availability and Access 1920 Census Schedules [table striped ... Home , Research Our Records , Census Records , 1920 Federal Population Census - Microfilm Catalog , 1920 Federal Population ...
... census records, immigration lists and other records - all in one family search! ... Census & Voter Lists. Many countries took periodic censuses to keep track of their populations. Census records often include ... details about your ancestors and their families and allow you to track their location and families at the time of the census. , ...
This variable was introduced in the 2006 Census to replace Family Type (FMTF) which was used in previous Censuses.. Families ... For the Census, FMCF relates only to the basic composition of the family. FMCF is the principal family variable used in family ... 2011 Census Dictionary >> Glossary >> Family Composition (FMCF). Family Composition (FMCF). ...
Brain Cell Atlas and Cell Census Program. Overview. This Program supports optimization and implementation of innovative ... Pilot optimization of high throughput assays and technology platforms that enable a systematic cell census and construction of ... Brain Cell Atlas and Cell Census Program. ... Brain Cell Atlas and Cell Census Program. *Developmental ...
... a third-generation Mexican American who has just become the first Latino to lead the census. ... Senate confirms first Latino to lead the Census Bureau. 02:38. *Share this - ... a third-generation Mexican American who has just become the first Latino to lead the census. Nov. 7, 2021 ...
Donald Trump is clearly very unhappy with how his legal case to put a citizenship question on the 2020 Census is going. The ...
Australian government pins Census collapse on geoblocking failure and overloaded router. *ABS blames Census 2016 site failure ... Census 2016: Government must set the right example This week, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) became the object of ... ABS decided years ago to make this the first time that a majority of Australians would be encouraged to complete the Census ... While there were whispers of some sort of folksy narrative around filling out the census being a "great Australian thing to do ...
Five justices held that the Census Act allows the question, but a separate five-justice majority found the rulemaking that ... The Trump administration said Wednesday it will attempt to add a citizenship question on the 2020 census while complying with ... How to Put Citizenship Back in the Census. .css-jiugt2-Dek-Dek{margin:0px;color:var(--secondary-text-color);direction:var(-- ... https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-to-put-citizenship-back-in-the-census-11562264430 ...
The most recent census took place in March of 2021.. The census asks every household questions about the people who live there ... The census is undertaken by the Office for National Statistics every 10 years and gives us a picture of all the people and ... Information from the census helps the government and local authorities to plan and fund local services, such as education, ... Key census statistics for Leicester are published on the open data platform to make information accessible to local services, ...
... (Viewing Images for the 1940 Census in One Step) Stephen P. Morse, PhD. & Joel D. Weintraub ...
... anti-census antics could wipe the GOP off the electoral map. ... Census results are used to draw the maps of congressional seats ... Census returns from red states like Texas and Alabama are already below the national average, causing the GOP some anxiety. ... In fact, some right-wing activists are now hoping to use the census in service of their own causes. Right Wing Watch reports ... But now top Republicans are realizing that this anti-census crusade could backfire badly-by threatening the existence of GOP ...
The Census website was unavailable for days after it was pulled offline by Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) on Census ... There is also a Senate inquiry into the 2016 Census.. IBM has been tight lipped following the debacle, but eventually made a ... The news follows the call from Malcolm Turnbull that heads would roll, made in a press conference on the day following Census ... MacGibbon said he had spent the last "happy month" investigating the "failure" of the delivery of the census. He has been ...
The European Union is urging Bosnia to publish the results of a disputed national census, stressing that it is needed to move ... Bosnias last census was conducted in 1991, a year before the beginning of the war that claimed 100,000 lives and left more ... The EU wants the most important data published by July 1, the date set by the Bosnian law governing the census, otherwise it ... The European Union is urging Bosnia to publish the results of a disputed national census, stressing that it is needed to move ...
Census Bureau Releases Apportionment Data. 04.26.2021 / 3:43 PM Media Contact. * Aunna Dennis (202)644-6500 adennis@commoncause ... Today, the US Census Bureau released the statewide population numbers that determine congressional apportionment. Georgia will ...
The inaccuracy of the 2020 census diminished the political representation of communities of color. ... Why census undercounts are problematic for political representation. Gabriel R. Sanchez Monday, March 28, 2022. ... The report last week from the U.S. Census Bureau confirmed what many experts and advocates have worried about over the past two ... The importance of census population figures to policymaking and revenue distribution are huge. The inaccuracy of the 2020 count ...
A new estimate shows Floridas population grew by almost 11 percent in the past eight years. The estimate released this week by the University of Floridas Bureau of Economic and Business Research …
Trumps census shenanigans shouldnt count. By Renée Loth Contributor,Updated November 8, 2019, 5:00 a.m. ... There are threats to the 2020 Census, now just a few months away: It will be the first one conducted mostly online, and the ... Advocates for a full and fair census breathed a sigh of relief at the Supreme Courts narrowly written opinion. But they still ... None of the detailed data have yet been released. Previous studies by the Census Bureau have reached the opposite conclusion. ...
... Union says they will protest if not paid before Eid. ... Thousands of teachers who rendered services for the census and voters lists work have yet not been paid 10 months after the ... had commissioned some 3,330 teachers from public schools in the district last year in September and October for census and ...
  • Produced by the United States Census Bureau. (cdc.gov)
  • The 2020 Census will incorporate a new way to protect your identity. (esri.com)
  • This webinar will cover some of the main points on what GIS users need to know to successfully work with Census 2020 data. (esri.com)
  • Census 2020 brings a new era of disclosure avoidance with the implementation of differential privacy . (esri.com)
  • This unsettling finding, along with other successful reconstruction attacks, was the catalyst for the Census Bureau to implement differential privacy to protect Census 2020 data. (esri.com)
  • Donald Trump is clearly very unhappy with how his legal case to put a citizenship question on the 2020 Census is going. (thedailybeast.com)
  • The report last week from the U.S. Census Bureau confirmed what many experts and advocates have worried about over the past two years: Despite achieving an accurate overall estimate of the population, the 2020 census suffered from significant undercounts of racial and ethnic minorities. (brookings.edu)
  • Last week, the US Census Bureau declared that - contrary to expectations and common sense -- adding a citizenship question to the 2020 count would not have seriously affected the response rate, even in communities with large immigrant populations. (bostonglobe.com)
  • There are threats to the 2020 Census, now just a few months away: It will be the first one conducted mostly online, and the bureau is not on track to hire sufficient workers to conduct the count. (bostonglobe.com)
  • Analysis of 1999 to 2020 mortality data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, among women by race/ethnicity, age, and US Census region. (nih.gov)
  • This report provides national estimates of breast cancer mortality from 1999 to 2020 by race/ethnicity, age group, and US Census region. (nih.gov)
  • The NIH's Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative Cell Census Network (BICCN) aims to provide researchers with a comprehensive reference of the diverse cell types in human, monkey, and mouse brain. (nih.gov)
  • In 2017, NIH expanded support for the collection of cell census data and development of relevant tools by launching a coordinated set of awards under the auspices of a BRAIN Initiative Cell Census Network (BICCN). (nih.gov)
  • There is also a Senate inquiry into the 2016 Census. (cio.com)
  • The most recent census took place in March of 2021. (data.gov.uk)
  • This dataset provides Census 2021 estimates that classify usual residents in England and Wales by their main language. (data.gov.uk)
  • The estimates are as at Census Day, 21 March 2021. (data.gov.uk)
  • A successful implementation of differential privacy should look very similar to prior decennial census releases. (esri.com)
  • Trump further instructed the Secretary of Commerce to "consider initiating any administrative process necessary to include a citizenship question on the 2030 decennial census. (bostonglobe.com)
  • This one-hour discussion will help GIS users prepare for and anticipate the marked changes in how census data are released. (esri.com)
  • The Census Bureau is also required to keep the information they collect confidential for 72 years, and under Title 13, they must protect any individual from being identifiable in published data. (esri.com)
  • This dichotomy between publishing accurate data and protecting an individual's identity is a perpetual challenge for the Census Bureau. (esri.com)
  • In past censuses the Census Bureau has used various forms of disclosure avoidance to ensure that privacy is protected while also releasing high quality data that fits the needs for numerous use cases. (esri.com)
  • Increases in computing power, innovations in data science, and the general increase in the amount of data collected has raised the fear of a "reconstruction attack" that utilizes census data. (esri.com)
  • The Census Bureau performed an internal experiment that attempted to reconstruct the 2010 Census data using commercially available databases. (esri.com)
  • The data released by Census on Thursday , though, shows how those same population shifts are creating new challenges for the GOP. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Key census statistics for Leicester are published on the open data platform to make information accessible to local services, voluntary and community groups, and residents. (data.gov.uk)
  • For more Census data, see Census data access tools . (cdc.gov)
  • Right Wing Watch reports that nativist group American for Legal Immigration PAC (ALIPAC) is urging Congress to pass a new law that would allow the government to use census data "to detect, detain, and deport illegal immigrants" who fill it out. (motherjones.com)
  • The EU wants the most important data published by July 1, the date set by the Bosnian law governing the census, otherwise it will no longer will be valid, he said. (rferl.org)
  • A copy of your IC's official Census data can be obtained from the Division of Facilities Planning, Office of Research Facilities (see below for contact information). (nih.gov)
  • and (4) generate a unified and comprehensive brain cell knowledge base that integrates all existing brain cell census data and information across diverse repositories. (nih.gov)
  • Population and housing censuses and agricultural censuses provide in-depth, community- scale data on demographics, education, employment, and living conditions as well as on farming inputs, practices, and productivity. (nih.gov)
  • We compared their self-reported data with data from the 1992 and 1997 Censuses of Agriculture. (nih.gov)
  • Aims The main objective of this research was to calculate child mortality rates (CMRs) indirectly, using census data, and to investigate using spatial pattern analysis the presence of any clustering patterns among provincial regions. (who.int)
  • Vital status registry systems and direct and indirect estimates based on sampling or census data are regarded as the main source of mortality rates (8). (who.int)
  • In essence, most child mortality information is collected retrospectively from women of childbearing age (15-49 years) using census data and household surveys (1). (who.int)
  • In 2014, the NIH BRAIN Initiative awarded 10 grants to pilot classification strategies and generate data/metadata for this comprehensive brain cell census. (nih.gov)
  • Specialized (U01) Collaboratories that contribute cell census data for endpoints in the mouse brain not otherwise covered in the U19 Centers. (nih.gov)
  • Specialized (U01) Collaboratories that begin to collect cell census data from human or non-human primate brains. (nih.gov)
  • A U24 BRAIN Cell Data Center (BCDC) that integrate, visualize, and disseminate the cell census data generated by the U19 and U01 Centers and Collaboratories as well as create a brain cell knowledge base. (nih.gov)
  • Over the last four years, National Institutes of Health-supported researchers at RTI International in North Carolina have been transforming anonymized data from the 2000 Census-which described the country's 281 million people and 116 million households-into a virtual U.S. population. (nih.gov)
  • But the Census data did give them the population, household sizes, family incomes and residents' ages and ethnicities for every town, county and state. (nih.gov)
  • The June survey was just one national sample and not a rigorous field test of the sort the bureau conducts repeatedly before every census. (bostonglobe.com)
  • While nearly every country conducts regular censuses, the results are published independently by hundreds of statistical agencies, often in reports designed for reading rather than for analysis. (nih.gov)
  • Census records often include helpful details about your ancestors and their families and allow you to track their location and families at the time of the census. (myheritage.com)
  • Time to gin up the machinery to put a citizenship question on the 2030 Census! (bostonglobe.com)
  • It was found that overall breast cancer mortality is decreasing but varies by race/ethnicity, age group, and US Census region. (nih.gov)
  • When the Census released its reapportionment totals in December, much of the focus was on the new seats in red states, and how it was a good thing for Republicans. (washingtonpost.com)
  • But now top Republicans are realizing that this anti-census crusade could backfire badly-by threaten ing the existence of GOP congressional and legislature seats if conservative voters are under-counted. (motherjones.com)
  • It's ironic that Republicans are so bent on requiring respondents to declare their immigration status, since for years they trashed the census precisely for asking too many nosy questions. (bostonglobe.com)
  • To help answer these questions, NIDCR researchers conducted a census of oral mucosal cells from gum and inner cheek tissues of people with and without severe periodontitis. (nih.gov)
  • NIH researchers have just completed the first census of the fungi that live on the human body, and it's quite a diverse collection [1]. (nih.gov)
  • The Census protects citizens' privacy, and the RTI researchers don't-in fact, can't-duplicate John Smith from Manhattan or Jane Doe from Iowa City. (nih.gov)
  • Census results are used to draw the maps of congressional seats and state offices, based on population. (motherjones.com)
  • The European Union is urging Bosnia to publish the results of a disputed national census, stressing that it is needed to move towards EU integration. (rferl.org)
  • They finished the 'synthetic population' in 2009, and they will be updating it as the 2010 Census results come out. (nih.gov)
  • The Census Bureau operates with a constitutional mandate to enumerate the US population every ten years. (esri.com)
  • Individual Census forms remain confidential for 100 years. (bristol.gov.uk)
  • The U.S. federal censuses for the years 1900-1930 include a date of immigration for immigrants. (ancestry.com)
  • ABS decided years ago to make this the first time that a majority of Australians would be encouraged to complete the Census online. (zdnet.com)
  • The census is undertaken by the Office for National Statistics every 10 years and gives us a picture of all the people and households in England and Wales. (data.gov.uk)
  • Copies of the report are available at https://www2.census.gov/library/publications/2011/acs/acs-17.pdf (194K). (nih.gov)
  • with Dr. John M. Abowd , Associate Director for Research and Methodology and Chief Scientist at the US Census Bureau. (esri.com)
  • A central goal of this and the three companion FOAs is to build a brain cell census resource that can be widely used throughout the research community. (nih.gov)
  • As we know, states base decisions on maps defining political districts on the census population estimates, with creation of districts where communities of interest (such as racial and ethnic minorities) have influence over the election outcomes in their districts. (brookings.edu)
  • This report compares the characteristics of AHS farmers to the Census of Agriculture to evaluate the generalizability of AHS findings. (nih.gov)
  • However, animals raised are similar to those in the North Carolina Census of Agriculture. (nih.gov)
  • This variable was introduced in the 2006 Census to replace Family Type (FMTF) which was used in previous Censuses. (abs.gov.au)
  • Previous studies by the Census Bureau have reached the opposite conclusion. (bostonglobe.com)
  • Advocates for a full and fair census breathed a sigh of relief at the Supreme Court's narrowly written opinion . (bostonglobe.com)
  • The Census Report can be filtered and is searchable in a variety of ways including: by employee, employee NIH ID number, by type of employee, by SAC (HN code), by location, etc. (nih.gov)
  • Today, the US Census Bureau released the statewide population numbers that determine congressional apportionment. (commoncause.org)
  • Though there are other factors that contribute to under-reporting-including immigration status, education, and income level-a right-wing revolt against the census could eliminate seats in conservative corners of the country. (motherjones.com)
  • Conducted in October 2013, the census has been the subject of an interethnic dispute in a country divided along ethnic lines between the Serb Republic and Muslim-Croat Federation. (rferl.org)
  • it has among the lowest census response rates in the country. (bostonglobe.com)
  • While the questions in census records vary from place to place, and year to year, you can find information like names of other household members, ages, birthplaces, residence, occupation, immigration and citizenship details, marriage information, military service and more. (ancestry.com)
  • The census asks every household questions about the people who live there and the type of home they live in. (data.gov.uk)
  • Further questions about the NIH Census? (nih.gov)
  • Did you know that when you filled out your census form, you helped computer scientists model how diseases spread in the United States? (nih.gov)
  • And GOP Rep. Patrick McHenry has also sought to tamp down anti-census hysteria, telling conservatives that it's their "constitutional duty" to complete the questionnaire, the Journal noted in another story. (motherjones.com)
  • In fact, some right-wing activists are now hoping to use the census in service of their own causes. (motherjones.com)
  • IBM Global Technology Services, the Census' service provider, have reportedly replaced the departed staff with senior executives from IBM's Asia Pacific services business. (cio.com)
  • The Census is also used for calculating certain central service charges to the ICs and utilization rates for administrative space. (nih.gov)
  • The state of Alabama is suing the US Commerce Department for following the Constitution's mandate that the federal government count "the whole number of persons in each state," saying that including undocumented immigrants in the census puts states with fewer immigrants at a disadvantage. (bostonglobe.com)
  • by 2050, the ranks of people 90 and older may reach 9 million, according to a report from the U.S. Census Bureau, commissioned by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) at the National Institutes of Health. (nih.gov)
  • The IC can see who is included in their Census Report with the filters applied. (nih.gov)
  • Use the tool to select the type of area that you're interested in (eg LSOA) and then the name of the area you're interested in and a 4 page 2011 Census profile is produced. (bristol.gov.uk)
  • IBM won the $9.6 million contract from the ABS to host the Census in 2014. (cio.com)
  • And it is for this reason that the apparent failure by many involved to read and anticipate the consequences of those pressing issues that contributed to make Census night and the following days unnecessarily confusing. (zdnet.com)
  • Given the significant consequences associated with the population numbers generated by the census, civil rights leaders are calling for changes to be made to the process-one that consistently diminishes the political influence of diverse communities who are hard to reach. (brookings.edu)
  • Census takers didn't always have the best penmanship, so if you're having a hard time locating your ancestor, write out the name and try replacing some of the letters with letters that look similar. (ancestry.com)
  • Census records can be rich with details about your ancestor. (ancestry.com)
  • Pinpoint your ancestor's location from the census on a map, and then look for churches, cemeteries, and other places where your ancestor may have left records. (ancestry.com)
  • Be sure to locate your ancestor's adult siblings in census records. (ancestry.com)
  • His talk, entitled "Counting in the Dark: Racial Classification, the Census, and the Concept of Race," will address the question of how we understand the necessity of racial classification and its meaning for group claims of recognition, the formation of multiracial identities, and social issues such as racial profiling. (nih.gov)
  • Information from the census helps the government and local authorities to plan and fund local services, such as education, doctors' surgeries and roads. (data.gov.uk)
  • It's often difficult for conservatives to separate overall government intervention from a question as simple as the census," McHenry added. (motherjones.com)
  • But the sudden rush from conservatives to promote the census shows how quickly they're willing to embrace government action-provided that it advances the right agenda. (motherjones.com)
  • Two senior IBM staff have "resigned with immediate effect" following the Census debacle, according to reports. (cio.com)
  • The timing of the test couldn't have been worse," said Terri Ann Lowenthal, a former staff director of the House census oversight subcommittee. (bostonglobe.com)
  • The Census includes staff who occupy NIH controlled facilities on a regular basis. (nih.gov)
  • Pilot optimization of high throughput assays and technology platforms that enable a systematic cell census and construction of reference brain atlases. (nih.gov)
  • Recent technological advances in high throughput analyses of molecular, anatomic, and physiological measurements at the single cell level promise to open a new era calling for a unified brain cell census. (nih.gov)
  • Dr. Abowd will share insights into the US Census Bureau's evolving approach to differential privacy. (esri.com)
  • According to the Census Bureau's Chief Scientist, Dr. John Abowd, the shift to differential privacy "marks a sea change for the way that official statistics are produced and published. (esri.com)
  • This video Protecting Privacy with MATH, produced by minutephysics in collaboration with the Census Bureau, provides an excellent overview of differential privacy and reconstruction attacks. (esri.com)
  • Right-wing activists have long railed against the census as an unconstitutional invasion of privacy, urging their followers not to complete the once-a-decade survey. (motherjones.com)
  • The news follows the call from Malcolm Turnbull that heads would roll, made in a press conference on the day following Census night. (cio.com)
  • IBM has been tight lipped following the debacle, but eventually made a statement days after census night. (cio.com)
  • The age-adjusted death rates for stroke in all U.S. Census regions in the United States generally decreased from 1970 to 2013, although the rates in all regions were relatively stable from 1992 to 1999. (cdc.gov)
  • It's not clear that a mass census boycott is actually occurring: Greg Sargent examined a sample of conservative districts and discovered higher-than-average reporting rates. (motherjones.com)