Censuses: Enumerations of populations usually recording identities of all persons in every place of residence with age or date of birth, sex, occupation, national origin, language, marital status, income, relation to head of household, information on the dwelling place, education, literacy, health-related data (e.g., permanent disability), etc. The census or "numbering of the people" is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. Among the Romans, censuses were intimately connected with the enumeration of troops before and after battle and probably a military necessity. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed; Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, p66, p119)IndiaResidence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Small-Area Analysis: A method of analyzing the variation in utilization of health care in small geographic or demographic areas. It often studies, for example, the usage rates for a given service or procedure in several small areas, documenting the variation among the areas. By comparing high- and low-use areas, the analysis attempts to determine whether there is a pattern to such use and to identify variables that are associated with and contribute to the variation.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Poverty Areas: City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.United StatesGeographic Information Systems: Computer systems capable of assembling, storing, manipulating, and displaying geographically referenced information, i.e. data identified according to their locations.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.WalesAge Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Cultural Deprivation: The absence of certain expected and acceptable cultural phenomena in the environment which results in the failure of the individual to communicate and respond in the most appropriate manner within the context of society. Language acquisition and language use are commonly used in assessing this concept.Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.EnglandHealth Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Vital Statistics: Used for general articles concerning statistics of births, deaths, marriages, etc.Geographic Mapping: Creating a representation of areas of the earth or other celestial bodies, for the purpose of visualizing spatial distributions of various information.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Space-Time Clustering: A statistically significant excess of cases of a disease, occurring within a limited space-time continuum.Occupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Unemployment: The state of not being engaged in a gainful occupation.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Life Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.Maps as Topic: Representations, normally to scale and on a flat medium, of a selection of material or abstract features on the surface of the earth, the heavens, or celestial bodies.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.CaliforniaAfrican Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Poisson Distribution: A distribution function used to describe the occurrence of rare events or to describe the sampling distribution of isolated counts in a continuum of time or space.Building Codes: Standards or regulations for construction which are designed to ensure safety against electrical hazards, fires, etc.Electric Wiring: An arrangement of wires distributing electricity.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Family Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.History of NursingCluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Birth Rate: The number of births in a given population per year or other unit of time.Spatial Analysis: Techniques which study entities using their topological, geometric, or geographic properties.Topography, Medical: The systematic surveying, mapping, charting, and description of specific geographical sites, with reference to the physical features that were presumed to influence health and disease. Medical topography should be differentiated from EPIDEMIOLOGY in that the former emphasizes geography whereas the latter emphasizes disease outbreaks.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Medical Record Linkage: The creation and maintenance of medical and vital records in multiple institutions in a manner that will facilitate the combined use of the records of identified individuals.RomeVulnerable Populations: Groups of persons whose range of options is severely limited, who are frequently subjected to COERCION in their DECISION MAKING, or who may be compromised in their ability to give INFORMED CONSENT.Psychosocial Deprivation: The absence of appropriate stimuli in the physical or social environment which are necessary for the emotional, social, and intellectual development of the individual.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Cities: A large or important municipality of a country, usually a major metropolitan center.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Rhode IslandEnvironment Design: The structuring of the environment to permit or promote specific patterns of behavior.MassachusettsBed Occupancy: A measure of inpatient health facility use based upon the average number or proportion of beds occupied for a given period of time.BrazilHealth Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.): A center in the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE which is primarily concerned with the collection, analysis, and dissemination of health statistics on vital events and health activities to reflect the health status of people, health needs, and health resources.PhiladelphiaGreat BritainSocial Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Death Certificates: Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Marriage: The social institution involving legal and/or religious sanction whereby individuals are joined together.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Suburban Population: The inhabitants of peripheral or adjacent areas of a city or town.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Asia: The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Population: The total number of individuals inhabiting a particular region or area.RestaurantsAfrican Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.Crowding: An excessive number of individuals, human or animal, in relation to available space.Sex Preselection: Methods for controlling genetic SEX of offspring.New York CityNeoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Language Arts: Skills in the use of language which lead to proficiency in written or spoken communication.TexasEnvironmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Records as Topic: The commitment in writing, as authentic evidence, of something having legal importance. The concept includes certificates of birth, death, etc., as well as hospital, medical, and other institutional records.Population Growth: Increase, over a specific period of time, in the number of individuals living in a country or region.Rodent Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous rodents through chemical, biological, or other means.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Emigrants and Immigrants: People who leave their place of residence in one country and settle in a different country.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Los AngelesChicagoMichiganHealth Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Food Supply: The production and movement of food items from point of origin to use or consumption.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Rodenticides: Substances used to destroy or inhibit the action of rats, mice, or other rodents.Bias (Epidemiology): Any deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such deviation. Bias can result from several sources: one-sided or systematic variations in measurement from the true value (systematic error); flaws in study design; deviation of inferences, interpretations, or analyses based on flawed data or data collection; etc. There is no sense of prejudice or subjectivity implied in the assessment of bias under these conditions.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Child Mortality: Number of deaths of children between one year of age to 12 years of age in a given population.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Racism: Differential treatment or unequal access to opportunities, based on group membership such as origin or ethnicity.Ownership: The legal relation between an entity (individual, group, corporation, or-profit, secular, government) and an object. The object may be corporeal, such as equipment, or completely a creature of law, such as a patent; it may be movable, such as an animal, or immovable, such as a building.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.North CarolinaHondurasSwedenPhylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Sex Ratio: The number of males per 100 females.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Multilevel Analysis: The statistical manipulation of hierarchically and non-hierarchically nested data. It includes clustered data, such as a sample of subjects within a group of schools. Prevalent in the social, behavioral sciences, and biomedical sciences, both linear and nonlinear regression models are applied.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Medicine, Ayurvedic: The traditional Hindu system of medicine which is based on customs, beliefs, and practices of the Hindu culture. Ayurveda means "the science of Life": veda - science, ayur - life.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Population Groups: Individuals classified according to their sex, racial origin, religion, common place of living, financial or social status, or some other cultural or behavioral attribute. (UMLS, 2003)FiresSocial Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Asian Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.Southeastern United States: The geographic area of the southeastern region of the United States in general or when the specific state or states are not included. The states usually included in this region are Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, West Virginia, and Virginia.Health Facilities, Proprietary: Health care institutions operated by private groups or corporations for a profit.Crime: A violation of the criminal law, i.e., a breach of the conduct code specifically sanctioned by the state, which through its administrative agencies prosecutes offenders and imposes and administers punishments. The concept includes unacceptable actions whether prosecuted or going unpunished.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Social Conditions: The state of society as it exists or in flux. While it usually refers to society as a whole in a specified geographical or political region, it is applicable also to restricted strata of a society.FloridaHealth Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Minority Groups: A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.Transportation: The means of moving persons, animals, goods, or materials from one place to another.Alcoholic Beverages: Drinkable liquids containing ETHANOL.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Sampling Studies: Studies in which a number of subjects are selected from all subjects in a defined population. Conclusions based on sample results may be attributed only to the population sampled.
  • Subsequently, public protests against the Government of India and the Government of Delhi for not providing adequate security for women took place in New Delhi. (hubpages.com)
  • unicef Government of India Ministry of Human Resource Development Department of Women and Child Development Shastri Bhawan, New Delhi-110001 FOREWORD The World Summit for Children (WSC), held at UN Headquarters in September 1990, adopted the Declaration on Survival, Protection and Development of Children and a Plan of Action for implementing it. (rhsupplies.org)
  • Delhi, urban India, 1985-6. (bmj.com)
  • Delhi, India. (princeton.edu)
  • The data for the last two censuses indicate that there is a perceptible decline in the proportion of Sikhs in Delhi, from 6.33% in 1981 to 4.01% in 2001. (partitionofindia.com)
  • Under East India Company and later under the British Raj , Kolkata served as the capital of India until 1911, when its perceived geographical disadvantages, combined with growing nationalism in Bengal , led to a shift of the capital to New Delhi . (blogspot.com)
  • Publisher: New Delhi, India, Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. (sanctumbooks.com)
  • Alchi is a village in the Leh district of Jammu and Kashmir, India. (wikipedia.org)
  • Goral are also found across most of the southern slopes of the Himalayas of northern India from Jammu and Kashmir to eastern Arunachal Pradesh, as far as the Brahmaputra. (iucnredlist.org)
  • In India, the Himalayan goral is apparently patchily distributed along the Himalayan mountain ranges in Jammu and Kashmir, with reports of its presence in Dachigam National Park (Johnsingh et al . (iucnredlist.org)
  • Historically Sikhism was pan-Indian, with the main Sikh scriptures Guru Granth Sahib drawing from works of saints in North as well as South India, and the several of its major seats (such as Nankana Sahib in Pakistan, Panj Takhts Takht Sri Patna Sahib in Bihar, Hazur Sahib Nanded in Maharashtra) outside of Punjab. (wikipedia.org)
  • In late 1930s and 1940s the Sikh leaders realized that Muslim Pakistan and a Hindu India were imminent. (wikipedia.org)
  • India is ranked 33rd and Pakistan 39th among the most overcrowded nations of the world by Overpopulation Index published by the Optimum Population Trust based in the United Kingdom. (riazhaq.com)
  • Pakistan is less crowded than China (ranked 29), India (ranked 33) and the US (ranked 35), according to the index. (riazhaq.com)
  • The current political ethos of India flows from the 5,000 year old Indian experience - the India that today no longer is but has been replaced by Pakistan, India and Bangladesh. (mediamonitors.net)
  • Although much larger in size and population the post 1947 India continued to engage in a political cum psychological battle with a Pakistan much smaller in size. (mediamonitors.net)
  • The establishment of Pakistan had drastically undermined the pre-eminent geo-political of an undivided India. (mediamonitors.net)
  • The Himalayan goral is found across the Himalayas including Bhutan, China (southern Tibet), northern India (including Sikkim), Nepal, and northern Pakistan (Grubb 2005) and possibly western Myanmar (though in this assessment we treat gorals in Myanmar, and in northeast India east and south of the Brahmaputra, as Naemorhedus griseus , pending further resolution of their taxonomy). (iucnredlist.org)
  • In the preparation of this review, the term "South Asian" was used to represent people originating from the Indian subcontinent (India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Nepal, and Bangladesh). (ahajournals.org)
  • The only continent with a female population deficit is Asia, with China, India and Pakistan being the three biggest contributors to the deficit. (dawn.com)
  • Bangladesh Bhutan India Maldives Nepal Pakistan Sri Lanka. (docme.ru)
  • Covering the southern part of the peninsular Deccan Plateau , South India is bounded by the Bay of Bengal in the east, the Arabian Sea in the west and the Indian Ocean in the south. (wikipedia.org)
  • During its history , a number of dynastic kingdoms ruled over parts of South India whose invasions across southern and southeastern Asia impacted the history and culture in those regions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Major dynasties that were established in South India include the Cheras , Cholas , Pandyas , Pallavas , Satavahanas , Chalukyas , Rashtrakutas and Vijayanagara . (wikipedia.org)
  • The fertility rate in South India is 1.9, the lowest of all regions in India. (wikipedia.org)
  • South India also known as Peninsular India has been known by several other names. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carnatic derived from "Karnād" or "Karunād" meaning high country has also been associated with South India. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carbon dating on ash mounds associated with Neolithic cultures in South India date back to 8000 BCE. (wikipedia.org)
  • however, there does not appear to be a fully developed Bronze Age preceding the Iron Age in South India. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Europeans arrived in the 15th century and by the middle of the 18th century, the French and the British were involved in a protracted struggle for military control over the South India. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the defeat of Tipu Sultan in the Fourth Anglo-Mysore War in 1799 and the end of the Vellore Mutiny in 1806, the British consolidated their power over much of present-day South India with the exception of French Pondichéry . (wikipedia.org)
  • The study found a pattern of SNPs that is found in genetics of Dravidian speakers from South India. (wikipedia.org)
  • The proportion of females to males in the major religious communities in India as per 1981 Census is given in Table No. 14. (jainworld.com)
  • Particularly in India and China, a deep-seated preference for having sons over daughters is due to a variety of factors that continue to make males more socially and economically valuable than females. (guttmacher.org)
  • India is one of the few countries in the world where males outnumber females. (ourfrontcover.com)
  • THERE are 95.2 females of all ages per 100 males in the country, according to the provisional results of 2017 census. (dawn.com)
  • articles critical of the industry and in its defence (EPW 1967-1980, Kale 1972, Rajagopalam 1981, Subrahmanyam 1982). (savingiceland.org)
  • Like several other northeastern states of India , Mizoram was previously part of Assam until 1972, when it was carved out as a Union Territory . (ipfs.io)
  • By using both time series and cross-sectional data, this paper examines the factors associated with the decline in maternal mortality in India. (cambridge.org)
  • Indeed, four of the ten Union censuses only described the White population in the country, while substantial sets of collected data were never tabulated and published. (scielo.org.za)
  • Inderdaad vier van die tien Unie sensusse beskryf slegs die wit deel van die bevolking, terwyl baie van die versamelde data was nooit getabuleer en gepubliseer nie. (scielo.org.za)
  • 6 It has been noted that the census was one of the key elements in the definition of the modern nation-state through the collection of unified data and the adoption of common classification schemes, paralleling the survey and mapping of the territory of the state, whether nineteenth-century England or post-colonial Asia. (scielo.org.za)
  • The Report drew heavily on different data sources such as Census 2001 and National Family Health Survey (NFHS)-2 as well as the findings of Multiple Indicator Survey (MICS-2000), specially designed by UNICEF to secure from developing countries reliable, comparable data necessary to measure the progress towards World Summit Goals. (rhsupplies.org)
  • Collected from about 120,000 families through a nationwide sample survey, the data included in MICS carried out in India provides vital information, among others, on child development, maternal health, and knowledge of HIV /AIDS. (rhsupplies.org)
  • Data on birth registration, pre-school attendance, and living arrangements of children have been collected through a household survey for the first time in India. (rhsupplies.org)
  • This document should be of considerable use to policy makers and planners looking for specialised data on women and children in India. (rhsupplies.org)
  • How to create a map of demographics using Canada Census Data? (stackexchange.com)
  • 5 Several reasons have been suggested for the rise in tobacco use in developing countries, 6 but few reliable data exist on the distribution and determinants of smoking in India and other Asian countries. (bmj.com)
  • Researchers acquired and analyzed religious composition information from about 2,500 data sources, including censuses, demographic surveys, general population surveys and other studies - the largest project of its kind to date. (pewforum.org)
  • However, variation in methods among censuses and surveys (including sampling, question wording, response categories and period of data collection) can lead to variation in results. (pewforum.org)
  • The paper examines the determinants of the child and juvenile sex ratios in India in a multivariate framework, using district level data from the 1981, 1991, and 2001 Indian population censuses. (st-andrews.ac.uk)
  • We can guess that something is wrong, by looking at data since the 1981 Census. (indiatogether.org)
  • Kochi urban agglomeration constituted on the basis of census data 2001, consists of Corporation of Kochi (Cochin), five municipalities, 15 Panchayaths and parts of 3 Panchayaths . (thefullwiki.org)
  • However, such estimates of measles mortality have depended heavily on assumed regional measles case fatality risks (CFRs) and made little use of mortality data from low- and middle-income countries in general and India, the country with the highest measles burden globally, in particular. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We developed a data- and model-driven estimation of the historical measles dynamics, CFR, and vaccination impact in India, extracting the periodicity of epidemics using spectral and coherence analysis, which allowed us to infer key parameters driving measles transmission dynamics and mortality. (biomedcentral.com)
  • These estimates made little use of measles mortality data from low- and middle-income countries in general, particularly regarding India, the country with the highest measles burden globally. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A spatially resolved biomass burning data set, and related emissions of SO2 and aerosol chemical constituents was constructed for India, for 1996-1997 and extrapolated to the INDOEX period (1998-1999). (science20.com)
  • Source: United Nations List of National Parks and Protected Areas: India (1993) WCMC Protected Areas Data Unit. (angelfire.com)
  • METHODS: This study used data from two rounds of the National Family Health Survey (NFHS) of India, conducted during 2005-06 and 2015-16 respectively. (bvsalud.org)
  • This paper assesses the reasons for non-use of contraceptive methods, and the possible complexity of reported data on women in India. (bvsalud.org)
  • This study examined the pattern of economic disparity in the modern contraceptive prevalence rate (mCPR) among women receiving contraceptives from the public and private health sectors in India, using data from all four rounds of the National Family Health Survey conducted between 1992-93 and 2015-16. (bvsalud.org)
  • Although female infanticide is now a crime in India, census data of the last two decades show a persisting male bias in sex ratios in several parts of the country ( Muthulakshmi, 1997 , Natarajan, 1997 ). (ethology.ru)
  • Having originated in India (according to linguistics and genetic data), Romani people are known to have reached the Byzantine Empire (modern day Turkey and Greece) by the tenth century ( Fraser 1992 ). (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Data are from the 1986 Fijian census. (princeton.edu)
  • The model was tested using 1980 census data on Puerto Rican return and nonreturn migrants. (princeton.edu)
  • The model was then used to estimate the measles CFR, the number of measles deaths, and the impact of vaccination in 2000-2015 among under-five children in India and in the states of Bihar and Uttar Pradesh (UP), two states with large populations and the highest numbers of measles deaths in India. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We obtained the following estimated CFRs among under-five children for the year 2005: 0.63% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.40-1.00%) for India as a whole, 0.62% (0.38-1.00%) for Bihar, and 1.19% (0.80-1.75%) for UP. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The second day is Choti Diwali , or equivalent in north India, while for Hindus in the south of India it is Diwali proper. (wikipedia.org)
  • Before the partition of India in 1947, Sikhs were not in majority in any of the districts of pre-partition British Punjab Province other than Ludhiana .The districts in the region had a majority of either the Hindus or Muslims depending on its location in the British province . (wikipedia.org)
  • and religious census of 2001 accounts 81 % Hindus and 13.5 % Muslims. (internationaljournalofresearch.com)
  • This is notably the case in a number of South and East Asian countries, primarily India, China, Singapore, Taiwan, Hong Kong and South Korea, as well as in such former Soviet Bloc countries in the Caucuses and Balkans as Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia and Serbia. (guttmacher.org)
  • At that time the colonies consisted of India, Hong Kong, Malaysia, much of Africa, most of the Caribbean, and a number of other smaller territories. (amren.com)
  • In the year 2000, the Department ofWomen and Child Development brought out the India Report on the World Summit for Children 2000, which brings out the progress made towards reaching the goals the country set for itself in the decade of 1990s. (rhsupplies.org)
  • During 2000-2015, we estimated that 607,000 (95% CI: 383,000-958,000) under-five deaths attributed to measles occurred in India as a whole. (biomedcentral.com)
  • If no routine vaccination or supplemental immunization activities had occurred from 2000 to 2015, an additional 1.6 (1.0-2.6) million deaths for under-five children would have occurred across India. (biomedcentral.com)
  • India is expected to surpass China as the world's most populous nation by 2025. (riazhaq.com)
  • Tamil Nadu is the eleventh-largest state in India by area and the sixth-most populous. (wikipedia.org)
  • the urban agglomeration, which comprises the city and its suburbs, was home to approximately 14.1 million, making it the third-most populous metropolitan area in India. (blogspot.com)
  • In the case of Mumbai, India, the Mumbai Urban Transport Project (MUTP), financed by the World Bank in 2002, included a Resettlement and Rehabilitation component with a Resettlement and Rehabilitation Policy, embracing the World Bank's Involuntary Resettlement Policy, to help restore the overall living standards of the displaced households. (ubc.ca)
  • Within India, takin is found in Arunachal Pradesh (both along its western border with Bhutan and its northeastern border with China and Myanmar), and in Sikkim. (iucnredlist.org)
  • Following the malaria eradication program using DDT in the 1960s, a large and heterogeneous non-Tharu population from the Nepali hills, Bhutan , Sikkim and India settled in the region. (turkcewiki.org)
  • 16. Wild Life 163-164: United Nations List of National Parks and Protected Areas: India: (1993). (rediff.com)
  • With financial and political support of the Sikh diaspora the movement flourished in the Indian state of Punjab , which has a Sikh-majority population and reached its zenith in the late 1970s and 1980s, when the secessionist movement caused large-scale violence among the local population including assassination of PM Indira Gandhi and bombing of Air India plane killing 328 passengers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Punjab is the only state in India with a majority Sikh population. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the rise of Sikh nationalism in British India , the idea of a separate Sikh state first came up in the early 20th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Bhutan, no censuses have been carried out, but it is believed the species occurs in scattered populations throughout the forested and unforested mountain slopes along Bhutan's northern border. (iucnredlist.org)
  • 3 It is predicted that by the 2020s there will be about 10 million tobacco related deaths annually worldwide, 1 and most of the increase in deaths will occur in the developing Asian countries of China and India, 2 4 where the rate of tobacco consumption is increasing. (bmj.com)
  • The Mishmi takin is found in the southeast of Tibet and northwestern Yunnan, but its distribution in China is split into two sections by the extreme northeast tip of India and northern Myanmar. (iucnredlist.org)
  • Five administrative development regions cut vertical north-south slices through the ecological zones and are locked in by the borders of India and China. (migrationpolicy.org)
  • There is a classic case in history: Why is it that the industrial Revolution began in Europe and not in advanced civilizations of China, Egypt and India? (partitionofindia.com)
  • Largely as a result of this practice, there are now an estimated 80 million missing females in India and China alone. (pnas.org)
  • The wider social and political consequences of these distortions are discussed, with particular reference to China, India, and South Korea. (pnas.org)
  • By 2025, 50 million more will die in India and China, in addition to 100 million in Africa. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • The biomass consumption densities were high over the east-coast and north India, and low over central and western India. (science20.com)
  • The PM2.5 emission fluxes were high in east-coast and north India. (science20.com)
  • As noted by Miller (1981) , One fact clearly emerges from the welter of reports and secondary studies from British India: that is, female infanticide was not practiced in every region of India, and not everyone in those areas was involved (p. 53). (ethology.ru)
  • In Tibet, the western boundary is formed by the great bend of the Yarlung Zangbo (Tsangpo) river, where it occurs south of Medog on the mountain slopes on the border with Arunachal Pradesh (India). (iucnredlist.org)
  • Censuses represent a major government enterprise to gather useful information on the population of the country to assist in the administration. (scielo.org.za)
  • The 2006 census by the Canadian government revealed that there are 780,000 Muslims in the country, representing 2.5 percent of the total population, while the 373,000 Jews account for about 1 percent. (jcpa.org)
  • In 1952, just five years after it gained independence from Britain, India became the first country to establish a policy for population control. (riazhaq.com)
  • literally 'The Land of Tamils' or 'Tamil Country') is one of the 29 states of India . (wikipedia.org)
  • India, a country whose size, history and present aspirations, the world views with awe and admiration, stands at a genuine cross-road. (mediamonitors.net)
  • With immense potential and danger hovering over this billion-strong country, India is truly a playing field of paradoxes. (mediamonitors.net)
  • India is a country of striking contrasts and enormous ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity. (mediamonitors.net)
  • 3. Which of the following country conducts Census at 5 years interval? (ntaugcnetexam.com)
  • Pew Research Center staff standardized religion categories in all available censuses and surveys for each country. (pewforum.org)
  • According to the 2011 census India has 1.24 billion population and accounts for 2nd most populated country it contributes 17 percent to the global population a significant percentage contribution and alarming. (internationaljournalofresearch.com)
  • Up to 1.5 million others in the country of 27.8 million are estimated to regularly cross Nepal's long, porous border for permit-free work in India. (migrationpolicy.org)
  • Gopal Bhargava, a prolific writer and author of several books, was a senior official in Town and Country Planning Organization, Ministry of Urban Development, Government of India. (rediff.com)
  • Known to be a diverse country of multiple cultures and multiple languages, India has faced the challenge of dealing with this resource called diversity. (springer.com)
  • Quartz Studio is a marketing and advertisement venture in Saudi Arabia and UAE with a prestigious clientele from the Middle East and India like Qatar Airways, Alhazmi Co Ltd, M. WALK BEHIND SWEEPER BSW 375 ET MADE IN ITALY PART NO. It is the largest country in the Middle East, about the size of Western. (danieledivittorio.it)
  • Thus, for each rural Indian, there were 0.304 urban people in India in 1981. (preservearticles.com)
  • This broad definition of Hindi is one of the ones used in the Indian census , and results in more than forty percent of Indians being reported to be speakers of Hindi, though Hindi-area respondents vary as to whether they call their language Hindi or use a local language name to distinguish their language from Hindi. (hitchhikersgui.de)
  • We constructed a dynamic model of measles transmission in India with parameters that were empirically inferred using spectral analysis from a time series of measles mortality extracted from the Million Death Study, an ongoing longitudinal study recording deaths across 2.4 million Indian households and attributing causes of death using verbal autopsy. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Indian mythology says that Shiv(male) and Shakti(female) complement each other to manage affairs of world, but women in India are subjected to discrimination and losing their parity with opposite sex, they became subjugated to male dominance in rural society. (ourfrontcover.com)
  • Language policies, both explicit and implicit, are evident in the Indian Census and Constitution as well as language-related education policies, including the Three-Language Formula and national recommendations related to medium of instruction. (springer.com)
  • West Bengal's share of the Bengali film industry is based in the city, which also hosts venerable cultural institutions of national importance, such as the Academy of Fine Arts , the Victoria Memorial , the Asiatic Society , the Indian Museum , and the National Library of India . (blogspot.com)
  • Within India, there is a perceptible rural-urban gradient in stroke prevalence, underlying the dangers of the rapid transition in socioeconomic circumstances seen across the Indian subcontinent. (ahajournals.org)
  • This is the highest concentration of tribal people among all states of India, and they are currently protected under Indian constitution as a Scheduled Tribe . (ipfs.io)
  • At this stage, just under 45 per cent of a total New Zealand Indian population of 11,577 had been born in New Zealand, while 31 per cent had been born in India. (nriol.com)
  • Moreover, after the first census in 1911, different questionnaires were supplied to various racial groups and most of the statistics tabulated for the majority of the population were relegated to brief separate reports or summary tables, following the White figures. (scielo.org.za)
  • In this connection it may be mentioned that no definite tendency is conclusively revealed by these figures and that the alternate variation in figures at many censuses seems to be the result of incorrect enumeration of females among the Jainas during the census operations. (jainworld.com)
  • The latest census figures of 2011 reveal an alarming "gender gap" in the age group of 0 to 6 years which happens to be the worst in the history of Independent India. (hrln.org)
  • All figures in this paper are taken from the Census Of India 1991 and 2001 unless otherwise stated]. (indiatogether.org)
  • Buitendien, ná die eerste sensus in 1911, was veelsoortige vraelyste aan verskillende rassegroepe gegee, en die meeste van die statistieke wat vir die meerderheid van die bevolking ingepalm was, het slegs in kort, afsonderlike verslae of opsomming tabelle beland. (scielo.org.za)
  • To determine the prevalence and predictors of smoking in urban India. (bmj.com)
  • Cultural and ethnographic reports suggest that the role of cultural practices, such as the high costs of dowry (payment to the bridegroom's family) and the prospect of old age care and protection by sons, are the main reasons for the prevalence of female neglect ( Miller, 1981 ). (ethology.ru)
  • 13) 25 million people worldwide have died from AIDS since 1981, making it one of the three deadliest epidemics in human history. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • The study may provide a basis to understand the dynamics of language shift--as it might have implications of language planning in multilingual societies like India. (google.com)
  • Language and language-in-education planning in multilingual India: A linguistic minority perspective. (springer.com)