An odontogenic fibroma in which cells have developed into cementoblasts and which consists largely of cementum.
Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.
Neoplasms produced from tooth-forming tissues.
Fibrous blood-filled cyst in the bone. Although benign it can be destructive causing deformity and fractures.
The largest of the TARSAL BONES which is situated at the lower and back part of the FOOT, forming the HEEL.
Cancers or tumors of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE unspecified. For neoplasms of the maxilla, MAXILLARY NEOPLASMS is available and of the mandible, MANDIBULAR NEOPLASMS is available.
A scraping, usually of the interior of a cavity or tract, for removal of new growth or other abnormal tissue, or to obtain material for tissue diagnosis. It is performed with a curet (curette), a spoon-shaped instrument designed for that purpose. (From Stedman, 25th ed & Dorland, 27th ed)
A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.
Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.
Process of substituting a symbol or code for a term such as a diagnosis or procedure. (from Slee's Health Care Terms, 3d ed.)
The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.
A benign tumor composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It can be surrounded by a thin layer of connective tissue (encapsulated), or diffuse without the capsule.
The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.
A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.
CD4-positive T cells that inhibit immunopathology or autoimmune disease in vivo. They inhibit the immune response by influencing the activity of other cell types. Regulatory T-cells include naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ cells, IL-10 secreting Tr1 cells, and Th3 cells.
A subclass of winged helix DNA-binding proteins that share homology with their founding member fork head protein, Drosophila.
Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.
Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).
A low affinity interleukin-2 receptor subunit that combines with the INTERLEUKIN-2 RECEPTOR BETA SUBUNIT and the INTERLEUKIN RECEPTOR COMMON GAMMA-CHAIN to form a high affinity receptor for INTERLEUKIN-2.
A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.
A classification of T-lymphocytes, especially into helper/inducer, suppressor/effector, and cytotoxic subsets, based on structurally or functionally different populations of cells.
Bony structure of the mouth that holds the teeth. It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA.
Tumors or cancer of the MANDIBLE.
One of three bones that make up the coxal bone of the pelvic girdle. In tetrapods, it is the part of the pelvis that projects backward on the ventral side, and in primates, it bears the weight of the sitting animal.
Removal of mineral constituents or salts from bone or bone tissue. Demineralization is used as a method of studying bone strength and bone chemistry.
A bone that forms the lower and anterior part of each side of the hip bone.
Extracellular substance of bone tissue consisting of COLLAGEN fibers, ground substance, and inorganic crystalline minerals and salts.
Injections introduced directly into localized lesions.
RNA consisting of two strands as opposed to the more prevalent single-stranded RNA. Most of the double-stranded segments are formed from transcription of DNA by intramolecular base-pairing of inverted complementary sequences separated by a single-stranded loop. Some double-stranded segments of RNA are normal in all organisms.
Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.
The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.
A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.

Hereditary familial polyposis and Gardner's syndrome: contribution of the odonto-stomatology examination in its diagnosis and a case description. (1/17)

Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and its phenotype variant, Gardner's syndrome, constitute a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder. They are characterised by the development, generally during the second and third decades of life, of multiple adenomatous polyps in the colon and rectum. These polyps have a high risk of subsequently becoming malignant, which normally occurs in the third and fourth decades of life. The phenotypical features of FAP can be very variable. As well as colorectal polyps, these individuals can present with extra-colonic symptoms, among which are particularly: gastro-duodenal polyps, dermoid and epidermoid cysts, desmoid tumours, congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium, disorders of the maxillary and skeletal bones and dental anomalies. In this paper the most important aspects of this syndrome are reviewed, showing an example based on a well documented clinical case. The importance of odonto-stomatological examinations should be pointed out, among others, as a means of reaching a presumptive diagnosis, whose confirmation is vital to the patient.  (+info)

Clinical, radiographic, biochemical and histological findings of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia and report of a case. (2/17)

Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia has been described as a condition that characteristically affects the jaws of middle-aged black women. It usually manifests as multiple radiopaque cementum-like masses distributed throughout the jaws. This condition has also been classified as gigantiform cementoma, chronic sclerosing osteomyelitis, sclerosing osteitis, multiple estenosis and sclerotic cemental masses. The authors present a case of an uncomplicated florid cemento-osseous dysplasia in a 48-year-old black woman. Multiple sclerotic masses with radiolucent border in the mandible were identified radiographically. Histopathologic findings revealed formation of calcified dense sclerotic masses similar to cementum. All clinical, radiographic, biochemical and histological features were suggestive of the diagnosis of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia.  (+info)

Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia: Review and report of two cases. (3/17)

Only three Indian patients of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia have been reported (less than 2%), according to the review of recent literature (2003). This makes the occurrence of FCOD a relatively rare phenomenon. The age group may vary from 19-76 years and typically presents in the fourth and fifth decade. In most of the cases, patients do not have family history of the disease. We report two cases showing classic radiologic features. The diagnosis of our cases were made radiographically.  (+info)

Dental benign cementomas in three horses. (4/17)

Cementoma is a very rare odontogenic neoplasm of mesenchymal origin. Clinically, in 3 horses, multiple bony enlargements of the upper and lower jaw extending into the oral cavity were observed. Radiographically, multiple, well-circumscribed, radiopaque masses surrounding the roots of the upper and lower incisors or an upper premolar tooth were present. Due to malocclusion and local pain, single teeth were extracted in each case. Grossly, a hard grayish-white mass surrounding the root of the incisors and the premolars was identified. Histopathologically, the tumors consisted of excessive deposition of cementum-like tissue. Cells, resembling cementoblasts, lined irregularly shaped lacunae, which were present in the tumor tissue, and showed minimal cellular pleomorphism. Mitotic figures were not present. Macroscopically and histologically, all 3 equine cases displayed great similarities to cementomas in other species. However, due to their high degree of differentiation, hypercementosis must be considered as a differential diagnosis.  (+info)

Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia: a case report. (5/17)

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Analysis of GNAS mutations in cemento-ossifying fibromas and cemento-osseous dysplasias of the jaws. (6/17)

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Benign fibro-osseous lesions of the craniofacial complex. A review. (7/17)

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Cemento-ossifying fibroma of the mandible. (8/17)

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According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the classification of odontogenic tumor keeps changing [6, 7]. Cementoma, as a common benign odontogenic tumor, generally occurs in the maxilla and the mandible [4]. Cementoma occurring in the long bone is the rare bone lesion [1, 8]. There is a controversy in the cementoma located in the long bones, due to the reason that many authors do not accept the existence of true cementum outside the gnathic region. Mirra et al. [8] thought cementoma of long bone is merely a form of simple bone cysts. In 1985, Adler [2] found there was calcified cementum-like material accompanied by few fibroblasts in the solitary bone cysts. They thought cementoma was originally bone cysts which calcified steadily with age [2]. This tumor in the long bone has been reported in three separate types of lesions [3], including a simple bone cyst with associated cementum-like particles in the cyst lining, calcified cementum such as is present in our patient, cementifying ...
MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Factors. Ameloblastoma / classification. Ameloblastoma / pathology. Ameloblastoma / surgery. Cementoma / classification. Cementoma / pathology. Cementoma / surgery. Child. Child, Preschool. Dental Cementum / pathology. Diagnosis, Differential. Fibroma / classification. Fibroma / pathology. Fibroma / surgery. Humans. Mandible / pathology. Mandible / surgery. Mandibular Neoplasms / classification. Mandibular Neoplasms / pathology. Mandibular Neoplasms / surgery. Maxilla / pathology. Maxilla / surgery. Maxillary Neoplasms / pathology. Maxillary Neoplasms / surgery. Myxoma / classification. Myxoma / pathology. Myxoma / surgery. Osteolysis / classification. Osteolysis / pathology. Osteolysis / surgery. Prognosis. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Young ...
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research aims to publish findings of doctors at grass root level and post graduate students, so that all unique medical experiences are recorded in literature.
Peripheral cemento-ossifying fibroma is a rare osteogenic neoplasm that ordinarily presents as an epulis-like growth. A rare case of peripheral cemento-ossifying fibroma of the maxilla, 3.0 cm mesiodistally and 2.5 cm occluso-gingivally in diameter and causing difficulty in eating and speech, is reported. The choice of treatment should always be founded on the basic principles of pathology and sound surgical judgment. The ideal modality would allow a bloodless field, require no anesthesia, allow histological examination without distortion, provide a precise and controlled cut, enable a painless postoperative period, and cause no collateral damage to adjacent tissues. Although scalpel surgery does allow for precise incision with minimal collateral damage, it also usually necessitates working in a bloody field and does little to decrease postoperative pain and swelling. Diode lasers have several distinct advantages over the other modalities for the removal of benign lesions. Here we present a case ...
VARGAS F, Ilich; MAYER O, Cristopher; HERVOZO S, Percival y NAVIA G, Eduardo. Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma: Clinical, Radiological and Histological Analysis of 2 Cases in One Family. Int. J. Odontostomat. [online]. 2011, vol.5, n.3, pp.270-278. ISSN 0718-381X. http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0718-381X2011000300011.. The Cemento-ossifying fibroma (COF) is a benign fibro-osseous neoplasm of odontogenic origin, that is preferentially localized in the molar and premolar mandibular area. Our goal is to present cases of COF that occurred within the same family, describing clinical, radiological and histological characteristics, in addition to treatment and monitoring of each case.Two patients who are brothers, treated at the Hospital de Carabineros, who had mandibular COF, were included in this study. The complete evolution of each case is presented, highlighting the family component of this uncommon disease. All patients were treated with complete removal of the lesion and filling the bone defect with ...
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Juvenile Ossifying Fibroma (JOF) represents a group of heterogenous, uncommon, benign fibro-osseous lesions that affect the craniofacial skeleton.
with extensive extension into adjacent anatomic compartments involving several sinuses, nasal cavity, nasopharynx, palate, and the cranial cavity. The radiographic features are valuable for diagnosis and determination of the extent of the lesion. With computed tomography, COF may appear as an expansile mass covered by a thick shell of bone density with a multiloculated internal appearance and a varying density content.. COF belongs to the group of fibro-osseous lesions that are histologically benign tumors of the jaws, and present microscopic features like benign connective tissue matrix and trabeculae of new bone [4]. The biologic behavior of these lesions ranges from indolent to aggressive, and inflammatory to neoplastic. The term COF is used for the lesions that arise from periodontal ligament tissue and may contain a mixture of small deposits of bone and cementum. No universally accepted classification exists for these lesions, however Waldrons concept of categorization (Table 1) has been ...
Bone - Fibro-osseous lesion in a female B6C3F1/N mouse from a chronic study. There is replacement of bony trabeculae and the marrow cavity with fibrovascular stroma ...
there is a 1.2x1.1cm well-circumscribed mass lesion present within the left upper lobe. This lesion demonstrates linear calcification centrally.
There is a well-circumscribed mildly T1 hyperintense and markedly T2 hypointense, nonenhancing mass, in the anterior-superior third ventricle. The hypointensit
Junctional parenchymal defects in renal imaging are a normal variant. Pathology It results from the incomplete embryonic fusion of renunculi. Radiographic features Ultrasound It can be seen as a triangular echogenic cortical defect, frequent...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Bulloughs bump. T2 - Unusual protuberant fibro-osseous tumor of the temporal bone. case report. AU - Jiang, Bowen. AU - Mushlin, Harry. AU - Zhang, Lei. AU - James, Aaron. AU - Cohen, Alan. PY - 2018/2/1. Y1 - 2018/2/1. N2 - Scalp and calvarial masses are common in children and the differential diagnosis is broad. The authors recently cared for a child with an unusual fibro-osseous lesion of the temporal bone that has previously not been described in the pediatric neurosurgery literature. A 10-year-old girl presented with a firm, slowly enlarging protuberant mass arising from the squamous suture of the temporal bone without intracranial extension. The mass was removed en bloc through a temporal craniectomy and cranioplasty was performed. The patient had a smooth postoperative course. Histological examination showed multiple oval osseous islands dispersed throughout a bland fibrous stroma. The pathological diagnosis was Bulloughs bump, a rare, benign fibro-osseous neoplasm ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Liposclerosing myxofibrous tumor. T2 - A radiologic-pathologic-distinct fibro-osseous lesion of bone with a marked predilection for the intertrochanteric region of the femur. AU - Kransdorf, Mark J.. AU - Murphey, Mark D.. AU - Sweet, Donald E.. PY - 1999/9. Y1 - 1999/9. N2 - PURPOSE: To describe the characteristic features of liposclerosing myxofibrous tumor (LSMFT) of bone. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The radiographs and clinical histories of 39 patients (21 male, 18 female; mean age, 42 years; age range, 15-69 years) with histologically verified LSMFT of bone were retrospectively studied. RESULTS: LSMFT had a predilection for the proximal femur; more than 90% (30 of 33) of the femoral lesions were in the intertrochanteric region. Radiographs showed an indolent growth pattern with a well-defined and often extensively sclerotic margin. The bone contour either was normal or showed mild expansile remodeling. Mineralization within the lesion was not uncommon. Scintigrams showed mild to ...
Learn in-depth information on Molecular Testing for Simple Bone Cyst, on why the laboratory test is performed, specimen collected, significance of the results, and its use in diagnosing medical conditions.
http://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0278-2391&volume=61&issue=12&spage=1487&epage=1491 &date=2003&atitle=Variations+in+clinical+presentations+of+the+simple+bone+cyst:+report+of+ ...
Rees, F., Doherty, S., Hui, M., Maciewicz, R., Muir, K., Zhang, W. and Doherty, M. (2012), Distribution of finger nodes and their association with underlying radiographic features of osteoarthritis. Arthritis Care Res, 64: 533-538. doi: 10.1002/acr.21586 ...
The lower zone is one of the four chest radiograph zones and is sometimes used synonymously with lung bases. Radiographic features Plain radiograph on frontal chest radiographs, extends inferiorly from the inferior aspect of the hilum to the h...
Title:Molecular Diagnosis of Fibro-osseous Lesions of the Oral and Maxillofacial Region: A Tale from Africa. VOLUME: 1 ISSUE: 1. Author(s):Olujide O. Soyele, Adeyinka H. Adedapo and Henry A. Adeola*. Affiliation:Department of Oral Maxillo-facial Surgery and Oral Pathology, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Department of Oral Pathology/Medicine, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of the Western Cape and Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town. Keywords:Fibro-osseous lesions, Africa, bone dysplasia, fibrous dysplasia, molecular diagnosis, ossifying fibroma.. Abstract:Fibro-osseous lesions (FOLs) are a poorly defined but pathologically diverse group of lesions affecting the craniofacial bones and jaw. They are mostly characterized by the replacement of bone by a benign connective tissue matrix, which may contain foci of mineralization in the form of woven bone or cementum-like round acellular intensely basophilic ...
Introduction: Simple bone cyst or unicameral bone cyst (UBC) are benign cystic lesions commonly found in femur and humerus. However hand is a very rare site of occurrence. Treatment described for UBC of hand commonly involves curettage and bone grafting. Case Report: A 7 year old right hand dominant girl presented to us with chief complaints of pain and swelling in right 4th metacarpal since 2 month. On imaging, plain radiographs of right hand showed expansile lytic lesion on Metaphyseal-diaphyseal region of 4thmetacarpal with pathological fracture.MRI showed cystic lesions with internal loculations and fluid-fluid levels (Fig 2). There was minimal soft tissue extension. We performed aspiration which showed serosanguinous fluid with haemorrhagic tinge. With the diagnosis of unicameral bone cyst in mind we performed and closed intramedullary nail with k wire. The cyst healed up completely within 2 months. There was no recurrence at 18 month follow up. Conclusion: In conclusion simple bone cyst is very
Stapleton AL, Tyler-Kabara EC, Gardner PA, Snyderman CH. Endoscopic endonasal surgery for benign fibro-osseous lesions of the pediatric skull base. Laryngoscope. 2015 Sep;125 (9):2199-203. Govil N, Stapleton AL, Georg MW, Yellon RF. The role of tympanostomy tubes in surgery for acquired retraction pocket cholesteatoma. Int. J. Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2015 Aug 29. pii: S0165-5876(15)00431-0. doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2015.08.028.. Albergotti WG, Shurm J, Stapleton AL, Simons JP, Mehta D, Chi DH. Is routine intensive care unit stay necessary after pediatric surpraglottoplasty? JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2015, 141(8): 704-709.. Stapleton AL, Tyler-Kabara EC, Gardner PA, Snyderman CH. The Costs of Skull Base Surgery in the Pediatric Population. J Neurol Surg B. 2015 Feb;76(1):39-42.. Stapleton AL, Chang YF, Soose RJ, Gillman GS. The Impact of Nasal Surgery on Sleep Quality: Prospective Outcomes Study. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2014 Nov; 151 (5): 868-73.. Stapleton AL, Egloff AM, Yellon RF. ...
Hyperplastic reactive gingival/alveolar lesions are one of the most common subgroups of oral lesions, however few studies have focused their clinical and microscopic characteristics on our population. The aim of this study was to analyze the socio-demographic, clinical and microscopical features of 90 hyperplastic reactive gingival/alveolar lesions from an Oral Pathology Laboratory from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Inflammatory gingival hyperplasia (IGH) and pyogenic granuloma (PG) were the most common diagnosis in this group. Females on their 3rd to 4th decades of life were the predominant group affected and most cases affected the anterior portion of the oral cavity. Histopathology revealed that all cases were associated to chronic inflammatory infiltrate and vascular proliferation was prominent in PG. Epithelial alterations were also more common in PG, but mineralization showed marked affinity for peripheral cemento-ossifying fibroma (PCOF). Fibroblastic proliferation was more evident on PCOF and ...
Chapter 70 covers acromesomelic dysplasia, Maroteaux type (MIM 602875), including major clinical findings, radiographic features, and differential diagnoses.
Looking for online definition of periapical cemental dysplasia in the Medical Dictionary? periapical cemental dysplasia explanation free. What is periapical cemental dysplasia? Meaning of periapical cemental dysplasia medical term. What does periapical cemental dysplasia mean?
Fibrous dysplasia is one of the benign fibro-osseous lesions. It may have more common monostotic form (a single bone lesion) or polyostotic form (multiple bone lesions) which is less common and may be associated with McCune-Albright Syndrome (that is hyperfunctioning endocrinopathies and hyperpigmented skin lesions). Fibrous dysplasia is common in its monostotic form in the maxillofacial skeleton. What is essential in a dental practice of each clinicist is not only knowledge of classification of diseases of the jaws but also being able to differentiate them, make a proper diagnosis beforehand for a subsequent suitable treatment. The aim of this article is to outline the differences between FD, the most common lesions such as ossifying fibroma, but also other nosologic entities of this heterogeneous group of diseases ...
The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is involved in the formation of craniofacial skeleton and oral tissues. Aberrant nuclear localization of β-catenin protein has been described in several human diseases including a subset of odontogenic tumors thereby suggesting an important role in tumor development. Fibro-osseous lesions of the craniofacial skeleton comprise several neoplastic, and reactive mesenchymal proliferations in which β-catenin status is unknown. To study this, we immunostained 171 fibro-osseous lesions for β-catenin protein and, for lesions with nuclear positivity, sequenced exon 3 of the CTNNB1 gene and exon 15 of the APC gene ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Lesions of the Jaw. AU - Mosier, Kristine. PY - 2015/10/1. Y1 - 2015/10/1. N2 - Imaging of lesions within the maxilla and mandible is often fraught with difficulty owing to the similarity in the imaging appearance of a diverse array of pathological processes. Principally, lesions arise from either odontogenic sources or from primary bone lesions. The response of the cancellous and cortical bone to pathologic insult can be expressed either through an osteolytic or an osteoblastic response; thus the majority of lesions within the jaws can be classified as cystic or lytic appearing, sclerotic, or a mixture of the two. This article will review the imaging features of the most common cysts, fibro-osseous lesions, benign and malignant neoplasms, and highlight those features key to the differential diagnosis.. AB - Imaging of lesions within the maxilla and mandible is often fraught with difficulty owing to the similarity in the imaging appearance of a diverse array of pathological ...
Abstract:A 26-year-old woman presented with a 7-month history of a slowly growing right-sided, well-circumscribed, subcutaneous, soft, painless, large vulvoinguinal lump that now measured up to 12 cm. Adjacent to but separate from this was a well-circumscribed, soft, painless, mobile, large inguinal
A juvenile active ossifying fibroma is a benign fibro-osseous neoplasm composed of mixture of stroma and bone characterized by rapid and destructive growth. This tumor has gone by several names in the past, but active ossifying fibroma is similar to juvenile active ossifying fibroma, except it does not develop in young patients. Aggressive psammomatoid ossifying fibroma is still employed by some, but is to be discouraged. Most patients are asymptomatic, and come to clinical attention when a mass is discovered incidentally on routine dental X-rays. When patients are symptomatic, they present with non-specific symptoms, such as chronic sinusitis, rhinorrhea, obstruction, pain, facial enlargement and possibly visual changes. When performing imaging studies, bone windows in computed tomography studies are the best. The lesion is usually identified as a well demarcated, expansile mass with an ossified rim at the periphery. Calcifications are noted throughout. MRI shows a variable finding depending on ...
Discussion. Cherubism results from replacement of bone with multilocular cysts due to osteoblasts and osteoclasts malfunctioning (Figs. 2 and 3, Supplementary Material). As already mentioned it represent a benign fibro-osseous pathology and it should be distinguished from central giant cell granuloma (CGCG), multiple giant-cell lesion syndrome, fibrous dysplasia, brown tumors and Ramon syndrome and hyperparathyroidism.6 Differential diagnosis is based on specific clinical, radiological and anatomo-pathological features.. Although the severity of pathology, no effective treatment exists. Therapy strategies include: (a) surgical treatment; (b) medical treatment.. In relation to surgery, the strategy of wait and see is the most commonly used in these patients (Table 1, Supplementary Material). Surgery before puberty is only recommended in case of serious deformity or severe psychological impact.7. In relation to medical treatment, there is no evidence for an effective medical treatment. Recently, ...
Fibro osseous lesions area diverse group of disorders characterized by replacement of normal archi- tecture of bone by a benign connective tissue matrix that displays various amount ofmineralizationin the form of woven bone or cementum. It includes developmental, reactive and neoplastic lesions. The different type of fibro-osseous lesions express a common clinical and radiological features. Soad- equate knowledge and clinical observationare necessary for proper interpretation and appropriate diagnosis of these lesions.becausemanagement of patients with fibro-osseous lesions are case specificandindividualized.The aim of this study was to analyse the clinical, radiological and histo- pathological characteristics of fibro osseous lesions andprovide a proper management system affect- ed by this type of lesions. Materials and methods:The retrospective study was performed in the Department of Oral & Maxillofacial surgery, Dhaka Dental College and Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh from a period of January ...
Results Overall, the radiographic features showed OA progression during follow-up. Based on the development, five clusters were identified that were interpreted as severe (n=17; most progression of all radiographic features) or no (n=108) progression, early (n=110; progression of all features specifically between T0 and T2y) or late (n=69; progression of all features specifically between T2y and T5y) progression, or specific involvement of bone density (n=113). Clinical characteristics at T0 were not evidently different between the clusters, and WOMAC scores were only slightly lower in the no cluster than in the other clusters. In the evaluation of predictors for the different clusters, the area under the curve (AUC) improved when radiographic features were added to basic demographic and clinical variables. Kellgren & Lawrence grading was not a significant predictor for any of the phenotypes. The predictors for early, late, and no progression phenotypes generally had an ...
Pleomorphic lipoma is an uncommon variant of lipoma, which microscopically may resemble a liposarcoma. However, it is a slow-growing and well-circumscribed lesion with a benign behavior. Therefore, recognizing this entity is extremely important to perform the proper treatment. We present an additional case of pleomorphic lipoma in the face, which to our knowledge seems to be the 11th case reported in the English-language literature ...
A 58 year old man without any significant previous history was seen for a slow-growing subcutaneous soft tissue mass in the gluteal fold of 2 years evolution. The lesion was surgically excised with clear margins. The gross specimen measured 7.5 x 6.0 x 4.3 cm and showed a well-circumscribed but unencapsulated mass 6.0 cm. in greatest diameter with a yellow-gray soft and glistening lobulated cut surface. There was no evidence of hemorrhage or necrosis. ...
It is important to mention that in a retrospective, COVID 19 case controlled study of 104 patients, 54% of asymptomatic patients had CT radiographic features in keeping with COVID 19. 21 CT scan changes are estimated to be as high as 97% 98% sensitive and can thus be useful when there is a strong suspicion of COVID 19 despite negative nasopharyngeal swabs. 8, 9, 22 This can avoid clinicians ...
In this section the radiographic appearance of the cardiovascular system is described including changes seen with left- and right-sided congestive heart failure, and the normal size and shape of the heart followed by the radiographic features of individual chamber enlargement. ...
Theory:. The tumor contains both proliferating ductal elements (adenoma) and loose fibrous tissue (fibroma).. In patho 1 it is only important to describe the tumor with the terms: encapsulated, expansile border and well-circumscribed. This is a benign tumor.. This type of tumor stands in contrast to breast carcinoma, and these two topics should be learned together and compared.. ...
CLINICAL HISTORY AND IMAGING STUDIES. A 25-year-old, previously healthy woman presented with a 3-year history of lumbago with radiation to the right lower extremity and was admitted to our hospital. Pain was of mechanical type and responded well to rest. Complete neurological examination was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed two well-circumscribed isolated intradural masses at levels L2-L3 and S1-S2. One at level L2-L3 measured 3.2 cm in its longest axis. The other extending from S1-S2 measured 2.2 cm in its long axis. Both masses were heterogeneous in T2 and strongly enhanced after gadolinium injection (Figures 1a, 1b,1c). No other lesions were identified elsewhere on craniospinal axis by MRI. Both masses were completely resected. The patient was discharged ten days later. The MRI performed 10 months after surgery showed no recurrence of the tumors.. ...
Background Inflammatory pseudotumor is a rare, benign entity characterized histologically as a well-circumscribed, reactive fibroinflammatory process. The liver is a common site of involvement. While its precise etiology is unknown, it is postulated to arise as the result of an exaggerated reaction to a prior intraabdominal infectious or inflammatory process. Clinical and imaging features are non-specific, with the diagnosis often made by exclusion only after extensive laboratory and surgical evaluations. Nonetheless, this entity should be considered in the workup of hepatic masses to avoid unnecessarily aggressive intervention since most cases resolve spontaneously or with conservative management. ...
Urticaria, commonly referred to as hives, is the most frequent dermatologic disorder seen in the ED. It appears as raised, well-circumscribed areas of erythema and edema involving the dermis and epidermis that are very pruritic.
Bone broths are great for adding flavor to your favorite soups. But did you know they also have healing capacities? Learn how to make a simple bone broth to improve your immune system, digestion, and bone health.
On todays final episode of Underground Wellness Radio, Reed and I get together one last time to show you how to become your own health detective … one who stops chasing symptoms and gets to the root cause.. Heres what we talked about: 5:35 All about Reeds pre-Functional Diagnostic Nutrition days in law school and the corporate world proves its never too late to start something new. 14:30 How Reed bridged the gap between his experience in the corporate world and his interest in health and healing. 18:14 Need more clients? Reed talks about the hustle to get more clients than anyone thought possible.. 23:51 How a simple bone density test turned into a series of lab tests-that eventually became Functional Diagnostic Nutrition. 26:10 What could be stealing your sex drive and why - and what you can do to get it back. 31:14 Which lab tests to use to find the hidden stressors affecting your hormones and your health. 41:18 The second skin you need to take care of-so that it can take care of you! ...
Buy High Quality Imaging Wireless Portable Ultrasound Scanners, Mobile Ultrasound probe, Vein Finder, Healthcare Telepresence Robots.. | SIFSOF . CA . USA
Gigantiform cementoma • Gingiva • Gingival and periodontal pockets • Gingival cyst of the adult • Gingival cyst of the newborn ...
The cementoma grew to cover nearly his entire face, interfering with his vision, his breathing, and his ability to eat. His ... Before surgery, the cementoma weighed approximately 2 lb (0.91 kg). David Liu, a volunteer with the charity Tzu Chi on a ... When Novemthree returned to Batam, the cementoma had already grown to alarming size; so much so that his mother questioned if ... was a young Indonesian boy who had the rare condition gigantiform cementoma. The story of his life garnered much media ...
Cementoma It is a lytic lesion that is most often seen with amorphous calcification. Teratoma, a type of tumor in which tooth ...
He was one of only a handful of patients ever recorded to be suffering from Gigantiform cementoma. His daughter, Ayun Lee, also ...
... cementoma MeSH C04.557.695.605 - odontogenic cyst, calcifying MeSH C04.557.695.607 - odontogenic tumor, squamous MeSH C04.557. ...
... benign M9274/0 Cementifying fibroma Cemento-ossifying fibroma M9275/0 Gigantiform cementoma Florid osseus dysplasia M9280/0 ... carcinoma/sarcoma Primary intraosseus or ameloblastic carcinoma M9271/0 Ameloblastic fibrodentinoma Dentinoma M9272/0 Cementoma ...
Ameloblastic fibrosarcoma Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor Cementoblastoma Cementoma ...
... is not exclusive to the mandible as it can infrequently occur in the maxilla and other parts of the body such as the ... A cementoma may present itself on a radiograph or x-ray and appear as an radiopaque mass depending on its stage and mass within ... Cementoma is an odontogenic tumor of cementum. It is usually observed as a benign spherical mass of hard tissue fused to the ... Cementoma is characterized by a significant amount of thickening of the cementum around the roots of the teeth. The main teeth ...
... is a rare, autosomal dental tumor. It is benign, but without intervention it can result in severe ... "OMIM Entry - % 137575 - GIGANTIFORM CEMENTOMA, FAMILIAL". omim.org. Retrieved 14 June 2019. v t e. ...
Cementoma. *Hypercementosis. References[edit]. *^ "Cementum". DentalFind. 2007-01-01.. .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font- ...
Cutaneous LP is a self-limiting condition. It usually resolves within 6 to 12 months. Oral LP is a non infectious, chronic inflammatory condition that involves the oral mucosa and may be accompanied by skin lesions. The etiology of oral LP are unknown. It is not clear whether the mechanisms causing isolated oral LP are different from those causing oral LP with cutaneous LP. An immune-mediated mechanism where basal keratinocytes are being targeted as foreign antigens by activated T cells, especially CD8+ T cells, has been proposed.[43] Upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and cytokines associated with T-helper 1 immune response, may also pay an important role in the pathogenesis of lichen planus. Stress is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of oral LP. Patients with anxiety and depression are reported more commonly with oral LP if compared to normal healthy individuals.[44][45] Some studies have indicated that stressful events can induce LP lesions in otherwise ...
Aphthous affectations" and "aphthous ulcerations" of the mouth are mentioned several times in the treatise "Of the Epidemics" (part of the Hippocratic corpus, in the 4th century BC),[22] although it seems likely that this was oral ulceration as a manifestation of some infectious disease, since they are described as occurring in epidemic-like patterns, with concurrent symptoms such as fever. Aphthous stomatitis was once thought to be a form of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection, and some clinicians still refer to the condition as "herpes" despite this cause having been disproven.[23] The informal term "canker sore" is sometimes used, mainly in North America,[24] either to describe this condition generally, or to refer to the individual ulcers of this condition,[25] or mouth ulcers of any cause unrelated to this condition. The origin of the word "canker" is thought to have been influenced by Latin, Old English, Middle English and Old North French.[26] In Latin, cancer translates to ...
At-home treatments include desensitizing toothpastes or dentifrices, potassium salts, mouthwashes and chewing gums. A variety of toothpastes are marketed for dentin hypersensitivity, including compounds such as strontium chloride, strontium acetate, arginine, calcium carbonate, hydroxyapatite and calcium sodium phosphosilicate.[1] Desensitizing chewing gums[19] and mouthwashes are also marketed.[5] Potassium-containing toothpastes are common; however, the mechanism by which they may reduce hypersensitivity is unclear. Animal research has demonstrated that potassium ions placed in deep dentin cavities cause nerve depolarization and prevent re-polarization. It is not known if this effect would occur with the twice-daily, transient and small increase in potassium ions in saliva that brushing with potassium-containing toothpaste creates. In individuals with dentin hypersensitivity associated with exposed root surfaces, brushing twice daily with toothpaste containing 5% potassium nitrate for six to ...
The cause is uncertain,[5] but it is thought to be caused by accumulation of epithelial squames and proliferation of chromogenic (i.e., color-producing) microorganisms.[7] There may be an increase in keratin production or a decrease in normal desquamation (shedding of surface epithelial cells).[5] Many people with BHT are heavy smokers.[5] Other possible associated factors are poor oral hygiene,[5] general debilitation,[5] hyposalivation (i.e., decreased salivary flow rate),[7] radiotherapy,[5] overgrowth of fungal or bacterial organisms,[5] and a soft diet.[7] Occasionally, BHT may be caused by the use of antimicrobial medications (e.g., tetracyclines),[7] or oxidizing mouthwashes or antacids.[5] A soft diet may be involved as normally food has an abrasive action on the tongue, which keeps the filiform papillae short. Pellagra, a condition caused by niacin (vitamin B3) deficiency, may cause a thick greyish fur to develop on the dorsal tongue, along with other oral signs.[8] Transient surface ...
The exact pathogenesis is dependent upon the cause. Ulcers and erosions can be the result of a spectrum of conditions including those causing auto-immune epithelial damage, damage because of an immune defect (e.g., HIV, leukemia, infections e.g. herpes viruses) or nutritional disorders (e.g., vitamin deficiencies). Simple mechanisms which predispose the mouth to trauma and ulceration are xerostomia (dry mouth - as saliva usually lubricates the mucous membrane and controls bacterial levels) and epithelial atrophy (thinning, e.g., after radiotherapy), making the lining more fragile and easily breached.[19]:7 Stomatitis is a general term meaning inflammation within the mouth, and often may be associated with ulceration.[20] Pathologically, the mouth represents a transition between the gastrointestinal tract and the skin, meaning that many gastrointestinal and cutaneous conditions can involve the mouth. Some conditions usually associated with the whole gastrointestinal tract may present only in the ...
The focus of treatment is to remove plaque. Therapy is aimed at the reduction of oral bacteria and may take the form of regular periodic visits to a dental professional together with adequate oral hygiene home care. Thus, several of the methods used in the prevention of gingivitis can also be used for the treatment of manifest gingivitis, such as scaling, root planing, curettage, mouth washes containing chlorhexidine or hydrogen peroxide, and flossing. Interdental brushes also help remove any causative agents. Powered toothbrushes work better than manual toothbrushes in reducing the disease.[15] The active ingredients that "reduce plaque and demonstrate effective reduction of gingival inflammation over a period of time" are triclosan, chlorhexidine digluconate, and a combination of thymol, menthol, eucalyptol, and methyl salicylate. These ingredients are found in toothpaste and mouthwash. Hydrogen peroxide was long considered a suitable over-the-counter agent to treat gingivitis. There has been ...
Following active infection, herpes viruses establish a latent infection in sensory and autonomic ganglia of the nervous system. The double-stranded DNA of the virus is incorporated into the cell physiology by infection of the nucleus of a nerve's cell body. HSV latency is static; no virus is produced; and is controlled by a number of viral genes, including latency-associated transcript.[70] Many HSV-infected people experience recurrence within the first year of infection.[14] Prodrome precedes development of lesions. Prodromal symptoms include tingling (paresthesia), itching, and pain where lumbosacral nerves innervate the skin. Prodrome may occur as long as several days or as short as a few hours before lesions develop. Beginning antiviral treatment when prodrome is experienced can reduce the appearance and duration of lesions in some individuals. During recurrence, fewer lesions are likely to develop and are less painful and heal faster (within 5-10 days without antiviral treatment) than those ...
Diagnosis is suspected when a patient presents with the symptoms of the classic form of "Eagle syndrome" e.g. unilateral neck pain, sore throat or tinnitus. Sometimes the tip of the styloid process is palpable in the back of the throat. The diagnosis of the vascular type is more difficult and requires an expert opinion. One should have a high level of suspicion when neurological symptoms occur upon head rotation. Symptoms tend to be worsened on bimanual palpation of the styloid through the tonsillar bed. They may be relieved by infiltration of lidocaine into the tonsillar bed. Because of the proximity of several large vascular structures in this area this procedure should not be considered to be risk free. Imaging is important and is diagnostic. Visualizing the styloid process on a CT scan with 3D reconstruction is the suggested imaging technique.[8] The enlarged styloid may be visible on an orthopantogram or a lateral soft tissue X ray of the neck. It is worth noting that the styloid may be ...
The syndrome is rare in the United States, Africa and South America, but is common in the Middle East and Asia, suggesting a possible cause endemic to those tropical areas.[38] A theory suggested that past exposure to lethal infectious agents might have fixed the genetic susceptibility factors to Behçet's disease in those area.[39] It is not associated with cancer, and links with tissue-types (which are under investigation) are not certain. It also does not follow the usual pattern for autoimmune diseases. However, one study has revealed a possible connection to food allergies, particularly to dairy products.[40] An estimated 15,000 to 20,000 Americans have been diagnosed with this disease. In the UK, it is estimated to have about 1 case for every 100,000 people.[41] Globally, males are affected more frequently than females.[42] In the United States, more females are affected than males.[citation needed]. In an epidemiologic study, 56 percent of patients with Behçet's disease developed ocular ...
Symptoms include sudden fever with sore throat, headache, loss of appetite, and often neck pain. Within two days of onset an average of four or five (but sometimes up to twenty) 1 to 2 mm diameter grayish lumps form and develop into vesicles with red surrounds, and over 24 hours these become shallow ulcers, rarely larger than 5 mm diameter, that heal in one to seven days. These lesions most often appear on the tonsillar pillars (adjacent to the tonsils), but also on the soft palate, tonsils, uvula, or tongue.[5] A small number of lesions (usually 2 - 6) form in the back area of the mouth, particularly the soft palate or tonsillar pillars. The lesions progress initially from red macules to vesicles and lastly to ulcerations which can be 2 - 4 mm in size. ...
As abfraction is still a controversial theory there are various ideas on what causes the lesions. Because of this controversy the true causes of abfraction also remain disputable.[10] Researchers have proposed that abfraction is caused by forces on the tooth from the teeth touching together, occlusal forces, when chewing and swallowing.[3][11] These lead to a concentration of stress and flexion at the area where the enamel and cementum meet (CEJ).[2][4] This theoretical stress concentration[12] and flexion over time causes the bonds in the enamel of the tooth to break down and either fracture or be worn away from other stressors such as erosion or abrasion.[2][4][10][11] The people who initially proposed the theory of abfraction believe the occlusal forces alone cause the lesions[12] without requiring the added abrasive components such as toothbrush and paste or erosion.[12] If teeth come together in a non-ideal bite the researchers state that this would create further stress in areas on the ...
... are named after Henry Koplik (1858-1927), an American pediatrician who published a short description of them in 1896, emphasising their appearance before the skin rash and their value in the differential diagnosis of diseases with which measles might be mistaken.[4][6] He published two further papers on the spots, including one with a colour illustration.[7] An anonymous reviewer of Koplik's The Diseases of Infancy and Childhood refers to the illustration as "the now famous coloured plate".[8] Some authors ascribe the first written description of these spots to Reubold, Würzburg 1854, and others to Johann Andreas Murray (1740-1791). Before Koplik, the German internist Carl Jakob Adolf Christian Gerhardt (1833-1902) in 1874, the Danish physician N. Flindt in 1879, and the Russian Nil Filatov (1847-1902) in 1895, had observed equivalent phenomena.[9] Koplik was aware of Filatov's work,[10] thought his evidence insufficient and rejected his claim for priority.[7] ...
... infection occurs when the herpes simplex virus comes into contact with oral mucosal tissue or abraded skin of the mouth. Infection by the type 1 strain of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is most common; however, cases of oral infection by the type 2 strain are increasing.[11] Specifically, type 2 has been implicated as causing 10-15% of oral infections. Cold sores are the result of the virus reactivating in the body. Once HSV-1 has entered the body, it never leaves. The virus moves from the mouth to remain latent in the central nervous system. In approximately one-third of people, the virus can "wake up" or reactivate to cause disease. When reactivation occurs, the virus travels down the nerves to the skin where it may cause blisters (cold sores) around the lips, in the mouth or, in about 10% of cases, on the nose, chin, or cheeks. Cold sore outbreaks may be influenced by stress, menstruation, sunlight, sunburn, fever, dehydration, or local skin trauma. Surgical procedures such as ...
In about 50% of cases of burning mouth sensation no identifiable cause is apparent;[1] these cases are termed (primary) BMS.[9] Several theories of what causes BMS have been proposed, and these are supported by varying degrees of evidence, but none is proven.[5][9] As most people with BMS are postmenopausal women, one theory of the cause of BMS is of estrogen or progesterone deficit, but a strong statistical correlation has not been demonstrated.[5] Another theory is that BMS is related to autoimmunity, as abnormal antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor can be found in the serum of more than 50% of persons with BMS, but these levels may also be seen in elderly people who do not have any of the symptoms of this condition.[5] Whilst salivary flow rates are normal and there are no clinical signs of a dry mouth to explain a complaint of dry mouth, levels of salivary proteins and phosphate may be elevated and salivary pH or buffering capacity may be reduced.[5] Depression and anxiety are strongly ...
Physiotherapy (physical therapy) is sometimes used as an adjuvant to other methods of treatment in TMD.[75] There are many different approaches described, but exercises aiming to increase the range of mandibular movements are commonly involved.[49] Jaw exercises aim to directly oppose the negative effects of disuse that may occur in TMD, due to pain discouraging people from moving their jaw. After initial instruction, people are able to perform a physical therapy regimen at home. The most simple method is by regular stretching within pain tolerance, using the thumb and a finger in a "scissor" maneuver. Gentle force is applied until pain of resistance is felt, and then the position is held for several seconds. Commercial devices have been developed to carry out this stretching exercise (e.g. the "Therabite" appliance). Over time, the amount of mouth opening possible without pain can be gradually increased. A baseline record of the distance at the start of physical therapy (e.g. the number of ...
An odontogenic keratocyst is a rare and benign but locally aggressive developmental cyst. It most often affects the posterior mandible. It most commonly presents in the third decade of life.[1]. In the WHO/IARC classification of head and neck pathology, this clinical entity had been known for years as the odontogenic keratocyst; it was reclassified as keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) from 2005 to 2017.[2][3] In 2017 it reverted to the earlier name, as the new WHO/IARC classification reclassified OKC back into the cystic category.[4] The WHO/IARC classification no longer considers it a neoplasm, because the evidence supporting that hypothesis (for example, clonality) is considered insufficient. However, this is an area of hot debate within the head and neck pathology community, and some pathologists still regard OKC as a neoplasm despite the reclassification.. ...
Focal radiodensity of the jaw which is not inflammatory, dysplastic, neoplastic or a manifestation of a systemic disease. This is common and affects 5% of the population, usually seen in teens and those in their 20s. Typically asymptomatic and is an incidental finding on a radiograph. found anywhere in the jaw, most commonly in the mandibular premolar-molar region. The shape ranges from round to linear streaks to occasional angular forms. ...
Varicella zoster virus (VZV) has a high level of infectivity and has a worldwide prevalence.[66] Shingles is a re-activation of latent VZV infection: zoster can only occur in someone who has previously had chickenpox (varicella).. Shingles has no relationship to season and does not occur in epidemics. There is, however, a strong relationship with increasing age.[19][38] The incidence rate of shingles ranges from 1.2 to 3.4 per 1,000 person‐years among younger healthy individuals, increasing to 3.9-11.8 per 1,000 person‐years among those older than 65 years,[14][19] and incidence rates worldwide are similar.[14][67] This relationship with age has been demonstrated in many countries,[14][67][68][69][70][71] and is attributed to the fact that cellular immunity declines as people grow older.. Another important risk factor is immunosuppression.[72][73][74] Other risk factors include psychological stress.[18][75][76] According to a study in North Carolina, "black subjects were significantly less ...
Cementoma is not exclusive to the mandible as it can infrequently occur in the maxilla and other parts of the body such as the ... A cementoma may present itself on a radiograph or x-ray and appear as an radiopaque mass depending on its stage and mass within ... Cementoma is an odontogenic tumor of cementum. It is usually observed as a benign spherical mass of hard tissue fused to the ... Cementoma is characterized by a significant amount of thickening of the cementum around the roots of the teeth. The main teeth ...
Gigantiform cementoma is a rare, autosomal dental tumor. It is benign, but without intervention it can result in severe ... "OMIM Entry - % 137575 - GIGANTIFORM CEMENTOMA, FAMILIAL". omim.org. Retrieved 14 June 2019. v t e. ...
"Cementoma" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Cementoma" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Cementoma" by people in Profiles. ... whether "Cementoma" was a major or minor topic of these publication. ...
We first present a rare case of cementoma of the calcaneus. When compared with dental cementoma, cementoma of the extragnathic ... CementomaCalcaneusRadiographyComputerized tomography. Background. Extragnathic cementoma of long bone as a benign bone neoplasm ... Cementoma occurring in the long bone is the rare bone lesion [1, 8]. There is a controversy in the cementoma located in the ... but the cementoma occurring in the long bone is rare. Moreover, the incidence of cementoma in the calcaneus is extremely ...
Familial gigantiform cementoma (FGC) is a rare benign autosomal dominant fibrocemento-osseous lesion generally limited to the ... Management strategy in patient with familial gigantiform cementoma: A case report and analysis of the literature. ...
Familial gigantiform cementoma is an exceedingly rare but distinct subtype of cemento-osseous-fibrous lesion. Undocumented. ... Familial gigantiform cementoma: classification and presentation of a large pedigree.. Compared with other 3 CODs, FGC takes on ... Familial gigantiform cementoma is a rare benign fibrocemento-osseous lesion of the jaws that can cause severe facial deformity ... Familial gigantiform cementoma with Ehlers - Danlos syndrome: A report of 2 cases. D Postoperative view of patient after ...
Familial Gigantiform Cementoma on 99mTc MDP Bone Scintigraphy. Jin, Xiaona; Jing, Hongli; Liu, Yu; More ...
Index: LILACS (Americas) Main subject: Biopsy / Radiography, Panoramic / Cementoma / Odontogenic Tumors Type of study: Case ... Index: LILACS (Americas) Main subject: Biopsy / Radiography, Panoramic / Cementoma / Odontogenic Tumors Type of study: Case ... Child , Middle Aged , Humans , Male , Female , Biopsy , Cementoma/classification , Odontogenic Tumors , Radiography, Panoramic ... Cementomas: displasia cementaria periapical; fibroma cementificante; cementoblastoma verdadero; cementoma giganteforme Aimar de ...
Study Diseases, disorders and conditions - NEOPLASTIC flashcards from Muhannad AbuSultan
Keywords: Cementoma, Dentition, Mandible, Odontogenic tumors Abstract View Paper Case Report Original: English ...
However, cementoma is usually located in the mandibular anterior region and does not obscure the PDL space. Cementomas actually ... The mature cementoma, also known as periapical cemental dysplasia, is another common lesion that students may confuse with ... Cementoblastoma, as distinguished from cementoma, is a true neoplasm of cementum. This benign neoplasm is rare and is usually ...
Cementoma, often caused by trauma, is usually seen on lower front teeth. No treatment is required.. An abscess may have a ... A condition called cementoma, in which excess bone forms around the root of a tooth or teeth, looks like an abscess during its ... Tagged asabscessAloe vera gelBelladonna 30xcementomagingivitisgumsholistic dentistrymouthwashespusSilicea 6x ...
Also called first-state cementoma. Want to thank TFD for its existence? Tell a friend about us, add a link to this page, or ...
Cementoma (M9273/0) 213.1. *. gigantiform (M9275/0) 213.1. *. upper jaw (bone) 213.0 ...
... cementoma; odontoma; teratoma; thymoma, chorioblastoma; adenocarcinoma, adenoma; cholangioma; cholesteatoma; cylindroma; ...
Cementoma (M9273/0) 213.1*. gigantiform (M9275/0) 213.1*. upper jaw (bone) 213.0. ...
Cementoblastoma is a true neoplasm of cementum which is also designated as true cementoma. It constitutes less than 1% of the ...
Follow-up CT findings of recurrent familial gigantiform cementoma of a female child. ...
teeth/odontogenic: (Cementoblastoma, Cementoma, Odontoma, Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, Ameloblastoma) Adamantinoma. ...
teeth/odontogenic: (Cementoblastoma, Cementoma, Odontoma, Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, Ameloblastoma) Adamantinoma. Category ...
Cementoma, NOS. 9273/0. Cementoblastoma, benign. 9274/0. Cementifying fibroma. 9275/0. Gigantiform cementoma. ...
Ma C, Wang H, He G, Qin X. Familial gigantiform cementoma. Case report of an unusual clinical manifestation and possible ...
A form of cementoma occurring in the mandible of the elderly and consisting of cellular fibrous tissue containing round or ...
... cementoma, Pagets disease, and nonspecific chronic lymphadenitis [38, 39]. Malignancy (osteosarcoma) is also included in the ...
... "cementoma" of long bones). Report of three cases. Electron microscopic observations supporting a synovial origin to the simple ...
... gigantiform cementoma.17 In the second edition of the World Health Organizations classification of odontogenic tumors, the ...
do nothing (observe) (Periapical cemental dysplasia formerly known as cementoma) The term "cementoma" is a misnomer as the ...
... cementoma, odontoma, teratoma, thymoma, trophoblastic tumor, adenocarcinoma, adenoma, cholangioma, cholesteatoma, cylindroma, ...
Oral tumors commonly arise from gingiva or tongue in cats and the gingiva in dogs, but they can arise from buccal mucosa, mandible, maxilla, palate, dental structures, and ...
  • Gigantiform cementoma is a rare, autosomal dental tumor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Familial gigantiform cementoma is an exceedingly rare but distinct subtype of cemento-osseous-fibrous lesion. (chothuemasteri.info)
  • Very few cases of gigantiform cementoma have been reported, and those associated with a positive family history are especially rare. (chothuemasteri.info)
  • Familial gigantiform cementoma is a rare benign fibrocemento-osseous lesion of the jaws that can cause severe facial deformity. (chothuemasteri.info)
  • We present an adolescent case with recurrent familial gigantiform cementoma who received surgical intervention in our hospital. (chothuemasteri.info)
  • Familial gigantiform cementoma FGC is a distinct and uncommon fibro-cemento-osseous lesion with unknown etiology. (chothuemasteri.info)
  • Familial gigantiform cementoma: classification and presentation of a large pedigree. (chothuemasteri.info)
  • B Preoperative panorex X-ray showed a characteristic radiographic feature of familial gigantiform cementoma FGC with well-circumscribed radiopaque areas involving all quadrants of the jaw, with mandible being more severely damaged. (chothuemasteri.info)
  • Some of his consanguineous relatives bore the same burden of fractures during pubertal period.Considering these polyostotic conditions, a correlation of congenital bone metabolism disorder in cases with familial gigantiform cementoma, named "calcium steal disorder," was thus proposed. (bvsalud.org)
  • Familial gigantiform cementoma is closely associated with "calcium steal disorder. (bvsalud.org)
  • Novemthree Siahaan ( November 3 , 1998 - September 15 , 2005 [1] ) was a young Indonesian boy who had the rare condition gigantiform cementoma . (blogspot.com)
  • iv) the gigantiform cementoma is a single lesion that can reach a large size and primarily affects children [ 3 , 4 ]. (jomos.org)
  • Lee and his daughter share a rare genetic disorder called gigantiform cementoma, a hereditary tumor that causes disfigurement of the jaw and teeth. (joins.com)
  • Cementoblastoma is a true neoplasm of cementum which is also designated as true cementoma. (hindawi.com)
  • True cementoma (cementoblastoma). (bikramyogaleiden.nl)
  • Benign Cementoblastoma is an odontogenic neoplasm of cementoblasts, also known as true cementoma. (ijsronline.net)
  • Periapical cemental dysplasia is a form of benign fibro-osseous lesions of the jaws that until recently was being considered as "Cementoma", an odontogenic tumor of connective tissue origin. (wda.org)
  • Cementoma is an odontogenic tumor of cementum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moreover, we performed in situ hybridization for the same amelogenin cDNA probe on human odontogenic tumor : Ameloblastoma (plexiform type, follicular type and mixed type), Calcifying odon togenic tumor, and Cementoma. (nii.ac.jp)
  • The amelogenin was detected on ameloblastoma both plexiform and follicular type but not calcifying odontogenic tumor and cementoma, because of previous decalcification by hydrochloric acid. (nii.ac.jp)
  • A form of cementoma occurring in the mandible of the elderly and consisting of cellular fibrous tissue containing round or lobulated masses of cementum. (dictionary.com)
  • By analyzing tissue taken from biopsies, oral pathologists will help diagnose and finally address several oral ailments, like leukoplakia, cementoma and squamous cell carcinoma, between Some others. (blogolize.com)
  • By examining tissue taken from biopsies, oral pathologists will help diagnose and ultimately handle many oral ailments, such as leukoplakia, cementoma and squamous cell carcinoma, among Other individuals. (tinyblogging.com)
  • By analyzing tissue taken from biopsies, oral pathologists can help diagnose and finally treat quite a few oral illnesses, like leukoplakia, cementoma and squamous cell carcinoma, amid others. (ampedpages.com)
  • By analyzing tissue taken from biopsies, oral pathologists can assist diagnose and at some point handle several oral diseases, such as leukoplakia, cementoma and squamous mobile carcinoma, among the others. (amoblog.com)
  • By examining tissue taken from biopsies, oral pathologists may help diagnose and ultimately take care of numerous oral disorders, which includes leukoplakia, cementoma and squamous cell carcinoma, among Some others. (blogdon.net)
  • By analyzing tissue taken from biopsies, oral pathologists may help diagnose and ultimately handle a variety of oral conditions, together with leukoplakia, cementoma and squamous mobile carcinoma, among Other individuals. (full-design.com)
  • By analyzing tissue taken from biopsies, oral pathologists will help diagnose and inevitably deal with quite a few oral conditions, like leukoplakia, cementoma and squamous cell carcinoma, amid Other folks. (blogocial.com)
  • Cementoma three stages: 1st (radiolucent) - 2nd (mixed) - 3rd (radiopaque). (ddmfr.org)
  • Cementoma is not exclusive to the mandible as it can infrequently occur in the maxilla and other parts of the body such as the long bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cementoma is a common disease of the dental root apex, which generally occurs in the maxilla and the mandible, but the cementoma occurring in the long bone is rare. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A cementoma may present itself on a radiograph or x-ray and appear as an radiopaque mass depending on its stage and mass within the lower dental arch. (wikipedia.org)
  • A condition called cementoma, in which excess bone forms around the root of a tooth or teeth, looks like an abscess during its beginning stage, but it is not. (healthy.net)
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the protection of the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle in alveolar bone operation in conditions such as chronic osteomyelitis and cementoma. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Cementoma is characterized by a significant amount of thickening of the cementum around the roots of the teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following the WHO classification, fibro-osseous lesions containing cementum are grouped together under the heading of cementoma and are divided into four subgroups. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Extragnathic cementoma was hypothesized and surgical excision was recommended. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Treatment of a cementoma involves surgically removing the mass and possibly a portion of the affected area and/or teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Visibility of the cementoma may increase with growth and cause distortion/swelling to the face and surrounding areas along with tooth displacement. (wikipedia.org)
  • The study enrolled 7 cases, 4 with chronic osteomyelitis and 3 with cementoma with pain. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Several cases of cementoma (1st stage). (ddmfr.org)
  • Cementoma" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (harvard.edu)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Cementoma" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Cementoma" was a major or minor topic of these publication. (harvard.edu)
  • We report an extragnathic cementoma of the calcaneus in a 19-year-old woman, who presented with intermittent pain at the left heel half a year ago. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Although benign, a cementoma will continue to grow in size if left untreated. (wikipedia.org)
  • His mother sent him to live with his grandparents at a young age, before the cementoma had started to grow. (blogspot.com)
  • Presentación caso Paciente de 41 años de edad buscó tratamiento dental debido a la movilidad dental en la región anterior de la mandíbula . (bvsalud.org)