A genus of aerobic, gram-negative, motile, slightly curved, rod-shaped bacteria. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)
A family of gram-negative bacteria usually found in soil or water and including many plant pathogens and a few animal pathogens.
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal, non-reducing beta-D-mannose residues in beta-D-mannosides. The enzyme plays a role in the lysosomal degradation of the N-glycosylprotein glycans. Defects in the lysosomal form of the enzyme in humans result in a buildup of mannoside intermediate metabolites and the disease BETA-MANNOSIDOSIS.
A genus of aerobic or facultatively anaerobic BACTERIA, in the family Cellulomonadaceae. It is found in the SOIL and capable of hydrolyzing CELLULOSE.
A large group of aerobic bacteria which show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method. This is because the cell walls of gram-negative bacteria are low in peptidoglycan and thus have low affinity for violet stain and high affinity for the pink dye safranine.
Polysaccharides consisting of xylose units.
Glycoside Hydrolases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds, resulting in the breakdown of complex carbohydrates and oligosaccharides into simpler sugars.
A polysaccharide with glucose units linked as in CELLOBIOSE. It is the chief constituent of plant fibers, cotton being the purest natural form of the substance. As a raw material, it forms the basis for many derivatives used in chromatography, ion exchange materials, explosives manufacturing, and pharmaceutical preparations.
A species of nonpathogenic fluorescent bacteria found in feces, sewage, soil, and water, and which liquefy gelatin.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.

A novel Cellvibrio mixtus family 10 xylanase that is both intracellular and expressed under non-inducing conditions. (1/33)

Hydrolysis of the plant cell wall polysaccharides cellulose and xylan requires the synergistic interaction of a repertoire of extracellular enzymes. Recently, evidence has emerged that anaerobic bacteria can synthesize high levels of periplasmic xylanases which may be involved in the hydrolysis of small xylo-oligosaccharides absorbed by the micro-organism. Cellvibrio mixtus, a saprophytic aerobic soil bacterium that is highly active against plant cell wall polysaccharides, was shown to express internal xylanase activity when cultured on media containing xylan or glucose as sole carbon source. A genomic library of C. mixtus DNA, constructed in lambdaZAPII, was screened for xylanase activity. The nucleotide sequence of the genomic insert from a xylanase-positive clone that expressed intracellular xylanase activity in Escherichia coli revealed an ORF of 1137 bp (xynC), encoding a polypeptide with a deduced M(r) of 43413, defined as xylanase C (XylC). Probing a gene library of Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa with C. mixtus xynC identified a xynC homologue (designated xynG) encoding XylG; XylG and xynG were 67% and 63% identical to the corresponding C. mixtus sequences, respectively. Both XylC and XylG exhibit extensive sequence identity with family 10 xylanases, particularly with non-modular enzymes, and gene deletion studies on xynC supported the suggestion that they are single-domain xylanases. Purified recombinant XylC had an M(r) of 41000, and displayed biochemical properties typical of family 10 polysaccharidases. However, unlike previously characterized xylanases, XylC was particularly sensitive to proteolytic inactivation by pancreatic proteinases and was thermolabile. C. mixtus was grown to late-exponential phase in the presence of glucose or xylan and the cytoplasmic, periplasmic and cell envelope fractions were probed with anti-XylC antibodies. The results showed that XylC was absent from the culture media but was predominantly present in the periplasm of C. mixtus cells grown on glucose, xylan, CM-cellulose or Avicel. These data suggest that C. mixtus can express non-modular internal xylanases whose potential roles in the hydrolysis of plant cell wall components are discussed.  (+info)

The membrane-bound alpha-glucuronidase from Pseudomonas cellulosa hydrolyzes 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronoxylooligosaccharides but not 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronoxylan. (2/33)

The microbial degradation of xylan is a key biological process. Hardwood 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronoxylans are extensively decorated with 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronic acid, which is cleaved from the polysaccharides by alpha-glucuronidases. In this report we describe the primary structures of the alpha-glucuronidase from Cellvibrio mixtus (C. mixtus GlcA67A) and the alpha-glucuronidase from Pseudomonas cellulosa (P. cellulosa GlcA67A) and characterize P. cellulosa GlcA67A. The primary structures of C. mixtus GlcA67A and P. cellulosa GlcA67A, which are 76% identical, exhibit similarities with alpha-glucuronidases in glycoside hydrolase family 67. The membrane-associated pseudomonad alpha-glucuronidase released 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronic acid from 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronoxylooligosaccharides but not from 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronoxylan. We propose that the role of the glucuronidase, in combination with cell-associated xylanases, is to hydrolyze decorated xylooligosaccharides, generated by extracellular hemicellulases, to xylose and 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronic acid, enabling the pseudomonad to preferentially utilize the sugars derived from these polymers.  (+info)

Convergent evolution sheds light on the anti-beta -elimination mechanism common to family 1 and 10 polysaccharide lyases. (3/33)

Enzyme-catalyzed beta-elimination of sugar uronic acids, exemplified by the degradation of plant cell wall pectins, plays an important role in a wide spectrum of biological processes ranging from the recycling of plant biomass through to pathogen virulence. The three-dimensional crystal structure of the catalytic module of a "family PL-10" polysaccharide lyase, Pel10Acm from Cellvibrio japonicus, solved at a resolution of 1.3 A, reveals a new polysaccharide lyase fold and is the first example of a polygalacturonic acid lyase that does not exhibit the "parallel beta-helix" topology. The "Michaelis" complex of an inactive mutant in association with the substrate trigalacturonate/Ca2+ reveals the catalytic machinery harnessed by this polygalacturonate lyase, which displays a stunning resemblance, presumably through convergent evolution, to the tetragalacturonic acid complex observed for a structurally unrelated polygalacturonate lyase from family PL-1. Common coordination of the -1 and +1 subsite saccharide carboxylate groups by a protein-liganded Ca2+ ion, the positioning of an arginine catalytic base in close proximity to the alpha-carbon hydrogen and numerous other conserved enzyme-substrate interactions, considered in light of mutagenesis data for both families, suggest a generic polysaccharide anti-beta-elimination mechanism.  (+info)

The alpha-glucuronidase, GlcA67A, of Cellvibrio japonicus utilizes the carboxylate and methyl groups of aldobiouronic acid as important substrate recognition determinants. (4/33)

alpha-Glucuronidases are key components of the ensemble of enzymes that degrade the plant cell wall. They hydrolyze the alpha1,2-glycosidic bond between 4-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid (4-O-MeGlcA) and the xylan or xylooligosaccharide backbone. Here we report the crystal structure of an inactive mutant (E292A) of the alpha-glucuronidase, GlcA67A, from Cellvibrio japonicus in complex with its substrate. The data show that the 4-O-methyl group of the substrate is accommodated within a hydrophobic sheath flanked by Val-210 and Trp-160, whereas the carboxylate moiety is located within a positively charged region of the substrate-binding pocket. The carboxylate side chains of Glu-393 and Asp-365, on the "beta-face" of 4-O-MeGlcA, form hydrogen bonds with a water molecule that is perfectly positioned to mount a nucleophilic attack at the anomeric carbon of the target glycosidic bond, providing further support for the view that, singly or together, these amino acids function as the catalytic base. The capacity of reaction products and product analogues to inhibit GlcA67A shows that the 4-O-methyl group, the carboxylate, and the xylose sugar of aldobiouronic acid all play an important role in substrate binding. Site-directed mutagenesis informed by the crystal structure of enzyme-ligand complexes was used to probe the importance of highly conserved residues at the active site of GlcA67A. The biochemical properties of K288A, R325A, and K360A show that a constellation of three basic amino acids (Lys-288, Arg-325, and Lys-360) plays a critical role in binding the carboxylate moiety of 4-O-MeGlcA. Disruption of the apolar nature of the pocket created by Val-210 (V210N and V210S) has a detrimental effect on substrate binding, although the reduction in affinity is not reflected by an inability to accommodate the 4-O-methyl group. Replacing the two tryptophan residues that stack against the sugar rings of the substrate with alanine (W160A and W543A) greatly reduced activity.  (+info)

Reclassification of 'Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa' NCIMB 10462 (Ueda et al. 1952) as Cellvibrio japonicus sp. nov. and revival of Cellvibrio vulgaris sp. nov., nom. rev. and Cellvibrio fulvus sp. nov., nom. rev. (5/33)

'Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa' NCIMB 10462 has been demonstrated by a polyphasic taxonomic approach to be a member of the genus Cellvibrio. 16S rDNA sequence analysis suggests that this is the only genus that could accept this specimen. The sequence is 95.5% similar to that of Cellvibrio mixtus subsp. mixtus ACM 2601T (the type strain of the type species of the genus), which is its closest relation. The genomic DNA G + C content was determined to be 53.3 mol%, which is similar to the values obtained for the validly described Cellvibrio species. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments have shown that strain NCIMB 10462T (= NCDO 2697T) represents a novel species; therefore, it is proposed that it be designated as the type strain of the novel species Cellvibrio japonicus sp. nov. This study also used 16S rDNA analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization experiments and phenotypic testing to revive the species Cellvibrio vulgaris sp. nov., nom. rev. and Cellvibrio fulvus sp. nov., nom. rev. C. vulgaris NCIMB 8633T (=LMG 2848T) and C. fulvus NCIMB 8634T (=LMG 2847T) are the proposed type strains.  (+info)

Taxonomic study of Cellvibrio strains and description of Cellvibrio ostraviensis sp. nov., Cellvibrio fibrivorans sp. nov. and Cellvibrio gandavensis sp. nov. (6/33)

Thirty-one cellulolytic bacterial isolates from soils that were phenotypically very similar and phylogenetically highly related to Cellvibrio strains were further characterized using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. By using repetitive extragenic palindromic DNA-PCR fingerprinting, six different fingerprints could be recognized among the isolates. Representative strains and four reference strains of the genus Cellvibrio were used for DNA-DNA hybridization, which yielded eight DNA hybridization groups at a cut-off level of 70% DNA binding. One group was formed by three isolates and Cellvibrio vulgaris LMG 2848T and a second group consisted of Cellvibrio mixtus strains ACM 2601T and ACM 2603. Two isolates and Cellvibrio fulvus LMG 2847T constituted single-member groups. For the remaining groups, three novel species are proposed: Cellvibrio fibrivorans sp. nov. (six strains, type strain LMG 18561T =ACM 5172T), Cellvibrio ostraviensis sp. nov. (eight strains, type strain LMG 19434T =ACM 5173T) and Cellvibrio gandavensis sp. nov. (12 strains, type strain LMG 18551T =ACM 5174T). The novel Cellvibrio species could be differentiated from each other and from C. mixtus, C. vulgaris and C. fulvus on the basis of phenotypic features, their fatty acid compositions and the G + C content of their DNA.  (+info)

Parallel induction of D-arabitol and D-sorbitol dehydrogenases. (7/33)

Scolnick, Edward M. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.) and Edmund C. C. Lin. Parallel induction of d-arabitol and d-sorbitol dehydrogenases. J. Bacteriol. 84:631-637. 1962.-Two inducible diphosphopyridine nucleotide-linked dehydrogenases are described in a bacterium isolated from the soil, Cellvibrio polyoltrophicus ATCC 14774. The first enzyme catalyzes the dehydrogenation of d-arabitol to d-xylulose and d-mannitol to d-fructose. The data suggest that in vivo this enzyme has the dual function of the utilization of both of these polyhydric alcohols. The second enzyme was found to act only on d-sorbitol, converting it to d-fructose. Evidence for its physiological function as a d-sorbitol dehydrogenase is also given. Both of these enzymes were found to be induced in parallel by any of the three polyhydric alcohols, d-arabitol, d-mannitol, and d-sorbitol. A common stereoconfiguration of the inducers for these enzymes is suggested. The parallel evolution of substrate specificity and inducer specificity is discussed with respect to the functional advantage that such a selective process might offer.  (+info)

The mechanisms by which family 10 glycoside hydrolases bind decorated substrates. (8/33)

Endo-beta-1,4-xylanases (xylanases), which cleave beta-1,4 glycosidic bonds in the xylan backbone, are important components of the repertoire of enzymes that catalyze plant cell wall degradation. The mechanism by which these enzymes are able to hydrolyze a range of decorated xylans remains unclear. Here we reveal the three-dimensional structure, determined by x-ray crystallography, and the catalytic properties of the Cellvibrio mixtus enzyme Xyn10B (CmXyn10B), the most active GH10 xylanase described to date. The crystal structure of the enzyme in complex with xylopentaose reveals that at the +1 subsite the xylose moiety is sandwiched between hydrophobic residues, which is likely to mediate tighter binding than in other GH10 xylanases. The crystal structure of the xylanase in complex with a range of decorated xylooligosaccharides reveals how this enzyme is able to hydrolyze substituted xylan. Solvent exposure of the O-2 groups of xylose at the +4, +3, +1, and -3 subsites may allow accommodation of the alpha-1,2-linked 4-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid side chain in glucuronoxylan at these locations. Furthermore, the uronic acid makes hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions with the enzyme at the +1 subsite, indicating that the sugar decorations in glucuronoxylan are targeted to this proximal aglycone binding site. Accommodation of 3'-linked l-arabinofuranoside decorations is observed in the -2 subsite and could, most likely, be tolerated when bound to xylosides in -3 and +4. A notable feature of the binding mode of decorated substrates is the way in which the subsite specificities are tailored both to prevent the formation of "dead-end" reaction products and to facilitate synergy with the xylan degradation-accessory enzymes such as alpha-glucuronidase. The data described in this report and in the accompanying paper indicate that the complementarity in the binding of decorated substrates between the glycone and aglycone regions appears to be a conserved feature of GH10 xylanases.  (+info)

"Cellvibrio" is a genus of bacteria that belongs to the family of Oxalobacteraceae. These bacteria are gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rods that are commonly found in various environments such as soil, water, and plant material. They are known for their ability to degrade complex organic compounds, including polysaccharides like cellulose and xylan. Some species of Cellvibrio have potential applications in biotechnology and bioenergy production due to their ability to produce enzymes that can break down plant biomass into fermentable sugars. However, there is no specific medical definition or association with human diseases for the genus "Cellvibrio".

Pseudomonadaceae is a family of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria within the class Gammaproteobacteria. The name "Pseudomonadaceae" comes from the type genus Pseudomonas, which means "false unitform." This refers to the fact that these bacteria can appear similar to other rod-shaped bacteria but have distinct characteristics.

Members of this family are typically motile, aerobic organisms with a single polar flagellum or multiple lateral flagella. They are widely distributed in various environments, including soil, water, and as part of the normal microbiota of plants and animals. Some species can cause diseases in humans, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is an opportunistic pathogen known to cause severe infections in individuals with weakened immune systems, cystic fibrosis, or burn wounds.

Pseudomonadaceae bacteria are metabolically versatile and can utilize various organic compounds as carbon sources. They often produce pigments, such as pyocyanin and fluorescein, which contribute to their identification in laboratory settings. The family Pseudomonadaceae includes several genera, with Pseudomonas being the most well-known and clinically relevant.

Beta-Mannosidase is an enzyme that breaks down complex carbohydrates known as glycoproteins. It does this by catalyzing the hydrolysis of beta-mannosidic linkages, which are specific types of chemical bonds that connect mannose sugars within glycoproteins.

This enzyme plays an important role in the normal functioning of the body, particularly in the breakdown and recycling of glycoproteins. A deficiency in beta-mannosidase activity can lead to a rare genetic disorder known as beta-Mannosidosis, which is characterized by the accumulation of mannose-rich oligosaccharides in various tissues and organs, leading to progressive neurological deterioration and other symptoms.

"Cellulomonas" is a genus of bacteria that are gram-positive, aerobic, and rod-shaped. They are known for their ability to break down cellulose, which is a complex carbohydrate that makes up the cell walls of plants. This ability to degrade cellulose is what gives members of this genus their name, as "Cellulomonas" can be translated to "cellulose-dweller."

Cellulomonas species are commonly found in soil and decaying plant material, where they play an important role in the carbon cycle by helping to break down dead plant matter. They are also known to cause infections in humans, although this is relatively rare. When they do cause infections, they typically affect the skin and soft tissues, and can cause conditions such as cellulitis or wound infections.

It's worth noting that while Cellulomonas species are important for their role in breaking down cellulose in the environment, they are not commonly encountered in clinical settings. If you suspect that you may have an infection caused by a member of this genus, it is important to seek medical attention from a healthcare professional.

Gram-negative aerobic bacteria are a type of bacteria that do not retain the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining method, which is a technique used to differentiate bacterial species based on their cell wall composition. These bacteria have a thin peptidoglycan layer and an outer membrane containing lipopolysaccharides (LPS), making them resistant to many antibiotics and disinfectants. They are called aerobic because they require oxygen for their growth and metabolism. Examples of Gram-negative aerobic bacteria include Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. These bacteria can cause various infections in humans, such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and sepsis.

Xylans are a type of complex carbohydrate, specifically a hemicellulose, that are found in the cell walls of many plants. They are made up of a backbone of beta-1,4-linked xylose sugar molecules and can be substituted with various side groups such as arabinose, glucuronic acid, and acetyl groups. Xylans are indigestible by humans, but they can be broken down by certain microorganisms in the gut through a process called fermentation, which can produce short-chain fatty acids that have beneficial effects on health.

Glycoside hydrolases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds found in various substrates such as polysaccharides, oligosaccharides, and glycoproteins. These enzymes break down complex carbohydrates into simpler sugars by cleaving the glycosidic linkages that connect monosaccharide units.

Glycoside hydrolases are classified based on their mechanism of action and the type of glycosidic bond they hydrolyze. The classification system is maintained by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (IUBMB). Each enzyme in this class is assigned a unique Enzyme Commission (EC) number, which reflects its specificity towards the substrate and the type of reaction it catalyzes.

These enzymes have various applications in different industries, including food processing, biofuel production, pulp and paper manufacturing, and biomedical research. In medicine, glycoside hydrolases are used to diagnose and monitor certain medical conditions, such as carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome, a rare inherited disorder affecting the structure of glycoproteins.

Cellulose is a complex carbohydrate that is the main structural component of the cell walls of green plants, many algae, and some fungi. It is a polysaccharide consisting of long chains of beta-glucose molecules linked together by beta-1,4 glycosidic bonds. Cellulose is insoluble in water and most organic solvents, and it is resistant to digestion by humans and non-ruminant animals due to the lack of cellulase enzymes in their digestive systems. However, ruminants such as cows and sheep can digest cellulose with the help of microbes in their rumen that produce cellulase.

Cellulose has many industrial applications, including the production of paper, textiles, and building materials. It is also used as a source of dietary fiber in human food and animal feed. Cellulose-based materials are being explored for use in biomedical applications such as tissue engineering and drug delivery due to their biocompatibility and mechanical properties.

"Pseudomonas fluorescens" is a gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium found in various environments such as soil, water, and some plants. It is a non-pathogenic species of the Pseudomonas genus, which means it does not typically cause disease in humans. The name "fluorescens" comes from its ability to produce a yellow-green pigment that fluoresces under ultraviolet light. This bacterium is known for its versatility and adaptability, as well as its ability to break down various organic compounds, making it useful in bioremediation and other industrial applications.

I apologize, but there seems to be a misunderstanding. "Soil microbiology" is not a medical term; rather, it is a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of microorganisms in soil. It involves understanding the diversity, ecology, and biochemistry of bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa, and other microscopic life forms found in soil. This field has applications in agriculture, environmental science, and waste management but is not directly related to medical definitions or human health.

... is a genus of Gammaproteobacteria. The cells are slender curved rods. Cellvibrio is (like all Proteobacteria) Gram- ... "Cellvibrio". LPSN. George M. Garrity: Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology. 2. Auflage. Springer, New York, 2005, Volume ... 2: The Proteobacteria, Part B: The Gammaproteobacteria Cellvibrio J.P. Euzéby: List of Prokaryotic names with Standing in ...
"Taxonomic study of Cellvibrio strains and description of Cellvibrio ostraviensis sp. nov., Cellvibrio fibrivorans sp. nov. and ... Cellvibrio fibrivorans is a bacterium from the genus of Cellvibrio which has been isolated from soil from a Botanic garden in ... "Cellvibrio". LPSN. "Cellvibrio fibrivorans". www.uniprot.org. Parker, Charles Thomas; Garrity, George M (1 August 2008). Parker ... Cellvibrio gandavensis sp. nov". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 53 (2): 465-471. doi: ...
... is a Gram-negative soil bacterium. Type strain of Cellvibrio japonicus at BacDive - the Bacterial ...
"Cellvibrio". LPSN. "Cellvibrio fontiphilus". UniProt. Chen, WM; Liu, LP; Sheu, SY (August 2017). "Cellvibrio fontiphilus sp. ... Cellvibrio fontiphilus is a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic and motile bacterium from the genus of Cellvibrio which has been ... Type strain of Cellvibrio fontiphilus at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short description ...
... is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, aerobic and nitrogen-fixing bacterium from the genus of Cellvibrio ... "Cellvibrio". LPSN. "Cellvibrio diazotrophicus". www.uniprot.org. Suarez, C; Ratering, S; Kramer, I; Schnell, S (February 2014 ... "Cellvibrio diazotrophicus sp. nov., a nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of salt meadow plants and emended ... description of the genus Cellvibrio". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 64 (Pt 2): 481-6. doi: ...
... is a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic and motile bacterium from the genus of Cellvibrio which has been ... "Cellvibrio". LPSN. "Cellvibrio zantedeschiae". www.uniprot.org. Sheu, SY; Huang, CW; Hsu, MY; Sheu, C; Chen, WM (September 2017 ... "Cellvibrio zantedeschiae sp. nov., isolated from the roots of Zantedeschia aethiopica". International Journal of Systematic and ...
cellulosa and Cellvibrio mixtus". Biochem. J. 312 (1): 39-48. doi:10.1042/bj3120039. PMC 1136224. PMID 7492333. Fanutti C, ... Cellvibrio mixtus endoglucanase 5A contains two CBM6 domains, the CBM6 domain at the C-terminus displays distinct ligand ...
Ccl3; TC# 2.A.46.1.6), or as many as 14 TMSs (i.e., BenE of Cellvibrio gilvus; TC# 2.A.46.1.4). BenE family members exhibit ...
"Cellvibrio japonicus alpha-L-arabinanase 43A has a novel five-blade beta-propeller fold". Nature Structural Biology. 9 (9): 665 ... The structure of arabinanase Arb43A from Cellvibrio japonicus reveals a five-bladed beta-propeller fold. A long V-shaped groove ...
"Structural and enzymatic characterization of a glycoside hydrolase family 31 α-xylosidase from Cellvibrio japonicus involved in ...
Taxonomy of the psychrophile Flavobacterium frigidarium and the mesophile Cellvibrio japonicus, and comparative analyses of ...
Cellvibrio MeSH B03.440.400.425.292 - comamonadaceae MeSH B03.440.400.425.292.150 - Comamonas MeSH B03.440.400.425.292.150.750 ... Cellvibrio MeSH B03.660.250.580.590 - Pseudomonas MeSH B03.660.250.580.590.050 - Pseudomonas aeruginosa MeSH B03.660.250.580. ...
Cellvibrio is a genus of Gammaproteobacteria. The cells are slender curved rods. Cellvibrio is (like all Proteobacteria) Gram- ... "Cellvibrio". LPSN. George M. Garrity: Bergeys Manual of Systematic Bacteriology. 2. Auflage. Springer, New York, 2005, Volume ... 2: The Proteobacteria, Part B: The Gammaproteobacteria Cellvibrio J.P. Euzéby: List of Prokaryotic names with Standing in ...
Structural and functional variation of chitin-binding domains of a lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase from Cellvibrio japonicus ... and functional analysis of a lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase important for efficient utilization of chitin in Cellvibrio ...
Cellvibrio japonicus 5oyc_a B3PD52 99.50 5.60E-19 3.50E-23 162.60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
Structure and activity of FMOs from Cellvibrio sp. BR and Pseudomonas stutzeri NF13. Journal of Molecular Catalysis B: ...
CELLVIBRIO JAPONICUS HYDROLASE Ref.: STRUCTURAL ENZYMOLOGY OF CELLVIBRIO JAPONICUS AGD31 ALPHA-TRANSGLUCOSYLASE ACTIVITY IN ... CELLVIBRIO JAPONICUS HYDROLASE Ref.: 1,6-CYCLOPHELLITOL CYCLOSULFATES: A NEW CLASS OF IRREVERSIBLE GLYCOSIDASE INHIBITOR. ACS ...
The prevalence of the Enterobacteriaceae family was reduced; there was no Cellvibrio, which hydrolyses chitin; and no ...
Cellvibrio japonicus NCIMB 10462 (B3PGI9, ACE83583.1, YP_001980768.1) 1 mg - 10.00. 10 mg - 70.00. 100 mg - 450.00. 1 g - ...
Cellvibrio RSV_genus1164 Bacteria;Proteobacteria;Gammaproteobacteria;Cellvibrionales;Cellvibrionaceae;Simiduia RSV_genus1165 ...
One-step bioconversion of hemicellulose polymers to rhamnolipids with Cellvibrio japonicus: a proof-of-concept for a potential ...
KY-GH-1 QEY16841.1 ncbi GH19_2 Bacteria Cellvibrio sp. KY-GH-1 QEY17877.1 ncbi GH19_2 Bacteria Cellvibrio sp. PSBB006 ... TH-20 ARK04239.1 ncbi GH19_2 Bacteria Cellvibrio japonicus ADPT1-KOJIBIOSE QEI18772.1 ncbi GH19_2 Bacteria Cellvibrio japonicus ... 2 Bacteria Cellvibrio japonicus Ueda107 ACE85809.1 ncbi GH19_2 Bacteria Cellvibrio sp. ... ARU28903.1 ncbi GH19_2 Bacteria Cellvibrio sp. PSBB006 ARU29893.1 ncbi GH19_2 Eukaryota Cenchrus americanus ADG65345.1 ncbi ...
Larsbrink, J., Izumi, A., Hemsworth, G. R., Davies, G. J., & Brumer, H. (2012) Structural enzymology of cellvibrio japonicus ...
CELLVIBRIO. CELLVIBRIO. CELLVIBRIO. CELULAS DEL CUERNO POSTERIOR. POSTERIOR HORN CELLS. CÉLULAS DO CORNO POSTERIOR. ...
CELLVIBRIO. CELLVIBRIO. CELLVIBRIO. CELULAS DEL CUERNO POSTERIOR. POSTERIOR HORN CELLS. CÉLULAS DO CORNO POSTERIOR. ...
CELLVIBRIO. CELLVIBRIO. CELLVIBRIO. CELULAS DEL CUERNO POSTERIOR. POSTERIOR HORN CELLS. CÉLULAS DO CORNO POSTERIOR. ...
CELLVIBRIO CELLVIBRIO CELLVIBRIO CENTRAL CORD SYNDROME SINDROME DEL CORDON CENTRAL SÍNDROME MEDULAR CENTRAL ...
CELLVIBRIO CELLVIBRIO CELLVIBRIO CENTRAL CORD SYNDROME SINDROME DEL CORDON CENTRAL SÍNDROME MEDULAR CENTRAL ...
CELLVIBRIO CELLVIBRIO CELLVIBRIO CÉLULAS DENDRÍTICAS FOLICULARES DENDRITIC CELLS, FOLLICULAR CELULAS DENDRITICAS FOLICULARES ...
CELLVIBRIO. CELLVIBRIO. CELLVIBRIO. CELULAS DEL CUERNO POSTERIOR. POSTERIOR HORN CELLS. CÉLULAS DO CORNO POSTERIOR. ...
CELLVIBRIO CELLVIBRIO CELLVIBRIO CENTRAL CORD SYNDROME SINDROME DEL CORDON CENTRAL SÍNDROME MEDULAR CENTRAL ...
CELLVIBRIO CELLVIBRIO CELLVIBRIO CÉLULAS DENDRÍTICAS FOLICULARES DENDRITIC CELLS, FOLLICULAR CELULAS DENDRITICAS FOLICULARES ...
CELLVIBRIO CELLVIBRIO CELLVIBRIO CENTRAL CORD SYNDROME SINDROME DEL CORDON CENTRAL SÍNDROME MEDULAR CENTRAL ...
CELLVIBRIO CELLVIBRIO CELLVIBRIO CENTRAL CORD SYNDROME SINDROME DEL CORDON CENTRAL SÍNDROME MEDULAR CENTRAL ...
CELLVIBRIO CELLVIBRIO CELLVIBRIO CÉLULAS DENDRÍTICAS FOLICULARES DENDRITIC CELLS, FOLLICULAR CELULAS DENDRITICAS FOLICULARES ...
In vitro and in vivo characterization of three Cellvibrio japonicus Glycoside Hydrolase Family 5 members reveals potent ...
Subject: NC_015671:2011462 Cellvibrio gilvus ATCC 13127 chromosome, complete genome. Lineage: Cellvibrio gilvus; Cellvibrio; ... Cellvibrio gilvus was isolated from bovine feces. This organism is able to degrade cellulose. ...
Cellvibrio japonicus Ueda107. Marinobacter aqueolei. Marinobacter sp. ELB17. Saccharophagus degradans 2-40. ...
Cellvibrio japonicus Ueda107. Magnesium (Mg), Cobalt (Co), Nickel (Ni), Manganese (Mn). magnesium and cobalt transport protein ...
Cellvibrio gilvus ATCC 13127 chromosome, complete genome. quinolinate synthetase complex, A subunit. NC_013132:893849:899758. ...
Thestructure of GH26 beta-mannanase CjMan26C from Cellvibrio japonicus in complex with ManIFG [Cellvibrio japonicus Ueda107], ... CellvibrioJaponicus Mannanase Cjman26c Native Form [Cellvibrio japonicus],2VX6_A CELLVIBRIO JAPONICUS MANNANASE CJMAN26C ... 4CD5_A The structure of GH26 beta-mannanase CjMan26C from Cellvibrio japonicus in complex with ManMIm [Cellvibrio japonicus ... Mannan endo-1,4-beta-mannosidase OS=Cellvibrio japonicus (strain Ueda107) OX=498211 GN=manA PE=1 SV=2 ...
  • We use the bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus because of the sophisticated genetic tools to manipulate the microorganism, and because this bacterium has the incredible ability to completely depolymerize both plant cell wall, fungal cell wall, and crustacean shell polysaccharides to obtain carbon and energy. (umbc.edu)
  • 26 6.7 d1uuqa_ c.1.8.3 (A:) Exomannosidase {Cellvibrio mixtus [TaxId: 3. (uni-wuerzburg.de)
  • Cellvibrio gilvus was isolated from bovine feces. (up.ac.za)
  • Cellvibrio is (like all Proteobacteria) Gram-negative. (wikipedia.org)
  • KY-GH-1 QEY18047.1 ncbi GH13_46 Bacteria Cellvibrio sp. (cazy.org)
  • KY-YJ-3 QEY14203.1 ncbi GH13_46 Bacteria Cellvibrio sp. (cazy.org)
  • PSBB006 ARU29251.1 ncbi GH13_46 Bacteria Cellvibrio sp. (cazy.org)
  • PSBB023 AQT61808.1 ncbi GH13_46 Bacteria Cellvibrio sp. (cazy.org)
  • QJXJ UUA70956.1 ncbi GH13_46 Bacteria Cellvibrio sp. (cazy.org)
  • nov. and revival of Cellvibrio vulgaris sp. (nih.gov)