Dental Cementum: The bonelike rigid connective tissue covering the root of a tooth from the cementoenamel junction to the apex and lining the apex of the root canal, also assisting in tooth support by serving as attachment structures for the periodontal ligament. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Cementogenesis: The formation of DENTAL CEMENTUM, a bone-like material that covers the root of the tooth.Tooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Periodontal Ligament: The fibrous CONNECTIVE TISSUE surrounding the TOOTH ROOT, separating it from and attaching it to the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS).Tooth Cervix: The constricted part of the tooth at the junction of the crown and root or roots. It is often referred to as the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), the line at which the cementum covering the root of a tooth and the enamel of the tooth meet. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p530, p433)Dental Care: The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).Periodontium: The structures surrounding and supporting the tooth. Periodontium includes the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.Integrin-Binding Sialoprotein: A highly glycosylated and sulfated phosphoprotein that is found almost exclusively in mineralized connective tissues. It is an extracellular matrix protein that binds to hydroxyapatite through polyglutamic acid sequences and mediates cell attachment through an RGD sequence.Tooth Calcification: The process whereby calcium salts are deposited in the dental enamel. The process is normal in the development of bones and teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p43)Root Resorption: Resorption in which cementum or dentin is lost from the root of a tooth owing to cementoclastic or osteoclastic activity in conditions such as trauma of occlusion or neoplasms. (Dorland, 27th ed)Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Tooth Apex: The tip or terminal end of the root of a tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p62)Alveolar Process: The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Dental Enamel Proteins: The proteins that are part of the dental enamel matrix.Dental Enamel: A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Age Determination by Teeth: A means of identifying the age of an animal or human through tooth examination.Dental Care for Chronically Ill: Dental care for patients with chronic diseases. These diseases include chronic cardiovascular, endocrinologic, hematologic, immunologic, neoplastic, and renal diseases. The concept does not include dental care for the mentally or physically disabled which is DENTAL CARE FOR DISABLED.Dental Care for Children: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Dental Clinics: Facilities where dental care is provided to patients.Phosphate Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins that are involved in the active transport of phosphate.Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Hygienists: Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.Odontogenesis: The process of TOOTH formation. It is divided into several stages including: the dental lamina stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, and the bell stage. Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum (CEMENTOGENESIS).Tooth Resorption: Resorption of calcified dental tissue, involving demineralization due to reversal of the cation exchange and lacunar resorption by osteoclasts. There are two types: external (as a result of tooth pathology) and internal (apparently initiated by a peculiar inflammatory hyperplasia of the pulp). (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p676)Tooth Migration: The movement of teeth into altered positions in relationship to the basal bone of the ALVEOLAR PROCESS and to adjoining and opposing teeth as a result of loss of approximating or opposing teeth, occlusal interferences, habits, inflammatory and dystrophic disease of the attaching and supporting structures of the teeth. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Cementoma: An odontogenic fibroma in which cells have developed into cementoblasts and which consists largely of cementum.Furcation Defects: Conditions in which a bifurcation or trifurcation of the molar tooth root becomes denuded as a result of periodontal disease. It may be followed by tooth mobility, temperature sensitivity, pain, and alveolar bone resorption.Dental Care for Disabled: Dental care for the emotionally, mentally, or physically disabled patient. It does not include dental care for the chronically ill ( = DENTAL CARE FOR CHRONICALLY ILL).Tooth Eruption: The emergence of a tooth from within its follicle in the ALVEOLAR PROCESS of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE into the ORAL CAVITY. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Guided Tissue Regeneration, Periodontal: Techniques for enhancing and directing cell growth to repopulate specific parts of the PERIODONTIUM that have been damaged by PERIODONTAL DISEASES; TOOTH DISEASES; or TRAUMA, or to correct TOOTH ABNORMALITIES. Repopulation and repair is achieved by guiding the progenitor cells to reproduce in the desired location by blocking contact with surrounding tissue by use of membranes composed of synthetic or natural material that may include growth inducing factors as well.Dental Anxiety: Abnormal fear or dread of visiting the dentist for preventive care or therapy and unwarranted anxiety over dental procedures.Insurance, Dental: Insurance providing coverage for dental care.Dental Auxiliaries: Personnel whose work is prescribed and supervised by the dentist.Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Dental Research: The study of laws, theories, and hypotheses through a systematic examination of pertinent facts and their interpretation in the field of dentistry. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982, p674)Decalcification, Pathologic: The loss of calcium salts from bones and teeth. Bacteria may be responsible for this occurrence in teeth. Old age may be a factor contributing to calcium loss, as is the presence of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.Tooth Movement: Orthodontic techniques used to correct the malposition of a single tooth.Dental Care for Aged: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of the elderly for proper maintenance or treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Dental Cavity Preparation: An operation in which carious material is removed from teeth and biomechanically correct forms are established in the teeth to receive and retain restorations. A constant requirement is provision for prevention of failure of the restoration through recurrence of decay or inadequate resistance to applied stresses. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239-40)Dental Arch: The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.Periodontal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PERIODONTIUM including the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.Gold Colloid: A suspension of metallic gold particles.Hardness: The mechanical property of material that determines its resistance to force. HARDNESS TESTS measure this property.Dental Plaque: A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.Epithelial Attachment: A wedge-shaped collar of epithelial cells which form the attachment of the gingiva to the tooth surface at the base of the gingival crevice.Dental Offices: The room or rooms in which the dentist and dental staff provide care. Offices include all rooms in the dentist's office suite.Osteopontin: A negatively-charged extracellular matrix protein that plays a role in the regulation of BONE metabolism and a variety of other biological functions. Cell signaling by osteopontin may occur through a cell adhesion sequence that recognizes INTEGRIN ALPHA-V BETA-3.Dental Records: Data collected during dental examination for the purpose of study, diagnosis, or treatment planning.Microspectrophotometry: Analytical technique for studying substances present at enzyme concentrations in single cells, in situ, by measuring light absorption. Light from a tungsten strip lamp or xenon arc dispersed by a grating monochromator illuminates the optical system of a microscope. The absorbance of light is measured (in nanometers) by comparing the difference between the image of the sample and a reference image.Dental Staff: Personnel who provide dental service to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.Dental Equipment: The nonexpendable items used by the dentist or dental staff in the performance of professional duties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p106)Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)X-Ray Microtomography: X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.General Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Dental Amalgam: An alloy used in restorative dentistry that contains mercury, silver, tin, copper, and possibly zinc.Alveolar Bone Loss: Resorption or wasting of the tooth-supporting bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS) in the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE.Dentinogenesis: The formation of dentin. Dentin first appears in the layer between the ameloblasts and odontoblasts and becomes calcified immediately. Formation progresses from the tip of the papilla over its slope to form a calcified cap becoming thicker by the apposition of new layers pulpward. A layer of uncalcified dentin intervenes between the calcified tissue and the odontoblast and its processes. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Socket: A hollow part of the alveolar process of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE where each tooth fits and is attached via the periodontal ligament.Dental Occlusion: The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)Amelogenin: A major dental enamel-forming protein found in mammals. In humans the protein is encoded by GENES found on both the X CHROMOSOME and the Y CHROMOSOME.
  • Dental caries and role of fluorides. (edu.sa)
  • Tooth loss due to oral diseases, such as dental caries, periodontal diseases, and traumatic injury, results in a loss of oral function in enunciation, mastication, and occlusion and agitated general health issues .To restore these lost functions, a number of attempts have been made, including artificial material, fixed dental bridges and removable dentures .These conventional dental therapies for tooth loss bring numerous functional difficulties. (oatext.com)
  • Dental caries is one of the most common chronic health conditions in both children and adults. (mhmedical.com)
  • Dental caries stems from an imbalance in saliva defense, microbial load, and lifestyle habits. (mhmedical.com)
  • Dental caries can lead to tooth sensitivity, cause oral pain, and have implications for overall health. (mhmedical.com)
  • The rs17032907 genetic variant and the haplotype (ACA) of CA VI may be associated with dental caries susceptibility. (wikiversity.org)
  • 1. Dental caries. (docplayer.net)
  • 4. dental caries. (docplayer.net)
  • For instance, periodontal disease, which may impair your immune system, and dental caries, have both been linked to specific bacteria. (mercola.com)
  • In practice, the scalar light pathogenic cleanse is capable of disassembling pathogens such as bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoan that have been implicated as the etiological agents of dental caries and gum disease, namely, gingivitis and periodontitis. (scalarlight.com)
  • Succinctly, the scalar light pathogenic cleanse will disassemble and eradicate oral bacteria thereby preventing, curing or palliating dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. (scalarlight.com)
  • Dental caries develop when bacteria combine with food debris and saliva in your mouth in order to produce plaque. (scalarlight.com)
  • As a result, a small hole known as a cavity can develop on the surface of the tooth which is the beginning of dental caries. (scalarlight.com)
  • The scalar light pathogenic cleanse is the remedy for dental caries as well as gingivitis and periodontitis. (scalarlight.com)
  • The scalar energy sessions routinely disassemble and eradicate the bacteria responsible for dental caries and gum disease. (scalarlight.com)
  • In so doing, the scalar light pathogenic cleanse serves to prevent, cure or palliate dental caries as well as gum disease. (scalarlight.com)
  • In consummate fashion, the scalar light pathogenic cleanse will eradicate these pathogens and others thereby preventing, curing or palliating dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. (scalarlight.com)
  • In synopsis, the scalar light pathogenic cleanse as well as the scalar light nutrient program serves to promote dental health, prevent and palliate dental caries and gum disease. (scalarlight.com)
  • The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage exploratory or developmental research on the role of the nervous system in metabolism, homeostasis, and remodeling and/or regeneration of the postnatal dental and craniofacial skeletal system (DCS) in health and disease. (nih.gov)
  • True Regeneration ™ can be obtained despite the presence of periodontal disease - one of the most stubborn, persistent, and widespread infectious diseases according to the Surgeon General and the CDC 2010 NHANES report in the Journal of Dental Research on the prevalence of periodontal disease. (multivu.com)
  • Andrew Sullivan, DDS, Chair of Periodontics at Rutgers, says, "As Chair of the Periodontics Department of Rutgers School of Dental Medicine, I was delighted to learn Millennium has received acknowledgement from the FDA that LANAP can achieve the "Gold Standard" in periodontal therapy - true periodontal regeneration. (multivu.com)
  • HERS-H1 exhibits relevant key molecular characteristics and constitutes a new biological model for basic research on HERS and the dental EMI during root development and regeneration. (edu.au)
  • We believe that the microenvironment plays an essential role in maintaining stem cell populations and directing their migration and differentiation, and that this factor needs to be considered for utilization of stem cell-based therapy for periodontal regeneration and regenerative dental medicine. (springer.com)
  • More recent approaches involve the incorporation of naturally occurring growth factors into the dental transplant site with the aim of enhancing periodontal healing, root formation and pulpal regeneration. (springeropen.com)
  • Immunohistochemical staining showed less localization of matrix proteins such as Bsp, Dmp1, Pstn, and Ank in the cementum, periodontal ligament, and/or cementoblast. (kapd.org)
  • The fact that BSP is specifically localized to the cemental surface suggests that this protein is involved in cementoblast differentiation and/or early mineralization of the cementum matrix. (nih.gov)
  • WNT5a, a ligand that can activate both canonical and non-canonical Wnt pathways [ 10 ], is expressed in the dental epithelium and mesenchyme at early developmental stages of a tooth [ 11 , 12 ]. (medsci.org)
  • In this study, we generated the dental mesenchyme-specific Smoothened (Smo) activated/inactivated mice with the activity of Cre recombinase under the control of osteocalcin promoter. (kapd.org)
  • It's believed that like the development of tooth crown, the formation of R/PT also requires sequential and reciprocal interaction between dental epithelia and mesenchyme mediated by protein messengers known as signaling molecules. (tamhsc.edu)
  • 3,4 The zygote and cells derived from the first two cellular divisions constitute the most primitive cells (totipotent cells) that are capable of forming the embryo and the embryonic annexes (e.g. placenta, amniotic membranes etc). (bvsalud.org)
  • We have for the first time related the known dental anomalies which occur as integral features of HP to the recognized clinical forms of HP. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The modules in week 2 describe basic dental anatomy including embryology of the oral cavity, oral functions, basic tooth structure, and clinical implications of disease. (coursera.org)
  • The cellular composition as it relates to structure, physiology, oral health, and clinical significance will be discussed. (netce.com)
  • clinical record - The patient record that includes all services rendered, treatment notes, treatment correspondence and medical and dental histories. (scribd.com)
  • 2. In dentistry, a nonmetallic material used for luting, filling, or permanent or temporary restorative purposes, made by mixing components into a plastic mass that sets, or as an adherent sealer in attaching various dental restorations in or on the tooth. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The Degree of Bachelor of Dental Surgery (B.D.S.) shall be the primary degree in the Faculty of Dentistry and shall be awarded after a successful completion of the courses of study. (edu.ng)
  • To qualify for the Degree of Bachelor of Dental Surgery, candidates must spend the last three years in the Faculty of Dentistry in line with the regulations made by the Senate of the University of Nigeria regarding inter-university transfers. (edu.ng)
  • As a future dental student, this course taught me the basics and really gave me a broad insight into dentistry. (coursera.org)
  • When the first micron-size dental nanorobots can be constructed, perhaps 10-20 years from today, how might they be applied to dentistry? (rfreitas.com)
  • Here, the application of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and optical interferometry to a range of dentistry issues, including characterization of dental enamel, oral bacteria, biofilms and the role of surface proteins in biochemical and nanomechanical properties of bacterial adhesins, is reviewed. (mdpi.com)
  • Emerging technologies and new nanoscale information have the potential to transform dental practice [ 1 ] by advancing all aspects of dental diagnostics, therapeutics and cosmetic dentistry [ 2 ] into a new paradigm of state-of-the-art patient care beyond traditional oral care methods and procedures. (mdpi.com)
  • There is disclosed in this specification an improved composition for reducing dental plaque and calculus formation, comprising zinc ions and an organoleptically acceptable enzyme, which may be a protease, carbohydrase, or lipase, or mixtures of these enzymes. (google.com)
  • After dental traumas, sequelae (root resorption, root canal obliteration, interruption in root formation, periapical lesion, and damages to permanent tooth buds) may be frequently observed in patient's follow-up appointments 6,7,18 . (bvsalud.org)
  • Enamel matrix proteins provide an initial and essential step in the formation of a cellular cementum. (nii.ac.jp)