Nerve Tissue: Differentiated tissue of the central nervous system composed of NERVE CELLS, fibers, DENDRITES, and specialized supporting cells.Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue: Neoplasms composed of nerve tissue. This concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the nervous system or its component nerves.Portulaca: A plant genus of the family PORTULACACEAE.Nerve Regeneration: Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.Optic Nerve: The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Organic Chemistry Phenomena: The conformation, properties, reaction processes, and the properties of the reactions of carbon compounds.PropaneOptical Imaging: The use of light interaction (scattering, absorption, and fluorescence) with biological tissue to obtain morphologically based information. It includes measuring inherent tissue optical properties such as scattering, absorption, and autofluorescence; or optical properties of exogenous targeted fluorescent molecular probes such as those used in optical MOLECULAR IMAGING, or nontargeted optical CONTRAST AGENTS.Nanofibers: Submicron-sized fibers with diameters typically between 50 and 500 nanometers. The very small dimension of these fibers can generate a high surface area to volume ratio, which makes them potential candidates for various biomedical and other applications.Schwann Cells: Neuroglial cells of the peripheral nervous system which form the insulating myelin sheaths of peripheral axons.Nerve Tissue ProteinsTissue Scaffolds: Cell growth support structures composed of BIOCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS. They are specially designed solid support matrices for cell attachment in TISSUE ENGINEERING and GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION uses.Nerve Fibers: Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Axons: Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Nerve Endings: Branch-like terminations of NERVE FIBERS, sensory or motor NEURONS. Endings of sensory neurons are the beginnings of afferent pathway to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Endings of motor neurons are the terminals of axons at the muscle cells. Nerve endings which release neurotransmitters are called PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS.Sural Nerve: A branch of the tibial nerve which supplies sensory innervation to parts of the lower leg and foot.Median Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the median nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C6 to T1), travel via the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the forearm and hand.Facial Nerve: The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.Nerve Crush: Treatment of muscles and nerves under pressure as a result of crush injuries.Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.Tibial Nerve: The medial terminal branch of the sciatic nerve. The tibial nerve fibers originate in lumbar and sacral spinal segments (L4 to S2). They supply motor and sensory innervation to parts of the calf and foot.Ulnar Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the ulnar nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C7 to T1), travel via the medial cord of the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the hand and forearm.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Femoral Nerve: A nerve originating in the lumbar spinal cord (usually L2 to L4) and traveling through the lumbar plexus to provide motor innervation to extensors of the thigh and sensory innervation to parts of the thigh, lower leg, and foot, and to the hip and knee joints.Spinal Nerves: The 31 paired peripheral nerves formed by the union of the dorsal and ventral spinal roots from each spinal cord segment. The spinal nerve plexuses and the spinal roots are also included.Nerve Growth Factor: NERVE GROWTH FACTOR is the first of a series of neurotrophic factors that were found to influence the growth and differentiation of sympathetic and sensory neurons. It is comprised of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits. The beta subunit is responsible for its growth stimulating activity.Trigeminal Nerve: The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the TRIGEMINAL GANGLION and project to the TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.Nerve Growth Factors: Factors which enhance the growth potentialities of sensory and sympathetic nerve cells.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Phrenic Nerve: The motor nerve of the diaphragm. The phrenic nerve fibers originate in the cervical spinal column (mostly C4) and travel through the cervical plexus to the diaphragm.Radial Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans the fibers of the radial nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C5 to T1), travel via the posterior cord of the brachial plexus, and supply motor innervation to extensor muscles of the arm and cutaneous sensory fibers to extensor regions of the arm and hand.Cranial Nerves: Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Spinal Nerve Roots: Paired bundles of NERVE FIBERS entering and leaving the SPINAL CORD at each segment. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots join to form the mixed segmental spinal nerves. The dorsal roots are generally afferent, formed by the central projections of the spinal (dorsal root) ganglia sensory cells, and the ventral roots are efferent, comprising the axons of spinal motor and PREGANGLIONIC AUTONOMIC FIBERS.Nerve Compression Syndromes: Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.Ophthalmic Nerve: A sensory branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The ophthalmic nerve carries general afferents from the superficial division of the face including the eyeball, conjunctiva, upper eyelid, upper nose, nasal mucosa, and scalp.Mandibular Nerve: A branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The mandibular nerve carries motor fibers to the muscles of mastication and sensory fibers to the teeth and gingivae, the face in the region of the mandible, and parts of the dura.Cochlear Nerve: The cochlear part of the 8th cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE). The cochlear nerve fibers originate from neurons of the SPIRAL GANGLION and project peripherally to cochlear hair cells and centrally to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS) of the BRAIN STEM. They mediate the sense of hearing.Splanchnic Nerves: The major nerves supplying sympathetic innervation to the abdomen. The greater, lesser, and lowest (or smallest) splanchnic nerves are formed by preganglionic fibers from the spinal cord which pass through the paravertebral ganglia and then to the celiac ganglia and plexuses. The lumbar splanchnic nerves carry fibers which pass through the lumbar paravertebral ganglia to the mesenteric and hypogastric ganglia.Glossopharyngeal Nerve: The 9th cranial nerve. The glossopharyngeal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve; it conveys somatic and autonomic efferents as well as general, special, and visceral afferents. Among the connections are motor fibers to the stylopharyngeus muscle, parasympathetic fibers to the parotid glands, general and taste afferents from the posterior third of the tongue, the nasopharynx, and the palate, and afferents from baroreceptors and CHEMORECEPTOR CELLS of the carotid sinus.Neural Conduction: The propagation of the NERVE IMPULSE along the nerve away from the site of an excitation stimulus.Optic Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the optic nerve induced by a trauma to the face or head. These may occur with closed or penetrating injuries. Relatively minor compression of the superior aspect of orbit may also result in trauma to the optic nerve. Clinical manifestations may include visual loss, PAPILLEDEMA, and an afferent pupillary defect.Optic Nerve Diseases: Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second cranial or optic nerve, which is generally considered a component of the central nervous system. Damage to optic nerve fibers may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, or lateral geniculate nuclei. Clinical manifestations may include decreased visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, impaired color vision, and an afferent pupillary defect.Thoracic Nerves: The twelve spinal nerves on each side of the thorax. They include eleven INTERCOSTAL NERVES and one subcostal nerve. Both sensory and motor, they supply the muscles and skin of the thoracic and abdominal walls.Nerve Fibers, Myelinated: A class of nerve fibers as defined by their structure, specifically the nerve sheath arrangement. The AXONS of the myelinated nerve fibers are completely encased in a MYELIN SHEATH. They are fibers of relatively large and varied diameters. Their NEURAL CONDUCTION rates are faster than those of the unmyelinated nerve fibers (NERVE FIBERS, UNMYELINATED). Myelinated nerve fibers are present in somatic and autonomic nerves.Accessory Nerve: The 11th cranial nerve which originates from NEURONS in the MEDULLA and in the CERVICAL SPINAL CORD. It has a cranial root, which joins the VAGUS NERVE (10th cranial) and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the LARYNX, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the TRAPEZIUS and the sternocleidomastoid muscles.Facial Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the facial nerve. This may result in FACIAL PARALYSIS, decreased lacrimation and salivation, and loss of taste sensation in the anterior tongue. The nerve may regenerate and reform its original pattern of innervation, or regenerate aberrantly, resulting in inappropriate lacrimation in response to gustatory stimuli (e.g., "crocodile tears") and other syndromes.Abducens Nerve: The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.Oculomotor Nerve: The 3d cranial nerve. The oculomotor nerve sends motor fibers to the levator muscles of the eyelid and to the superior rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles of the eye. It also sends parasympathetic efferents (via the ciliary ganglion) to the muscles controlling pupillary constriction and accommodation. The motor fibers originate in the oculomotor nuclei of the midbrain.Sympathetic Nervous System: The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.Cranial Nerve Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.Facial Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.
  • Optic nerve sheath diameter ultrasonography is strongly correlated with invasive ICP measurements and may serve as a sensitive and noninvasive method for detecting elevated ICP in TBI patients after decompressive craniectomy 1) . (neurosurgery.directory)
  • Optic nerve sheath diameter measured by transorbital ultrasound imaging is an accurate method for detecting intracranial hypertension that can be applied in a broad range of settings. (neurosurgery.directory)
  • 7.5 MHz ) linear probes with improved spatial resolution have enabled excellent views of the optic nerve sheath . (neurosurgery.directory)
  • The optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD), measured at a fixed distance behind the retina has been evaluated to diagnose and measure intracranial hypertension in traumatic brain injury and intracranial hemorrhage 3) 4) . (neurosurgery.directory)
  • The optic nerve sheath is fairly easy to visualize by ultrasonography by insonation across the orbit in the axial plane. (neurosurgery.directory)
  • Padayachy et al present a method for assessment of optic nerve sheath ONS pulsatile dynamics using transorbital ultrasound imaging . (neurosurgery.directory)
  • Of the studied ultrasound noninvasive intracranial pressure monitoring , optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD), is the best estimator of ICP . (neurosurgery.directory)
  • The novel combination of optic nerve sheath diameter ultrasonography and venous transcranial Doppler (vTCD) of the straight sinus is a promising and easily available technique for identifying critically ill patients with intracranial hypertension 10) . (neurosurgery.directory)
  • Correlations between ICP and Optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) using CT and MRI have been observed in adult populations. (neurosurgery.directory)
  • Intracranial pressure (ICP) can be noninvasively estimated from the sonographic measurement of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) and from the transcranial Doppler analysis of the pulsatility (ICPPI) and the diastolic component (ICPFVd) of the velocity waveform 14) . (neurosurgery.directory)
  • This is most likely due to an impaired retraction capability of the optic nerve sheath. (neurosurgery.directory)
  • Old human cells return to a more youthful and vigorous state after being induced to briefly express a panel of proteins involved in embryonic development, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (news-medical.net)
  • Neuromodulator-mediated phosphorylation of specific proteins in a neurotumor hybrid cell line (NCB-20). (curehunter.com)
  • This suggests that in NCB-20 cells, several unique proteins can be phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase in response to hormonal elevation of cyclic AMP levels. (curehunter.com)
  • Proteins are the molecular building blocks and engines of the cell, and are involved in practically all life processes. (mpg.de)
  • Composed of a limited number of proteins and often organized according to geometric principles, viral particles are effective devices in the transfer of the viral genome and proteins to host cells. (mpg.de)
  • Axonal injury in the optic nerve is associated with retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration and irreversible loss of vision. (frontiersin.org)
  • Researchers at the University of Zurich show that different stem cell populations are innervated in distinct ways. (innovations-report.com)
  • In the second study, the researchers examined the interaction between nerves and cancer stem cells found in ameloblastoma, an aggressive tumour of the mouth. (innovations-report.com)
  • In 2011 researchers at the same center announced that they had grown intestinal tissue-but it was missing nerve cells and so was unable to contract in the undulating motion that pushes food along a colon. (georgetown.edu)
  • Eventually, the researchers hope to treat people with gastrointestinal problems by making copies of a patient's gut to observe how a disease manifests-or even to transplant the tissue. (georgetown.edu)
  • First Person is a series of interviews with the first authors of a selection of papers published in Journal of Cell Science, helping early-career researchers promote themselves alongside their papers. (biologists.org)
  • The current challenge for researchers is to develop a biomimetic scaffold that is capable of stimulating the re-growth of the native tissue, thus structurally mimicking the extracellular matrix (ECM), providing chemical guidance cues and mechanical support for re-enervation of the damaged region. (nus.edu.sg)
  • A team of researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine developed a method to grow and maintain olfactory stem cells in culture, which can then be used to restore tissue in the nose. (scienceandtechnologyresearchnews.com)
  • In this study, the researchers determined the optimal conditions for expanding and maintaining healthy HBC stem cells in culture, borrowing methods and factors used to maintain respiratory stem cells. (scienceandtechnologyresearchnews.com)
  • The stem cells offer another potential alternative to embryonic stem cells for researchers who aim to treat diseases such as diabetes and Parkinson's by replacing damaged or malfunctioning cells with custom-grown replacements. (latimes.com)
  • Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have created a new, rubber-like material with a unique set of properties, which could act as a replacement for human tissue in medical procedures. (news-medical.net)
  • Researchers are using the tissue, synthesized with human pluripotent stem cells and implanted into mice, to study a rare form of Hirschprung's disease. (the-scientist.com)
  • Using genes inserted into two types of human cells, fibroblasts and glia cells, researchers showed that it is possible to reprogram other cells to become nerve cells directly in the brain. (scitechdaily.com)
  • A new report from researchers at Lund University in Sweden shows that it is possible to reprogram other cells to become nerve cells, directly in the brain. (scitechdaily.com)
  • Two years ago, researchers in Lund were the first in the world to reprogram human skin cells, known as fibroblasts, to dopamine-producing nerve cells - without taking a detour via the stem cell stage. (scitechdaily.com)
  • Once the researchers had transplanted the cells into the brains of rats, the genes were activated using a drug in the animals' drinking water. (scitechdaily.com)
  • The Stowers researchers derived mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells from animals that lacked the gene encoding the ARPC3 subunit of the Arp2/3 complex and normal control mice and differentiated them into fibroblasts. (redorbit.com)
  • To find out whether the inability to form lamellipodia impacted cells' ability to move, the researchers used a wound healing-assay to test cell motility. (redorbit.com)
  • The researchers also want to find out what the actual protein composition of the cell looks like and how complete biological systems function. (mpg.de)
  • Researchers of the MPI for Molecular Biomedicine in Münster have made an important advancement towards obtaining patient-specific stem cells. (mpg.de)
  • A team of researchers spoke to News-Medical about their latest research investigating whether micro and nanoplastics are accumulating in human tissues. (news-medical.net)
  • Now, however, a team of researchers from a range of disciplines in the University - from engineering to biology - have discovered a novel, electronically-controlled method of generating dynamic cell patterns using a portable device based on acoustic force for spatial manipulation of cells and particles. (phys.org)
  • Dr Mathis Riehle, a reader in the Institute of Molecular Cell and Systems Biology, said the researchers' ambition was to turn what is currently a two-dimensional application into one that is three-dimensional. (phys.org)
  • In this review, we discuss the different stem cell types that are showing promise for nervous system tissue engineering in the context of peripheral nerve injury. (hindawi.com)
  • When ameloblastoma cells were isolated and placed in the "organ-on-a-chip" devices, they retained not only their stem cell properties but also attracted nerves and established contact with them. (innovations-report.com)
  • Published today in the journal Stem Cell Reports , the development paves the way for further research into stem cell transplantation therapies, or pharmacological approaches that stimulate stem cells within the nose to regenerate tissue. (scienceandtechnologyresearchnews.com)
  • The trigger used was retinoic acid, which has the effect of lowering levels of the protein P63 in the cells, leading to stem cell activation. (scienceandtechnologyresearchnews.com)
  • Experiments in mice suggested that reproductive cells -- also known as germ cells -- were good candidates for making stem cells because they naturally express low levels of the "pluripotency" genes that make embryonic stem cells so versatile, said Renee A. Reijo Pera, director of the Center for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research and Education at Stanford University, who was not involved in the study. (latimes.com)
  • This would be a great way to produce pluripotent stem cells," said Kathrin Plath, a researcher at the Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA, who was not involved in the study. (latimes.com)
  • The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of reduced-intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation (RIST) with RIC regimen in children with neuroblastoma who have failed a prior autologous stem cell transplantation. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Therefore, a strategy using high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) has been explored to improve the prognosis of patients with high-risk NB. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In this context, allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has been tried as salvage treatment in patients with NB who have failed a prior auto-SCT. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • High-dose chemotherapy and radiation therapy with stem cell rescue. (medlineplus.gov)
  • So your child will get a stem cell transplant , usually of his or her own cells collected earlier. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The ability to regenerate whole-body structures has been studied for many decades and is of particular interest for stem cell research due to its therapeutic potential. (frontiersin.org)
  • A stem-cell matrix can repair brain damage in rodents. (technologyreview.com)
  • Correlation of HIWI and HILI Expression with Cancer Stem Cell Markers in Colorectal Cancer. (cancerindex.org)
  • Side effects can happen any time during, immediately after or days to months after stem cell transplant. (cancer.ca)
  • Short-term, or acute, side effects generally develop during the first 100 days after a stem cell transplant. (cancer.ca)
  • A stem cell transplant is a very complex procedure. (cancer.ca)
  • Side effects of stem cell transplant can be very serious or even life-threatening. (cancer.ca)
  • The healthcare team watches people receiving a stem cell transplant very closely. (cancer.ca)
  • All types of stem cell transplants share some of the same side effects. (cancer.ca)
  • Other side effects are unique to high-dose therapy and stem cell transplant. (cancer.ca)
  • The following are the most common side effects that people tend to experience with stem cell transplant. (cancer.ca)
  • Tell your healthcare team if you have these side effects or others you think might be from stem cell transplant. (cancer.ca)
  • Infection is one of the most common early side effects of a stem cell transplant. (cancer.ca)
  • Infection occurs after stem cell transplant because the white blood cell count is very low and the immune system is very weak. (cancer.ca)
  • People who have a stem cell transplant need to take special precautions until their white blood cell counts are back to normal and their bodies can fight infections. (cancer.ca)
  • Many people who receive a stem cell transplant have to follow dietary restrictions and food safety guidelines. (cancer.ca)
  • Doctors may also prescribe colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), such as filgrastim (Neupogen) or pegfilgrastim (Neulasta), following a stem cell transplant to help lower the risk of infection and speed up engraftment. (cancer.ca)
  • Infection can also occur long after a stem cell transplant. (cancer.ca)
  • This could make future stem cell therapies simpler and safer. (mpg.de)
  • A PML-PPAR-δ pathway for fatty acid oxidation regulates hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. (yu.edu)
  • To kick off the 2018 Till & McCulloch Meetings in style, the Stem Cell Network and CCRM will be hosting a welcome reception on the evening of Sunday November 11. (cvent.com)
  • Once we determined that we could grow HBCs in the lab, and that they expressed the same identifying molecular markers found in vivo, we sought to confirm whether they would work as well as the in vivo HBCs - can they regenerate tissue that has been injured - and they did! (scienceandtechnologyresearchnews.com)
  • The aim of this area is to prepare a lung-on-a-chip for the development of novel strategies to regenerate damaged lung tissue. (utwente.nl)
  • Marian Blanca Ramírez from the CSIC in Spain has been studying the effects of LRRK2, a protein associated with Parkinson's disease, on cell motility. (biologists.org)
  • Immunofluorescence revealed that this protein is a useful oligodendrocyte cell-type marker in rodent and primate ONs. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The so-called germline stem cells grew nearly as fast as embryonic stem cells and produced many of the specialized protein markers associated with embryonic stem cells. (latimes.com)
  • Unlike other members of the family, the protein encoded by this gene does not directly control cell cycle regulation. (cancerindex.org)
  • The encoded protein contains a high mobility group-box DNA binding domain and participates in the regulation of cell cycle genes and cellular senescence. (cancerindex.org)
  • Dead and dying nerve cells contain tangles, which are made up of twisted strands of another protein. (alz.org)
  • In this study, we analyzed the prognostic value of epithelial membrane protein 3 (EMP3) in terms of overall survival (OS) in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and the association between its expression and DNA methylation.Bioinformatic analysis was performed by using data from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database.EMP3 expression was markedly higher in GBM tissues than in normal brain tissues. (bireme.br)
  • The Interleukin (IL) -1 (IL-1), IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a), protein C-reactive (CRP) and white blood cells count were measured at rest, immediately post-exercise, and at 24, 48, 72, 96 h in post-exercise recovery. (slideshare.net)
  • D-Ala2,D-Leu enkephalin , which decreased cyclic AMP levels and reversed the 2-chloroadenosine-stimulated phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase in differentiated PC12 cells, also reversed the stimulation of phosphorylation of the 90-kDa protein in NCB-20 cells. (curehunter.com)
  • These products of cell metabolism are primarily nitrogenous substances derived from protein, especially ammonia, or possibly certain short-chain fatty acids. (britannica.com)
  • Our findings open up the possibility of anti-inflammatory drugs that are more tissue-specific and don't have NSAIDs' side effects," said the study's senior author Benjamin F. Cravatt, chair of the Department of Chemical Physiology and member of the Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology and the Dorris Neuroscience Center at Scripps Research. (healthcanal.com)
  • Anatomy and Physiology Microscope Slide Set for biology and life science illustrates the fascinating diversity and specialization of tissues which comprise the various organ systems of the mammalian body. (flinnsci.com)
  • They are theoretically superior to traditional embryonic stem cells because they can be obtained directly from male patients and used to grow replacement tissue that their bodies won't reject, Sabine Conrad of the University of Tuebingen in Germany and her colleagues wrote. (latimes.com)
  • After about three weeks, some of the cells formed colonies resembling embryonic stem cells, the team reported. (latimes.com)
  • Reijo Pera said germline stem cells do not have a completely blank slate like embryonic stem cells or the reprogrammed skin cells known as induced pluripotent stem cells. (latimes.com)
  • Therapy based on embryonic stem cells improved patients. (latimes.com)
  • Our study is the first one to use knock-out mice and differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells to dissect the function of Arp2/3 in fibroblast cell motility," says postdoctoral researcher and lead author Praveen Suraneni, Ph.D. Fibroblasts are very mobile and have become the standard model to study cell motility. (redorbit.com)
  • Li and her team are now planning to look at different cell types derived from ARPC+/+ and ARPC-/- mouse embryonic stem cells. (redorbit.com)
  • They have succeeded in resetting adult somatic cells to an embryonic original state with less intrusions than previously necessary: instead of a „cocktail" of four genes, the scientists needed merely two. (mpg.de)
  • These amino acids are required for tissue building and repair, playing an important role in immune function, taking part in various biochemical reactions and are vital for metabolism. (hindustantimes.com)
  • Their study provides new insight into cell motility, a complex and integrated process, which, when gone awry, can lead to various disease conditions such as cancer metastasis, birth defects, cardiovascular disease and compromised immune function. (redorbit.com)
  • B cells are important in helping the immune system fight pathogens. (news-medical.net)
  • The fight against illnesses and pathogens requires activation or deactivation of a large number of different cell types in our immune system at the right place and the right time. (news-medical.net)
  • In recent years certain immune cells, the myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), have been receiving increasing attention in this context. (news-medical.net)
  • B cells can develop into cells which produce antibodies, but they can also activate other immune cells by secreting immune messengers. (news-medical.net)
  • or, B cells activate immune cells in the blood and lymph systems which then move to the meninges, where they cause damage. (news-medical.net)
  • We are now accepting submissions for our upcoming special issue on 'Reconstituting cell biology', guest edited by Manuel Théry. (biologists.org)
  • tissue, in biology, aggregation of cells that are similar in form and function and the intercellular substances produced by them. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Nerves are fundamental for regulating the physiological and regenerative processes involving stem cells. (innovations-report.com)
  • The nerves that confer the sense of smell are unique when compared to the rest of the nervous system, in that they can trigger a robust and nearly complete regenerative response after injury. (scienceandtechnologyresearchnews.com)
  • In the current study, we investigated the signal propagation in single intraretinal axons as well as characteristic activity features of RGCs in a naive, a degenerative or a regenerative state in ex vivo retinae 1 week after either optic nerve cut alone (ONC) or additional IS (ONC + IS). (frontiersin.org)
  • It remains unclear whether the reported changes are a consequence of decreased cell density or arise at single-cell level which would be necessary to investigate the health status of surviving RGCs or susceptibility to regenerative treatments after optic nerve cut. (frontiersin.org)
  • Trainees and HQP interested in connecting with experts and leaders the field of stem cells and regenerative medicine should gather in the Governor General III Room for this valuable networking and career building event. (cvent.com)
  • A majority of progenitor cells migrated through dorsal white matter without proliferation during the period of one week after transplantation. (nii.ac.jp)
  • In this study, we examined apoptosis, proliferation, migration, and survival of newborn cells in the young (2 weeks), young-adult (6 weeks), middle-aged (12 months), and old (24 months) rat DG. (nih.gov)
  • We show that new cell proliferation and apoptosis slow down profoundly over this time period. (nih.gov)
  • The main focus of this area is to understand and improve the adhesion and proliferation of endothelial cells on natural and artificial surfaces. (utwente.nl)
  • Being able to carry out the reprogramming in vivo makes it possible to imagine a future in which we form new cells directly in the human brain, without taking a detour via cell cultures and transplants", concluded Malin Parmar. (scitechdaily.com)
  • Cartilage is a stiff yet flexible connective tissue found in many areas in the bodies of humans and other animals, including the joints between bones, the rib cage, the ear, the nose, the elbow, the knee, the ankle, the bronchial tubes and the intervertebral discs. (news-medical.net)
  • We conclude that the new cDNA library is a faithful representation of human ON and EST data provide an initial overview of gene expression patterns in this tissue. (biomedcentral.com)
  • While many cDNA libraries are normalized (a subtraction hybridization approach to reduce the representation of abundant clones) or amplified (an expansion in which different clones proliferate at different rates), most NEIBank libraries are unnormalized and unamplified so that random sequencing for EST analysis reflects more closely the natural abundance of common gene transcripts in each tissue. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Single-cell sequencing reveals dissociation-induced gene expression in tissue subpopulations. (nature.com)
  • Moreover, the description of the stomach as the major source of the novel anorexigenic hormone nesfatin-1 derived from the NUCB2 gene further corroborated the assumption that the gastric X/A-like cell products are not only stimulant but also inhibitors of feeding, thereby acting as so far unique dual regulator of food intake located in a logistically important place where the gastrointestinal tract has initial contact with food. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The mutation in the gene means that the nerve tissue is not properly controlled. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This gene encodes a member of the T cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor family of transcription factors. (cancerindex.org)
  • In primary nasal epithelial cells transfected with the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene, knockdown of p63 by siRNAs induced claudin-4 expression. (bireme.br)
  • Claudin-4 knockout by TALEN-mediated gene targeting in MDCK cells: Claudin-4 is dispensable for the permeability properties of tight junctions in wild-type MDCK cells. (bireme.br)
  • The ON consists of the myelinated axons of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), their supporting glia, oligodendrocytes and vascular elements, all enclosed by a fibrous sheath. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The genes were inserted into two types of human cells: fibroblasts and glia cells - support cells that are naturally present in the brain. (scitechdaily.com)
  • In a separate experiment on mice, where similar genes were injected into the mice's brains, the research group also succeeded in reprogramming the mice's own glia cells to become nerve cells. (scitechdaily.com)
  • Hydroxyurea and a cGMP-amplifying agent have immediate benefits on acute vaso-occlusive events in sickle cell disease mice. (yu.edu)
  • Apoptosis * ('programmed cell death') is a biologically ubiquitous phenomenon that deserves to be much more widely known among non-biologists and laypeople. (creation.com)
  • However, stem cells are also present in cancerous tissues and are involved in cancer progression and metastasis. (innovations-report.com)
  • The expression level of HIWI and HILI and cancer stem cells markers in paired cancerous and non-cancerous tissues was measured by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. (cancerindex.org)
  • A non-cancerous (benign) soft tissue tumour is a growth that does not spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. (cancer.ca)
  • There are many types of non-cancerous soft tissue tumours. (cancer.ca)
  • Many non-cancerous soft tissue tumours start in the fat tissue of the body including the following. (cancer.ca)
  • Lipoma is the most common type of non-cancerous soft tissue tumour. (cancer.ca)
  • Different non-cancerous tumours can develop in fibrous tissues. (cancer.ca)
  • Superficial fibromatosis is when small non-cancerous tumours develop in the tissues of the hands, feet or penis. (cancer.ca)
  • Desmoid-type fibromatosis is a soft tissue tumour that is usually non-cancerous. (cancer.ca)
  • A benign (non-cancerous) brain tumour is a mass of cells that grows relatively slowly in the brain. (www.nhs.uk)
  • There are many different types of non-cancerous brain tumours, which are related to the type of brain cells affected. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis of cDNA libraries can provide an informative overview of major transcripts in specific tissues. (biomedcentral.com)