Nerve Tissue: Differentiated tissue of the central nervous system composed of NERVE CELLS, fibers, DENDRITES, and specialized supporting cells.Neoplasms, Plasma Cell: Neoplasms associated with a proliferation of a single clone of PLASMA CELLS and characterized by the secretion of PARAPROTEINS.Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Adenoma, Oxyphilic: A usually benign glandular tumor composed of oxyphil cells, large cells with small irregular nuclei and dense acidophilic granules due to the presence of abundant MITOCHONDRIA. Oxyphil cells, also known as oncocytes, are found in oncocytomas of the kidney, salivary glands, and endocrine glands. In the thyroid gland, oxyphil cells are known as Hurthle cells and Askanazy cells.Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.Histiocytic Disorders, Malignant: Distinctive neoplastic disorders of histiocytes. Included are malignant neoplasms of MACROPHAGES and DENDRITIC CELLS.Perivascular Epithelioid Cell Neoplasms: A family of mesenchymal tumors composed of histologically and immunohistochemically distinctive perivascular epithelioid cells. These cells do not have a normal anatomic homolog. (From Fletcher CDM, et. al., World Health Organization Classification of Tumors: Pathology and Genetics of Tumors of Soft Tissue and Bone, 2002).Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue: Neoplasms composed of nerve tissue. This concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the nervous system or its component nerves.Plasmacytoma: Any discrete, presumably solitary, mass of neoplastic PLASMA CELLS either in BONE MARROW or various extramedullary sites.Portulaca: A plant genus of the family PORTULACACEAE.Nerve Regeneration: Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.Optic Nerve: The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Organic Chemistry Phenomena: The conformation, properties, reaction processes, and the properties of the reactions of carbon compounds.PropaneOptical Imaging: The use of light interaction (scattering, absorption, and fluorescence) with biological tissue to obtain morphologically based information. It includes measuring inherent tissue optical properties such as scattering, absorption, and autofluorescence; or optical properties of exogenous targeted fluorescent molecular probes such as those used in optical MOLECULAR IMAGING, or nontargeted optical CONTRAST AGENTS.Nanofibers: Submicron-sized fibers with diameters typically between 50 and 500 nanometers. The very small dimension of these fibers can generate a high surface area to volume ratio, which makes them potential candidates for various biomedical and other applications.Schwann Cells: Neuroglial cells of the peripheral nervous system which form the insulating myelin sheaths of peripheral axons.Nerve Tissue ProteinsHistiocytic Sarcoma: Malignant neoplasms composed of MACROPHAGES or DENDRITIC CELLS. Most histiocytic sarcomas present as localized tumor masses without a leukemic phase. Though the biological behavior of these neoplasms resemble lymphomas, their cell lineage is histiocytic not lymphoid.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Myofibroma: A benign tumor that consists chiefly of fibrous CONNECTIVE TISSUE, with variable numbers of MUSCLE CELLS forming portions of the neoplasm (From Stedman's, 27th ed).Nose Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the NOSE.Tissue Scaffolds: Cell growth support structures composed of BIOCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS. They are specially designed solid support matrices for cell attachment in TISSUE ENGINEERING and GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION uses.Thyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.Nerve Fibers: Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Testicular Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the TESTIS. Germ cell tumors (GERMINOMA) of the testis constitute 95% of all testicular neoplasms.Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal: Neoplasms composed of primordial GERM CELLS of embryonic GONADS or of elements of the germ layers of the EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the gonads or present in an embryo or FETUS.APUD Cells: Cells with the capacity to take up and decarboxylate the amine precursors DIHYDROXYPHENYLALANINE or 5-HYDROXYTRYPTOPHAN. This is a property of endocrine cells of neural and non-neural origin. APUDOMA is a general term collectively applied to tumors associated with APUD cells.Leukemia: A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)Axons: Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Thyroidectomy: Surgical removal of the thyroid gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)Kidney Neoplasms: Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.S100 Proteins: A family of highly acidic calcium-binding proteins found in large concentration in the brain and believed to be glial in origin. They are also found in other organs in the body. They have in common the EF-hand motif (EF HAND MOTIFS) found on a number of calcium binding proteins. The name of this family derives from the property of being soluble in a 100% saturated ammonium sulfate solution.Multiple Myeloma: A malignancy of mature PLASMA CELLS engaging in monoclonal immunoglobulin production. It is characterized by hyperglobulinemia, excess Bence-Jones proteins (free monoclonal IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) in the urine, skeletal destruction, bone pain, and fractures. Other features include ANEMIA; HYPERCALCEMIA; and RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Hematologic Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.Lymphoma, T-Cell: A group of heterogeneous lymphoid tumors representing malignant transformations of T-lymphocytes.Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Nerve Endings: Branch-like terminations of NERVE FIBERS, sensory or motor NEURONS. Endings of sensory neurons are the beginnings of afferent pathway to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Endings of motor neurons are the terminals of axons at the muscle cells. Nerve endings which release neurotransmitters are called PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS.Neoplasms, Basal Cell: Neoplasms composed of cells from the deepest layer of the epidermis. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the stratum basale.Sural Nerve: A branch of the tibial nerve which supplies sensory innervation to parts of the lower leg and foot.Median Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the median nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C6 to T1), travel via the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the forearm and hand.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Facial Nerve: The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.Nerve Crush: Treatment of muscles and nerves under pressure as a result of crush injuries.Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.Lymphoma, B-Cell: A group of heterogeneous lymphoid tumors generally expressing one or more B-cell antigens or representing malignant transformations of B-lymphocytes.Plasma Cells: Specialized forms of antibody-producing B-LYMPHOCYTES. They synthesize and secrete immunoglobulin. They are found only in lymphoid organs and at sites of immune responses and normally do not circulate in the blood or lymph. (Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989, p169 & Abbas et al., Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 2d ed, p20)Tibial Nerve: The medial terminal branch of the sciatic nerve. The tibial nerve fibers originate in lumbar and sacral spinal segments (L4 to S2). They supply motor and sensory innervation to parts of the calf and foot.Ulnar Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the ulnar nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C7 to T1), travel via the medial cord of the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the hand and forearm.Sarcoma: A connective tissue neoplasm formed by proliferation of mesodermal cells; it is usually highly malignant.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Biopsy, Fine-Needle: Using fine needles (finer than 22-gauge) to remove tissue or fluid specimens from the living body for examination in the pathology laboratory and for disease diagnosis.Dendritic Cells: Specialized cells of the hematopoietic system that have branch-like extensions. They are found throughout the lymphatic system, and in non-lymphoid tissues such as SKIN and the epithelia of the intestinal, respiratory, and reproductive tracts. They trap and process ANTIGENS, and present them to T-CELLS, thereby stimulating CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY. They are different from the non-hematopoietic FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS, which have a similar morphology and immune system function, but with respect to humoral immunity (ANTIBODY PRODUCTION).Femoral Nerve: A nerve originating in the lumbar spinal cord (usually L2 to L4) and traveling through the lumbar plexus to provide motor innervation to extensors of the thigh and sensory innervation to parts of the thigh, lower leg, and foot, and to the hip and knee joints.Spinal Nerves: The 31 paired peripheral nerves formed by the union of the dorsal and ventral spinal roots from each spinal cord segment. The spinal nerve plexuses and the spinal roots are also included.Leukemia, Lymphoid: Leukemia associated with HYPERPLASIA of the lymphoid tissues and increased numbers of circulating malignant LYMPHOCYTES and lymphoblasts.B-Lymphocytes: Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous: Neoplasms containing cyst-like formations or producing mucin or serum.Nerve Growth Factor: NERVE GROWTH FACTOR is the first of a series of neurotrophic factors that were found to influence the growth and differentiation of sympathetic and sensory neurons. It is comprised of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits. The beta subunit is responsible for its growth stimulating activity.Immunophenotyping: Process of classifying cells of the immune system based on structural and functional differences. The process is commonly used to analyze and sort T-lymphocytes into subsets based on CD antigens by the technique of flow cytometry.Trigeminal Nerve: The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the TRIGEMINAL GANGLION and project to the TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.Nerve Growth Factors: Factors which enhance the growth potentialities of sensory and sympathetic nerve cells.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Phrenic Nerve: The motor nerve of the diaphragm. The phrenic nerve fibers originate in the cervical spinal column (mostly C4) and travel through the cervical plexus to the diaphragm.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Radial Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans the fibers of the radial nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C5 to T1), travel via the posterior cord of the brachial plexus, and supply motor innervation to extensor muscles of the arm and cutaneous sensory fibers to extensor regions of the arm and hand.Cranial Nerves: Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.Spinal Nerve Roots: Paired bundles of NERVE FIBERS entering and leaving the SPINAL CORD at each segment. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots join to form the mixed segmental spinal nerves. The dorsal roots are generally afferent, formed by the central projections of the spinal (dorsal root) ganglia sensory cells, and the ventral roots are efferent, comprising the axons of spinal motor and PREGANGLIONIC AUTONOMIC FIBERS.Nerve Compression Syndromes: Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.Ophthalmic Nerve: A sensory branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The ophthalmic nerve carries general afferents from the superficial division of the face including the eyeball, conjunctiva, upper eyelid, upper nose, nasal mucosa, and scalp.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Mandibular Nerve: A branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The mandibular nerve carries motor fibers to the muscles of mastication and sensory fibers to the teeth and gingivae, the face in the region of the mandible, and parts of the dura.Neoplasms, Multiple Primary: Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.Neoplasms, Squamous Cell: Neoplasms of the SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in tissue composed of squamous elements.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Cochlear Nerve: The cochlear part of the 8th cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE). The cochlear nerve fibers originate from neurons of the SPIRAL GANGLION and project peripherally to cochlear hair cells and centrally to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS) of the BRAIN STEM. They mediate the sense of hearing.Splanchnic Nerves: The major nerves supplying sympathetic innervation to the abdomen. The greater, lesser, and lowest (or smallest) splanchnic nerves are formed by preganglionic fibers from the spinal cord which pass through the paravertebral ganglia and then to the celiac ganglia and plexuses. The lumbar splanchnic nerves carry fibers which pass through the lumbar paravertebral ganglia to the mesenteric and hypogastric ganglia.Glossopharyngeal Nerve: The 9th cranial nerve. The glossopharyngeal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve; it conveys somatic and autonomic efferents as well as general, special, and visceral afferents. Among the connections are motor fibers to the stylopharyngeus muscle, parasympathetic fibers to the parotid glands, general and taste afferents from the posterior third of the tongue, the nasopharynx, and the palate, and afferents from baroreceptors and CHEMORECEPTOR CELLS of the carotid sinus.Neoplasms, Second Primary: Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Neural Conduction: The propagation of the NERVE IMPULSE along the nerve away from the site of an excitation stimulus.Optic Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the optic nerve induced by a trauma to the face or head. These may occur with closed or penetrating injuries. Relatively minor compression of the superior aspect of orbit may also result in trauma to the optic nerve. Clinical manifestations may include visual loss, PAPILLEDEMA, and an afferent pupillary defect.Cranial Nerve Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.Optic Nerve Diseases: Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second cranial or optic nerve, which is generally considered a component of the central nervous system. Damage to optic nerve fibers may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, or lateral geniculate nuclei. Clinical manifestations may include decreased visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, impaired color vision, and an afferent pupillary defect.Thoracic Nerves: The twelve spinal nerves on each side of the thorax. They include eleven INTERCOSTAL NERVES and one subcostal nerve. Both sensory and motor, they supply the muscles and skin of the thoracic and abdominal walls.Nerve Fibers, Myelinated: A class of nerve fibers as defined by their structure, specifically the nerve sheath arrangement. The AXONS of the myelinated nerve fibers are completely encased in a MYELIN SHEATH. They are fibers of relatively large and varied diameters. Their NEURAL CONDUCTION rates are faster than those of the unmyelinated nerve fibers (NERVE FIBERS, UNMYELINATED). Myelinated nerve fibers are present in somatic and autonomic nerves.Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous: An adenocarcinoma producing mucin in significant amounts. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Accessory Nerve: The 11th cranial nerve which originates from NEURONS in the MEDULLA and in the CERVICAL SPINAL CORD. It has a cranial root, which joins the VAGUS NERVE (10th cranial) and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the LARYNX, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the TRAPEZIUS and the sternocleidomastoid muscles.Myeloproliferative Disorders: Conditions which cause proliferation of hemopoietically active tissue or of tissue which has embryonic hemopoietic potential. They all involve dysregulation of multipotent MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS, most often caused by a mutation in the JAK2 PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASE.Nerve Sheath Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from nerve sheaths formed by SCHWANN CELLS in the PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM or by OLIGODENDROCYTES in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, NEUROFIBROMA, and NEURILEMMOMA are relatively common tumors in this category.Facial Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the facial nerve. This may result in FACIAL PARALYSIS, decreased lacrimation and salivation, and loss of taste sensation in the anterior tongue. The nerve may regenerate and reform its original pattern of innervation, or regenerate aberrantly, resulting in inappropriate lacrimation in response to gustatory stimuli (e.g., "crocodile tears") and other syndromes.Parotid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.Abducens Nerve: The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.Oculomotor Nerve: The 3d cranial nerve. The oculomotor nerve sends motor fibers to the levator muscles of the eyelid and to the superior rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles of the eye. It also sends parasympathetic efferents (via the ciliary ganglion) to the muscles controlling pupillary constriction and accommodation. The motor fibers originate in the oculomotor nuclei of the midbrain.Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from peripheral nerve tissue. This includes NEUROFIBROMAS; SCHWANNOMAS; GRANULAR CELL TUMORS; and malignant peripheral NERVE SHEATH NEOPLASMS. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp1750-1)Sympathetic Nervous System: The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.Facial Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.
... is a growth or tumor of nerve tissue. Neuromas tend to be benign (i.e. not cancerous); many nerve tumors, including those that ... The term is also used to refer to any swelling of a nerve, even in the absence of abnormal cell growth. In particular, ... including the nerve fibers and their myelin sheath, as in the case of genuine neoplasms (growths) like ganglioneuromas and ... neuromas generally arise from non-neuronal nerve tissues. The word was originally used to refer to any nerve tumor, but its ...
... the ganglion tissue, containing the cell bodies and dendrites, contain relay points for nerve tissue impulses. The nerve tissue ... Neoplasms (tumours) in nervous tissue include: *Gliomas (glial cell tumors). Gliomatosis cerebri, Oligoastrocytoma, Choroid ... Nervous tissue, also called neural tissue or nerve tissue, is the main tissue component of the nervous system. The nervous ... Nervous tissue is composed of neurons, also called nerve cells, and neuroglial cells. Four types of neuroglia found in the CNS ...
... tissue neoplasms including sarcomas such as hemangiopericytoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in nervous tissue. ... The cells of connective tissue include fibroblasts, adipocytes, macrophages, mast cells and leucocytes. Connective tissue can ... Connective tissue (CT) is one of the four basic types of animal tissue, along with epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and ... and special connective tissue. Connective tissue proper consists of loose connective tissue and dense connective tissue (which ...
... nerves). Injected fat-tissue grafts that are not perfused among the tissues can die, and result in necrotic cysts and eventual ... New fat tissue is generated by the activity of a large, wandering histocyte-type cell, which ingests fat and then becomes a fat ... neoplasm) in the fat-augmented breasts. Moreover, given the sensitive, biologic nature of breast tissue, periodic MRI and 3-D ... Tissue engineering I. The breast mound The breast-tissue matrix consists of engineered tissues of complex, implanted, ...
... a neuroendocrine tumor of any neural crest tissue of the sympathetic nervous system Ganglioneuroma, a tumor in the nerve cells ... As a cluster of neuron cell bodies, the adrenal medulla is considered a ganglion of the sympathetic nervous system. Neoplasms ... The adrenal medulla consists of irregularly shaped cells grouped around blood vessels. These cells are intimately connected ... Medullary cells are derived from the embryonic neural crest and, as such, are simply modified neurons. In particular, they are ...
... neoplasm protein - Nernst equation - nerve - nerve growth factor - nerve growth factor receptor - nerve tissue protein - nerve ... cell - cell adhesion molecule - Cell biology - cell cycle protein - cell membrane - cell membrane transport - cell nucleus - ... T cell - T-cell antigen receptors - tachykinin - tachykinin receptor - talin protein - tandem repeat sequence - taste bud - ... Hela cell - helminth protein - helper T cell - hemopexin - hemoglobin - herpes simplex virus protein vmw65 - heterocyclic ...
There, these cells continue growing and dividing, becoming another invasive neoplasm of the primary cancer's tissue. Secondary ... The most common primary brain tumors are: Gliomas (50.4%) Meningiomas (20.8%) Pituitary adenomas (15%) Nerve sheath tumors (8 ... Anaplastic cells have lost total control of their normal functions and many have deteriorated cell structures. Anaplastic cells ... the cells in the neoplasm have an obviously different form (in size and shape). Anaplastic cells display marked pleomorphism. ...
Granular cell nerve sheath tumor, and Granular cell schwannoma.) Granular cell tumors show similarity to neural tissue, as can ... origin or other soft tissue neoplasms. Granular cell tumors can affect all parts of the body; however, the head and neck areas ... Malignant granular cell tumor of soft tissue: diagnostic criteria and clinicopathologic correlation. Am J Surg Pathol. Jul 1998 ... Granular cell tumor is a tumor that can develop on any skin or mucosal surface, but occurs on the tongue 40% of the time. It is ...
Nerve cells. Ganglioneuroma Reference[31]. Benign neoplasms are typically but not always composed of cells which bear a strong ... that can compress tissues and may cause nerve damage, reduction of blood to an area of the body (ischaemia), tissue death ( ... or liver cells). Teratomas contain many cell types such as skin, nerve, brain and thyroid, among others, because they are ... A benign tumor is a mass of cells (tumor) that lacks the ability to invade neighboring tissue or metastasize. These do not ...
... a neoplasm, or tumor composed of glial cells) on a lobe of the pituitary gland, as well congenital underdevelopment of the ... congenital replacement of the islets with fatty tissue, or improper nerve signalling to the islets. Endocrine dysfunction of ... necessary for cellular processes such as cell division, cell signalling, cell surface receptor function, apoptosis, DNA ... fatty tissue replacement, connective tissue proliferation and errors in innervation of the acini and islets, correlating to ...
... , abbreviated ASPS, is a very rare type of soft-tissue sarcoma, that grows slowly and whose cell of ... Therefore, ASPS symptoms may either be a painless swelling, or a soreness caused by compressed nerves or muscles, affecting the ... Calcifications are commonly present, as may be seen with slow growing neoplasms. Although ASPS displays a relatively indolent ... The tumor cells seem to be arranged in the same pattern as the cells of the small air sacks (alveoli) in the lungs. However, ...
Tissue antigens. 70(2):105-109, 2007 Cruz AAV. Orbital inflammation and infection versus neoplasia. In: Karcioglu ZA, ed. ... It is the most common painful orbital mass in the adult population, and is associated with proptosis, cranial nerve palsy ( ... Its diagnosis is of exclusion once neoplasm, primary infection and systemic disorders have been ruled-out. Once diagnosed, it ... that organisms resembling Mollicutes cause orbital inflammation by destroying the cytoplasmic organelles of parasitized cells. ...
It consists of loose connective tissue, adipose tissue and elastin. The main cell types are fibroblasts, macrophages and ... Sensation: contains a variety of nerve endings that react to heat and cold, touch, pressure, vibration, and tissue injury; see ... Diseases of the skin include skin infections and skin neoplasms (including skin cancer). Dermatology is the branch of medicine ... Cells are formed through mitosis at the basale layer. The daughter cells (see cell division) move up the strata changing shape ...
... haematopoietic and related tissue (D47.0) Histiocytic and mast cell tumours of uncertain and unknown behaviour Mast cell tumour ... Olfactory nerve (C72.3) Optic nerve (C72.4) Acoustic nerve (C72.5) Other and unspecified cranial nerves (C72.8) Overlapping ... Benign neoplasm of mesothelial tissue (D20) Benign neoplasm of soft tissue of retroperitoneum and peritoneum (D21) Other benign ... Neoplasms. (C00) Malignant neoplasm of lip (C01) Malignant neoplasm of base of tongue (C02) Malignant neoplasm of other and ...
Inflammatory cells are not seen in the stroma and dysplasia is not present in the neural tissues. Without treatment, persons ... Mucosal neuromas are made up of nerve cells, often with thickened perineurium, intertwined with one another in a plexiform ... Benign tumors (neoplasms) develop in the mouth, eyes, and submucosa of almost all organs in the first decade of life. Medullary ... This tortuous pattern of nerves is seen within a background of loose endoneurium-like fibrous stroma. Variations in the RET ...
Radiation treatments may damage nerves near the target area or within the delivery path as nerve tissue is also radiosensitive. ... Targeting double-stranded breaks increases the probability that cells will undergo cell death. Cancer cells are generally less ... Hypopituitarism commonly develops after radiation therapy for sellar and parasellar neoplasms, extrasellar brain tumours, head ... They are often due to damage of blood vessels and connective tissue cells. Many late effects are reduced by fractionating ...
Neoplasm (Premalignant: dysplasia) - (Malignant: Squamous cell carcinoma) Trauma (Iatrogenic: surgery, intubation) - ( ... More specifically, it results from an impairment in vocal fold vibration or the nerve supply of the larynx. The assessment and ... Note that this list is not exhaustive): Neoplastic/structural: Abnormal growths of the vocal fold tissue. Dysplasia Cysts ... Multiple Sclerosis Myasthenia Gravis Parkinson's disease Spasmodic Dysphonia Nerve injury Associated Systemic Diseases: ...
They are also present along the vagus nerve, in the inner ears, in the lungs, and at other sites. Neoplasms of glomus cells are ... and histochemical tissue culture study". The Laryngoscope. 90 (1): 120-44. doi:10.1288/00005537-198001000-00014. PMID 6243386. ... Autonomic ganglia innervate the glomus cells, and some presynaptic sympathetic ganglia synapse with glomus cells. The nerve ... across cell-nerve ending junctions". Respiration Physiology. 115 (2): 135-149. doi:10.1016/S0034-5687(99)00020-1. PMID 10385028 ...
A neuroma /njuːˈroʊmə/ (plural: neuromata or neuromas) is a growth or tumor of nerve tissue.[1] Neuromas tend to be benign (i.e ... Other nerve swellingsEdit. Some of the benign varieties of neuroma, in the broadest sense of the term, are not neoplasms. ... The term is also used to refer to any swelling of a nerve, even in the absence of abnormal cell growth. In particular, ... neuromas generally arise from non-neuronal nerve tissues. The word was originally used to refer to any nerve tumor, but its ...
doi:10.1016/S0161-6420(96)30428-4. FontR, Croxatto J, Rao N. Tumors of the optic nerve and optic nerve head: medulloepithelioma ... the semi-translucent membrane covering the lens in some tumors corresponds to spreading neoplastic cells. Tumor cells form a ... Diktyoma is classified into teratoid and nonteratoid types, based on heteroplastic tissue in the former. Each type may be sub- ... Shields, Jerry A.; Eagle, Ralph C.; Shields, Carol L.; De Potter, Patrick (December 1996). "Congenital Neoplasms of the ...
Hematol Oncol Stem Cell Ther 2008;1:14-21. "Hematology/Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy" National Cancer Institute. What You Need ... There's still a risk of hypothyroidism though, as the remaining thyroid tissue may not be able to produce enough hormones in ... Problems with the voice, nerve or muscular damage, or bleeding from a lacerated blood vessel are rare but serious complications ... Thyroid neoplasm is a neoplasm or tumor of the thyroid. It can be a benign tumor such as thyroid adenoma, or it can be a ...
... neoplasms including sarcomas such as hemangiopericytoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in ... The cells of connective tissue include fibroblasts, adipocytes, macrophages, mast cells and leucocytes. ... Connective tissue is one of the four basic types of animal tissue, along with epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous ... Fibroareolar tissue is a mix of fibrous and areolar tissue.[10] Fibromuscular tissue is made up of fibrous tissue and muscular ...
... neoplasm - nephrotomogram - nephrotoxic - nephroureterectomy - nerve block - nerve grafting - nerve-sparing radical ... soft tissue sarcoma - solar keratosis - solid tumor - somatic cell - somatic mutation - somnolence syndrome - sonogram - ... cell - cell differentiation - cell motility - cell proliferation - cell respiration - cell adhesion - cellular adoptive ... human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 - Hürthle cell neoplasm - hydrazine sulfate - hydromorphone - hydronephrosis - hydroureter ...
Sarcoma: Cancers arising from connective tissue (i.e. bone, cartilage, fat, nerve), each of which develops from cells ... They form a subset of neoplasms. A neoplasm or tumor is a group of cells that have undergone unregulated growth and will often ... Invasion of tissue and formation of metastases[26]. The progression from normal cells to cells that can form a detectable mass ... Cancer is fundamentally a disease of tissue growth regulation. In order for a normal cell to transform into a cancer cell, the ...
Skin peeling syndrome Slavotinek Hurst syndrome Sleepwalking disorder Sly syndrome Small cell lung cancer Small uncloven cell ... X linked Sixth nerve palsy Sjögren-Larsson syndrome Sjögren's syndrome Skandaitis Skeletal dysplasia brachydactyly Skeletal ... Smith-Fineman-Myers syndrome Smith-Martin-Dodd syndrome Smith-Magenis syndrome Sneddon's syndrome Sociophobia Soft-tissue ... muscular atrophy Spinal atrophy ophthalmoplegia pyramidal syndrome Spinal cord disorder Spinal cord injury Spinal cord neoplasm ...
... neoplasms including sarcomas such as hemangiopericytoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in ... The cells of connective tissue include fibroblasts, adipocytes, macrophages, mast cells and leucocytes. ... Connective tissue (CT) is one of the four basic types of animal tissue, along with epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and ... and special connective tissue.[5][6] Connective tissue proper consists of loose connective tissue and dense connective tissue ( ...
Divergent differentiation in malignant soft tissue neoplasms: the paradigm of liposarcoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath ... shaped cells, and negative in the epithelioid region (5 B) (X 100). CD56 was positive in tumor tissue with spindle-shaped cells ... Samruay S, Sunpetch B, Soottiporn C. Malignant mesenchymoma of median nerve: combined nerve shenath sarcoma and liposarcoma. J ... The differential diagnosis of MPNST from other spindle cell neoplasms poses great challenges for pathologists. This report ...
What is Nerve sheath tumor? Meaning of Nerve sheath tumor as a legal term. What does Nerve sheath tumor mean in law? ... Definition of Nerve sheath tumor in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. ... Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a high-grade sarcoma that accounts for 10% of soft tissue tumors.. MR ... and 1 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (table).. An analysis of salivary gland neoplasms: a 12-year, single-institution ...
... of all soft tissue sarcomas. This neoplasm is also referred to older designations as a malignant schwannoma, malignant ... Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor associated with clear cell renal cell carcinoma - case report. ... Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor associated with clear cell renal cell carcinoma - case report ... of all soft tissue sarcomas. This neoplasm is also referred to older designations as a malignant schwannoma, malignant ...
Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue. Nevi and Melanomas. ... The Role of Peptide-loaded Dendritic Cells to Augment the Therapeutic Effect of Interleukin-2. The safety and scientific ... The principal objective of the study is to identify whether a dendritic cell-based vaccine can increase the moderate ... The Role of Autologous Dendritic Cells Pulsed by Melanoma Associated Peptides to Augment the Therapeutic Effect of Interleukin- ...
Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue. Neoplasms, ... Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping ... together with a peripheral stem cell transplant may allow more chemotherapy to be given so that more tumor cells are killed. It ... Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial. Glioma. Etoposide phosphate. Cisplatin. Cyclophosphamide. Carboplatin. Methotrexate. ...
Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue. Nevi and Melanomas. ... poor CD4 T cell generation due to low CD4 T cell recovery and likely HIV reservoir in stimulator cells used in vitro culture) ... RATIONALE: Laboratory-treated T cells may be able to kill tumor cells when they are put back into the body. Aldesleukin and ... Laboratory-Treated T Cells and Aldesleukin After Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IV Melanoma. The safety and ...
Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue. Nevi and Melanomas. ... Tracing Dissemination of Melanoma Cells in Healthy Tissues (DISSEMELA). The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... The presence of these clonal cells in these healthy tissues will be correlated to the survival of the patients after 5 years ... Immunofluorescence anti-BRAFV600E or anti tumoral/initiating/stem cells will be done on same tissues. These simple techniques ...
... and cancer stem cells (CSCs) are important cellular components in the cancer microenvironment and may affect cancer phenotype ... Nerve Tissue Proteins / genetics * Nerve Tissue Proteins / metabolism* * Ovarian Neoplasms / immunology* * Ovarian Neoplasms / ... Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and cancer stem cells (CSCs) are important cellular components in the cancer ... and CtBP2 directly targeted stem cell core genes resulting in increased cancer cell stemness and increasing metastatic and ...
Neoplasm Proteins*. Nerve Tissue Proteins*. Omentum / cytology. Rats. Rats, Inbred F344. Stem Cells / metabolism*. Substrate ... 0/Neoplasm Proteins; 0/Nerve Tissue Proteins; 0/Tumor Suppressor Proteins; EC 2.3.1.21/Carnitine O-Palmitoyltransferase ... Cells, Cultured. Epididymis. Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins. Fatty Acids, Nonesterified / metabolism*. Female. Humans. Kidney. ... 3507236 - The effect of storage on rat tissues and human plasma amino acid levels determined by h.... 6295766 - The acute ...
Nerve Tissue Proteins. *Cell Differentiation. *Neoplasm Proteins. *Purines. *Xenopus laevis. *Western Blotting ... cell division - cell junction - cell proliferation - cell-matrix adhesion - central nervous system neuron development - ... Curcumin has been shown to induce cell death in many human cancer cells, including human lung cancer cells. However, the ... Curcumin alters gene expression-associated DNA damage, cell cycle, cell survival and cell migration and invasion in NCI-H460 ...
Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue; Neoplasms, Connective and Soft Tissue; Neoplasms, Ductal, Lobular ... Germ Cell and Embryonal; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Sarcoma, Synovial; Urogenital Neoplasms; Urologic Neoplasms; Neuroectodermal ... Pediatric Cancers, Miscellaneous; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Solid Tumors; Neoplasms, ... including small cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcemic type [SCCOHT], also known as malignant rhaboid tumor of the ovary [ ...
Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive lung tumor subtype with poor prognosis. We sequenced 29 SCLC exomes, 2 genomes ... Nerve Tissue Proteins / genetics * Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis * PTEN Phosphohydrolase / genetics * Polymorphism, ... Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive lung tumor subtype with poor prognosis. We sequenced 29 SCLC exomes, 2 genomes ... Integrative genome analyses identify key somatic driver mutations of small-cell lung cancer Nat Genet. 2012 Oct;44(10):1104-10. ...
Neoplasms, Basal Cell; Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue; ... Bone Neoplasms; Carcinoma; Carcinoma, Basal Cell; DNA Repair-Deficiency Disorders; Melanoma; ...
... and primary cell cultures of human glioblastoma lose it d ... In contrast, most cultivated glioma cell lines dont express ... Neoplasm Proteins / biosynthesis*. Neoplasm Transplantation. Neoplasms, Experimental / metabolism*, pathology. Nerve Tissue ... Accordingly, in C6 cells and RG2 cells, two glioma cell lines of the rat, and in SMA mouse glioma cell lines, we found no AQP4 ... Most primary cells from glioblastoma tissue as well as glioma cell lines do not express AQP4 under culture conditions. McCoy ...
Purchase Current Concepts in Soft Tissue Pathology, An Issue of Surgical Pathology Clinics, Volume 4-3 - 1st Edition. Print ... Peripheral nerve sheath tumors; Clear cell lesions; Primitive round cell neoplasms; Plexiform neoplasms; Myxoid neoplasms; ... Topics for pathologists covering soft tissue pathology include: Soft Tissue Pseudosarcomas; Spindle cell sarcomas; ... Current Concepts in Soft Tissue Pathology, An Issue of Surgical Pathology Clinics, Volume 4-3 1st Edition. ...
Create healthcare diagrams like this example called Tumors of the Peripheral Nerves in minutes with SmartDraw. SmartDraw ... Schwann cells, which form the myelin sheath around nerves), press against and sometimes even damage the nerves they surround. ... The most common tumors are neurofibromas, which develop in the tissue surrounding peripheral nerves. Most tumors are non- ... Tumors begin in the cells that make up the myelin sheath, a thin membrane that envelops and protects nerve fibers, and often ...
All MeSH CategoriesDiseases CategoryNeoplasmsNeoplasms by Histologic TypeNeoplasms, Nerve TissueNeuroectodermal Tumors ... All MeSH CategoriesDiseases CategoryNeoplasmsNeoplasms by Histologic TypeNeoplasms, Germ Cell and EmbryonalNeuroectodermal ... A malignant neoplasm derived from cells that are capable of forming melanin, which may occur in the skin of any part of the ... All MeSH CategoriesDiseases CategoryNeoplasmsNeoplasms by Histologic TypeNevi and MelanomasMelanomaHutchinsons Melanotic ...
Dead cells.. Neoplasm. A tumor, either benign or malignant.. Nervous System. The entire integrated system of nerve tissue in ... Any tumor arising from glial cells, which are cells that provides energy, nutrients and other support for nerve cells in the ... The 12 pairs of nerves that originate in the brain.. Craniopharyngioma. A benign tumor arising from small nests of cells ... Tissue swelling caused by the accumulation of fluid.. Efficacy Able to achieve the desired results or produces beneficial ...
Dead cells.. Neoplasm. A tumor, either benign or malignant.. Nervous System. The entire integrated system of nerve tissue in ... A mass of nerve tissue or a group of nerve cell bodies. ... Glial Tissue/Cells. The supportive tissue of the brain. The ... Any tumor arising from glial tissue of the brain, which provides energy, nutrients and other support for nerve cells in the ... 12 pairs of nerves having their origin in the brain.. Craniopharyngioma. A benign tumor arising from small nests of cells ...
a neoplasm composed of nerve cells and elements of their supporting connective tissue. ... A ganglioneuroma derived from neurons, with numerous glial cells and fibers in the matrix. ... A ganglioneuroma derived from neurons, with numerous glial cells and fibers in the matrix. ...
Bronchial Neoplasms; Lung Neoplasms; Respiratory Tract Neoplasms; Thoracic Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue; Nevi and ... Conditions: Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung; Thyroid Neoplasms; Sarcoma; Colorectal Neoplasms; Salivary Gland Neoplasms; Biliary ... Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Pontine Glioma; Pancreatic Neoplasms; Ovarian Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Renal Cell; ... Tract Neoplasms; Brain Neoplasm, Primary; Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast; Melanoma; Solid Tumors; Glioblastoma; Bile Duct Neoplasms ...
Neoplasms that cause pulmonary nodules include lumps of connective tissue known as fibromas, lumps of nerve tissue known as ... Non-small cell is the most common type of lung cancer that causes pulmonary nodules, though small cell cancer and lung ... Benign or malignant neoplasms or malignant tumors, including lung cancer, lymphoma, sarcoma and metastatic tumors, can also ... and tumors in connective tissue known as sarcomas. ... How is diabetic nerve pain in the feet treated?. * Q: What are ...
Neoplasms that cause pulmonary nodules include lumps of connective tissue known as fibromas, lumps of nerve tissue known as ... Non-small cell is the most common type of lung cancer that causes pulmonary nodules, though small cell cancer and lung ... Benign or malignant neoplasms or malignant tumors, including lung cancer, lymphoma, sarcoma and metastatic tumors, can also ... and tumors in connective tissue known as sarcomas. ... which are groupings of normal cells that have attached ...
Soft tissues are the source of a wide variety of neoplasms and tumorlike conditions often presenting as a palpable mass... ... Soft tissue tumors are relatively common in the first year of life [1-17]. ... Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Fibrous Histiocytoma Cavernous Hemangioma Infantile Hemangioma Granular Cell Tumor ... Soft tissue tumors are relatively common in the first year of life [1-17]. Soft tissues are the source of a wide variety of ...
SPINDLE CELL TUMOR OF NEURAL ORIGIN MANIFESTING IN ORAL CAVITY: A CASE REPORT WITH REVIEW.(Report) by Pakistan Oral and Dental ... Journal; Health, general Histochemistry Analysis Mouth tumors Diagnosis Stem cells Research Tumors ... repair the damaged nerve in an exaggerated manner comprising of nerve tissue hyperplasia.14 Like other spindle cell neoplasms, ... Granular cell tumor. Granular cell tumor (GCT) is a soft tissue neoplasm originally believed to arise from muscle cell ...
  • The principal objective of the study is to identify whether a dendritic cell-based vaccine can increase the moderate therapeutic effect of bolus high dose IL-2 in patients with metastatic melanoma. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In one group of patients, the IL-2 will be preceded by three doses of autologous dendritic cell pulsed with melanoma antigens appropriate for their blood type. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Giving laboratory-treated T cells together with aldesleukin after cyclophosphamide may be an effective treatment for melanoma. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • PURPOSE: This phase I/II trial is studying the side effects of giving laboratory-treated T cells together with aldesleukin after cyclophosphamide and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage IV melanoma. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • I. To assess the safety and toxicity of cellular adoptive immunotherapy in melanoma patients using autologous CD4+ and CD8+ antigen-specific T cell clones. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • To evaluate the antitumor effects of CD4+ and CD8+ antigen-specific T cells in patients with metastatic melanoma. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The objective of this project is to evaluate the presence of melanoma quiescent or initiating clonal cells in peritumoral healthy tissue displaying the same molecular signature than those of the tumor/metastasis and to correlate this presence to the prognostic value. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • BRAF, NRAS and c-kit genes play an important role in cell proliferation and are mutated at very high frequency in melanoma. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • These simple techniques will test -using a sensitive molecular biology tool- whether in humans with melanomas, there is early dissemination of melanoma cells in histopathological healthy sentinel lymph node and peritumoral skin. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Malignant melanoma favors melanocytes and nerves and thus may spread to the brain since the neural tissue and melanocytes arise from the same cell line in the embryo. (news-medical.net)
  • Malignant melanoma presents in less than 1% of neoplasms in this region. (cancer.gov)
  • Moreover, it has been established that COVID-19 interacts and infects brain cells in humans via ACE2. (cdc.gov)
  • Soft tissues are the source of a wide variety of neoplasms and tumorlike conditions often presenting as a palpable mass (Tables 4.1 and 4.2). (springer.com)
  • Neurosurgeons should be acutely aware of the variety of neoplasms that occur in the paranasal region. (thejns.org)
  • occurs usually in subscapular adipose tissue of old persons. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Proteus syndrome is characterised by nevi , asymmetric overgrowth of various body parts, adipose tissue dysregulation, cystadenomas , adenomas , vascular malformation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Human Colors--The Rainbow Garden of Pathology: What Gives Normal and Pathologic Tissues Their Color? (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Detailed Pathology section describes common neoplasms in horses, cites research literature, and describes what is generally known about each condition. (elsevier.com)
  • Immunofluorescence anti-BRAFV600E or anti tumoral/initiating/stem cells will be done on same tissues. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and cancer stem cells (CSCs) are important cellular components in the cancer microenvironment and may affect cancer phenotype and patient outcome. (nih.gov)
  • These characteristics have driven investigators to hypothesize that glioblastoma is a heterogeneous combination of cells and cancer stem cells. (frontiersin.org)
  • Similarly, overexpression of RTVP-1 in human neural stem cells induced mesenchymal differentiation, whereas silencing of RTVP-1 in glioma stem cells (GSCs) decreased the mesenchymal transformation and stemness of these cells. (henryford.com)
  • From the quantitative phosphoproteome data on EGF-stimulated glioblastoma stem cells, our PTMapper-based network analysis unveiled p70S6K-related signaling as one of the most significantly regulated sub-networks, which was not observed in the conventional PPI network. (omictools.com)
  • As some previous studies demonstrated that p70S6K was correlated with survival and stemness maintenance of glioblastoma stem cells, the strategy based on phosphorylation site-oriented network analysis proved to be effective to unbiasedly extract crucial signaling pathways from the complex signaling networks. (omictools.com)
  • Pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hold great potential for restoring tissue and organ function, which has been hindered by inefficiency and instability of generating desired cell types through multi-lineage differentiation. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Patients receive stem cells from their brother, sister, parent or unrelated donor (a person who is not related to the patient). (ohsu.edu)
  • Patients receive stem cells from a brother, sister, parent or donor who is not a relative. (ohsu.edu)
  • Ultrastructurally the stem cells of ovarian teratomas did not differ from stem cells of testicular or embryo-derived teratomas. (jax.org)
  • AQP4 expression in intracerebral gliomas went along with an OAP loss, compared to normal brain tissue. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Swelling of the brain tissue due to an accumulation of fluid which may be caused by tumor, toxic chemicals or interaction. (uamshealth.com)
  • Glioblastoma (GBM) are characterized by increased invasion into the surrounding normal brain tissue. (henryford.com)
  • The bulging aneurysm can put pressure on a nerve or surrounding brain tissue. (biacolorado.org)
  • Although a canine meningioma may be classified as benign, it may be locally invasive and have poor demarcation from normal brain tissue. (vin.com)
  • Meningiomas in cats are almost always well defined with a clear demarcation between normal and affected brain tissue and appear to grow more slowly than canine meningiomas. (vin.com)
  • This type of cancer develops from astrocytes, which are part of the auxiliary brain tissue. (medhelpsis.com)
  • The cells of the tumor will often grow into nearby normal brain tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast, most cultivated glioma cell lines don't express AQP4, and primary cell cultures of human glioblastoma lose it during the first passages. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Accordingly, in C6 cells and RG2 cells, two glioma cell lines of the rat, and in SMA mouse glioma cell lines, we found no AQP4 expression. (biomedsearch.com)
  • RG-2 glioma cells if grafted into the brain developed AQP4 expression. (biomedsearch.com)
  • In this study, we showed for the first time implanted AQP4 negative glioma cells in animal brain or flank to express AQP4 specifically in the intracerebral gliomas but neither in the extracranial nor in the flank gliomas. (biomedsearch.com)
  • RTVP-1 regulates glioma cell migration and invasion via interaction wi" by Amotz Ziv-Av, Nissim David Giladi et al. (henryford.com)
  • RTVP-1 regulates glioma cell migration and invasion via interaction with N-WASP and hnRNPK. (henryford.com)
  • Ziv-Av A, Giladi ND, Lee HK, Cazacu S, Finniss S, Xiang C, Pauker MH, Barda-Saad M, Poisson L, and Brodie C. RTVP-1 regulates glioma cell migration and invasion via interaction with N-WASP and hnRNPK. (henryford.com)
  • RTVP-1 is highly expressed in GBM and regulates the migration and invasion of glioma cells. (henryford.com)
  • hnRNPK decreased cell migration, spreading and invasion in glioma cells. (henryford.com)
  • Using co-immunoprecipitation we validated the interactions of hnRNPK with N-WASP and RTVP-1 in glioma cells. (henryford.com)
  • In summary, we report that RTVP-1 regulates glioma cell spreading, migration and invasion and that these effects are mediated via interaction with N-WASP and by interfering with the inhibitory effect of hnRNPK on the function of this protein. (henryford.com)
  • We explored the role of RTVP-1, a glioma-associated protein that promotes glioma cell migration, in the mesenchymal transformation of GBM. (henryford.com)
  • RTVP-1 increased the migration and mesenchymal transformation of glioma cells. (henryford.com)
  • Using gene array analysis of RTVP-1 silenced glioma cells we identified IL-6 as a mediator of RTVP-1 effects on the mesenchymal transformation and migration of GSCs, therefore acting in a positive feedback loop by upregulating RTVP-1 expression via the STAT3 pathway. (henryford.com)
  • Can COVID-19 induce glioma tumorogenesis through binding cell receptors? (cdc.gov)
  • Therefore in the light of these known facts we hypothesized that viral S protein molecule may bind to the other overexpressed receptor molecules in glioma cells and may play some role in glioma tumorogenesis. (cdc.gov)
  • We confirmed an AQP4 loss in primary human glioblastoma cell cultures after a few passages. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The goal of this study is to determine a methodology for the establishment of primary human glioblastoma cell lines. (frontiersin.org)
  • Hence, we described a successful method for isolation of CD133-positive cell population and establishment of glioblastoma neurospheres from this primary culture, which are more robust than the ones derived straight from the tumor. (frontiersin.org)
  • Pointed out that the neurospheres derived from glioblastoma primary culture showed 29% more cells expressing CD133 then the ones straight tumor-derived, denoting a higher concentration of CD133-positive cells in the neurospheres derived from glioblastoma primary culture. (frontiersin.org)
  • Also, the present study describes an optimization of neurospheres/subspheres isolation from glioblastoma primary culture by selection of CD133-positive adherent stem cell. (frontiersin.org)
  • Microglia are macrophage cells that make up the primary immune system for the CNS. (wikipedia.org)
  • A primary malignant neoplasm that overlaps two or more contiguous (next to each other) sites should be classified to the subcategory/code .8 ('overlapping lesion'), unless the combination is specifically indexed elsewhere. (icd10data.com)
  • The theory states that cancer cells find survival outside their primary suites difficult. (news-medical.net)
  • He noted that cancer cells affected the regional lymph nodes near the primary tumor. (news-medical.net)
  • Five established ovarian cancer cell lines, cells derived from two benign ovarian ascites samples and 40 primary cultures of EOC derived from ovarian ascites samples were analysed by protein slot blotting and/or immunofluorescence to determine ASPM and microcephalin protein levels and their cellular localisation. (nih.gov)
  • Established ovarian cell lines and primary cultures display different ASPM levels after fluorescence quantification. (nih.gov)
  • Having established that at both the mRNA and protein levels there were differences in ASPM expression among established ovarian cancer cell lines and the primary cultures, we next investigated the cellular localisation and expression levels of ASPM using immunofluorescence. (nih.gov)
  • Primary neoplasms of the soft tissue in the head and neck are rare. (mhmedical.com)
  • Cerebral meningioma is the most frequently reported primary brain tumor of cats and accounts for almost 10% of all nonhematopoietic neoplasms. (vin.com)
  • Primary neoplasms appear as a result of changes occurring in the brain. (perfecthealthus.com)
  • The single most important and frequent group of neoplasms is the gliomas which can be subdivided, according to the three major cell types, into astrocytomas, oligodendrocytomas and ependymomas. (springer.com)
  • The meninges ensheathing the CNS also give rise to a group of neoplasms, the meningiomas which appear to have an increasingly large number of subtypes. (springer.com)
  • Sarcomas constitute a large and heterogeneous group of neoplasms. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Leiomyomas of deep somatic soft tissue occur primarily in middle-aged adults, with a mean age of 37 years, and with equal distribution among the genders [ 10 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Mesenchymal tissue is defined as the complex of nonepithelial structures of the body exclusive of reproductive tissue, glia, and hematopoietic and lymphoid tissue. (aacrjournals.org)
  • We show here that EM011, a tubulin-binding, nontoxic, orally available anticancer agent, does not alter absolute CD4 + , CD8 + , B220 + , and NK1.1 + cell counts in immunocompetent mice. (aacrjournals.org)
  • More importantly, EM011 treatment at tumor-suppressive dosages (300 mg/kg) does not suppress cell-mediated immune responses in mice experimentally challenged with acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection, in that mice mount robust virus-specific CD8 + and CD4 + T-cell immune responses while maintained on daily drug treatment. (aacrjournals.org)
  • They correspond both cytologically and developmentally to ectodermal embryonic cells from the egg-cylinder, the most advanced developmental stage of parthenotes observed previously in the ovary of LT mice. (jax.org)
  • Neuromas can arise from different types of nervous tissue, including the nerve fibers and their myelin sheath, as in the case of genuine neoplasms (growths) like ganglioneuromas and neurinomas. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1) Patients with a neoplasm of the temporal bone usually present with deficits in hearing, balance, and facial function. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Cerebrospinal fluid samples and bone marrow biopsies were negative for neoplastic cells. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • A cancer in which the bone marrow makes too many lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell. (ohsu.edu)
  • A cancer in which there are too many immature blood-forming cells in the blood and bone marrow. (ohsu.edu)
  • Stem cell (bone marrow) transplant is frequently used to treat high risk or relapsed disease. (ohsu.edu)
  • More importantly, we have thus far failed to detect any toxicity in tissues such as hematopoietic, gut, spleen, and long nerves that are common targets of currently used antimicrotubule drugs ( 15 , 17 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • Spindle neoplasms are often labeled sarcomas which are an uncommon class of cancers, yet they make up about 10, 000 to 12, 000 cases in the us per year. (healthtap.com)