Colitis: Inflammation of the COLON section of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE), usually with symptoms such as DIARRHEA (often with blood and mucus), ABDOMINAL PAIN, and FEVER.Colitis, Ulcerative: Inflammation of the COLON that is predominantly confined to the MUCOSA. Its major symptoms include DIARRHEA, rectal BLEEDING, the passage of MUCUS, and ABDOMINAL PAIN.Colitis, Ischemic: Inflammation of the COLON due to colonic ISCHEMIA resulting from alterations in systemic circulation or local vasculature.Colitis, Microscopic: A condition characterized by chronic watery DIARRHEA of unknown origin, a normal COLONOSCOPY but abnormal histopathology on BIOPSY. This syndrome was first described in 1980 by Read and associates. Subtypes include COLLAGENOUS COLITIS and LYMPHOCYTIC COLITIS. Both have similar clinical symptoms and are distinguishable only by histology.Dextran Sulfate: Long-chain polymer of glucose containing 17-20% sulfur. It has been used as an anticoagulant and also has been shown to inhibit the binding of HIV-1 to CD4-POSITIVE T-LYMPHOCYTES. It is commonly used as both an experimental and clinical laboratory reagent and has been investigated for use as an antiviral agent, in the treatment of hypolipidemia, and for the prevention of free radical damage, among other applications.Colitis, Collagenous: A subtype of MICROSCOPIC COLITIS, characterized by chronic watery DIARRHEA of unknown origin, a normal COLONOSCOPY but abnormal histopathology on BIOPSY. Microscopic examination of biopsy samples taken from the COLON show larger-than-normal band of subepithelial COLLAGEN.Colon: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid: A reagent that is used to neutralize peptide terminal amino groups.Colitis, Lymphocytic: A subtype of MICROSCOPIC COLITIS, characterized by chronic watery DIARRHEA of unknown origin, a normal COLONOSCOPY but abnormal histopathology on BIOPSY. Microscopic examination of biopsy samples taken from the COLON show infiltration of LYMPHOCYTES in the superficial EPITHELIUM and the underlying connective tissue (lamina propria).Crohn Disease: A chronic transmural inflammation that may involve any part of the DIGESTIVE TRACT from MOUTH to ANUS, mostly found in the ILEUM, the CECUM, and the COLON. In Crohn disease, the inflammation, extending through the intestinal wall from the MUCOSA to the serosa, is characteristically asymmetric and segmental. Epithelioid GRANULOMAS may be seen in some patients.Intestinal Mucosa: Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Chronic, non-specific inflammation of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT. Etiology may be genetic or environmental. This term includes CROHN DISEASE and ULCERATIVE COLITIS.Mesalamine: An anti-inflammatory agent, structurally related to the SALICYLATES, which is active in INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE. It is considered to be the active moiety of SULPHASALAZINE. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed)Rectum: The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.Sulfasalazine: A drug that is used in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases. Its activity is generally considered to lie in its metabolic breakdown product, 5-aminosalicylic acid (see MESALAMINE) released in the colon. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p907)Peroxidase: A hemeprotein from leukocytes. Deficiency of this enzyme leads to a hereditary disorder coupled with disseminated moniliasis. It catalyzes the conversion of a donor and peroxide to an oxidized donor and water. EC 1.11.1.7.Gastrointestinal Agents: Drugs used for their effects on the gastrointestinal system, as to control gastric acidity, regulate gastrointestinal motility and water flow, and improve digestion.Colectomy: Excision of a portion of the colon or of the whole colon. (Dorland, 28th ed)Proctocolectomy, Restorative: A surgical procedure involving the excision of the COLON and RECTUM and the formation of an ILEOANAL RESERVOIR (pouch). In patients with intestinal diseases, such as ulcerative colitis, this procedure avoids the need for an OSTOMY by allowing for transanal defecation.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Colonoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.Dysentery, Amebic: DYSENTERY caused by intestinal amebic infection, chiefly with ENTAMOEBA HISTOLYTICA. This condition may be associated with amebic infection of the LIVER and other distant sites.Ileostomy: Surgical creation of an external opening into the ILEUM for fecal diversion or drainage. This replacement for the RECTUM is usually created in patients with severe INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES. Loop (continent) or tube (incontinent) procedures are most often employed.Administration, Rectal: The insertion of drugs into the rectum, usually for confused or incompetent patients, like children, infants, and the very old or comatose.Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous: An acute inflammation of the INTESTINAL MUCOSA that is characterized by the presence of pseudomembranes or plaques in the SMALL INTESTINE (pseudomembranous enteritis) and the LARGE INTESTINE (pseudomembranous colitis). It is commonly associated with antibiotic therapy and CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE colonization.Pouchitis: Acute INFLAMMATION in the INTESTINAL MUCOSA of the continent ileal reservoir (or pouch) in patients who have undergone ILEOSTOMY and restorative proctocolectomy (PROCTOCOLECTOMY, RESTORATIVE).Mice, Inbred C57BLEnterocolitis: Inflammation of the MUCOSA of both the SMALL INTESTINE and the LARGE INTESTINE. Etiology includes ISCHEMIA, infections, allergic, and immune responses.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Colonic Pouches: Sacs or reservoirs created to function in place of the COLON and/or RECTUM in patients who have undergone restorative proctocolectomy (PROCTOCOLECTOMY, RESTORATIVE).Acetic Acid: Product of the oxidation of ethanol and of the destructive distillation of wood. It is used locally, occasionally internally, as a counterirritant and also as a reagent. (Stedman, 26th ed)Intestines: The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.Probiotics: Live microbial DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS which beneficially affect the host animal by improving its intestinal microbial balance. Antibiotics and other related compounds are not included in this definition. In humans, lactobacilli are commonly used as probiotics, either as single species or in mixed culture with other bacteria. Other genera that have been used are bifidobacteria and streptococci. (J. Nutr. 1995;125:1401-12)Interleukin-10: A cytokine produced by a variety of cell types, including T-LYMPHOCYTES; MONOCYTES; DENDRITIC CELLS; and EPITHELIAL CELLS that exerts a variety of effects on immunoregulation and INFLAMMATION. Interleukin-10 combines with itself to form a homodimeric molecule that is the biologically active form of the protein.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Cecum: The blind sac or outpouching area of the LARGE INTESTINE that is below the entrance of the SMALL INTESTINE. It has a worm-like extension, the vermiform APPENDIX.Citrobacter rodentium: A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus CITROBACTER, family ENTEROBACTERIACEAE. As an important pathogen of laboratory mice, it serves as a model for investigating epithelial hyperproliferation and tumor promotion. It was previously considered a strain of CITROBACTER FREUNDII.Ileitis: Inflammation of any segment of the ILEUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Helicobacter hepaticus: A species of HELICOBACTER that colonizes the CECUM and COLON of several strains of MICE, and is associated with HEPATITIS and carcinogenesis.Mice, Inbred BALB CAnti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Megacolon, Toxic: An acute form of MEGACOLON, severe pathological dilatation of the COLON. It is associated with clinical conditions such as ULCERATIVE COLITIS; CROHN DISEASE; AMEBIC DYSENTERY; or CLOSTRIDIUM ENTEROCOLITIS.Ileum: The distal and narrowest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between the JEJUNUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE.Oxazolone: Immunologic adjuvant and sensitizing agent.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Clostridium difficile: A common inhabitant of the colon flora in human infants and sometimes in adults. It produces a toxin that causes pseudomembranous enterocolitis (ENTEROCOLITIS, PSEUDOMEMBRANOUS) in patients receiving antibiotic therapy.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Colon, Sigmoid: A segment of the COLON between the RECTUM and the descending colon.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Sigmoidoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the sigmoid flexure.Colonic Diseases: Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Proctitis: INFLAMMATION of the MUCOUS MEMBRANE of the RECTUM, the distal end of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Intestine, Large: A segment of the LOWER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT that includes the CECUM; the COLON; and the RECTUM.Cholangitis, Sclerosing: Chronic inflammatory disease of the BILIARY TRACT. It is characterized by fibrosis and hardening of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary ductal systems leading to bile duct strictures, CHOLESTASIS, and eventual BILIARY CIRRHOSIS.Mucous Membrane: An EPITHELIUM with MUCUS-secreting cells, such as GOBLET CELLS. It forms the lining of many body cavities, such as the DIGESTIVE TRACT, the RESPIRATORY TRACT, and the reproductive tract. Mucosa, rich in blood and lymph vessels, comprises an inner epithelium, a middle layer (lamina propria) of loose CONNECTIVE TISSUE, and an outer layer (muscularis mucosae) of SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS that separates the mucosa from submucosa.Azathioprine: An immunosuppressive agent used in combination with cyclophosphamide and hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), this substance has been listed as a known carcinogen. (Merck Index, 11th ed)Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Proctocolitis: Inflammation of the RECTUM and the distal portion of the COLON.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Prednisolone: A glucocorticoid with the general properties of the corticosteroids. It is the drug of choice for all conditions in which routine systemic corticosteroid therapy is indicated, except adrenal deficiency states.Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha: Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.Dinitrofluorobenzene: Irritants and reagents for labeling terminal amino acid groups.Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: Bleeding in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Bacterial Translocation: The passage of viable bacteria from the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT to extra-intestinal sites, such as the mesenteric lymph node complex, liver, spleen, kidney, and blood. Factors that promote bacterial translocation include overgrowth with gram-negative enteric bacilli, impaired host immune defenses, and injury to the INTESTINAL MUCOSA resulting in increased intestinal permeability. Bacterial translocation from the lung to the circulation is also possible and sometimes accompanies MECHANICAL VENTILATION.Mesentery: A layer of the peritoneum which attaches the abdominal viscera to the ABDOMINAL WALL and conveys their blood vessels and nerves.Clostridium Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus CLOSTRIDIUM.Collagen Diseases: Historically, a heterogeneous group of acute and chronic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, progressive systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, etc. This classification was based on the notion that "collagen" was equivalent to "connective tissue", but with the present recognition of the different types of collagen and the aggregates derived from them as distinct entities, the term "collagen diseases" now pertains exclusively to those inherited conditions in which the primary defect is at the gene level and affects collagen biosynthesis, post-translational modification, or extracellular processing directly. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1494)CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Ulcer: A lesion on the surface of the skin or a mucous surface, produced by the sloughing of inflammatory necrotic tissue.Mucin-2: A gel-forming mucin found predominantly in SMALL INTESTINE and variety of mucous membrane-containing organs. It provides a protective, lubricating barrier against particles and infectious agents.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.
  • We report a unique case of a 10-year-old Danish boy with severe small duct autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis and synchronic Crohn colitis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We present a case of a 10-year-old boy, diagnosed as AISC with an unusual, severe small duct lesion and concomitant Crohn colitis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The proliferative activity and polyamine levels of the rectal epithelium in unoperated ulcerative colitis patients and in ulcerative colitis patients after total colectomy and ileorectal anastomosis were determined and compared with control subjects. (unifi.it)
  • In ulcerative colitis patients the labeling index was significantly increased, and labeled cells were shifted toward the upper part of the crypt when compared with controls. (unifi.it)
  • Ileorectal anastomosis patients showed a normalization of the labeling index and a distribution of labeled cells similar to controls. (unifi.it)
  • The immune response in the gastrointestinal tract is a tightly controlled balance between effector and regulatory cell responses. (rupress.org)
  • OX40 −/− T reg cells showed reduced accumulation in the colon and peripheral lymphoid organs, resulting in their inability to keep pace with the effector response. (rupress.org)
  • As OX40 also promoted the colitogenic Th1 response, its expression on T reg cells may be required for effective competition with OX40-dependent effector responses. (rupress.org)
  • Understanding how particular co-stimulatory pathways affect both effector T (T eff) cell and T reg cell responses is crucial for development of antiinflammatory strategies based on co-stimulatory blockade, as interventions that inhibit both types of response may not reset the immunological balance in favor of T reg cells. (rupress.org)
  • Treg expanded in vivo to the same extent as CD4 + CD45RB high T cells after transfer and they did not inhibit CD4 + CD45RB high T cell expansion in lymphoid tissues, although they prevented the accumulation of Th1 effector cells in the intestine. (jimmunol.org)
  • These data demonstrate that Treg can prevent colitis by inhibiting the accumulation of tissue-seeking effector cells and that Treg accumulation in the intestine is dispensable for colitis suppression. (jimmunol.org)
  • Transient ablation of CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T during tumor development in the CAC model suppressed tumor outgrowth and distribution, accompanied by an increased number of CD8+IFN-γ-/granzyme B-producing effector T cells. (aacrjournals.org)
  • While quiescent T cells use oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for energy production, and effector T cells (Teffs) rely on glycolysis for proliferation, the distinct metabolic features of regulatory T cells (Tregs) are less well established. (pnas.org)
  • Collectively, these data suggest that CD103+ and CD103- DCs represent functionally distinct subsets and that CD103 expression on DCs influences the balance between effector and regulatory T cell activity in the intestine. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Starting from the observation that Tregs isolated from the lamina propria of active but not inactive IBD patients or uninflamed controls express Tbet and IFNγ, we investigated the functional role of Th1-like Tregs in the dextran sulfate model of colitis. (frontiersin.org)
  • Moreover, S100A4 is secreted from both tumor and non-malignant cells and exerts extracellular effects regulating cell mobility, invasion, and angiogenesis by interacting with annexin II, RAGE, and heparan sulfate proteoglycans 18 , 19 , 20 . (medicalrecords.com)
  • CX 3 CR1 + MNPs from both mouse and human tissue produced more IL-23 and IL-1β than conventional CD103 + dendritic cells (cDCs) and were more efficient than cDCs in supporting IL-22 production in ILC3 in vitro and in vivo. (rupress.org)
  • In addition, dendritic cells (DCs) are important components of antitumor immunity. (begellhouse.com)
  • Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages lacking CARD9 have signaling defects downstream of C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG)-like receptors, and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) ( 1 ). (sciencemag.org)
  • We asked ourselves whether dendritic cells in the gut could capture mucus, as well as bacteria and food antigens," said Andrea Cerutti, MD, PhD, the study's senior author and Professor in the Department of Medicine at the Immunology Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Dendritic cells are a type of immune cell found in the mucosa that launch an immune response . (medicalxpress.com)
  • Activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) accumulate in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of CCR9 −/− animals, altering the local ratio of DC subsets. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Our results demonstrate that CCL25/CCR9 interactions regulate inflammatory immune responses in the large intestinal mucosa by balancing different subsets of dendritic cells. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Non-T cell expression of CD103 is restricted primarily to CD11c(high)MHC class II(high) dendritic cells (DCs). (ox.ac.uk)
  • However, Tbet deficiency did not affect the Tregs suppressive capacity in vitro and in vivo in the adoptive transfer model of colitis. (frontiersin.org)
  • Here, we show that in vivo depletion of CX 3 CR1 + mononuclear phagocytes (MNPs) resulted in more severe colitis and death after infection with Citrobacter rodentium . (rupress.org)
  • These Treg were increased strongly in number in a mouse model of CAC and in the peripheral blood of colon cancer patients, exhibiting an activated phenotype as defined by elevated expression of GARP, CD103, CTLA-4 and IL-10, along with an increased suppressive effect on the proliferation and Th1 cytokine expression of CD4+CD25- responder T cells ex vivo. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Results are consistent with our in vitro data and with the hypothesis that AG drives inflammatory cell apoptosis in vivo , providing a mechanism by which AG protects from colitis in this DSS mouse model. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Recently, miR-133α was further examined forits role in NT-associated proinflammatory signaling cascades and acute colitis in vivo. (escholarship.org)
  • Recent studies demonstrate that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have potent immunoregulatory activity in vitro and in vivo. (labome.ru)
  • Mechanistic insights were gained from ex vivo studies of cell interactions, the piroxicam/IL-10 -/- mouse model of progressive colitis, and use of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. (northwestern.edu)
  • Mast cells recruited macrophages in ex vivo migration assays, and both mast cells and TAMs promoted invasion of cancer cells. (northwestern.edu)
  • Colitis induction by CD4 + CD45RB high T cells requires β 7 integrin-dependant intestinal localization, but the importance of β 7 integrins for Treg function is unknown. (jimmunol.org)
  • In this study, we have analyzed these issues by comparing transferred β 7 +/+ and β 7 −/− Treg for their ability to accumulate in different sites and their effects on cotransferred CD4 + CD45RB high T cells and colitis induction. (jimmunol.org)
  • In conclusion, this COLO 205 model provides evidence for CD133 induction concomitant with overexpression of CYP3A4, which, together with ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2) and others, may have a role in chemoresistant colon CSCs and a negative impact on disease-free survival in colon cancer patients. (mdpi.com)
  • Induction of cell proliferation would be particularly relevant for insulin treatment of subjects with diabetes and the potential of bearing tumor cells (e.g., a history of a malignant disease). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • In addition, intracolonicinjection of antisense-miR-133α before colitis induction improves histological scores and proinflammatory cytokine transcription. (escholarship.org)
  • Culture of UC LPMCs with lyso-sulfatide glycolipid to determine sulfatide induction of epithelial cell cytotoxicity, IL-13 production and IL-13Rα2 expression. (uni-regensburg.de)
  • Animals in the MSC treatment groups received either 1 × 10 5 , 1 × 10 6 or 3 × 10 6 MSCs by enema 3 hours after induction of colitis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • HSP70 is induced in PMN cells of UC patients and its induction correlates with depression and anxiety levels. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The severity of colitis was assessed by means of histological scores and weight loss. (nih.gov)
  • Thus, the study of mucosal immune responses (including lamina propria mononuclear cells and intraepithelial lymphocytes) is important to understand the role of the immune system during development and therapy in CRC. (springer.com)
  • Single immune cell suspensions from lamina propria and epithelium can be purified combining selective tissue digestion and Percoll gradient centrifugation. (springer.com)
  • Isolated splenocytes, peripheral lymph node cells, mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells, intraepithelial lymphocyte, and lamina propria lymphocyte (LPL) were stained with PE-Cy5 or allophycocyanin anti-TCRβ (H57-597), FITC anti-CD45.1 (A20), PE anti-CD25 (PC61), and PE-Cy5 or allophycocyanin anti-CD4 (GK1.5) (BD Pharmingen). (jimmunol.org)
  • Production of chemical mediators from lamina propria cells was measured by real-time reverse transcription PCR. (bmj.com)
  • Various immune cell infiltrations in the epithelium and lamina propria are seen in MC immunopathology. (diva-portal.org)
  • Objective: Previous studies have shown that ulcerative colitis (UC) is associated with the presence of lamina propria non-invariant (Type II) NKT cells producing IL-13 and mediating epithelial cell cytotoxicity. (uni-regensburg.de)
  • Here we sought to define the antigen(s) stimulating the NKT cells and to quantitate these cells in the UC lamina propria. (uni-regensburg.de)
  • These studies show that UC lamina propria is replete with Type II NKT cells responsive to lyso-sulfatide glycolipid and bearing IL-13Rα2. (uni-regensburg.de)
  • Additionally, infection with these pathogens induces infiltration of immune cells and edema within the lamina propria 8 , 9 . (medicalrecords.com)
  • The anti-inflammatory effect of FP7, active as TLR4 antagonist, was evaluated on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) isolated from IBD patients, and in a mouse model of ulcerative colitis. (springer.com)
  • This model allows the examination of interactions between APCs and T cells in the lamina propria. (ucc.ie)
  • Here, we have investigated the role of OX40 in influencing the balance between conventional T cells and Foxp3 + regulatory T (T reg) cells. (rupress.org)
  • In normal conditions gut homeostasis is maintained by the suppressive activity of regulatory T cells (Tregs), characterized by the expression of the transcription factor FoxP3. (frontiersin.org)
  • Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a class of T cells which negatively control the pro-inflammatory activity of adaptive and innate immune cells and they play a key role in the maintenance of the gut immune homeostasis ( 2 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Effect of jiaweiwumel decoction on regulatory T cells and interleukin-10 in a rat model of ulcerative colitis. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • With the goal of harnessing the immunomodulatory capacity of infection with H. diminuta, we assessed the putative generation of anti-colitic regulatory B cells following H. diminuta infection. (diva-portal.org)
  • Thus, in response to H. diminuta, a putatively unique splenic CD19(+) B cell with a functional immunoregulatory program is generated that promotes the suppression of colitis dominated by TH1, TH2, or TH1-plus-TH2 events, and may do so via the synthesis of TGF-beta and the generation of, or cooperation with, a regulatory macrophage. (diva-portal.org)
  • Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. (uzh.ch)
  • Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in maintaining immune tolerance to self-antigens and in suppressing excessive immune responses that may cause collateral damage to the host. (pnas.org)
  • One such molecule, the G-protein coupled receptor Gpr83, has been identified through gene expression analysis as being overexpressed within thymic and peripheral naturally arising regulatory T (nT(R)) cell populations. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Rather than being a general marker of activation, Gpr83 expression could only be detected in cells also expressing forkhead/winged helix transcription factor (Foxp3), further supporting the association of Gpr83 with the regulatory cell phenotype. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Gpr83 expression was dispensable for the regulatory activity of nT(R) cells as Gpr83-deficient nT(R) cells could suppress the development of disease in a T-cell transfer model of colitis. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Our results show no mandatory role for CD103 expression on T cells for either the development or CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (T reg) cell-mediated control of colitis. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The aggregates contained macrophages and B and T cells, and produced immune-regulatory molecules including FOXP3, interleukin (IL)10, transforming growth factor-β, arginase type II, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 22 (CCL22), heme oxygenase-1, and TSG6. (elsevier.com)
  • OBJECTIVE -It was reported that the long-acting insulin analogue glargine induces cell proliferation in a human osteosarcoma cell line and therefore might induce or accelerate tumor growth. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Inhibition of T-cell function was associated with strongly diminished recruitment of infiltrating neutrophils in the colon at the early stages of this model. (nih.gov)
  • The CAC model is useful to study the involvement of immune cells not only during the carcinogenesis process but, in addition, during the treatment with novel immunotherapy protocols. (springer.com)
  • We established an in vitro colon CSC-like model using the COLO 205 cell line, which revealed transiently increased expression of CD133 when transferred to serum-free stem cell culture medium. (mdpi.com)
  • Mechanistic studies with the DNBS model, revealed the anti-colitic HdBc(7(d)) was within the follicular B cell population and its phenotype was not dependent on IL-4 or IL-10. (diva-portal.org)
  • Administration of anti-NKG2A Ab increased the number of inflammatory foci in DSS-induced colitis, suggesting the involvement of NKG2A+ T cells in this colitis model. (ovid.com)
  • In this study, we evaluated intestinal 5-HT levels in the Winnie mouse model of spontaneous chronic colitis, which closely replicates UC. (edu.au)
  • Methods: A DSS-induced colitis model was used. (researchsquare.com)
  • HeLa cells are used as a model system to demonstrate the relation between these particles and cancer cells. (wiley.com)
  • Tumor and lymphoid cell lines from a patient with carcinoma of the colon for a cytotoxicity model. (addexbio.com)
  • Cells from the omentum exert anti-inflammatory and/or healing properties in the acute DSS-induced colitis model. (nih.gov)
  • Rossini, V., Radulovic, K., Riedel, C.U. and Niess, J.H. (2016) 'Development of an antigen-driven colitis model to study presentation of antigens by antigen presenting cells to T cells', Journal of Visualized Experiments, (115), e54421 (11pp). (ucc.ie)
  • One of the best ways to study the immunological mechanisms involved during the disease is the T cell transfer model of colitis. (ucc.ie)
  • To study the potential role of antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the disease process, it is helpful to have an antigen-driven disease model, in which a defined commensal-derived antigen leads to colitis. (ucc.ie)
  • An antigen driven-colitis model has hence been developed. (ucc.ie)
  • In this model OT-II CD4+ T cells, that can recognize only specific epitopes in the OVA protein, are transferred into RAG-/- hosts challenged with CFP-OVA-expressing E. coli. (ucc.ie)
  • It is also an ideal cell line model for sgRNA screening and validation, either individually or in pools. (creative-biogene.com)
  • These results suggest a redundant role for Gpr83 in the function of T(R) cells in this model of disease. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Publications] Yamashita K, Okayasu I, 他4名: 'Unique characteristics of rectal carcinoma cell lines derived from invasive carcinomas in ulcerative colitis patients. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Treatment consists in a cell suspension (5 million cells/mL) in aseptic buffered solution containing human expanded adipose-derived stem cells (eASCs) of allogeneic origin in disposable vials with no preservative agents. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Cancer stem cells (CSCs) seem to constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells that escape from chemotherapy and cause recurrent disease. (mdpi.com)
  • You go home for 10 days, come back for two weeks to harvest your stem cells. (crohnsforum.com)
  • One of the more exciting treatment options undergoing trials these days it the utilization of stem cells . (crohnsforum.com)
  • This thread will be dedicated to providing information about stem cells as a treatment option. (crohnsforum.com)
  • Transplantation of enhanced mesenchymal stem cells also helps to restore the patients' natural immunocompetency while also stopping the degeneration of the autoimmune process from continuing. (stemcellthailand.org)
  • Effects of the treatment with fetal stem cells in many diseases and conditions are far beyond the capacity of all other modern methods of treatment. (placidway.com)
  • CD4 + T-cell depletion or T-bet/IFN-γ deficiency protects against the development of colitis induced by CS. (frontiersin.org)
  • By using a Treg-specific Tbet conditional knockout, we demonstrated that Tbet expression in Tregs is required for the development of colitis. (frontiersin.org)
  • Professor Alexander Smikodub Sr. is a recognized world leader in developing of methods of stem cell treatment. (placidway.com)
  • There is currently no standardized technique to generate single-cell data, all methods must include cell isolation from the population, lysate formation, amplification through reverse transcription and quantification of expression levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are several methods available to isolate and amplify cells for single-cell analysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • High throughput methods are able to quickly isolate hundreds to tens of thousands of cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Under steady-state conditions, OX40 was required by T reg cells for their accumulation in the colon, but not peripheral lymphoid organs. (rupress.org)
  • Activated Syk triggers the formation of a CARD9-BCL10 (B cell lymphoma/leukemia 10)-Malt1 (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1) complex, which leads to the activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways ( 5 ). (sciencemag.org)