Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Stem Cell Transplantation: The transfer of STEM CELLS from one individual to another within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or between species (XENOTRANSPLANTATION), or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). The source and location of the stem cells determines their potency or pluripotency to differentiate into various cell types.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Transplantation Conditioning: Preparative treatment of transplant recipient with various conditioning regimens including radiation, immune sera, chemotherapy, and/or immunosuppressive agents, prior to transplantation. Transplantation conditioning is very common before bone marrow transplantation.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Transplantation of stem cells collected from the peripheral blood. It is a less invasive alternative to direct marrow harvesting of hematopoietic stem cells. Enrichment of stem cells in peripheral blood can be achieved by inducing mobilization of stem cells from the BONE MARROW.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Graft vs Host Disease: The clinical entity characterized by anorexia, diarrhea, loss of hair, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, growth retardation, and eventual death brought about by the GRAFT VS HOST REACTION.Cell Transplantation: Transference of cells within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Hematologic Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Transplantation Chimera: An organism that, as a result of transplantation of donor tissue or cells, consists of two or more cell lines descended from at least two zygotes. This state may result in the induction of donor-specific TRANSPLANTATION TOLERANCE.Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Transplantation of STEM CELLS collected from the fetal blood remaining in the UMBILICAL CORD and the PLACENTA after delivery. Included are the HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Organ Transplantation: Transference of an organ between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Transplantation Immunology: A general term for the complex phenomena involved in allo- and xenograft rejection by a host and graft vs host reaction. Although the reactions involved in transplantation immunology are primarily thymus-dependent phenomena of cellular immunity, humoral factors also play a part in late rejection.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Islets of Langerhans Transplantation: The transference of pancreatic islets within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Myeloablative Agonists: Agents that destroy bone marrow activity. They are used to prepare patients for BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION or STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Histocompatibility Testing: Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant DONORS and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Transplantation: Transference of a tissue or organ from either an alive or deceased donor, within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Whole-Body Irradiation: Irradiation of the whole body with ionizing or non-ionizing radiation. It is applicable to humans or animals but not to microorganisms.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS).Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Pancreas Transplantation: The transference of a pancreas from one human or animal to another.Busulfan: An alkylating agent having a selective immunosuppressive effect on BONE MARROW. It has been used in the palliative treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (MYELOID LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC), but although symptomatic relief is provided, no permanent remission is brought about. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), busulfan is listed as a known carcinogen.Histocompatibility: The degree of antigenic similarity between the tissues of different individuals, which determines the acceptance or rejection of allografts.Transplantation, Isogeneic: Transplantation between genetically identical individuals, i.e., members of the same species with identical histocompatibility antigens, such as monozygotic twins, members of the same inbred strain, or members of a hybrid population produced by crossing certain inbred strains.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Remission Induction: Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Multiple Myeloma: A malignancy of mature PLASMA CELLS engaging in monoclonal immunoglobulin production. It is characterized by hyperglobulinemia, excess Bence-Jones proteins (free monoclonal IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) in the urine, skeletal destruction, bone pain, and fractures. Other features include ANEMIA; HYPERCALCEMIA; and RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Living Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Melphalan: An alkylating nitrogen mustard that is used as an antineoplastic in the form of the levo isomer - MELPHALAN, the racemic mixture - MERPHALAN, and the dextro isomer - MEDPHALAN; toxic to bone marrow, but little vesicant action; potential carcinogen.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Graft vs Leukemia Effect: Immunological rejection of leukemia cells following bone marrow transplantation.Immunosuppression: Deliberate prevention or diminution of the host's immune response. It may be nonspecific as in the administration of immunosuppressive agents (drugs or radiation) or by lymphocyte depletion or may be specific as in desensitization or the simultaneous administration of antigen and immunosuppressive drugs.Leukemia: A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)Vidarabine: A nucleoside antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces antibioticus. It has some antineoplastic properties and has broad spectrum activity against DNA viruses in cell cultures and significant antiviral activity against infections caused by a variety of viruses such as the herpes viruses, the VACCINIA VIRUS and varicella zoster virus.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Transplantation Tolerance: An induced state of non-reactivity to grafted tissue from a donor organism that would ordinarily trigger a cell-mediated or humoral immune response.HLA Antigens: Antigens determined by leukocyte loci found on chromosome 6, the major histocompatibility loci in humans. They are polypeptides or glycoproteins found on most nucleated cells and platelets, determine tissue types for transplantation, and are associated with certain diseases.Transplantation, Heterotopic: Transplantation of tissue typical of one area to a different recipient site. The tissue may be autologous, heterologous, or homologous.Cyclophosphamide: Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.Graft vs Tumor Effect: Immunological rejection of tumor tissue/cells following bone marrow transplantation.Chimerism: The occurrence in an individual of two or more cell populations of different chromosomal constitutions, derived from different individuals. This contrasts with MOSAICISM in which the different cell populations are derived from a single individual.Heart-Lung Transplantation: The simultaneous, or near simultaneous, transference of heart and lungs from one human or animal to another.Unrelated Donors: Providers of tissues for transplant to non-related individuals.Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute: Clonal expansion of myeloid blasts in bone marrow, blood, and other tissue. Myeloid leukemias develop from changes in cells that normally produce NEUTROPHILS; BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and MONOCYTES.Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease: Liver disease that is caused by injuries to the ENDOTHELIAL CELLS of the vessels and subendothelial EDEMA, but not by THROMBOSIS. Extracellular matrix, rich in FIBRONECTINS, is usually deposited around the HEPATIC VEINS leading to venous outflow occlusion and sinusoidal obstruction.Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Siblings: Persons or animals having at least one parent in common. (American College Dictionary, 3d ed)Cyclosporine: A cyclic undecapeptide from an extract of soil fungi. It is a powerful immunosupressant with a specific action on T-lymphocytes. It is used for the prophylaxis of graft rejection in organ and tissue transplantation. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed).Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization: The release of stem cells from the bone marrow into the peripheral blood circulation for the purpose of leukapheresis, prior to stem cell transplantation. Hematopoietic growth factors or chemotherapeutic agents often are used to stimulate the mobilization.Fetal Tissue Transplantation: Transference of fetal tissue between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Salvage Therapy: A therapeutic approach, involving chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery, after initial regimens have failed to lead to improvement in a patient's condition. Salvage therapy is most often used for neoplastic diseases.Antilymphocyte Serum: Serum containing GAMMA-GLOBULINS which are antibodies for lymphocyte ANTIGENS. It is used both as a test for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY and therapeutically in TRANSPLANTATION.Lymphocyte Transfusion: The transfer of lymphocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Donor Selection: The procedure established to evaluate the health status and risk factors of the potential DONORS of biological materials. Donors are selected based on the principles that their health will not be compromised in the process, and the donated materials, such as TISSUES or organs, are safe for reuse in the recipients.Hematologic Diseases: Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplasia in one or more hematopoietic cell lineages. They predominantly affect patients over 60, are considered preleukemic conditions, and have high probability of transformation into ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA.Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin: Any of a group of malignant tumors of lymphoid tissue that differ from HODGKIN DISEASE, being more heterogeneous with respect to malignant cell lineage, clinical course, prognosis, and therapy. The only common feature among these tumors is the absence of giant REED-STERNBERG CELLS, a characteristic of Hodgkin's disease.Liver Failure: Severe inability of the LIVER to perform its normal metabolic functions, as evidenced by severe JAUNDICE and abnormal serum levels of AMMONIA; BILIRUBIN; ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE; ASPARTATE AMINOTRANSFERASE; LACTATE DEHYDROGENASES; and albumin/globulin ratio. (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed)Cytomegalovirus Infections: Infection with CYTOMEGALOVIRUS, characterized by enlarged cells bearing intranuclear inclusions. Infection may be in almost any organ, but the salivary glands are the most common site in children, as are the lungs in adults.Transplantation, Heterologous: Transplantation between animals of different species.Antigens, CD34: Glycoproteins found on immature hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells. They are the only molecules to date whose expression within the blood system is restricted to a small number of progenitor cells in the bone marrow.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma: A neoplasm characterized by abnormalities of the lymphoid cell precursors leading to excessive lymphoblasts in the marrow and other organs. It is the most common cancer in children and accounts for the vast majority of all childhood leukemias.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Anemia, Aplastic: A form of anemia in which the bone marrow fails to produce adequate numbers of peripheral blood elements.Tacrolimus: A macrolide isolated from the culture broth of a strain of Streptomyces tsukubaensis that has strong immunosuppressive activity in vivo and prevents the activation of T-lymphocytes in response to antigenic or mitogenic stimulation in vitro.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Lymphocyte Depletion: Immunosuppression by reduction of circulating lymphocytes or by T-cell depletion of bone marrow. The former may be accomplished in vivo by thoracic duct drainage or administration of antilymphocyte serum. The latter is performed ex vivo on bone marrow before its transplantation.Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive: Clonal hematopoetic disorder caused by an acquired genetic defect in PLURIPOTENT STEM CELLS. It starts in MYELOID CELLS of the bone marrow, invades the blood and then other organs. The condition progresses from a stable, more indolent, chronic phase (LEUKEMIA, MYELOID, CHRONIC PHASE) lasting up to 7 years, to an advanced phase composed of an accelerated phase (LEUKEMIA, MYELOID, ACCELERATED PHASE) and BLAST CRISIS.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Hodgkin Disease: A malignant disease characterized by progressive enlargement of the lymph nodes, spleen, and general lymphoid tissue. In the classical variant, giant usually multinucleate Hodgkin's and REED-STERNBERG CELLS are present; in the nodular lymphocyte predominant variant, lymphocytic and histiocytic cells are seen.Skin Transplantation: The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin.Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor: A glycoprotein of MW 25 kDa containing internal disulfide bonds. It induces the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of neutrophilic granulocyte precursor cells and functionally activates mature blood neutrophils. Among the family of colony-stimulating factors, G-CSF is the most potent inducer of terminal differentiation to granulocytes and macrophages of leukemic myeloid cell lines.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Cytarabine: A pyrimidine nucleoside analog that is used mainly in the treatment of leukemia, especially acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia. Cytarabine is an antimetabolite antineoplastic agent that inhibits the synthesis of DNA. Its actions are specific for the S phase of the cell cycle. It also has antiviral and immunosuppressant properties. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p472)Tissue Transplantation: Transference of tissue within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Infection: Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases.Corneal Transplantation: Partial or total replacement of the CORNEA from one human or animal to another.Brain Tissue Transplantation: Transference of brain tissue, either from a fetus or from a born individual, between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Waiting Lists: Prospective patient listings for appointments or treatments.Carmustine: A cell-cycle phase nonspecific alkylating antineoplastic agent. It is used in the treatment of brain tumors and various other malignant neoplasms. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p462) This substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen according to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985). (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Etoposide: A semisynthetic derivative of PODOPHYLLOTOXIN that exhibits antitumor activity. Etoposide inhibits DNA synthesis by forming a complex with topoisomerase II and DNA. This complex induces breaks in double stranded DNA and prevents repair by topoisomerase II binding. Accumulated breaks in DNA prevent entry into the mitotic phase of cell division, and lead to cell death. Etoposide acts primarily in the G2 and S phases of the cell cycle.Severe Combined Immunodeficiency: Group of rare congenital disorders characterized by impairment of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, leukopenia, and low or absent antibody levels. It is inherited as an X-linked or autosomal recessive defect. Mutations occurring in many different genes cause human Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID).Liver Diseases: Pathological processes of the LIVER.Blood Group Incompatibility: An antigenic mismatch between donor and recipient blood. Antibodies present in the recipient's serum may be directed against antigens in the donor product. Such a mismatch may result in a transfusion reaction in which, for example, donor blood is hemolyzed. (From Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984).Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Disorders characterized by proliferation of lymphoid tissue, general or unspecified.Minor Histocompatibility Antigens: Allelic alloantigens often responsible for weak graft rejection in cases when (major) histocompatibility has been established by standard tests. In the mouse they are coded by more than 500 genes at up to 30 minor histocompatibility loci. The most well-known minor histocompatibility antigen in mammals is the H-Y antigen.Neoplasm, Residual: Remnant of a tumor or cancer after primary, potentially curative therapy. (Dr. Daniel Masys, written communication)Immunocompromised Host: A human or animal whose immunologic mechanism is deficient because of an immunodeficiency disorder or other disease or as the result of the administration of immunosuppressive drugs or radiation.Bronchiolitis Obliterans: Inflammation of the BRONCHIOLES leading to an obstructive lung disease. Bronchioles are characterized by fibrous granulation tissue with bronchial exudates in the lumens. Clinical features include a nonproductive cough and DYSPNEA.Hematopoiesis: The development and formation of various types of BLOOD CELLS. Hematopoiesis can take place in the BONE MARROW (medullary) or outside the bone marrow (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).Mycophenolic Acid: An antibiotic substance derived from Penicillium stoloniferum, and related species. It blocks de novo biosynthesis of purine nucleotides by inhibition of the enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase. Mycophenolic acid is important because of its selective effects on the immune system. It prevents the proliferation of T-cells, lymphocytes, and the formation of antibodies from B-cells. It also may inhibit recruitment of leukocytes to inflammatory sites. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1301)Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Stem Cells: Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Leukapheresis: The preparation of leukocyte concentrates with the return of red cells and leukocyte-poor plasma to the donor.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Mice, Inbred C57BLBone Marrow Purging: Techniques for the removal of subpopulations of cells (usually residual tumor cells) from the bone marrow ex vivo before it is infused. The purging is achieved by a variety of agents including pharmacologic agents, biophysical agents (laser photoirradiation or radioisotopes) and immunologic agents. Bone marrow purging is used in both autologous and allogeneic BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION.Virus Activation: The mechanism by which latent viruses, such as genetically transmitted tumor viruses (PROVIRUSES) or PROPHAGES of lysogenic bacteria, are induced to replicate and then released as infectious viruses. It may be effected by various endogenous and exogenous stimuli, including B-cell LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES, glucocorticoid hormones, halogenated pyrimidines, IONIZING RADIATION, ultraviolet light, and superinfecting viruses.Allografts: Tissues, cells, or organs transplanted between genetically different individuals of the same species.Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Leukemia, Myeloid: Form of leukemia characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of the myeloid lineage and their precursors (MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS) in the bone marrow and other sites.Opportunistic Infections: An infection caused by an organism which becomes pathogenic under certain conditions, e.g., during immunosuppression.Cytomegalovirus: A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily BETAHERPESVIRINAE, infecting the salivary glands, liver, spleen, lungs, eyes, and other organs, in which they produce characteristically enlarged cells with intranuclear inclusions. Infection with Cytomegalovirus is also seen as an opportunistic infection in AIDS.Transplants: Organs, tissues, or cells taken from the body for grafting into another area of the same body or into another individual.Thiotepa: A very toxic alkylating antineoplastic agent also used as an insect sterilant. It causes skin, gastrointestinal, CNS, and bone marrow damage. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), thiotepa may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen (Merck Index, 11th ed).Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Vincristine: An antitumor alkaloid isolated from VINCA ROSEA. (Merck, 11th ed.)Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Facial Transplantation: The transference between individuals of the entire face or major facial structures. In addition to the skin and cartilaginous tissue (CARTILAGE), it may include muscle and bone as well.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating: A class of drugs that differs from other alkylating agents used clinically in that they are monofunctional and thus unable to cross-link cellular macromolecules. Among their common properties are a requirement for metabolic activation to intermediates with antitumor efficacy and the presence in their chemical structures of N-methyl groups, that after metabolism, can covalently modify cellular DNA. The precise mechanisms by which each of these drugs acts to kill tumor cells are not completely understood. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p2026)Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Fetal Blood: Blood of the fetus. Exchange of nutrients and waste between the fetal and maternal blood occurs via the PLACENTA. The cord blood is blood contained in the umbilical vessels (UMBILICAL CORD) at the time of delivery.ABO Blood-Group System: The major human blood type system which depends on the presence or absence of two antigens A and B. Type O occurs when neither A nor B is present and AB when both are present. A and B are genetic factors that determine the presence of enzymes for the synthesis of certain glycoproteins mainly in the red cell membrane.Prednisone: A synthetic anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid derived from CORTISONE. It is biologically inert and converted to PREDNISOLONE in the liver.Organ Preservation: The process by which organs are kept viable outside of the organism from which they were removed (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Rats, Inbred LewDirected Tissue Donation: Tissue, organ, or gamete donation intended for a designated recipient.Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Bone-marrow-derived, non-hematopoietic cells that support HEMATOPOETIC STEM CELLS. They have also been isolated from other organs and tissues such as UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD, umbilical vein subendothelium, and WHARTON JELLY. These cells are considered to be a source of multipotent stem cells because they include subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells.Stomatitis: INFLAMMATION of the soft tissues of the MOUTH, such as MUCOSA; PALATE; GINGIVA; and LIP.Regeneration: The physiological renewal, repair, or replacement of tissue.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Amyloidosis: A group of sporadic, familial and/or inherited, degenerative, and infectious disease processes, linked by the common theme of abnormal protein folding and deposition of AMYLOID. As the amyloid deposits enlarge they displace normal tissue structures, causing disruption of function. Various signs and symptoms depend on the location and size of the deposits.Leukocyte Transfusion: The transfer of leukocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived: Antibodies obtained from a single clone of cells grown in mice or rats.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Tissue and Organ Harvesting: The procedure of removing TISSUES, organs, or specimens from DONORS for reuse, such as TRANSPLANTATION.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)MycosesRoseolovirus Infections: Infection with ROSEOLOVIRUS, the most common in humans being EXANTHEMA SUBITUM, a benign disease of infants and young children.Survivors: Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.Actuarial Analysis: The application of probability and statistical methods to calculate the risk of occurrence of any event, such as onset of illness, recurrent disease, hospitalization, disability, or death. It may include calculation of the anticipated money costs of such events and of the premiums necessary to provide for payment of such costs.Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy: Therapies that involve the TRANSPLANTATION of CELLS or TISSUES developed for the purpose of restoring the function of diseased or dysfunctional cells or tissues.Ganciclovir: An ACYCLOVIR analog that is a potent inhibitor of the Herpesvirus family including cytomegalovirus. Ganciclovir is used to treat complications from AIDS-associated cytomegalovirus infections.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Lymphocyte Count: The number of LYMPHOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD.Cell SeparationBlood Component Removal: Any procedure in which blood is withdrawn from a donor, a portion is separated and retained and the remainder is returned to the donor.Spermatogonia: Euploid male germ cells of an early stage of SPERMATOGENESIS, derived from prespermatogonia. With the onset of puberty, spermatogonia at the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubule proliferate by mitotic then meiotic divisions and give rise to the haploid SPERMATOCYTES.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Fetal Stem Cells: Cells derived from a FETUS that retain the ability to divide, proliferate and provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Nuclear Family: A family composed of spouses and their children.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Neoplasm Transplantation: Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Liver Failure, Acute: A form of rapid-onset LIVER FAILURE, also known as fulminant hepatic failure, caused by severe liver injury or massive loss of HEPATOCYTES. It is characterized by sudden development of liver dysfunction and JAUNDICE. Acute liver failure may progress to exhibit cerebral dysfunction even HEPATIC COMA depending on the etiology that includes hepatic ISCHEMIA, drug toxicity, malignant infiltration, and viral hepatitis such as post-transfusion HEPATITIS B and HEPATITIS C.Antibodies, Neoplasm: Immunoglobulins induced by antigens specific for tumors other than the normally occurring HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS.Methylprednisolone: A PREDNISOLONE derivative with similar anti-inflammatory action.Platelet Transfusion: The transfer of blood platelets from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Graft vs Host Reaction: An immunological attack mounted by a graft against the host because of tissue incompatibility when immunologically competent cells are transplanted to an immunologically incompetent host; the resulting clinical picture is that of GRAFT VS HOST DISEASE.Chimera: An individual that contains cell populations derived from different zygotes.Hand Transplantation: The transference of a complete HAND, as a composite of many tissue types, from one individual to another.Aspergillosis: Infections with fungi of the genus ASPERGILLUS.Isoantibodies: Antibodies from an individual that react with ISOANTIGENS of another individual of the same species.Epstein-Barr Virus Infections: Infection with human herpesvirus 4 (HERPESVIRUS 4, HUMAN); which may facilitate the development of various lymphoproliferative disorders. These include BURKITT LYMPHOMA (African type), INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS, and oral hairy leukoplakia (LEUKOPLAKIA, HAIRY).Immunophenotyping: Process of classifying cells of the immune system based on structural and functional differences. The process is commonly used to analyze and sort T-lymphocytes into subsets based on CD antigens by the technique of flow cytometry.Primary Myelofibrosis: A de novo myeloproliferation arising from an abnormal stem cell. It is characterized by the replacement of bone marrow by fibrous tissue, a process that is mediated by CYTOKINES arising from the abnormal clone.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Cell Culture Techniques: Methods for maintaining or growing CELLS in vitro.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Blood DonorsRats, Nude: A mutant strain of Rattus norvegicus without a thymus and with depressed or absent T-cell function. This strain of rats may have a small amount of hair at times, but then lose it.Mice, Inbred BALB CBlood Cells: The cells found in the body fluid circulating throughout the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Platelet Count: The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Host vs Graft Reaction: The immune responses of a host to a graft. A specific response is GRAFT REJECTION.Cryopreservation: Preservation of cells, tissues, organs, or embryos by freezing. In histological preparations, cryopreservation or cryofixation is used to maintain the existing form, structure, and chemical composition of all the constituent elements of the specimens.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Antiviral Agents: Agents used in the prophylaxis or therapy of VIRUS DISEASES. Some of the ways they may act include preventing viral replication by inhibiting viral DNA polymerase; binding to specific cell-surface receptors and inhibiting viral penetration or uncoating; inhibiting viral protein synthesis; or blocking late stages of virus assembly.Mice, SCID: Mice homozygous for the mutant autosomal recessive gene "scid" which is located on the centromeric end of chromosome 16. These mice lack mature, functional lymphocytes and are thus highly susceptible to lethal opportunistic infections if not chronically treated with antibiotics. The lack of B- and T-cell immunity resembles severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) syndrome in human infants. SCID mice are useful as animal models since they are receptive to implantation of a human immune system producing SCID-human (SCID-hu) hematochimeric mice.Immune Tolerance: The specific failure of a normally responsive individual to make an immune response to a known antigen. It results from previous contact with the antigen by an immunologically immature individual (fetus or neonate) or by an adult exposed to extreme high-dose or low-dose antigen, or by exposure to radiation, antimetabolites, antilymphocytic serum, etc.

oko meduzy mutations affect neuronal patterning in the zebrafish retina and reveal cell-cell interactions of the retinal neuroepithelial sheet. (1/1372)

Mutations of the oko meduzy (ome) locus cause drastic neuronal patterning defect in the zebrafish retina. The precise, stratified appearance of the wild-type retina is absent in the mutants. Despite the lack of lamination, at least seven retinal cell types differentiate in oko meduzy. The ome phenotype is already expressed in the retinal neuroepithelium affecting morphology of the neuroepithelial cells. Our experiments indicate that previously unknown cell-cell interactions are involved in development of the retinal neuroepithelial sheet. In genetically mosaic animals, cell-cell interactions are sufficient to rescue the phenotype of oko meduzy retinal neuroepithelial cells. These cell-cell interactions may play a critical role in the patterning events that lead to differentiation of distinct neuronal laminae in the vertebrate retina.  (+info)

Adult subventricular zone neuronal precursors continue to proliferate and migrate in the absence of the olfactory bulb. (2/1372)

Neurons continue to be born in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles of adult mice. These cells migrate as a network of chains through the SVZ and the rostral migratory stream (RMS) into the olfactory bulb (OB), where they differentiate into mature neurons. The OB is the only known target for these neuronal precursors. Here, we show that, after elimination of the OB, the SVZ and RMS persist and become dramatically larger. The proportion of dividing [bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled] or dying (pyknotic or terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated UTP nick end-labeled) cells in the RMS was not significantly affected at 3 d or 3 weeks after bulbectomy (OBX). However, by 3 months after OBX, the percentage of BrdU-labeled cells in the RMS decreased by half and that of dying cells doubled. Surprisingly, the rostral migration of precursors continued along the RMS after OBX. This was demonstrated by focal microinjections of BrdU and grafts of SVZ cells carrying LacZ under the control of a neuron-specific promoter gene. Results indicate that the OB is not essential for proliferation and the directional migration of SVZ precursors.  (+info)

Endothelial implants inhibit intimal hyperplasia after porcine angioplasty. (3/1372)

The perivascular implantation of tissue-engineered endothelial cells around injured arteries offers an opportunity to study fundamental vascular physiology as well as restore and improve tissue function. Cell source is an important issue because the ability to implant either xenogeneic or allogeneic cells would greatly enhance the clinical applications of tissue-engineered grafts. We investigated the biological and immunological responses to endothelial cell xenografts and allografts in pigs 4 weeks after angioplasty of the carotid arteries. Porcine or bovine aortic endothelial cells were cultured within Gelfoam matrices and implanted in the perivascular space of 42 injured arteries. Both porcine and bovine endothelial cell grafts reduced the restenosis index compared with control by 54% and 46%, respectively. Perivascular heparin release devices, formulated to release heparin at twice the rate of release of heparan sulfate proteoglycan from endothelial cell implants, produced no significant reduction in the restenosis index. Endothelial cell implants also reduced occlusive thrombosis compared with control and heparin release devices. Host immune responses to endothelial implants were investigated by immunohistochemical examination of explanted devices and by immunocytochemistry of serum samples. The bovine cell grafts displayed infiltration of leukocytes, consisting primarily of lymphocytes, and caused an increase in antibodies detected in serum samples. Reduced cellular infiltration and no humoral response were detected in animals that received allografts. Despite the difference in immune response, the biological effects of xenografts or allografts did not differ significantly.  (+info)

Repopulation of different layers of host human Bruch's membrane by retinal pigment epithelial cell grafts. (4/1372)

PURPOSE: To determine the morphology of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) after reattachment to different ultrastructural layers of human Bruch's membrane (BM). METHODS: Bruch's membrane explants were prepared from eyes of 23 human donors (age range, 11-89 years). The basal lamina of the RPE, inner collagenous layer, and elastin layer were removed sequentially by mechanical and enzymatic techniques. First-passage cells of human RPE (15,000 cells/6 mm explant) from three donors (ages, 52, 64, and 80 years) were plated onto different layers of human BM, and the explants were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy up to 21 days later. RESULTS: RPE flattened and extended footplates 6 hours after plating onto basal lamina. Cells remained round 6 and 24 hours after plating onto the inner collagenous, elastin, or outer collagenous layer. The RPE cells became confluent 14 days after plating onto basal lamina but did not become confluent up to 21 days after plating onto the inner collagenous or elastin layer. Sparse round cells were observed 21 days after plating onto deeper layers, suggesting extensive loss of RPE. CONCLUSIONS: The morphology and subsequent behavior of the RPE reattached to BM depends on the anatomic layer of BM available for cell reattachment. The results suggest that the ability of transplanted RPE to repopulate BM in age-related macular degeneration and other disorders may depend on the layer of BM available to serve as a substrate for cell reattachment.  (+info)

Transplantation of osteoblast-like cells to the distracted callus in rabbits. (5/1372)

We carried out limb lengthening in rabbits and then transplanted osteoblast-like cells derived from the tibial periosteum to the centres of distracted callus immediately after distraction had been terminated. Two weeks later the transaxial area ratio at the centre of the distracted callus and the bone mineral density (BMD) were significantly higher in the transplanted group, by 21% and 42%, respectively, than in the non-injected group or the group injected with physiological saline (p < 0.05). Callus BMD as a percentage of density in uninvolved bone was also significantly higher in the transplanted group (p < 0.05) than in the other two groups, by 27% and 20% in the second and fourth weeks, respectively (p < 0.05). Mechanically, the callus in the transplanted group tended to be stronger as shown by the three-point bending test although the difference in fracture strength was not statistically significant. Our results show that transplantation of osteoblast-like cells promotes maturity of the distracted callus as observed at the second and fourth weeks after lengthening. The method appears promising as a means of shortening the consolidation period of callus distraction and decreasing complications during limb lengthening with an external fixator.  (+info)

Transplanted hepatocytes proliferate differently after CCl4 treatment and hepatocyte growth factor infusion. (6/1372)

To understand regulation of transplanted hepatocyte proliferation in the normal liver, we used genetically marked rat or mouse cells. Hosts were subjected to liver injury by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), to liver regeneration by a two-thirds partial hepatectomy, and to hepatocellular DNA synthesis by infusion of hepatocyte growth factor for comparative analysis. Transplanted hepatocytes were documented to integrate in periportal areas of the liver. In response to CCl4 treatments after cell transplantation, the transplanted hepatocyte mass increased incrementally, with the kinetics and magnitude of DNA synthesis being similar to those of host hepatocytes. In contrast, when cells were transplanted 24 h after CCl4 administration, transplanted hepatocytes appeared to be injured and most cells were rapidly cleared. When hepatocyte growth factor was infused into the portal circulation either subsequent to or before cell transplantation and engraftment, transplanted cell mass did not increase, although DNA synthesis rates increased in cultured primary hepatocytes as well as in intact mouse and rat livers. These data suggested that procedures causing selective ablation of host hepatocytes will be most effective in inducing transplanted cell proliferation in the normal liver. The number of transplanted hepatocytes was not increased in the liver by hepatocyte growth factor administration. Repopulation of the liver with genetically marked hepatocytes can provide effective reporters for studying liver growth control in the intact animal.  (+info)

Dynamics of myoblast transplantation reveal a discrete minority of precursors with stem cell-like properties as the myogenic source. (7/1372)

Myoblasts, the precursors of skeletal muscle fibers, can be induced to withdraw from the cell cycle and differentiate in vitro. Recent studies have also identified undifferentiated subpopulations that can self-renew and generate myogenic cells (Baroffio, A., M. Hamann, L. Bernheim, M.-L. Bochaton-Pillat, G. Gabbiani, and C.R. Bader. 1996. Differentiation. 60:47-57; Yoshida, N., S. Yoshida, K. Koishi, K. Masuda, and Y. Nabeshima. 1998. J. Cell Sci. 111:769-779). Cultured myoblasts can also differentiate and contribute to repair and new muscle formation in vivo, a capacity exploited in attempts to develop myoblast transplantation (MT) for genetic modification of adult muscle. Our studies of the dynamics of MT demonstrate that cultures of myoblasts contain distinct subpopulations defined by their behavior in vitro and divergent responses to grafting. By comparing a genomic and a semiconserved marker, we have followed the fate of myoblasts transplanted into muscles of dystrophic mice, finding that the majority of the grafted cells quickly die and only a minority are responsible for new muscle formation. This minority is behaviorally distinct, slowly dividing in tissue culture, but rapidly proliferative after grafting, suggesting a subpopulation with stem cell-like characteristics.  (+info)

Hepatocyte gene therapy in a large animal: a neonatal bovine model of citrullinemia. (8/1372)

The development of gene-replacement therapy for inborn errors of metabolism has been hindered by the limited number of suitable large-animal models of these diseases and by inadequate methods of assessing the efficacy of treatment. Such methods should provide sensitive detection of expression in vivo and should be unaffected by concurrent pharmacologic and dietary regimens. We present the results of studies in a neonatal bovine model of citrullinemia, an inborn error of urea-cycle metabolism characterized by deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase and consequent life-threatening hyperammonemia. Measurements of the flux of nitrogen from orally administered 15NH4 to [15N]urea were used to determine urea-cycle activity in vivo. In control animals, these isotopic measurements proved to be unaffected by pharmacologic treatments. Systemic administration of a first-generation E1-deleted adenoviral vector expressing human argininosuccinate synthetase resulted in transduction of hepatocytes and partial correction of the enzyme defect. The isotopic method showed significant restoration of urea synthesis. Moreover, the calves showed clinical improvement and normalization of plasma glutamine levels after treatment. The results show the clinical efficacy of treating a large-animal model of an inborn error of hepatocyte metabolism in conjunction with a method for sensitively measuring correction in vivo. These studies will be applicable to human trials of the treatment of this disorder and other related urea-cycle disorders.  (+info)

Shoukang Zhu, Shanming Deng, Qi Ma, Taifang Zhang, Chunling Jia, Degen Zhuo, Falin Yang, Jianqin Wei, Liyong Wang, Derek M. Dykxhoorn, Joshua M. Hare, Pascal J. Goldschmidt-Clermont and Chunming Dong ...
A primary assumption that guides current approaches to in utero hematopoietic cellular transplantation (IUHCT) is that the early-gestation fetus has an immature...
... is a therapy in which cellular material is inserted into a patient, its means intact, living cells. The main motto of cell therapy is to introduce cells into the body that will grow and replace damaged tissue. Organs and glands are used in cell treatment include brain, pituitary, thyroid, heart, pancreas, adrenals, thymus, liver, kidney, spleen, ovary and testis ...
PURPOSE. To evaluate the use of autologous serum (AS) from patients with severe ocular surface disease (OSD) in the development of transplantable corneal and oral epithelial tissue equivalents and to compare it with the use of conventional culture methods by using fetal bovine serum (FBS). METHODS. AS was obtained from patients with severe OSD secondary to Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Corneal and oral epithelial cells were cultivated in medium supplemented with either AS or FBS. Corneal and oral epithelial equivalents were constructed on denuded amniotic membranes. The bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) ELISA cell proliferation assay and colony-forming efficiency (CFE) of cells cultivated in AS- or FBS-supplemented media were compared. The morphologic characteristics and the basement membrane assembly of cultivated epithelial equivalents were analyzed by light and electron microscopy, as well as by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS. BrdU proliferation assay and CFE analysis showed that human corneal and oral ...
PubMed Central Canada (PMC Canada) provides free access to a stable and permanent online digital archive of full-text, peer-reviewed health and life sciences research publications. It builds on PubMed Central (PMC), the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature and is a member of the broader PMC International (PMCI) network of e-repositories.
Skeletal muscle has tissue-specific stem cells named "satellite cells". Satellite cells exist in a quiescent state between myofibers and the basal lamina. When skeletal muscle is injured, satellite cells are activated, proliferate, and differentiate into myofibers. It is reported that isolated satellite cells/myoblasts from healthy donors are able to fuse with host dystrophin-deficient myofibers after transplantation via intramuscular injection, and expression of dystrophin at the sarcolemma was observed. Therefore, myoblast transfer is expected to be a promising therapy for DMD. However, the numbers of cells prepared from donors are not adequate for clinical use. To obtain a large number of satellite cells/ myoblasts of good quality, we are developing a method to induce muscle stem cells from human iPS cells. Although autologous cell transplantation needs no immunosuppression, the genes require editing to express dystrophin. In addition, the time and expense required for the process impose a ...
Intramyocardial injections of cultured fetal cardiomyocytes after infarction in female rats in an ischaemia-reperfusion model increased ejection fraction at one month; male cells transplanted into the female hosts were identified at necropsy by detection of the Y chromosome using an in situ hybridisation technique.7 In a mouse model of doxorubicin induced global cardiomyopathy,8 local transplantation of fetal cardiomyocytes can also improve global function, suggesting the intervention of paracrine factors. Comparing intramyocardial injections of cultured fetal cardiomyocytes and allogenic fetal skeletal myoblasts after infarction in rats,9 the functional equivalence of these two types of cells was demonstrated with decreased cavity dilatation and increased ejection fraction of similar magnitude; this "anti-remodelling " effect was more pronounced for the lowest ejection fractions (, 40%) with an approximately 30% relative increase in ejection fraction without cavity dilatation. Similar results ...
Rajvanshi P, Fabrega A, Bhargava KK, Kerr A, Pollak R, Blanchard J, et al. Rapid clearance of transplanted hepatocytes from pulmonary capillaries in rats indicates a wide safety margin of liver repopulation and the potential of using surrogate albumin particles for safety analysis. J Hepatol 1999; 30: 299-310 ...
TY - CHAP. T1 - Hepatic preconditioning for transplanted cell engraftment and proliferation. AU - Wu, Yao Ming. AU - Gupta, Sanjeev. PY - 2009. Y1 - 2009. N2 - Hepatocyte transplantation has therapeutic potential for multiple hepatic and extrahepatic disorders with genetic or acquired basis. To demonstrate whether cell populations of interest will be effective for clinical applications, it is first necessary to characterize their properties in animal systems. Demonstrating the potential of cells to engraft and proliferate is a critical part of this characterization. Similarly, for stem/progenitor cells, demonstrating the capacity to differentiate along appropriate lineages and generate mature cells that can engraft and proliferate is essential. In various animal models, preconditioning of recipients prior to cell transplantation has been necessary to improve engraftment of cells, to stimulate proliferation of engrafted cells, and to induce extensive repopulation of the host liver by transplanted ...
Glaucoma is the term used to describe a group diseases characterised by a specific type of damage to the optic nerve head (ONH) known as cupping and a characteristic type of visual field loss. This loss is associated with progressive atrophy and loss of the retinal ganglion cells. Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. This project was aimed at investigating olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC), a population of radial glia proven to be neuroprotective in central and peripheral nerve injury models, and their potential to protect the retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma. We studied the interactions of RGC and OEC in culture. We show that OEC can straighten, ensheath and bundle RGC neurites as well as support the survival of RGC and their synapses in culture. We also show that OEC endocytose dead RGC in culture. We modified a rat model of glaucoma (where paramagnetic microbeads are injected into the anterior chamber of the rat eyes) and characterised the early and late ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Evidence for active acetylcholine metabolism in human amniotic epithelial cells. T2 - Applicable to intracerebral allografting for neurologic disease. AU - Sakuragawa, Norio. AU - Misawa, Hidemi. AU - Ohsugi, Keiko. AU - Kakishita, Kouji. AU - Ishii, Takashi. AU - Thangavel, Ramasamy. AU - Tohyama, Jun. AU - Elwan, Mohamed. AU - Yokoyama, Yasunobu. AU - Okuda, Osamu. AU - Arai, Hajime. AU - Ogino, Ikuko. AU - Sato, Kiyoshi. PY - 1997/8/22. Y1 - 1997/8/22. N2 - Human amniotic epithelial (HAE) cells have been used for allotransplantation in patients with lysosomal storage disease due to lack of expression of HLA antigens. Previously, we have reported the expression of differentiation markers for both neural stem cells, and neuron and glial cells. In the present study, we investigated the presence of choline acetyltransferase (CHAT) and acetylcholine (ACh) in HAE cells using different experimental approaches. Cultured HAE cells showed strong immunoreactivity against ChAT antibody. ...
Chen, H.-L., Chen, H.-L., Yuan, R.-H., Wu, S.-H., Chen, Y.-H., Chien, C.-S., Chou, S.-P., Wang, R., Ling, V. and Chang, M.-H. (2012), Hepatocyte transplantation in bile salt export pump-deficient mice: selective growth advantage of donor hepatocytes under bile acid stress. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, 16: 2679-2689. doi: 10.1111/j.1582-4934.2012.01586.x ...
The second day the conference focused on newer aspects of treatment for heart failure. Philippe Menasche (Paris) described the results of skeletal myoblast transfer in man. Based upon previous studies in animals, they had been able to optimise cell survival of thigh muscle myoblasts grown in culture. After 16 days culture a suspension containing 150 × 106 cells/ml is injected into scar tissue at the time of coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). Although some 90% of these cells die early after transplantation, those that survive remain committed to skeletal muscle form, but are resistant to ischaemia. To date, there is no evidence that skeletal myoblast transplantation leads to the formation of connexin 43 junctions, but arrhythmias remain a potential complication. Nevertheless, initial results in eight patients have shown evidence of improved cardiac function. A trial is proposed which will compare CABG grafting and injection of medium with CABG surgery and transplanted cells in 70-75 ...
Sigma-Aldrich offers abstracts and full-text articles by [Ali Jahed, James W Rowland, Todd McDonald, J Gordon Boyd, Ronald Doucette, Michael D Kawaja].
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Combining the kinase inhibitor Imbruvica (ibrutinib) with an investigational personalized cellular therapy known as CTL119 can lead to complete remission in patients with high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Penns Abramson Cancer Center (ACC). The team will present the results from its pilot study […]. ...
Rikke Bech, Babak Jalilian, Ralf Agger, Lars Iversen, Mogens Erlandsen, Kristian Otkjaer, Claus Johansen, Søren R. Paludan, Carina A. Rosenberg, Knud Kragballe, Thomas Vorup-Jensen ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Low-dose curcumin stimulates proliferation, migration and phagocytic activity of olfactory ensheathing cells. AU - Velasquez, Johana Tello. AU - Watts, Michelle E.. AU - Todorovic, Michael. AU - Nazareth, Lynnmaria. AU - Pastrana, Erika. AU - Diaz-Nido, Javier. AU - Lim, Filip. AU - Ekberg, Jenny A K. AU - Quinn, Ronald J.. AU - St John, James A.. PY - 2014/10/31. Y1 - 2014/10/31. N2 - One of the promising strategies for neural repair therapies is the transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) which are the glial cells of the olfactory system. We evaluated the effects of curcumin on the behaviour of mouse OECs to determine if it could be of use to further enhance the therapeutic potential of OECs. Curcumin, a natural polyphenol compound found in the spice turmeric, is known for its anti-cancer properties at doses over 10 μM, and often at 50 μM, and it exerts its effects on cancer cells in part by activation of MAP kinases. In contrast, we found that low-dose curcumin ...
View full text. Author: Vácz G, Cselenyák A, Cserép Z, Benkő R, Kovács E, Pankotai E, Lindenmair A, Wolbank S, Schwarz CM, Horváthy DB, Kiss L, Hornyák I, Lacza Z.. Year: 2016. Journal: Interv Med Appl Sci.. Volume: 8. Issue: 4. Pages: H848-H857. doi: 10.1556/1646.8.2016.4.6.. PubMed PMID: 28180006. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5283775.. Cited: 3. ...
Dedicated to Improving Your Quality of Life through the Use of Cellular Therapy.. We are a team of experts with more than 9 years of experience in the Cellular Therapy field. We provide the highest quality care during your quest to feel your best.. In recent years, there have been many exciting breakthroughs and therapeutic advances using cellular therapy. Our team of world class scientists has developed safe and effective procedures that may help improve your quality of life.. Cellular therapies may repair damaged tissues through various mechanisms of action. It has been proven that stem cells promote vascular repair and release growth factors that may help your own damaged cells and tissues heal.. Before undergoing cellular therapy, you should evaluate the provider. Ask them to describe the scientific support for the procedure and make sure that they are certified to perform it. Rehealths protocols and procedures are certified by COFEPRIS-Mexicos equivalent to US FDA. ...
Cardiomyoplasty is used when cardiac transplantation is not an option and the patient is asymptomatic at rest. The latissimus dorsum muscle is dissected free of its distal insertion and is wrapped around the heart. For the next 2 months, the muscle is stimulated with increasing frequency until it can contract in synchrony with each heartbeat. Six months after surgery, effects of an enhanced cardiac output should be evident.. ...
[113 Pages Report] Check for Discount on Global Systemic Mycoses Market Research Report 2017 report by QYResearch Group. In this report, the global Systemic Mycoses market is valued...
In the present study, we have shown that Robo proteins are expressed in cultured OECs and exhibit enriched distribution at the leading edge. A Slit-2 gradient indeed strongly repelled the migration of these cultured OECs. To our knowledge, this is the first guidance factor discovered to repel OEC migration. Because Slit-2 is highly expressed in the apical cells of OE, it is likely that it might help Robo-expressing OECs and olfactory axons migrate out of the OE through chemorepulsion during early development. Slits expressing in the OB might also regulate the stop and scattering of OECs that have arrived at the surface of the OB. OECs have been reported to pioneer the olfactory sensory nerves and provide a conductive substrate for the growth of olfactory sensory axons during development (Tennent and Chuah, 1996; Tisay and Key, 1999). An intriguing possibility is that the guidance of OECs by Slits might contribute to the guidance of axons because of the close interaction between neurons and glia. ...
AUTOLOGOUS CHONDROCYTE TRANSPLANTATION Melanie McNeal, PT, CSCS, CFT for patients of DAVID LINTNER, MD Articular cartilage (AC) provides a resilient surface for friction free movement of joints. It must bear ...
There is compelling experimental evidence to show that transplantation of skeletal myoblasts (SMBs) improves the function of failing hearts via paracrine effects. However, clinical application of this strategy has been curtailed due to arrhythmia occurrence and inconsistent outcomes observed in previous clinical trials of intramyocardial (IM) injection of SMBs. Severe inflammation and resultant global reduction of connexin43 have been reported to be causes of the arrhythmogenicity. Recent developments in bioengineering technology enabled production of "cell sheets" using temperature-responsive culture dishes, which allows retrieval of cells without enzymatic dissociation-related damages. We hypothesized that epicardial attachment of cell sheets would enhance retention, survival, and maintenance of functions of donor SMBs in the heart, with less myocardial injury, and therefore overcome the drawbacks of IM injection.. Methods & Results: After left coronary artery ligation in female Lewis rats, ...
Brigitte Bisaro, Giorgia Mandili, Alice Poli, Andrea Piolatto, Valentina Papa, Francesco Novelli, Giovanna Cenacchi, Marco Forni, Cristina Zanini ...
Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a type of specialized glial cell currently considered as having a double function in the nervous system: one regenerative, and another immune. OEC cultures resulted in continuous NF-B activation. The IFN-induced increase of iNOS manifestation was reversed in infected OECs. OECs are susceptible to infection, which can suppress their cytotoxic mechanisms in order to survive. We suggest that, in contrast to microglia, OECs might serve as safe focuses on for pneumococci, providing a more stable environment for evasion of the immune system. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a type of specialized glial cell that accompany and ensheath the primary olfactory axons through the olfactory pathway, from your olfactory epithelium to Natamycin small molecule kinase inhibitor the olfactory tract. OECs are crucial for olfactory axonal assistance and outgrowth inside the developing and adult olfactory program1,2. This real estate of OECs makes them a superb candidate ...
View more ,Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to analyze olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) proliferation and growth on Biosilicate and collagen bioscaffolds, and to determine whether the application of laser phototherapy would result in increased OEC proliferation on the scaffolds. The use of bioscaffolds is considered a promising strategy in a number of clinical applications where tissue healing is suboptimal. As in vitro OEC growth is a slow process, laser phototherapy could be useful to stimulate proliferation on bioscaffolds. Methods OEC cells were seeded on the Biosilicate and collagen scaffolds. Seeded scaffolds were irradiated with a single exposure of 830-nm laser. Nonirradiated seeded scaffolds acted as negative controls. Cell proliferation was assessed 7 days after irradiation. Results OECs were successfully grown on discs composed of a glass-ceramic and collagen composite. Laser irradiation produced a 32.7% decrease and a 13.2% increase in OEC proliferation on ...
Cell transplantation therapy is emerging as a promising mode of treatment following myocardial infarction. Of the various cell types that can potentially be used for transplantation, autologous skeletal myoblasts appear particularly attractive, because this would avoid issues of immunogenicity, tumorigenesis, ethics and donor availability. Additionally, skeletal myoblasts display much higher levels of ischemic tolerance and graft survival compared to other cell types. There is some evidence for improvement in heart function with skeletal myoblast transplantation. However, histological analysis revealed that transplanted myoblasts do not transdifferentiate into functional cardiomyocytes in situ. This is evident by the lack of expression of cardiac-specific antigens, and the absence of intercalated disc formation. Instead, there is differentiation into myotubes that are not electromechanically coupled to neighboring cardiomyocytes. This could in turn limit the clinical efficacy of treatment. This ...
After scientists injected paralyzed dogs at their injury sites with so-called olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC) taken from the linings of their noses, some were eventually able to walk. All the animals in the study suffered spinal injuries which prevented them from using or feeling anything in their hind legs.. "Our findings are extremely exciting because they show for the first time that transplanting these types of cell into a severely damaged spinal cord can bring about significant improvement," study author Robert Franklin, a regeneration biologist at the Wellcome Trust-MRC Stem Cell Institute, said in a press release. "Were confident that the technique might be able to restore at least a small amount of movement in human patients with spinal cord injuries but thats a long way from saying they might be able to regain all lost function.". YAY Science!. Now it seems the treatment has yet to be refined further but read the article and check out the quick video clip below.. ...
By: Dominik Zbogar This is a summary of a paper by researchers in Poland. Original article: Pawel Tabakow et al. (2014). Functional regeneration of supraspinal connections in a patient with transected spinal cord following transplantation of bulbar olfactory ensheathing cells Read More…. ...
Full time, Fixed term for 1 Year). The fellow will work full-time towards an MD(res) or PhD degree under the supervision of Dr. S. Saadoun and Prof. M.C. Papadopoulos within the Department of Neurosurgery. The project involves culturing human olfactory ensheathing cells, from olfactory bulbs, and implanting them into injured human spinal cord to promote neurological recovery.. National Training Number in Neurosurgery and successful attainment of at least ST4 level clinical training are essential requirements. Practical laboratory experience in cell culture and cell-based assays are desirable. The fellow will participate in the neurosurgery registrar on call rota and in daily clinical neurosurgery teaching.. For further information about this position, and to apply, visit http://jobs.sgul.ac.uk. ...
De Potter, Patrick. Clinical case--photo essay. Primary cyst of the iris pigment epithelium.. In: Bulletin de la Société belge dophtalmologie, , no. 307, p. 63-4 (2008 ...
Left ventricular function changes after cardiomyoplasty in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.: Dynamic cardiomyoplasty has been reported in the treatment of
Immortalized hepatocytes are an attractive cell source for hepatocyte transplantation and gene transfer. We compared the phenotype and immunogenicity of freshly isolated (FIH) and immortalized (IMH) rat hepatocytes. Effect of culture and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-agr, IFN-ggr) was studied on phenotype. FIH were isolated by collagenase digestion. Two SV40 immortalized hepatocyte cell lines were tested (RH1 and P9). Immunophenotyping was performed by FACS analysis using anti-rat-specific antibodies. Immunogenicity was evaluated by a mixed lymphocyte hepatocyte reaction (MLHR). FIH suspension was an almost homogeneous parenchymal cell population with few (1-2%) CD8+ cells. FIH showed a positive staining for ICAM-1 (20-35%) and for Class I (RT1A, 30-60%) but no staining for Class II (RT1B). After 48 h of culture, the already ICAM-1-positive cells were more strongly stained and additionally 3.6% of the cells (possibly endothelial cells) were Class II positive. IMH showed a consistent expression ...
Summary of Facts and Submissions. I. European patent application No. 00 948 918.8 with the title Muscle cells and their use in cardiac repair filed as a International application PCT/US 00/20129 was published under No. WO 01/07568. It was refused by the examining division in a decision dated 15 September 2006.. II. The decision of the examining division was taken on the basis of a main request and seven auxiliary requests which were all found to lack of novelty.. Claim 1 of said main request read as follows:. 1. A transplantable composition comprising isolated adult skeletal myoblast cells and isolated fibroblast cells, wherein the composition comprises from 20 to 70% skeletal myoblast cells. (see decision of the examining division, section X). The examining division observed, in particular, that document (4) on file (infra) described a composition of skeletal myoblast and fibroblast cells which were adult cells since the donor was identified as the subject of myocardial treatment. The ...
What is a peptide? Learn about our peptide research, synthesis and mapping for treatments as well as the science behind cellular therapy.
Chengdu Biopurify offers Retrorsine [480-54-6] - Synonym name: Beta-Longilobine Catalogue No.:... Customizes high quality Phytochemicals, from grams to kilograms, GMP is available. Offers compound library and high quality Herb Extracts.
Long noncoding RNA lncHand2 promotes liver repopulation via c-Met signaling. Wang Y, Zhu P, Wang J, Zhu X, Luo J, Meng S, Wu J, Ye B, He L, Du Y, He L, Chen R, Tian Y, Fan Z. J Hepatol. 2018 Oct;69(4):861-872. doi: 10.1016/j.jhep.2018.03.029. Epub 2018 Apr 11. ...
The strategy described here aims at narrowing the risk associated with ex vivo gene therapy as the medicinal product is thoroughly characterised before its use in the clinic. The validation process meets all safety recommendations of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) and the scientific community (Taylor et al, 2010; Goldring et al, 2011; Daley, 2012; Scadden & Srivastava, 2012). Hence, this strategy should help regulatory agencies in their task encouraging innovation while protecting patients (Buchholz et al, 2012; Abbott, 2013; Bianco et al, 2013a,b; Gaspar et al, 2013). Importantly, a successful clonal strategy necessitates the combination of efficient transduction, a superior culture system to efficiently expand the founder stem cells and a performant transplantation procedure. Our experiments make this clear demonstration using skin and validate a clonal strategy as the best option for safe ex vivo gene therapy by today standards.. The risk of insertional mutagenesis ...
Purpose: : To examine the characteristics of iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells cultured on amniotic membrane (AM) and to determine whether subretinal transplantation of this IPE cell sheet can protect photoreceptor cell loss in dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. Methods: : Human and rat IPE cells were cultured on the basement membrane side of dispase treated AM. After 2 weeks of seeding, the expression of several genes participate in the function of differentiated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells was evaluated using real time PCR and Western blotting. Ultrastructural changes were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. The IPE cell sheet cultured on AM was transplanted into the subretinal space of 4-week-old RCS rats, and the eyes were analyzed histologically at 12 weeks after grafting. The effect of transplantation of IPE cell sheet on the visual function was estimated by optokinetic reflex. Results: : IPE cells cultured on AM exhibited ultrastructural epithelial ...
Los Angeles, CA - September 12, 2017) For many years, HemaCare (OTCBB: HEMA) has been at the epicenter of cellular therapy, immunotherapy, and regenerative medicine research by providing researchers from biotech and pharma companies with mission critical human biological materials from reliable and recallable donors. This includes process development material for autologous therapies (patients own cells used to treat disease), as well as supplying starting material for allogeneic cell therapies (healthy donor material used to create "off the shelf" treatments). The ability to manipulate immune cells and reprogram them to target cancer and other diseases represents a new era in medicine, preceded by years of research and development using primary human cells from donors, including those collected and processed by HemaCare.. Our clients continue to request our expertise and rely upon our ability to provide cGMP collections as their development efforts move into advanced stages of development, ...
Learn how the CellBase CT from TAP Biosystems, which has been specifically developed to enable the automated ex-vivo expansion of autologous cell therapies, enables multiple individual patient products to be processed in parallel without contamination or cross-contamination occurring.
Immunotherapy is an attractive option to extend remission rates in ovarian cancer. The use of adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of ex vivo generated tumor-antigen sp...
Findings could one day lead to improved treatment of spinal cord injuries. Scientists have discovered the origin of a unique type of cell known for its ability to support regeneration in the central nervous system. Their findings, published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA (PNAS), raise the possibility of obtaining a more reliable source of these cells for use in cell transplantation therapy for spinal cord injuries.. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), as the name suggests, ensheath and protect the nerve fibers in the olfactory nerve, which transmit olfactory (smell) information to the brain from receptor cells sitting in the lining of the nose. Excitingly, OECs can promote nerve repair when transplanted into the damaged spinal cord. They can also be grown in dishes from pieces of nasal lining but, unfortunately, in such small quantities that this may not be a viable option for use in treatments.. Dr Clare Baker, from the Department of Physiology, ...
The Department of Veterinary Medicine at Cambridge University are currently 1 year into a 3 year clinical trial investigating the use of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells (OECs) in dogs with spinal cord injury (SCI), such as degenerative disc disease in Dachshunds. The aim is to repair the spinal cord with an injection of cells (OECs) taken…
TRAININI, Jorge C. et al. Myoblast Transplantation for Cardiac Repair: Results of a Three Year Follow-Up. Rev. argent. cardiol. [online]. 2006, vol.74, n.5, pp. 304-307. ISSN 1850-3748.. This study was performed as a follow-up of one of the first reports published in the world literature regarding the clinical implant of cells with myoblasts (previously reported in this journal). A total of 68 evaluable segments were analyzed and categorized in 4 groups: transmural infarction, non transmural infarction, ischemic or normal. In 4 patients who survived after 33 ± 6.05 months, there was a frank decrease in the number of segments with transmural scars, and an increase in the number of non-transmural and ischemic segments. The number of segments with transmural involvement decreased from 15 to 3, i.e., an 80% reduction (p=0.0005). A comprehensive assessment of non-transmural segments showed that although the overall number of such segments increased from 7 to 10, segments which were reported ...
Autologous cell therapy has had some remarkable clinical success, but to get to where it is today, industry has relied heavily on repurposed R&D equipment to manufacture individual batches of cell therapy. As patient numbers grow, traditional means of ensuring manufacturing reliability will no longer be adequate. The reliable delivery of autologous cell products for…
This week I attended the British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy annual conference in Cardiff. The aim of the conference was to showcase some of the amazing research going on in the field of gene and cell therapy (GCT). In this post I will give a summary of some the extraordinary research going on…
Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are the glial cells of the olfactory system. Their primary role is thought to be to provide support and guidance for primary olfactory axons. However, OECs are known to phagocytose bacteria and express immune markers and thus they may help to maintain a healthy environment. Interestingly, following widespread death of primary olfactory axons, there is minimal mobilisation of macrophages but yet the axonal debris is rapidly cleared. Purpose: We have therefore investigated whether OECs are the cells that are primarily responsible for removal of axonal debris. Methods: We cultured red fluorescent OECs from S100beta-DsRed mice and green fluorescent primary olfactory neurons from OMP-ZsGreen mice. Results: In explant cultures of DsRed-OECs and ZsGreen-neurons, OECs clearly contained green fluorescent axonal debris. When cellular debris from green fluorescent neurons was added to cultured OECs, the OECs extended pseudopodia and rapidly phagocytosed the axonal debris ...
Transplants of cells obtained from the olfactory system are a potential treatment for spinal cord injury and a number of clinical trials are in progress. However, the extent to which transplants improve recovery of function remains unclear and there are contradictory reports on the extent to which they support axonal regeneration. Here, we have used anatomical and electrophysiological techniques to investigate the repair promoted by olfactory cell transplants after a dorsal column lesion. Since the use of olfactory cells of varying type and origin may contribute to the differing outcomes of previous studies, regeneration of dorsal column axons was compared following transplants of pure olfactory ensheathing cells from neonatal animals and mixed olfactory cells from both neonatal and adult rats. Two to three months after lesioning, numerous regenerating fibres could be seen in each type of transplant. However, tracing of ascending dorsal column fibres showed that few regenerated beyond the ...
Preparation of primary Schwann cells and olfactory ensheathing cells. Primary SC cultures were generated using a protocol modified from that of Brockes et al. (1979). Briefly, both sciatic nerves were dissected from 2-d-old Fischer rat pups and placed into L-15 medium (Invitrogen, Paisley, UK), where the perineurium and residual blood vessels were removed. The nerves underwent dissociation to single cells using physical disruption and enzymatic digestion. After maceration, enzymatic digestion was performed using Collagenase (ICN Biomedicals, Aurora, OH) followed by 1% Trypsin (bovine pancreas trypsin; Sigma, Poole, UK) at 37°C. The reaction was stopped using a combination of bovine pancreas DNAase (0.04 mg/ml; Sigma), soybean trypsin inhibitor (0.52 mg/ml; Sigma), and bovine serum albumin (Sigma). The tissue was subsequently triturated six to eight times, using a 5 ml ground glass pipette and subsequently through 21 and 23 gauge needles. The cells were resuspended in 10% fetal bovine serum ...
Results Autologous cultivated oral mucosal epithelial sheets were successfully generated for all 17 patients. All patients were followed up for more than 36 months; the mean follow-up period was 55 months and the longest follow-up period was 90 months. During the long-term follow-up period, postoperative conjunctivalisation and symblepharon were significantly inhibited. All eyes manifested various degrees of postoperative corneal neovascularisation, but it gradually abated and its activity was stable at 6 months after surgery. Best-corrected visual acuity was improved in 18 eyes (95%) during the follow-up periods, and visual acuity at the postoperative 36th month was improved in 10 eyes (53%). ...
Park J; Wrzesinski SH; Stern E; Look M; Jay SM; Demento SL; Agawu A; Limon PL; Ferrandino AF; Flavell RA; Fahmy TM (2012). Enhanced anti-tumor activity by combination immunotherapy with sustained release of IL-2 and a TGF-β inhibitor from nanolipogel vehicles. In press in Nature Materials. Jay SM; Kurtagic E; Alvarez LM; de Picciotto S; Sanchez E; Hawkins JF; Prince RN; Guerrero Y; Treasure CT; Lee RT; Griffith LG (2011). Engineered bivalent ligands to bias ErbB receptor-mediated signaling and phenotypes. Journal of Biological Chemistry 286(31):27729-40. Selected by Faculty of 1000. Jay SM; Shepherd BR; Andrejecsk JW; Kyriakides TR; Pober JS; Saltzman WM (2010). Dual delivery of VEGF and MCP-1 to support endothelial cell transplantation for therapeutic vascularization. Biomaterials 31(11):3054-3062. Featured in Science Translational Medicine, 17 March 2010:Vol. 2, Issue 23, p. 23ec45. Editors Choice: Protein Cocktail Nourishes New Vessels. Roh JD; Sawh-Martinez R; Brennan MP; Jay SM; Devine L; ...
Lee is Cell Therapy Blogs founder and primary blogger. Lee is an executive, advisor, blogger, analyst, speaker, author and entrepreneur in the cell therapy industry. Lee is currently VP of Business and Corporate Development at RepliCel Life Sciences Inc. He was previously the founder and managing director of Cell Therapy Group - a consulting firm focused on the cell therapy and cell-based regenerative medicine industry. His is also co-founder/owner of RegenerativeMedicineJobs.com ...
Lee is Cell Therapy Blogs founder and primary blogger. Lee is an executive, advisor, blogger, analyst, speaker, author and entrepreneur in the cell therapy industry. Lee is currently VP of Business and Corporate Development at RepliCel Life Sciences Inc. He was previously the founder and managing director of Cell Therapy Group - a consulting firm focused on the cell therapy and cell-based regenerative medicine industry. His is also co-founder/owner of RegenerativeMedicineJobs.com ...
The global autologous cell therapy market is expected to grow due to the huge pool of unmet medical needs for cell based therapy, growing government support...
... (HSCT) is the transplantation of multipotent hematopoietic stem cells, usually derived ... Stem cell transplantation was pioneered using bone-marrow-derived stem cells by a team at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research ... See also: List of conditions treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Indications[edit]. Indications for stem cell ... Cutler C, Antin JH (2001). "Peripheral blood stem cells for allogeneic transplantation: a review". Stem Cells. 19 (2): 108-17. ...
Hematopoietic cell transplantation[edit]. On January 13, 2011, City of Hope performed its 10,000th hematopoietic stem cell ... peripheral blood stem cells collected by apheresis, and umbilical cord stem cells.[9] ... Southern California Islet Cell Consortium, Islet Cell Transplant Center, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. ... By 2016, this has grown to over 13,000 stem cell transplants. National Comprehensive Cancer Network[edit]. City of Hope is a ...
Islet cell transplantation[edit]. Main article: Islet cell transplantation. Islet cell transplantation may be an option for ... Stem cells[edit]. Pluripotent stem cells can be used to generate beta cells but previously these cells did not function as well ... involving an expansion of autoreactive CD4+ T helper cells and CD8+ T cells, autoantibody-producing B cells and activation of ... Hatipoglu, B (December 2016). "Islet Cell Transplantation and Alternative Therapies". Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of ...
Stem cell transplantation[edit]. In 2007, Timothy Ray Brown,[12] a 40-year-old HIV-positive man, also known as "the Berlin ... One study done in 2011 achieves successful CD4+ T-cell reconstitution as a result of CCR5Δ32/Δ32 stem cell transplantation at ... This novel cell-based therapy uses irradiated SupT1 cells as a decoy target for HIV to prevent CD4+ T cell depletion as well as ... Stem cell based gene therapy[edit]. In the past 7 years, scientists have been using different approaches of stem cell based ...
2019-03-19: Cell Transplantation. *2019-03-14: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research ...
Islet cell transplantation *see also digestive system procedures. Pituitary. *Hypophysectomy. *Transsphenoidal surgery * ...
Islet cell transplantation *see also digestive system procedures. Pituitary. *Hypophysectomy. *Transsphenoidal surgery * ...
"Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology. 17 (6): 667-74. doi:10.1016/j.semcdb.2006.11.003. PMC 2705932. PMID 17116414.. ... Transplantation. 20 (9): 1777-9. doi:10.1093/ndt/gfh961. PMID 15998650.. ... Heiner I, Eisfeld J, Lückhoff A (2004). "Role and regulation of TRP channels in neutrophil granulocytes". Cell Calcium. 33 (5-6 ... "Subunit composition of mammalian transient receptor potential channels in living cells". Proceedings of the National Academy ...
Robert J. Soiffer (17 November 2008). Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Springer. ISBN 978-1-934115-05-3. Retrieved 23 ... as well as abnormal looking cells (dysplasia) in at least one type of blood cell. CMML shows characteristics of a ... In adults, blood cells are formed in the bone marrow, by a process that is known as haematopoiesis. In CMML, there are ... Haematopoietic stem cell transplant remains the only curative treatment for CMML. However, due to the late age of onset and ...
"Stem cell transplantation for neuroblastoma". Bone Marrow Transplantation. 41 (2): 159-65. doi:10.1038/sj.bmt.1705929. PMC ... "Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation for Refractory/Relapsed Neuroblastoma". Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation. ... Observation, surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation[1]. Prognosis. US five-year survival ~95% (, 1 year ... A haploidentical stem cell transplant, that is, donor cells derived from parents, is being studied in those with refractory or ...
June 2008). "Stem cell transplantation for primary immunodeficiencies". Bone Marrow Transplant. 41 Suppl 2: S83-6. doi:10.1038/ ... cell responses to mitogens and allogeneic cells, cytokine production by cells Tests for B cell function: antibodies to routine ... natural killer cells and monocytes (CD15+), as well as activation markers (HLA-DR, CD25, CD80 (B cells). Tests for T cell ... Virus-specific T-Lymphocytes (VST) therapy is used for patients who have received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation that ...
On the cell surface, these proteins are bound to protein fragments (peptides) that have been exported from within the cell. MHC ... "Kidney Transplantation: Past, Present, and Future. University of Michigan Medical Center/Stanford University. Retrieved 14 Dec ... cell surface. • endoplasmic reticulum. • MHC class I protein complex. • ER to Golgi transport vesicle membrane. • integral ... regulation of T cell anergy. • viral process. • regulation of interleukin-6 production. • neutrophil degranulation. • positive ...
Scripps Center for Organ and Cell Transplantation. *Comprehensive cancer care at Scripps Cancer Center ...
"Intraspinal stem cell transplantation for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis". Annals of Neurology. 79 (3): 342-53. doi:10.1002/ana. ... Prion-like propagation of misfolded proteins from cell to cell may explain why ALS starts in one area and spreads to others.[27 ... One 2016 review of stem-cell therapy trials found tentative evidence that intraspinal stem cell implantation was relatively ... "Cell Death & Disease. 9 (3): 327. doi:10.1038/s41419-017-0022-7. PMC 5832427. PMID 29491392.. ...
Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with high intensity conditioning protocol has been performed in a few cases with ... There is a limited but encouraging therapeutic experience of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for SPS. ... "Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Stiff Person Syndrome". JAMA Neurology. 71 (10): 1296-9. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol. ... "Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for neurological diseases". J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 89 (2): 147-155 ...
Macrophages are a type of repairing cell that devour dead cells and pathogens, and trigger other immune cells to respond to ... "Liver regeneration in recipients and donors after transplantation". Lancet. 339 (8793): 580-1. doi:10.1016/0140-6736(92)90867-3 ... First, adult cells de-differentiate into progenitor cells which will replace the tissues they are derived from.[56][57] Second ... "Cell. 153 (6): 1219-1227. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2013.05.002. PMC 4394608 . PMID 23746839.. ...
"Toxic Leukoencephalopathy following Fludarabine-Associated Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation". Biology of Blood and Marrow ... Transplantation. 17 (3): 300-308. doi:10.1016/j.bbmt.2010.04.003. González-Suárez I, Aguilar-Amat MJ, Trigueros M, Borobia AM, ...
... or heterologous transplant is the transplantation of living cells, tissues or organs from one species to another.[3] Such cells ... T cells. Antigens of phagocytosed graft cells can also be presented by the host's class I MHC molecules to CD8+ T cells.[1][29] ... T cells) and NK cells (stimulated by the release of Il-2). Thus, the role of MHC molecules and T cell responses in activation ... where they coexist with the recipient's stem cells. The bone marrow stem cells give rise to cells of all hematopoietic lineages ...
Cell. 66 (4): 807-15. doi:10.1016/0092-8674(91)90124-H. PMID 1715244. Fegan, A; White, B; Carlson, JC; Wagner, CR (Jun 9, 2010 ... Transplantation. 64 (3): 436-43. doi:10.1097/00007890-199708150-00012. PMID 9275110. Liu J, Farmer JD, Lane WS, Friedman J, ...
These cells may constitute 90% or more of the marrow elements. Despite this lack of myeloblasts, these cases should be ... It can also involve bone marrow transplantation. Information on prognosis is limited by the rarity of the condition. Prognosis ... The most common symptoms of AEL are related to pancytopenia (a shortage of all types of blood cells), including fatigue, ... Acute erythroid leukemias can be classified as follows: 50% or more of all nucleated bone marrow cells are erythroblasts, ...
"Donor-specific B-cell tolerance after ABO-incompatible infant heart transplantation". Nature Medicine. 10 (11): 1227-33. doi: ... Lymphocytes of specific immunity T cells-including the subclasses helper T cells and killer T cells-and B cells. ... As a cell is indicated by the prefix cyto, a cytotoxic influence destroys the cell. Alloreactive killer T cells, also called ... The marrow's hematopoietic stem cells-the reservoir of stem cells replenishing exhausted blood cells including white blood ...
... with a single transplantation. Re-transplantation of encapsulated islets - a "booster" - was effective in providing glycemic ... Nature technology, 15, 358 - 36 3. Encapsulation System for the Immunisolation of Living Cells. US Patent 5,997,900 (1999) 4. A ... Taylor Wang, has developed an immunoisolation encapsulation system that protects cellular transplants, and sustains cell ... US Patent 6,001,312 (1999) 5. Capsule Patches (CP) for Cellular Transplantation without Immunosuppression. US Patent 8,673,294 ...
Cell Transplantation. 21 (9): 1997-2008. doi:10.3727/096368911X637452. PMID 22469297. Zhao, Dawen; Richer, Edmond; Antich, ... See also optogenetics which involves the use of light to control cells in living tissue, typically neurons, that have been ... Grazing copepods release any phytoplankton cells that flash, unharmed; if they were eaten they would make the copepods glow, ... Harvey, E.N. (1932). "The evolution of bioluminescence and its relation to cell respiration". Proceedings of the American ...
Stem cell transplantation is an important avenue for SCI research: the goal is to replace lost spinal cord cells, allow ... Types of cells being researched for use in SCI include embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, ... olfactory ensheathing cells, Schwann cells, activated macrophages, and induced pluripotent stem cells. Hundreds of stem cell ... CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link) Young, W (2015). "Electrical stimulation and motor recovery". Cell transplantation. 24 ...
Center for Cell and Gene Therapy . Texas Children's Cancer Center. Transplantation Biology. Texas Children's Cancer Center. ... cell and gene therapy, transplantation biology, tumor immunology and neuro-oncology. A major focus of the center is to develop ... Malcolm Brenner, MD, PhD - Director, Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Baylor College of Medicine Ralph Feigin, MD - Physician- ... Referrals for patients diagnosed with sickle cell disease are received from the East Texas region and 20 counties surrounding ...
"Transplantation of autologous olfactory ensheathing cells in complete human spinal cord injury". Cell Transplantation. 22 (9): ... "Paralyzed man recovers some function following transplantation of OECs and nerve bridge". EurekAlert!. 20 October 2014. Ben ...
T cells associate with and predict leukemia relapse in AML patients post allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Blood Cancer ... T Cells to protect tumour cells. Nature Communications. March 2018, 9 (1): 948. PMC 5838096. PMID 29507342. doi:10.1038/s41467- ... 细胞毒性T细胞(CTLs, killer T cells)负责杀伤被病毒感染的细胞和癌细胞,在对器官移植的免疫排斥中也有参与。其特点在于细胞表面的CD8蛋白质。它通过识别所有有核细胞表
Renal transplantation. Sickle cell anemia. Toxins, including ifosfamide (more commonly causing pRTA than dRTA), toluene, ... Cell Biol. 37 (6): 1151-61. doi:10.1016/j.biocel.2005.01.002. PMID 15778079. Buckalew VM Jr (1989). "Nephrolithiasis in renal ... Distal RTA is characterized by a failure of acid secretion by the alpha intercalated cells of the cortical collecting duct of ... 1997). "Familial distal renal tubular acidosis is associated with mutations in the red cell anion exchanger (Band 3, AE1) gene ...
Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the transplantation of multipotent hematopoietic stem cells, usually derived ... Stem cell transplantation was pioneered using bone-marrow-derived stem cells by a team at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research ... See also: List of conditions treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Indications[edit]. Indications for stem cell ... Cutler C, Antin JH (2001). "Peripheral blood stem cells for allogeneic transplantation: a review". Stem Cells. 19 (2): 108-17. ...
This article explores the process of transplantation, how to choose a donor, and the risks involved with such a procedure. Read ... Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is approved for use in treating some types of cancer and is an experimental treatment ... While the therapy is a form of stem cell transplantation, the stem cells are not the main part of the story. In fact, the key ... Stem cells are cells that have the ability to develop into a variety of different specialist cells within the body. ...
Hematopoietic cell transplantation for tolerance induction. In: Lanza R.P., Chick W.L. (eds) Yearbook of Cell and Tissue ... 1992) Donor dendritic cells repopulation in recipients after rat-to-mouse bone marrow transplantation. Lancet 339: 1610-1611. ... Graft Versus Host Disease Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Allograft Survival Donor Bone Marrow Renal Allograft Survival ... Yearbook of Cell and Tissue Transplantation 1996-1997 pp 287-290 , Cite as ...
Cell Transplantation publishes original, peer-reviewed research and review articles on the subject of cell transplantation and ... Cell Transplantation will report on relevant technological advances, and ethical and regulatory considerations of cell ... Cell Transplantation is now an Open Access journal starting with volume 18 in 2009, and therefore there will be an inexpensive ... Cell Transplantation. ISSN 0963-6897 (Print); ISSN 1555-3892 (Online) Visit publication homepage ...
Islet cell transplantation is an attractive alternative therapy to conventional insulin treatment or vascularized whole ... pancreas transplantation for type 1 diabetic patients. It represents a successful example of somatic cell therapy in humans ... Transplantation consists of a simple injection of few milliliter-purified tissue in the portal vein through a percutaneous ... risk of recurrent hypoglycemia and of diabetic complications are also seen as important benefits of islet cell transplantation ...
Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been used as curative treatment in both children and adults for hematologic ... Graft-versus-host disease Stem cell transplantation Skin cancer Squamous cell cancer Basal cell cancer Melanoma Autoimmune ... Basal cell skin cancer after total-body irradiation and hematopoietic cell transplantation. Radiat Res. 2009;171(2):155-63. ... Impact of chronic GVHD therapy on the development of squamous-cell cancers after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation: an ...
The preparative or conditioning regimen is a critical element in the hematopoietic cell transplant procedure. The purpose of ... Hematopoietic cell transplantation for aplastic anemia in adults. *Hematopoietic cell transplantation for idiopathic severe ... Hematopoietic cell transplantation (bone marrow transplantation) (Beyond the Basics). *Autologous hematopoietic cell ... Limiting transplantation-related mortality following unrelated donor stem cell transplantation by using a nonmyeloablative ...
A combination of drugs increases the number of blood stem cells released by bone marrow into circulation and could help ... Improving Blood Stem Cell Transplantation. Research Update March 13, 2013. A recent study conducted in mice, baboons, and human ... Meloxicam in combination with G-CSF may improve the success rates of blood stem cell transplantation by making it easier to ... This finding sheds light on how the body responds to injury and has implications for blood cell transplantation. The ...
Early trial results show autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has helped patients with multiple sclerosis walk ... Could stem cell transplantation yield a cure for MS?. Written by Honor Whiteman. on January 27, 2016 ... In the documentary, she revealed how she started to see amazing results within days of undergoing stem cell transplantation. ... The groundbreaking treatment being trialed is called autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) - a procedure ...
See The approach to hematopoietic cell transplantation survivorship and Malignancy after hematopoietic cell transplantation ... Preparative regimens for hematopoietic cell transplantation. *Thalassemia: Management after hematopoietic cell transplantation ... and Thalassemia: Management after hematopoietic cell transplantation and Hematopoietic cell transplantation for aplastic ... Hematopoietic cell transplantation for aplastic anemia in adults. *Hematopoietic support after hematopoietic cell ...
Service has opened a new laboratory in Edinburgh to offer around 12 people a year islet cell transplant therapy.Islet cell ... Islet cell transplantation. A small number of people with Type 1 diabetes can benefit from islet transplantation, a procedure ... "Islet cell transplantation can be life-changing for a small number of people with Type 1 diabetes and getting it to this stage ... Islets are groups of cells in the pancreas that contain the insulin-producing beta cells. In people with Type 1 diabetes, the ...
Studies have shown that stem cell transplantation could aid in the restoration of brain function in patients with medical ... Optimizing stem cell transplantation. BioPhotonics. Aug 2007 Researchers use labeling technique and MRI to track cells in vivo ... Still, they showed they could detect clusters of cells up to 18 weeks after transplantation, assuming that cells retain their ... However, concentrations of cells are high in vitro. The density of cells drops considerably when the cells begin to migrate and ...
Its important to weigh the risks and benefits of stem cell transplantation with your doctor as you consider your treatment ... Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (infusion of donor stem cells into a patient) is the best-documented curative treatment ... Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation. *Download or order The Leukemia & Lymphoma Societys free booklet, Blood and Marrow Stem ... On the one hand, transplantation has a proven curative track record for some CML patients. On the other hand, the TKIs may be ...
In bone marrow transplantation for patients weighing,60 kg, it is possible to obtain adequate nucleated cell count by ... Edited and published by : The Japan Society for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Produced and listed by : The Japan ... of patients after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation and is the leading cause of late morbidity, mortality and ... A current definition of gene therapy is the infusion of a therapeutic gene, or cells transduced with the gene, in order to cure ...
Purchase Immune Biology of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - 2nd Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN ... Immune Biology of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation 2nd Edition. Models in Discovery and Translation. 0 star ... Robert Zeiser serves as Full Professor of Medicine at the Department of Hematology, Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation ... Gerard Socies main field of expertise (clinical and biological); allogeneic stem cell transplantation with special focus on ...
Two studies published in the current issue of Cell Transplantation (19:12) investigate frontiers of islet cell transplantation ... Retrieving and preserving islet cells taken from nonliving donors for the purpose of islet cell transplantation to regenerate ... Rodolfo Alejandro, section editor for CELL TRANSPLANTATION and Professor of Medicine at the University of Miami Miller School ... "BM-derived cells have been found to differentiate into endothelial cells and their presence has been accompanied by a ...
Allogeneic stem cell transplantation involves transferring the stem cells from a healthy person (the donor) to your body after ... Patients Disease Information Treatment Types of Treatment Stem Cell Transplantation Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation ... white cells and platelets. The white cells and platelets, which contain the stem cells, are collected, while the red cells and ... Allogeneic stem cell transplantation involves transferring the stem cells from a healthy person (the donor) to your body after ...
... Pinar Ataca,1 Erden Atilla,1 Pelin Saracoglu, ... "Aspergillus Thyroiditis after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation," Case Reports in Hematology, vol. 2015, ...
Meerim Park and Jong Jin Seo, "Role of HLA in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation," Bone Marrow Research, vol. 2012, ... Role of HLA in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Meerim Park1 and Jong Jin Seo2 ...
Current research in Stem Cell Transplantation (SCT) focuses on improving transplant outcome through immune manipulations using ...
Stem-cell based therapies to strengthen the heart muscle and treat other diseases are beginning to show promise in human ... Tags: Biopsy, Blood, Blood Test, Cancer, Cardiac Surgery, Cell, Cell Biology, Children, Childrens Health, Diabetes, Efficacy, ... Experimental noninvasive tool assesses efficacy of stem cell transplantation. *Download PDF Copy ... The researchers found circulating exosomes delivered cell components to the target heart muscle cells, resulting in cardiac ...
Analysis of the blood test showed responding cells had changed their gene expression, behavior and secretions, suggesting this ... Researchers analyzed biomarkers secreted from transplanted human stem cells in the recipient blood of a rodent model of heart ... liquid biopsy could provide a window into stem cell activity and effectiveness. ... Experimental Noninvasive Tool Monitors Effectiveness of Stem Cell Transplantation. University of Maryland School of Medicine ...
Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) ... These data suggest that better control of GS prior to allo-HSCT is crucial to improve the outcome of transplantation for those ... A total of 44 patients (8.7%) had GS before transplantation. Patients with GS achieved comparable survival to those without GS ... Better disease control before allogeneic stem cell transplantation is crucial to improve the outcomes of transplantation for ...
Alloimmune T cells are central mediators of rejection and graft-versus-host disease in both solid organ and hematopoietic stem ... cell transplantation. Unique among immune responses in terms of its strength and diversity, the T cell alloresponse reflects ... High-throughput T cell receptor sequencing approaches have opened up new possibilities for tackling many fundamental questions ... The repertoire of alloreactive T cell clones is distinct for every donor-recipient pair and includes potentially thousands of ...
... "stem cell transplantation" or "hematopoietic cell transplantation" or "bone marrow transplantation" and "economics" or "cost ... Comparison of T-cell-depleted and non-T-cell-depleted unrelated donor transplantation for hematologic diseases: clinical ... Costs of hematopoietic cell transplantation: comparison of umbilical cord blood and matched related donor transplantation and ... Costs of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Transplantation 2006;82(2):147-153. ...
  • Identify and manage infectious complications of transplantation including suspected and documented bacterial, viral and/or fungal infections. (mdanderson.org)
  • Manage thrombotic and hemorrhagic complications of transplantation including bleeding, DIC, TTP and deep venous thromboses. (mdanderson.org)
  • Diagnose and manage other complications of transplantation, including hemorraghic cystitis, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, veno-occlusive disease and graft failure. (mdanderson.org)
  • Liver transplantation is still the most effective treatment for the patients with liver cirrhosis, However, serious problems are accompanied with liver transplantation, donor shortage, long waiting list, high cost, risk of rejection, operative complications and complications related to immunosuppressive drugs. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • SAN FRANCISCO (GenomeWeb) - A Cornell University research team aims to harness single-cell and cell-free DNA technologies to develop better, noninvasive methods to diagnose complications from kidney transplantation. (genomeweb.com)
  • However, other than observing clinical outcomes, lack of a repeatable, time-sensitive and noninvasive tool to assess the effectiveness of the transplanted cells within the target organ has slowed progress in the stem cell field. (news-medical.net)
  • Based on the notion that outcomes in human transplantation were unacceptable due to the requirement for long-term pharmacologic immunosuppression, and building on significant preclinical data, investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital attempted to achieve tolerance in humans. (frontiersin.org)
  • These data provide new insights into the mechanisms of action of transplantation in myeloma and provide rational approaches to improving clinical outcomes. (jci.org)
  • each play an important role in society by reporting the number and outcomes of transplantations and contributing new findings obtained from studies on individual topics. (omicsonline.org)
  • Optimizing the site of transplantation could improve clinical outcomes by minimizing required donor cells, increasing graft integration, and simplifying the transplantation and monitoring process. (nih.gov)
  • This chapter provides an overview on how this has been undertaken and achieved over decades to ultimately provide outstanding outcomes on par with other organ transplantation results. (intechopen.com)
  • Studies suggest that PBSCT has a better outcomes in terms of the number of hematopoietic stem cell (CD34+ cells) yield. (wikipedia.org)
  • This study provides evidence that mesenchymal stem cell transplantation could favorably impact a side effect of delivery and aging by releasing factors that can influence the urethra and vagina to treat stress urinary incontinence" said Dr Amit N. Patel, director of cardiovascular regenerative medicine at the University of Utah and section editor for Cell Transplantation . (medindia.net)
  • 1 Division of Stem Cell Therapy, Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, The Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 108-8639, Japan. (sciencemag.org)
  • 3 Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Lorry I. Lokey Stem Cell Research Building, 265 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5461, USA. (sciencemag.org)
  • The researchers concluded that DPaSCs could provide a source of stem cells for tooth regeneration and repair as well as a wide range of regenerative medicine applications in humans. (innovations-report.com)
  • Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Departments of Pathology and Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. (sciencemag.org)
  • Due to decreased immunity, post-transplantation patients are particularly susceptible to infections. (medindia.net)
  • The immediate post-transplantation course was uncomplicated and shortly afterwards his requirement for nasal desmopressin was reduced, presumably as a result of immunosuppressive therapy. (bmj.com)
  • In the new study, the researchers found that transplanted bone marrow stem cells carrying the normal lysosomal cystine transporter gene abundantly engrafted into every tissue of the experimental mice. (thaindian.com)
  • One of the disadvantage of cord blood is its low cell content which limits cord blood transplantation to generally low weight recipients, such as children. (amrita.edu)
  • Alternative sources of haematopoietic stem cells, such as HLA mismatched (haplo-identical) family members and cord blood, may be available. (nice.org.uk)
  • The members of JSHCT are playing key-roles for steering JMDP (Japan Marrow Donor Program), JCBBN (Japan Cord Blood Bank Network), APBMT (Asia-Pacific Blood and Marrow Transplantation Group) and WBMT (Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation). (omicsonline.org)
  • CD8+ T cells from mice with controlled myeloma had a distinct T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire and higher clonotype overlap relative to myeloma-free BMT recipients. (jci.org)
  • Furthermore, T cell-dependent myeloma control could be adoptively transferred to secondary recipients and was myeloma cell clone specific. (jci.org)
  • 2,3 Furthermore, recipients have a higher nonrelapse mortality if CMV reactivation occurs less than 100 days after transplantation. (hematology.org)
  • Upon intravenous transplantation, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can home to specialized niches, yet most HSCs fail to engraft unless recipients are subjected to toxic preconditioning. (sciencemag.org)
  • Equivalent PSC numbers were estimated in recipients of mixtures of genetically different cells, using the binomial model with covariance. (rupress.org)
  • mesenchymal stem cell based therapy has shown as promising tool in cirrhotic conditions as this type of cells have the ability to differentiate to different cell types including hepatocytes A series of studies have been performed to assess the application of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells to promote liver regeneration and to alleviate cirrhosis. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • 23 Autologous cells in general offer important safety advantages over allogeneic sources that include minimal risk of disease transfer, low risk of tumorigenicity, and the absence of immunosuppressive medication requirements. (genengnews.com)
  • The increased risk for malignancies was identified as a feature of the early AIDS epidemic, and several malignancies are recognized as AIDS-defining, including Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and certain forms of NHL, including diffuse large B cell lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, and primary central nervous system lymphoma . (natap.org)
  • Alemtuzumab is a drug that is designed to specifically attack some types of leukemia and lymphoma cells. (knowcancer.com)
  • Rituximab is designed to attach to lymphoma cells, which may cause them to die. (knowcancer.com)
  • We now have a tool to determine whether stem cell therapy will be efficacious for an individual patient, not only for the heart but for any organ that received stem cell therapy. (news-medical.net)
  • Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is emerging as a safe and effective therapy for HIV-infected persons with hematologic malignancies. (natap.org)
  • Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are at increased risk for a range of hematologic cancers for which stem cell transplantation (SCT) is considered standard therapy. (natap.org)
  • The Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy Department offers specialized training for physicians interested in bone marrow transplantation and stem cell therapy. (mdanderson.org)
  • Identify appropriateness of stem cell product therapy, growth factor therapy and transfusion medicine as is relevant to transplantation. (mdanderson.org)
  • Stem cell-based therapy has recently gained attention as a promising treatment for SUI," said study co-author Dr. Margot S. Damaser of the Cleveland Clinic's Department of Biomedical Engineering. (medindia.net)
  • Our results suggest a potential therapy for postpartum SUI," said Dr. Damaser.The group of female rats that received simulated childbirth injury (vaginal distension) and MSCs showed homing of the MSCs to the urethra and vagina, facilitating the recovery of continence.The researchers noted that other kinds of stem cells from different sources have been used in other studies aimed at treating SUI via stem cell transplantation. (medindia.net)
  • In recent years, advances in stem cell biology, have made the prospect of tissue regeneration a potential clinical reality, and several studies have shown the great promise that stem cells hold for therapy. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Transplantation of allogeneic (donated) stem cells is a mainstay of therapy for some forms of leukemia. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Cell transplantation is a leading candidate therapy to repair tissue damage in the traumatically injured spinal cord. (genengnews.com)
  • Washington, May 22 (ANI): Researchers from NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Centre suggest that genetically modifying stem cells prior to transplantation can help minimize the risk associated with the therapy. (thaindian.com)
  • Stem cell therapy offers enormous potential to treat and even cure serious diseases. (thaindian.com)
  • Researchers said that one of the biggest potential problems with stem cell therapy is the development of tumors. (thaindian.com)
  • Once the future stem cell therapist does the therapy, stem cells have the innate potential to produce more cells," he added. (thaindian.com)
  • This review will outline the current knowledge, including benefits and challenges, of the many current sources of stem cells for stroke therapy. (mdpi.com)
  • Cherqui said that adult bone marrow stem cell therapy is particularly well suited as a potential treatment for cystinosis because these cells target all types of tissues. (thaindian.com)
  • Although endothelial dysfunction does not necessarily preclude a favorable response to cytokine replacement therapy, indices of limb perfusion fail to reach ultimate levels recorded in wild-type animals, reflecting limitations imposed by a less-responsive endothelial cell (EC) substrate ( 1 - 4 ). (pnas.org)
  • Routine triple therapy immunosuppression (cyclosporin A, azathioprine, prednisolone) was maintained until 12 months after transplantation but azathioprine was then discontinued due to a persistently low white cell count. (bmj.com)
  • This novel cell therapy approach for treating subacute thoracic spinal cord injury is described in an article in Journal of Neurotrauma , a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. (news-medical.net)
  • Stem cells are collected (harvested) before conditioning therapy starts and are usually frozen until it is time for use. (thedailystar.net)
  • Human IDPSCs can be easily derived from dental pulp extracted from adult or 'baby teeth' during routine dental visits," said study lead author Dr. Patricia C.B. Beltrao-Braga of the highly ranked National Institute of Science and Technology in Stem and Cell Therapy in Ribeirao Preto, Brazil. (innovations-report.com)
  • Contact: Dr. Patricia C.B. Beltrao-Braga, National Institute of Science and Technology in Stem Cell and Cell Therapy, 2051 Tenente Catao Roxo St. Ribeirao Preto, Brazil. (innovations-report.com)
  • Although the only therapy that can cure the pancytopenia is stem cell transplantation, androgens, to which approximately 50-75% of patients respond, are used for those in whom transplantation is not an option. (medscape.com)