Cell Physiological Phenomena: Cellular processes, properties, and characteristics.Dental Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes and properties of the DENTITION.Digestive System and Oral Physiological Phenomena: Properties and processes of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM and DENTITION as a whole or of any of its parts.Reproductive and Urinary Physiological Phenomena: Physiology of the human and animal body, male or female, in the processes and characteristics of REPRODUCTION and the URINARY TRACT.Musculoskeletal and Neural Physiological Phenomena: Properties, and processes of the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM and the NERVOUS SYSTEM or their parts.Circulatory and Respiratory Physiological Phenomena: Functional processes and properties characteristic of the BLOOD; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.Integumentary System Physiological Phenomena: The properties and relationships and biological processes that characterize the nature and function of the SKIN and its appendages.Sports Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology related to EXERCISE or ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE.Reproductive Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes, factors, properties and characteristics pertaining to REPRODUCTION.Physiological Phenomena: The functions and properties of living organisms, including both the physical and chemical factors and processes, supporting life in single- or multi-cell organisms from their origin through the progression of life.Elder Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of adults aged 65 years of age and older.Urinary Tract Physiological Phenomena: Properties, functions, and processes of the URINARY TRACT as a whole or of any of its parts.Musculoskeletal Physiological Phenomena: Processes and properties of the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Virus Physiological Phenomena: Biological properties, processes, and activities of VIRUSES.Digestive System Physiological Phenomena: Properties and processes of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.Blood Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes and properties of the BLOOD.Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of children aged 13-18 years.Ocular Physiological Phenomena: Processes and properties of the EYE as a whole or of any of its parts.Nervous System Physiological Phenomena: Characteristic properties and processes of the NERVOUS SYSTEM as a whole or with reference to the peripheral or the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Respiratory Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes and properties of the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.Skin Physiological Phenomena: The functions of the skin in the human and animal body. It includes the pigmentation of the skin.Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutrition of FEMALE during PREGNANCY.Plant Physiological Phenomena: The physiological processes, properties, and states characteristic of plants.Bacterial Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes and properties of BACTERIA.Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena: Processes and properties of the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutrition of a mother which affects the health of the FETUS and INFANT as well as herself.Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of children aged 2-12 years.Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: The processes and properties of living organisms by which they take in and balance the use of nutritive materials for energy, heat production, or building material for the growth, maintenance, or repair of tissues and the nutritive properties of FOOD.Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of children from birth to 2 years of age.Raynaud Disease: An idiopathic vascular disorder characterized by bilateral Raynaud phenomenon, the abrupt onset of digital paleness or CYANOSIS in response to cold exposure or stress.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Indians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Asian Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.Mexican Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican descent.United StatesHispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Morphogenesis: The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.Anagallis: A plant genus of the family PRIMULACEAE that contains anagallosides, which are molluscacidal triterpenoid saponins.Plant Development: Processes orchestrated or driven by a plethora of genes, plant hormones, and inherent biological timing mechanisms facilitated by secondary molecules, which result in the systematic transformation of plants and plant parts, from one stage of maturity to another.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Arabidopsis Proteins: Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Glyoxysomes: Microbodies which occur in plant cells, and in some eukaryotic microorganisms, and which contain enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle. (Singleton and Stainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2nd ed)Microbodies: Electron-dense cytoplasmic particles bounded by a single membrane, such as PEROXISOMES; GLYOXYSOMES; and glycosomes.Peroxisomes: Microbodies which occur in animal and plant cells and in certain fungi and protozoa. They contain peroxidase, catalase, and allied enzymes. (From Singleton and Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2nd ed)Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Organoids: An organization of cells into an organ-like structure. Organoids can be generated in culture. They are also found in certain neoplasms.Ricinus: A plant genus of the family EUPHORBIACEAE, order Euphorbiales, subclass Rosidae. The seed of Ricinus communis L. is the CASTOR BEAN which is the source of CASTOR OIL; RICIN; and other lectins.Isocitrate Lyase: A key enzyme in the glyoxylate cycle. It catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate to succinate and glyoxylate. EC 4.1.3.1.

E-CELL: software environment for whole-cell simulation. (1/842)

MOTIVATION: Genome sequencing projects and further systematic functional analyses of complete gene sets are producing an unprecedented mass of molecular information for a wide range of model organisms. This provides us with a detailed account of the cell with which we may begin to build models for simulating intracellular molecular processes to predict the dynamic behavior of living cells. Previous work in biochemical and genetic simulation has isolated well-characterized pathways for detailed analysis, but methods for building integrative models of the cell that incorporate gene regulation, metabolism and signaling have not been established. We, therefore, were motivated to develop a software environment for building such integrative models based on gene sets, and running simulations to conduct experiments in silico. RESULTS: E-CELL, a modeling and simulation environment for biochemical and genetic processes, has been developed. The E-CELL system allows a user to define functions of proteins, protein-protein interactions, protein-DNA interactions, regulation of gene expression and other features of cellular metabolism, as a set of reaction rules. E-CELL simulates cell behavior by numerically integrating the differential equations described implicitly in these reaction rules. The user can observe, through a computer display, dynamic changes in concentrations of proteins, protein complexes and other chemical compounds in the cell. Using this software, we constructed a model of a hypothetical cell with only 127 genes sufficient for transcription, translation, energy production and phospholipid synthesis. Most of the genes are taken from Mycoplasma genitalium, the organism having the smallest known chromosome, whose complete 580 kb genome sequence was determined at TIGR in 1995. We discuss future applications of the E-CELL system with special respect to genome engineering. AVAILABILITY: The E-CELL software is available upon request. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The complete list of rules of the developed cell model with kinetic parameters can be obtained via our web site at: http://e-cell.org/.  (+info)

Titrating the effects of mitochondrial complex I impairment in the cell physiology. (2/842)

The mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system consists of five multimeric enzymes (complexes I-V). NADH dehydrogenase or complex I (CI) is affected in most of the mitochondrial diseases and in some neurodegenerative disorders. We have studied the physiological consequences of a partial CI inhibition at the cellular level. We used a genetic model (40% CI-inhibited human-ape xenomitochondrial cybrids) and a drug-induced model (0-100% CI-inhibited cells using different concentrations of rotenone). We observed a quantitative correlation between the level of CI impairment and cell respiration, cell growth, free radical production, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial membrane potential, and apoptosis. We showed that cell death was quantitatively associated with free radical production rather than with a decrease in respiratory chain function. The results obtained with human xenomitochondrial cybrid cells were compatible with those observed in rotenone-induced 40% CI-inhibited cells. At high concentrations (5-6-fold higher than the concentration necessary for 100% CI inhibition), rotenone showed a second toxic effect at the level of microtubule assembly, which also led to apoptosis. The correlation found among all the parameters studied helped clarify the physiological consequences of partial CI inhibitions at the cellular level.  (+info)

Workshop conclusions & recommendations.(3/842)

 (+info)

Time-resolved analysis and visualization of dynamic processes in living cells. (4/842)

Recent development of in vivo microscopy techniques, including green fluorescent proteins, has allowed the visualization of a wide range of dynamic processes in living cells. For quantitative and visual interpretation of such processes, new concepts for time-resolved image analysis and continuous time-space visualization are required. Here, we describe a versatile and fully automated approach consisting of four techniques, namely highly sensitive object detection, fuzzy logic-based dynamic object tracking, computer graphical visualization, and measurement in time-space. Systematic model simulations were performed to evaluate the reliability of the automated object detection and tracking method. To demonstrate potential applications, the method was applied to the analysis of secretory membrane traffic and the functional dynamics of nuclear compartments enriched in pre-mRNA splicing factors.  (+info)

Hyaluronan and proteoglycans in ovarian follicles. (5/842)

Proteoglycans are macromolecules formed by a protein backbone to which one or more glycosaminoglycan side chains are co-valently attached. They can be secreted by the cells, retained at the cell surface, or stored in intracellular vacuoles. Hyaluronan is an extremely long glycosaminoglycan which, at variance with other glycosaminoglycans, is released into the extracellular matrix as a free polysaccharide not co-valently linked to a core protein. Both proteoglycans and hyaluronan influence many aspects of cell behaviour by multiple interactions with other molecules. They are involved in matrix formation, cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion, cell proliferation and migration, and show co-receptor activity for growth factors. Both proteoglycan and hyaluranon synthesis change significantly during ovarian follicle development and atresia. This review describes the structure of these molecules and their possible function in ovarian physiology.  (+info)

Modeling electroporation in a single cell. I. Effects Of field strength and rest potential. (6/842)

This study develops a model for a single cell electroporated by an external electric field and uses it to investigate the effects of shock strength and rest potential on the transmembrane potential V(m) and pore density N around the cell. As compared to the induced potential predicted by resistive-capacitive theory, the model of electroporation predicts a smaller magnitude of V(m) throughout the cell. Both V(m) and N are symmetric about the equator with the same value at both poles of the cell. Larger shocks do not increase the maximum magnitude of V(m) because more pores form to shunt the excess stimulus current across the membrane. In addition, the value of the rest potential does not affect V(m) around the cell because the electroporation current is several orders of magnitude larger than the ionic current that supports the rest potential. Once the field is removed, the shock-induced V(m) discharges within 2 micros, but the pores persist in the membrane for several seconds. Complete resealing to preshock conditions requires approximately 20 s. These results agree qualitatively and quantitatively with the experimental data reported by Kinosita and coworkers for unfertilized sea urchin eggs exposed to large electric fields.  (+info)

Modeling electroporation in a single cell. II. Effects Of ionic concentrations. (7/842)

This study expands a previously developed model of a single cell electroporated by an external electric field by explicitly accounting for the ionic composition of the electroporation current. The previous model with non-specific electroporation current predicts that both the transmembrane potential V(m) and the pore density N are symmetric about the equator, with the same values at either end of the cell. The new, ion-specific case predicts that V(m) is symmetric and almost identical to the profile from the non-specific case, but N has a profound asymmetry with the pore density at the hyperpolarized end of the cell twice the value at the depolarized end. These modeling results agree with the experimentally observed preferential uptake of marker molecules at the hyperpolarized end of the cell as reported in the literature. This study also investigates the changes in intracellular ionic concentrations induced around an electroporated single cell. For all ion species, the concentrations near the membrane vary significantly, which may explain the electrical disturbances observed experimentally after large electric shocks are delivered to excitable cells and tissues.  (+info)

The osmotic migration of cells in a solute gradient. (8/842)

The effect of a nonuniform solute concentration on the osmotic transport of water through the boundaries of a simple model cell is investigated. A system of two ordinary differential equations is derived for the motion of a single cell in the limit of a fast solute diffusion, and an analytic solution is obtained for one special case. A two-dimensional finite element model has been developed to simulate the more general case (finite diffusion rates, solute gradient induced by a solidification front). It is shown that the cell moves to regions of lower solute concentration due to the uneven flux of water through the cell boundaries. This mechanism has apparently not been discussed previously. The magnitude of this effect is small for red blood cells, the case in which all of the relevant parameters are known. We show, however, that it increases with cell size and membrane permeability, so this effect could be important for larger cells. The finite element model presented should also have other applications in the study of the response of cells to an osmotic stress and for the interaction of cells and solidification fronts. Such investigations are of major relevance for the optimization of cryopreservation processes.  (+info)

  • In 1997, he was recruited to The Ohio State University to help create the Heart and Lung Research Institute where he was deputy director of the institute as well as professor of internal medicine, physiology and cell biology. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • From the initial attempts at purposeful genetic modification of a cell for the production of valuable compounds, we have now moved on to changing microbes genetically or metabolically.The arsenal of experimental and theoretical tools available for Metabolic and Cellular Engineering has expanded enormously, driven by the re-emergence of Physiology as Systems Biology. (whsmith.co.uk)
  • Thus, a gap persists between our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate insulin secretion, mostly derived from in vitro studies, and their relevance to in vivo physiology and β-cell dysfunction of T2D. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Discovery of cytoglobin and its roles in physiology and pathology of hepatic stellate cells. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • The molecular and mechanical mechanism of contraction in these nonmuscle cells, as well as their tissue level control ( 5 ⇓ - 7 ), are under intensive investigation ( 5 ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ - 13 ). (pnas.org)
  • It is believed that the molecular distinction between symmetric and asymmetric divisions lies in differential segregation of cell membrane proteins (such as receptors ) and their associated proteins between the daughter cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Molecular, Cellular & Physiological Biology Area is proud of its many lab classes and the connection to biomedical research. (csun.edu)
  • Although the factors regulating adhesion and migration have been extensively studied, hyaluronan - a high molecular weight and microns long polysaccharide forming the pericellular matrix around migrating cells, has been mostly neglected. (aps.org)
  • Methods of measurement of membrane voltage and membrane currents in isolated cells, recording of random pulse signals from membrane channels on molecular level. (vutbr.cz)
  • At the molecular level, little is known about the binding and entry of Chlamydia into the mammalian host cell. (jove.com)
  • The W-4PiSMSN incorporates deformable mirrors using two objectives, one above and one below the sample, and uses a set of algorithms to pinpoint molecular positions of proteins deep inside cells, resolving features deep below the surface of the sample. (photonics.com)
  • Testmetoder Yta Redovisning av Chemosensory Receptorer i heterologa Cells Sandeepa Dey 1 , Senmiao Zhan 2 , Hiroaki Matsunami 1 1 Department of Molecular Genetics and Molecular Biology , Duke University, 2 Department of Chemistry, Duke University Här visar vi ett protokoll för att utföra levande cell färgning som kan användas för att upptäcka luktreceptorer på ytan av HEK293T celler bekvämt. (jove.com)
  • Topics for the Miami Winter Symposia focus on areas of biochemistry in which recent progress offers new insights into the molecular basis of biological phenomena. (worldcat.org)
  • This volume summarizes the progress in selected areas of biochemistry and the insights into the molecular basis of biological phenomena. (worldcat.org)
  • We have implemented an unbiased cell morphology-based screen to identify small-molecule modulators of cellular processes using the Cytometrix (TM) automated imaging and analysis system. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Here we report the discovery of the fastest epithelial cellular contractions known in any metazoan, to be found in T. adhaerens dorsal epithelium (50% shrinkage of apical cell area within one second, at least an order of magnitude faster than other known examples). (pnas.org)
  • IL-1, TNFα and C5a cause the endothelial cells of blood vessels near the site of infection to express cellular adhesion molecules , including selectins . (wikipedia.org)
  • The cell cycle is a universal process during which, through a series of cellular events, single cell gives rise to two daughter individuals. (nature.com)
  • This communication is mediated by direct cellular contacts (e.g., synapse formation between neurons or between immune cells) and by soluble mediators (neurotransmitters or cytokines). (nature.com)
  • Chlamydia Attachment to Mammalian Cells Requires Protein Disulfide Isomerase Cellular Microbiology. (jove.com)
  • 1 At the cellular level, the tumor is comprised not only of cancer cells but also a diverse population that includes stromal cells, endothelial cells, components of immune cells, and cancer stem cells (CSCs). (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • A novel superresolution nanoscope allows 3D imaging of an entire mammalian cell and its cellular constituents at a resolution that is 20 to 50 times higher than conventional microscopy , with imaging depth improved approximately tenfold over state-of-the-art iPALM and 4Pi-SMSN implementations. (photonics.com)
  • One goal is to further push the envelope in the direction of live-cell and tissue imaging, two major roadblocks of modern superresolution techniques, and therefore allow visualization of cellular functions live in their physiological conditions at the nanoscale," said Fang Huang, professor of biomedical engineering at Purdue. (photonics.com)
  • This Review will focus on a subset of synthetic biology tools known as bottom-up techniques, which use technologies such as optogenetics and chemically induced dimerization to reconstitute cellular behavior in cells. (sciencemag.org)
  • It provides a framework for cell division and the trafficking of organelles and macromolecules, and also serves to regulate important cellular processes such as signaling, translation, and metabolism. (mcponline.org)
  • Transmigration of the leukocyte occurs as PECAM proteins, found on the leukocyte and endothelial cell surfaces, interact and effectively pull the cell through the endothelium. (wikipedia.org)
  • We have isolated caveolae from endothelial cells in culture and have identified several new proteins. (yale.edu)
  • By delivering suppressive cargos consisting of proteins similar to those in parent tumor cells to immune cells, TEX directly or indirectly influence the development, maturation, and antitumor activities of immune cells. (jci.org)
  • The most extensively investigated invasion mechanism requires the Type III Secretion System-1 (T3SS-1) encoded by the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1), a needle-like structure which directly injects bacterial effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm to manipulate cell signaling pathways leading to actin cytoskeletal rearrangement and bacterial internalization ( Ly and Casanova, 2007 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • The ascospores showed differences in the inner cell wall region at the lateral ridge of the spore and also qualitative differences in extractable proteins but did not differ in fatty acid or lipid content. (asm.org)
  • We show that the level of expression and the spatial distribution of hyaluronan at the cell-substrate interface, together with the surface density of extracellular matrix proteins, regulate cell adhesion and migration. (aps.org)
  • W-4PiSMSN is a versatile and powerful tool that promises a new perspective on how proteins distribute across entire organelles throughout whole cells, an as yet unmet challenge in cell biology. (photonics.com)
  • This study, for the first time, has demonstrated that tumor-bearing host-derived ImC, but not their progeny or Gr-1 + cells from control mice, are not only able to migrate into the tumor site and pick up soluble proteins, but also process them and induce Ag-specific tolerance of CD8 + T cells. (jimmunol.org)
  • The currently preferred method for producing recombinant proteins from E. coli is to grow the bacteria to high cell density and consequently increase the volumetric productivity [ 1 ]. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • These proteins, often called MT-interacting proteins (MIPs) ( 2 , 4 ), likely bind to MTs as a mechanism to regulate their own activity, to direct their subcellular localization, or as a concentrating mechanism at specific locations within the cell. (mcponline.org)
  • The large surface area provided by the MT network, and the cytoskeleton as a whole, likely serves as a matrix for the binding of hundreds of proteins to an extent that is dependent on cell type and environmental conditions ( 6 ). (mcponline.org)
  • Miami Winter Symposia, Volume 16: From Gene to Protein: Information Transfer in Normal and Abnormal Cells presents the expression and processing of genetic information at the levels of both proteins and nucleic acids. (worldcat.org)
  • However, it is known that in vitro cell culture conditions can alter the behavior of cells, proving that a particular subpopulation of cells possesses stem cell properties in vivo is challenging, and so considerable debate exists as to whether some proposed stem cell populations in the adult are indeed stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • My laboratory investigates the physiological and biochemical effects that neurotransmitters have on the behavior of animals. (csun.edu)
  • In contrast, we do not understand well even basic physiological behavior in these organisms. (frontiersin.org)
  • We explain contact-inhibition of locomotion in a new way, and show how the collective migration behavior varies with cell density. (aps.org)
  • Our goal is to understand how this nutrient-driven mechanism regulates stem cell behavior for lifelong optimization of organ form and function. (stanford.edu)
  • Cell Metabolism, 10: 208-218 (2009). (yale.edu)
  • Identifying the pathways that lead to APP phosphorylation in vivo , in normal physiological state, could help understand important aspects of APP transport and metabolism. (jneurosci.org)
  • The processes underlying the interaction between metabolism and circulation feature a multiscale nature: for instance, although metabolism takes place in cells, it modifies the hemodynamics of peripheral (capillaries) and central (heart) circulation. (epfl.ch)
  • The results suggest that E. coli B (BL21) tolerates high glucose concentration not only by its more efficient central carbon metabolism, but also by controlling the glucose transport into the cells regulated by the sRNA SgrS, which may suggest a way to control glucose consumption and increase its efficient utilization. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • According to that conjecture, early animal tissues, lacking rigid unifying cell walls, used contractions to counteract ciliary power and achieve coordinated motility ( 19 ⇓ - 21 ). (pnas.org)
  • White blood cells (leukocytes) perform most of their functions in tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adult stem cells are undifferentiated cells , found throughout the body after development, that multiply by cell division to replenish dying cells and regenerate damaged tissues . (wikipedia.org)
  • The cell cycle allows growth and proliferation of cells, development of tissues and whole organisms. (nature.com)
  • In the second stage these apoptotic bodies are shed from epithelial-lined surfaces or are taken up by other cells, where they undergo a series of changes resembling in vitro autolysis within phagosomes, and are rapidly degraded by lysosomal enzymes derived from the ingesting cells.Apoptosis seems to be involved in cell turnover in many healthy adult tissues and is responsible for focal elimination of cells during normal embryonic development. (nih.gov)
  • It is implicated in both physiological involution and atrophy of various tissues and organs. (nih.gov)
  • The majority of chemotherapeutic agents used in clinics are highly toxic to both tumor cells and normal tissues due to the lack of specificity. (dovepress.com)
  • These ImC accumulate in large numbers in spleens, lymph nodes, and tumor tissues of tumor-bearing mice and are comprised of precursors of myeloid cells. (jimmunol.org)
  • We now know that renin cells are precursors that appear early and in multiple tissues during embryonic development. (ahajournals.org)
  • The development of genetically encoded probes that allow quantification of ROS (reactive oxygen species) at a cell-specific and subcellular resolution in living tissues, and in real-time, have facilitated a more sophisticated understanding of the role of ROS in signalling and development [ 1 , 2 ]. (portlandpress.com)
  • Conclusion: The present review is aimed at providing an update on research and development efforts being made to create effective antiviral chemotherapeutic agents and approaches to their delivery to appropriate targeted cells or tissues. (eurekaselect.com)
  • The binding of PSGL-1 on the leukocyte to P-selectin on the endothelial cell allows for the leukocyte to roll along the endothelial surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is assisted through juxtacrine activation of integrins by chemokines and soluble factors released by endothelial cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the activated state, integrins bind tightly to complementary receptors expressed on endothelial cells, with high affinity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cytoskeletons of the leukocytes are reorganised in such a way that the leukocytes are spread out over the endothelial cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this form, leukocytes extend pseudopodia and pass through gaps between endothelial cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Selectins are expressed shortly after cytokine activation of endothelial cells by tissue macrophages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Activated endothelial cells initially express P-selectin molecules, but within two hours after activation E-selectin expression is favoured. (wikipedia.org)
  • We discovered that Nogo-B promotes the adhesion of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells and is a potent chemoattractant for endothelial cells. (yale.edu)
  • As such, many common diseases such as atherosclerosis, heart disease, cancer, macular degeneration and diabetes have a common signature of endothelial cell dysfunction. (yale.edu)
  • In addition, SR-A is found on smooth muscle cells and on a small subpopulation of endothelial cells in the lung ( 8 , 9 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • Invasion of non-phagocytic cells (i.e., epithelial, fibroblast and endothelial cells) involves either a trigger or a zipper mechanism mediated by the T3SS-1 or the invasin Rck, respectively. (frontiersin.org)
  • Specifically, the regenerative signals originate from the specialized endothelial cells that line the interior of blood vessels in the lung. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Dr. Rafii and his researchers had previously uncovered growth factors that control regeneration in the liver and bone marrow, and in both cases, they found that endothelial cells produce the key inductive growth factors, which they defined as "angiocrine factors. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The scientists found that removal of the left lung activates receptors on lung endothelial cells that respond to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). (bio-medicine.org)
  • When the investigators disabled receptors of VEGF and FGF-2 specifically in the endothelial cells of the mice, the right lung would not regenerate. (bio-medicine.org)
  • E-Selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) are adhesion molecules participating in mediating interactions between leukocytes and endothelial cells and have been found to be expressed in atherosclerotic plaques. (ahajournals.org)
  • In coronary endothelial cells derived from explanted human hearts, angiotensin II (10 −11 to 10 −5 mol/L) induced a concentration-dependent increase in E-selectin expression. (ahajournals.org)
  • The effect was measured by cell ELISA and duplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and reached its maximum at 10 −7 mol/L. Angiotensin II induced only a small increase in E-selectin expression in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells. (ahajournals.org)
  • In addition, only AT 1 -receptor, but not AT 2 -receptor, mRNA could be detected by RT-PCR in coronary endothelial cells. (ahajournals.org)
  • Therefore, it is suggested that AT 1 receptors mediate the effects of angiotensin II on E-selectin expression and leukocyte adhesion on coronary endothelial cells. (ahajournals.org)
  • 1 2 The adhesion molecules E-selectin, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 support monocyte adhesion to and interaction with endothelial cells and, hence, may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. (ahajournals.org)
  • VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 have been identified on endothelial cells covering atherosclerotic lesions in human coronary arteries. (ahajournals.org)
  • 3 The expression of E-selectin that mediates the adhesion of neutrophils as well as certain T lymphocytes and monocytes is restricted to endothelial cells. (ahajournals.org)
  • 10 Specific binding sites for angiotensin II on endothelial cells have been described, 11 and angiotensin II appears to have a modulating effect on several endothelial cell functions, such as prostacyclin, endothelin secretion, 12 13 and endothelial cell growth. (ahajournals.org)
  • In view of a possible functional relationship between the renin-angiotensin system and leukocyte adhesion in the pathophysiology of coronary atherosclerosis, the present study was designed to investigate the effects of angiotensin II on the expression and modulation of E-selectin, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 on human cardiac endothelial cells and on leukocyte adhesion. (ahajournals.org)
  • These experiments were performed with endothelial cells from epicardial coronary arteries and from microvessels of human hearts, since previous studies have shown functional differences between these cells in regard to their sensitivity to peptides and their ability to promote leukocyte adhesion. (ahajournals.org)
  • Apoptosis: a basic biological phenomenon with wide-ranging implications in tissue kinetics. (nih.gov)
  • A comprehensive in vitro and in vivo study using pH-responsive poly(ethylene oxide)-PbAE (PEO-PbAE) copolymer system demonstrated higher apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and effectively accumulated into the SKOV3 human ovarian cancer xenograft model. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Two hallmarks of cancer cells appear to be abnormal electron transport function and free radical leakage from the ETC. The free radical leakage is at levels which cause proliferation rather than apoptosis. (blogspot.com)
  • Here we propose a new system for quantitatively evaluating cancer cell invasion in a three-dimensional (3D), in vivo tissue-like environment. (rsc.org)
  • ImC are able to take up soluble protein in vivo, process it, and present antigenic epitopes on their surface and induce Ag-specific T cell anergy. (jimmunol.org)
  • However, whether ImC are able to take up Ags in vivo, process them, and induce lasting Ag-specific T cell tolerance is unknown. (jimmunol.org)
  • However, many compounds identified in screens using cell culture models are often found to be toxic or pharmacologically inactive in vivo 1-2 . (jove.com)
  • Impaired insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells is a long-recognized hallmark of type 2 diabetes (T2D) ( 1 ) and plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of the disease, as documented in countless in vivo studies. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • New knowledge from experimental studies has been incorporated into new models, with a special focus on the role of calcium in exocytosis ( 8 , 9 ), but because the model representation of the glucose-calcium-insulin secretion relationship is often incomplete, only limited extrapolation from in vitro to in vivo findings has been attempted, and β-cell dysfunction in diabetes has been marginally addressed. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Measuring superoxide dynamics in living intact cells, i.e. in vivo , is of particular interest as in most systems superoxide is the precursor for most other ROS and RNS (reactive nitrogen species) such as hydrogen peroxide, the hydroxyl radical or peroxynitrite. (portlandpress.com)
  • This phenomenon can be observed as well in vivo as in vitro. (epfl.ch)
  • have addressed the physiological and pharmacological relevance of basal receptor activity in vivo. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Genetic methods to enrich for mother cells in populations by inducing death of daughter cells have been developed, but population sizes are still limited by the frequency with which random mutations that compromise the selection systems occur. (jove.com)
  • We also show that unique cell and tissue architecture indeed minimizes the load on a contracting cell. (pnas.org)
  • Finally, we suggest a physiological role for these contractions: maintaining the integrity of such a minimalistic tissue. (pnas.org)
  • Live imaging reveals emergent contractile patterns that are mostly sporadic single-cell events, but also include propagating contraction waves across the tissue. (pnas.org)
  • We show that cell contraction speed can be explained by current models of nonmuscle actin-myosin bundles without load, while the tissue architecture and unique mechanical properties are softening the tissue, minimizing the load on a contracting cell. (pnas.org)
  • We propose a hypothesis, in which the physiological role of the contraction dynamics is to resist external stresses while avoiding tissue rupture ("active cohesion"), a concept that can be further applied to engineering of active materials. (pnas.org)
  • In this histological tissue, three types of cells are present: erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBCs), leukocytes (white blood cells, WBCs) and thrombocytes (platelets, in mammals). (angelfire.com)
  • Unlike for embryonic stem cells, the use of human adult stem cells in research and therapy is not considered to be controversial , as they are derived from adult tissue samples rather than human embryos designated for scientific research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Under normal conditions, tissue stem cells divide slowly and infrequently. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here, we highlight recent human and rodent studies that support the notion that the ability to recruit new fat cells through adipogenesis is a critical determinant of healthy adipose tissue distribution and remodeling in obesity. (jci.org)
  • Furthermore, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the identity of tissue-resident progenitor populations in WAT made possible through single-cell RNA sequencing analysis. (jci.org)
  • M2 macrophages moderate the inflammatory response, eliminate cell debris, and promote angiogenesis and tissue remodeling ( 3 , 5 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • SR-A is restricted to the myeloid lineage and is expressed on most mature tissue macrophages and on bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and splenic dendritic cells but not on their immature precursor monocytes. (jimmunol.org)
  • This work is providing evidence on how the tissue-specific and time-dependent expression of cell surface carbohydrates may be controlled. (go.jp)
  • It is interesting to note that Hugo Ribbert (1855-1920), professor of pathology in Bonn, formulated a modified version of Cohnheim's theory considering that sequestration of undifferentiated cells could take place not only during development, but also during the life of the individual because such cells could be generated if a lack of "tissue tension" appears. (hindawi.com)
  • On the contrary, if cells are maintained in their normal physiological context within a network of tissue interactions, their proliferation capacity would be counteracted by this tension. (hindawi.com)
  • Physical interpretation of electric phenomena in living tissue constitutes a special area of biophysics. (vutbr.cz)
  • The subject ‚Bioelectric phenomena' acquaints the students with biophysical basis of the genesis of electric signals on different structural levels , with passive electric properties a of living tissue, and with currently available methods of bioelectric measurements. (vutbr.cz)
  • not only can gene expression be manipulated and lineages traced at single-cell and whole-tissue levels, but complete population counts of all cell types are possible. (stanford.edu)
  • In 2001, we discovered cytoglobin (CYGB) in hepatic stellate cells (HSC), (1) which are important regulators of tissue repair in the damaged liver. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Regeneration is a process in which tissue parenchymal cells play a major role in reconstructing the lost part of the tissue, resulting in both structural and functional restoration. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Repair is a process in which non-parenchymal connective tissue cells largely contribute to reconstructing the damaged tissue, resulting in structural but not functional restoration. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • An unbiased cell morphology-based screen for new, biologically active small molecules. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Four human-cancer cell lines and one noncancerous primary cell type were treated with 107 small molecules comprising four different protein kinase-inhibitor scaffolds. (biomedsearch.com)
  • What roles do various intracellular molecules have in reducing or exacerbating this phenomenon? (csun.edu)
  • Tumor-derived exosomes (TEX) are harbingers of tumor-induced immune suppression: they carry immunosuppressive molecules and factors known to interfere with immune cell functions. (jci.org)
  • M1 macrophages classically are activated by IFN-γ, with or without microbial products, produce large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines, express high levels of MHC molecules, and are implicated in the killing of pathogens and tumor cells ( 3 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • 1990). When copper availability is adequate to allow the synthesis of the full complement of plastocyanin (~ 8 x 10 6 molecules per cell), the Cyc6 gene encoding cytochrome c 6 is transcriptionally silent (Merchant et al. (searlescholars.net)
  • Cancer is a complex disease involving many different cell types, extracellular matrices, immune factors, signaling molecules, and physiological phenomena. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • During the past decade, a set of pathways collectively known as "RNA silencing" has been shown to use small RNA molecules to regulate gene expression and protect cells from pathogens. (keystonesymposia.org)
  • Written by a diverse group of leading researchers, Rhythms in Plants will spark the interest of readers from many branches of science: from physicists and chemists wishing to learn about the multi-faceted rhythms in plants, to biologists and ecologists involved in the state-of-the-art modelling of complex rhythmic phenomena. (nhbs.com)
  • and just as little, we may expect, will a knowledge of the origin of the existing and extinct species of plants and animals, be the result of physiological and geological investigation. (todayinsci.com)
  • These properties can be illustrated with relative ease in vitro , using methods such as clonogenic assays , where the progeny of a single cell is characterized. (wikipedia.org)
  • It can be induced by modifying the growth medium when stem cells are cultured in vitro or transplanting them to an organ of the body different from the one they were originally isolated from. (wikipedia.org)
  • Finally, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with 4F, a small peptide SR-A ligand able to compete with physiological SR-A ligands in vitro, recapitulates the inhibition of tumor progression and metastasis observed in SR-A −/− mice. (jimmunol.org)
  • We then argue that these deformations allow cells to affect each other with novel long-range (in time) interactions and that these may be responsible for patterns observed both in vitro and in tumor samples. (aps.org)
  • These cells can suppress T cells in vitro. (jimmunol.org)
  • Moreover, in vitro experiments using cells transfected with recombinant MOR indicate that basal activity of the receptor is regulated by morphine pretreatment, resulting in at least two significant changes in receptor and ligand properties. (aspetjournals.org)
  • The pathologist must be careful to differentiate such lesions from salivary neoplasms with sebaceous cells, such as sebaceous lymphadenoma and sebaceous adenoma, and their malignant counterparts sebaceous lymphadenocarcinoma and sebaceous carcinoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nanoviscosity of the cytoplasm is a key factor affecting diffusion of biomolecules and - as a consequence - rates of biochemical reactions in a cell. (nature.com)
  • Thus, the question arises, whether rates of biochemical reactions depend on the point of cell cycle. (nature.com)
  • First, we address the quantitative analysis of the biochemical reactions that are responsible of energy production in muscle cells. (epfl.ch)
  • In the Oct. 28 issue of the journal Cell , the research team reports that they have uncovered the biochemical signals in mice that trigger generation of new lung alveoli, the numerous, tiny, grape-like sacs within the lung where oxygen exchange takes place. (bio-medicine.org)
  • In this study we demonstrate that melatonin, a pineal hormone with recently established antioxidant properties, is remarkably effective in preventing death of cultured neuroblastoma cells as well as oxidative damage and intracellular Ca 2+ increases induced by a cytotoxic fragment of Aβ. (jneurosci.org)
  • The effects of melatonin were extremely reproducible and corroborated by multiple quantitative methods, including cell viability studies by confocal laser microscopy, electron microscopy, and measurements of intracellular calcium levels. (jneurosci.org)
  • Nanoviscosity is an outcome of variable chemical and structural factors, which can temporarily change with cell-cycle associated changes of intracellular architecture. (nature.com)
  • In mammals, long-term energy storage is achieved through production of intracellular triglycerides, stored within specialized cells called white adipocytes. (jci.org)
  • By fusing the kinase with Renilla luciferase and the DARPin to GFP, an energy transfer from luciferase to GFP can be observed in COS-7 cells upon intracellular complex formation. (pnas.org)
  • Pubmed ID: 16925789 For Chlamydia, an intracellular pathogen of humans, host cell invasion is obligatory for survival, growth and pathogenesis. (jove.com)
  • The arterial diameter oscillations are attributed to the contractile activity of the smooth muscle cells which is directly linked to their intracellular calcium concentration. (epfl.ch)
  • These arteries have been observed under confocal fluorescence microscope allowing to quantify the intracellular calcium concentration in smooth muscle cells. (epfl.ch)
  • This consideration appeared to be challengeable because, unlike Mb-expressing cells, which are highly contractile (e.g., cardiac and skeletal muscle cells), the hitherto-known functions of HSCs and their activation were not fully discussed from the viewpoint of the intracellular [O.sub.homeostasis of HSCs. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Haemotaphonomy or hemotaphonomy (from the Greek haima for blood, taphos for burial, and nomos for law) is the science that deals with the cytomorphology of the blood cells in bloodstains. (angelfire.com)
  • These corpuscles have also been identified in prehistoric immovable items, such as an early Holocene building at ay n Tepesi (Turkey), containing anucleate red blood cells, human immunoglobulin G (IgG) and both human and non-human haemoglobin (Hb) on a stone slab. (angelfire.com)
  • For example, the carbohydrate ligand for P-selectin, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), is expressed by different types of leukocytes (white blood cells). (wikipedia.org)
  • The physiological changes following the reaction of lead upon red blood cells are numerous and show the marked effects of a change in the cell surface. (rupress.org)
  • The effects of lead upon red blood cells are thus manifested by shrinkage, inability to expand, increased brittleness, and loss of the normal consistency which makes their surface sticky. (rupress.org)
  • Bilirubin comes from red blood cells. (slideshare.net)
  • When red blood cells get old, they are destroyed. (slideshare.net)
  • Hemoglobin, the iron-containing chemical in red blood cells that carries oxygen, is released from the destroyed red blood cells after the iron it contains is removed. (slideshare.net)
  • Conjugated bilirubin is distinguished from the bilirubin that is released from the red blood cells and not yet removed from the blood which is termed unconjugated bilirubin.Jaundice occurs when there is 1) too much bilirubin being produced for the liver to remove from the blood. (slideshare.net)
  • Another physiological phenomenon involving cold temperatures, is the effect these temperatures have on hemoglobin in the red blood cells. (bikeforums.net)
  • A good physiological experiment like a good physical one requires that it should present anywhere, at any time, under identical conditions, the same certain and unequivocal phenomena that can always be confirmed. (rice.edu)
  • Cancer cell proliferation is guided through the micropassage because of the physical restriction imposed by the surrounding solid shell regions. (rsc.org)
  • Contractile cells such as fibroblasts exert physical forces on the surrounding extracellular matrix ECM and these forces can lead to material remodeling. (aps.org)
  • These physical changes are caused by very small strains (10 −5 ) at ultrasonic frequencies (10 6 Hz), but are closely analogous to those caused by relatively large strains (10 −1 ) at physiological frequencies (10 0 Hz). (rsc.org)
  • Using the technique developed here, we quantify the total active traction profiles that aggregates of mammalian cells exert on the boundary of synthetic spherical hydrogel bodies and report the stress profiles within tumor-cell spheroids. (aps.org)
  • Here we focus on a hydroxyl-substituted analog (hydroxy-PP) of the known Src-family kinase inhibitor PP2 because it induced cell-specific morphological features distinct from all known kinase inhibitors in the collection. (biomedsearch.com)
  • We chose N2a cells for most of the experiments because these cells exhibit larger cytoplasmic areas and better attachment to plates than PC12 cells, allowing better morphological analysis of cell damage. (jneurosci.org)
  • Its morphological features suggest that it is an active, inherently programmed phenomenon, and it has been shown that it can be initiated or inhibited by a variety of environmental stimuli, both physiological and pathological.The structural changes take place in two discrete stages. (nih.gov)
  • This idea was not revolutionary in itself because, as early as 1838, Johannes Müller (1801-1858) had described tumors as the abnormal continuation of embryonic cell development on the basis of morphological similarities. (hindawi.com)
  • But Cohnheim went further than the morphological similarities by imagining a common origin of all tumors based on the presence of persistent embryonic cells in the body. (hindawi.com)
  • Studies of this phenomenon using cultured tumor cells showed that these vesicles were produced in abundance and induced a variety of functional alterations in immune cells. (jci.org)
  • Alternatively activated macrophages express the pattern recognition receptor scavenger receptor A (SR-A). We demonstrated previously that coculture of macrophages with tumor cells upregulates macrophage SR-A expression. (jimmunol.org)
  • Exosomes, small membrane-bound vesicles, are a class of extracellular vesicles (EVs) made and released by most, if not all, cells. (jci.org)
  • This is possible because juxtaglomerular cells are sensors strategically located in the juxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA), where they receive and interpret signals that convey the composition and volume of the extracellular fluid and the level of perfusion pressure. (ahajournals.org)
  • The nervous and immune systems consist of complex networks of cells that monitor signals and respond in a specific manner. (csun.edu)
  • Cytokines are a group of polypeptides used as signals between cells of the peripheral immune system and the central nervous system. (csun.edu)
  • In the auditory hair cells of young postnatal mice and rats, a reduction in mechanotransducer current, via pharmacological channel blockers or disruption of tip links, leads to stereocilia shape changes and shortening. (elifesciences.org)
  • They migrate extensively throughout the embryo and form most of the head and peripheral nervous system, giving rise to sensory and sympathetic ganglia, heart regions, glia, head bones, teeth, muscle cells, sensory organs, melanocytes and other cell types. (csun.edu)
  • The immune system and the nervous system are highly complex organs composed of various different cells that must interact with each other for proper function of the system. (nature.com)
  • However, they can also diffuse in the blood and bind to nonneuronal cells, or they can be released from efferent nerve endings directly in peripheral organs, such as the spleen, lymph nodes, glands, the intestine, and other organs. (nature.com)
  • Ultradian Growth Oscillations in Organs: Physiological Signal or Noise? (nhbs.com)
  • Transmission electron micrograph of an adult stem cell displaying typical ultrastructural characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symmetric division gives rise to two identical daughter stem cells, whereas asymmetric division produces one stem cell and one progenitor cell with limited self-renewal potential. (wikipedia.org)
  • The niche the stem cell is found in plays a large role in maintaining quiescence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Perturbed niches cause the stem cell to begin actively dividing again to replace lost or damaged cells until the niche is restored. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ability to regulate the cell cycle in response to external cues helps prevent stem cell exhaustion, or the gradual loss of stem cells following an altered balance between dormant and active states. (wikipedia.org)
  • This phenomenon is referred to as stem cell transdifferentiation or plasticity. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is yet no consensus among biologists on the prevalence and physiological and therapeutic relevance of stem cell plasticity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The elsewhere uncharted security Patricia Neal is been a expression on stem, cell, and aging for romantically sixty others. (smokintex.com)
  • Neural crest cells are a stem cell population that migrates from the neural tube early in development. (csun.edu)
  • From the mid-19th century when the first theory on the embryonic origin of cancer was formulated to works on embryonal carcinoma cells in the mid-20th century, many steps have been crossed leading to the current cancer stem cell theory postulating that tumor growth is supported by a small fraction of the tumoral cells that have stem-like properties. (hindawi.com)
  • However, in the last fifteen years, many works regularly encourage us to revise the concept of cancer stem cell. (hindawi.com)
  • In adult flies, the midgut is a stem cell-based organ analogous to the vertebrate small intestine. (stanford.edu)
  • Our data suggest that hyaluronan at the cell-substrate interface regulates the adhesion strength by exerting repulsive forces counteracting focal adhesions. (aps.org)
  • The invention discloses a cell culture support which provides for the adhesion and culturing of one or more adhesive cells using a photoresist in which to provide a particular patterned design on a surface of the support. (google.com)
  • Also a reagent can be added to pretreat the support surface in order to facilitate adhesion at the photoresist prior to applying the photoresist into the cell culture support. (google.com)
  • Collagen specifically affects the cell adhesion rate or the morphology of the cells to be adhered to the support. (google.com)
  • 3. The cell culture support of claim 1 wherein the cell culture support surface is pretreated with a reagent which facilitates adhesion at the photoresist prior to applying the photoresist into the cell culture support surface. (google.com)
  • Well Plate-coupled Microfluidic Devices Designed for Facile Image-based Cell Adhesion and Transmigration Assays Journal of Biomolecular Screening. (jove.com)
  • Cancer cells overexpress aberrant forms and amounts of mucins, which contribute to tumor development by regulating cell growth, survival, adhesion, invasion and immune responses. (dissertations.se)
  • The first section involves the study of secretory miRNAs in cell-cell communication, and the second, the study of circulating miRNAs in body fluids. (springer.com)
  • The degradation occurs when the cells were exposed to the non-metabolizable glucose analog alpha methyl glucoside (αMG) [ 13 ], and also in response to the accumulation of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) or fructose-6- phosphate in E. coli W3110 as a result of mutations in the glycolytic pathway [ 11 , 12 ]. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • This regenerative phenomenon, however, only occurs after a trauma that abruptly reduces lung mass. (bio-medicine.org)
  • In contrast to its motogenic properties in the endothelium, Nogo-B blocks PDGF mediated migration of smooth muscle cells. (yale.edu)
  • We show in this study that macrophage SR-A deficiency inhibits tumor cell migration in a coculture assay. (jimmunol.org)
  • The presented hydrogel fiber-based migration assays could be useful for studying cell behaviors under 3D coculture conditions and for drug screening and evaluation. (rsc.org)
  • During this migration, cells can use different modes of motility. (aps.org)
  • Single and collective cell migration are fundamental in development, maintenance and the progression of diseases across multicellular organisms. (aps.org)
  • While overexpression of hyaluronan has been shown to promote cell migration and the opposite for low expression levels, our preliminary data suggest a more complex relation. (aps.org)
  • We employed the model to recapitulate various aspects of individual and collective cell migration on deformable or stiff substrates. (aps.org)
  • and they contain granules from where renin is stored and released in response to a diverse number of stimuli emanating from nearby cells, sympathetic terminal, and from the circulation. (ahajournals.org)
  • Active response suppression (inhibition) is seen whenever cortical cells are exposed to grating stimuli that are non-optimal, in either the domain of orientation or spatial frequency. (spie.org)
  • Although renin cells are crucial for blood pressure homeostasis, little is known about their nature. (ahajournals.org)
  • 8) The discovery of CYGB led us to study its biological and pathophysiological importance in the histological homeostasis of the liver and to rethink the biological features of HSCs as a cell type that harbors [O.sub.bearing globin, especially in relation to their activation upon hepatic insult. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • In this review, we will focus on how the nervous system influences the activity of the immune system using natural killer (NK) cells as an example. (nature.com)
  • Single-Cell RNA Sequencing to Understand Host-Pathogen Interactions. (harvard.edu)
  • The work in my laboratory focuses on the establishment of specific cell fates using genomics to decipher interactions between chromatin and developmental signaling cascades, between genomes and rapidly evolving cell types, and between genomic copy number variation and gene expression. (stanford.edu)
  • Conversely the structure of the ECM can determine the form of cell motility and cell-cell interactions. (aps.org)
  • Here we present the development of a force measurement method that uses cell-sized, compressible and elastic hydrogel microspheres (with diameters of 5-50 µm) as force sensors, thereby providing a solid cell-gel interface to promote natural cell-like interactions, and allowing measurements of nominal values of the cell-exerted forces, due to their inherent compressibility. (aps.org)