Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.
An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.
Depression in POSTPARTUM WOMEN, usually within four weeks after giving birth (PARTURITION). The degree of depression ranges from mild transient depression to neurotic or psychotic depressive disorders. (From DSM-IV, p386)
The decrease in neuronal activity (related to a decrease in metabolic demand) extending from the site of cortical stimulation. It is believed to be responsible for the decrease in cerebral blood flow that accompanies the aura of MIGRAINE WITH AURA. (Campbell's Psychiatric Dictionary, 8th ed.)
Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.
Mood-stimulating drugs used primarily in the treatment of affective disorders and related conditions. Several MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS are useful as antidepressants apparently as a long-term consequence of their modulation of catecholamine levels. The tricyclic compounds useful as antidepressive agents (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC) also appear to act through brain catecholamine systems. A third group (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, SECOND-GENERATION) is a diverse group of drugs including some that act specifically on serotonergic systems.
Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.
A persistent activity-dependent decrease in synaptic efficacy between NEURONS. It typically occurs following repeated low-frequency afferent stimulation, but it can be induced by other methods. Long-term depression appears to play a role in MEMORY.
Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.
Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.
A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.
Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.
The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.
A structurally and mechanistically diverse group of drugs that are not tricyclics or monoamine oxidase inhibitors. The most clinically important appear to act selectively on serotonergic systems, especially by inhibiting serotonin reuptake.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Compounds that specifically inhibit the reuptake of serotonin in the brain.
A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The decrease in a measurable parameter of a PHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESS, including cellular, microbial, and plant; immunological, cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, urinary, digestive, neural, musculoskeletal, ocular, and skin physiological processes; or METABOLIC PROCESS, including enzymatic and other pharmacological processes, by a drug or other chemical.
The composition, conformation, and properties of atoms and molecules, and their reaction and interaction processes.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.
Chronically depressed mood that occurs for most of the day more days than not for at least 2 years. The required minimum duration in children to make this diagnosis is 1 year. During periods of depressed mood, at least 2 of the following additional symptoms are present: poor appetite or overeating, insomnia or hypersomnia, low energy or fatigue, low self esteem, poor concentration or difficulty making decisions, and feelings of hopelessness. (DSM-IV)
A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.
A furancarbonitrile that is one of the SEROTONIN UPTAKE INHIBITORS used as an antidepressant. The drug is also effective in reducing ethanol uptake in alcoholics and is used in depressed patients who also suffer from tardive dyskinesia in preference to tricyclic antidepressants, which aggravate this condition.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
An acquired disorder characterized by recurrent symptoms, referable to multiple organ systems, occurring in response to demonstrable exposure to many chemically unrelated compounds at doses below those established in the general population to cause harmful effects. (Cullen MR. The worker with multiple chemical sensitivities: an overview. Occup Med 1987;2(4):655-61)
Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).
Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.
A selective serotonin uptake inhibitor that is used in the treatment of depression.
The aggregate enterprise of manufacturing and technically producing chemicals. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)
A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.
A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)
Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.
Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.
The act of killing oneself.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
The first highly specific serotonin uptake inhibitor. It is used as an antidepressant and often has a more acceptable side-effects profile than traditional antidepressants.
Substances that contain a fused three-ring moiety and are used in the treatment of depression. These drugs block the uptake of norepinephrine and serotonin into axon terminals and may block some subtypes of serotonin, adrenergic, and histamine receptors. However the mechanism of their antidepressant effects is not clear because the therapeutic effects usually take weeks to develop and may reflect compensatory changes in the central nervous system.
Tactical warfare using incendiary mixtures, smokes, or irritant, burning, or asphyxiating gases.
Failure to respond to two or more trials of antidepressant monotherapy or failure to respond to four or more trials of different antidepressant therapies. (Campbell's Psychiatric Dictionary, 9th ed.)
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
A broad class of substances containing carbon and its derivatives. Many of these chemicals will frequently contain hydrogen with or without oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus, and other elements. They exist in either carbon chain or carbon ring form.
The capacity of the NERVOUS SYSTEM to change its reactivity as the result of successive activations.
Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.
Electrically induced CONVULSIONS primarily used in the treatment of severe AFFECTIVE DISORDERS and SCHIZOPHRENIA.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
A risk factor for suicide attempts and completions, it is the most common of all suicidal behavior, but only a minority of ideators engage in overt self-harm.
Elements, compounds, mixtures, or solutions that are considered severely harmful to human health and the environment. They include substances that are toxic, corrosive, flammable, or explosive.
A broad class of substances encompassing all those that do not include carbon and its derivatives as their principal elements. However, carbides, carbonates, cyanides, cyanates, and carbon disulfide are included in this class.
Specialized junctions at which a neuron communicates with a target cell. At classical synapses, a neuron's presynaptic terminal releases a chemical transmitter stored in synaptic vesicles which diffuses across a narrow synaptic cleft and activates receptors on the postsynaptic membrane of the target cell. The target may be a dendrite, cell body, or axon of another neuron, or a specialized region of a muscle or secretory cell. Neurons may also communicate via direct electrical coupling with ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES. Several other non-synaptic chemical or electric signal transmitting processes occur via extracellular mediated interactions.
The communication from a NEURON to a target (neuron, muscle, or secretory cell) across a SYNAPSE. In chemical synaptic transmission, the presynaptic neuron releases a NEUROTRANSMITTER that diffuses across the synaptic cleft and binds to specific synaptic receptors, activating them. The activated receptors modulate specific ion channels and/or second-messenger systems in the postsynaptic cell. In electrical synaptic transmission, electrical signals are communicated as an ionic current flow across ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES.
Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.
A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.
Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
The mating of plants or non-human animals which are closely related genetically.
A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.
Depolarization of membrane potentials at the SYNAPTIC MEMBRANES of target neurons during neurotransmission. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials can singly or in summation reach the trigger threshold for ACTION POTENTIALS.
The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.
Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
A serotonin uptake inhibitor that is effective in the treatment of depression.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
Chemicals that are used to cause the disturbance, disease, or death of humans during WARFARE.
Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.
Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.
The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.
Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.
The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.
Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.
Substances or energies, for example heat or light, which when introduced into the air, water, or land threaten life or health of individuals or ECOSYSTEMS.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.
A person's view of himself.
Sodium chloride-dependent neurotransmitter symporters located primarily on the PLASMA MEMBRANE of serotonergic neurons. They are different than SEROTONIN RECEPTORS, which signal cellular responses to SEROTONIN. They remove SEROTONIN from the EXTRACELLULAR SPACE by high affinity reuptake into PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS. Regulates signal amplitude and duration at serotonergic synapses and is the site of action of the SEROTONIN UPTAKE INHIBITORS.
Interaction between a mother and child.
Monohydroxy derivatives of cyclohexanes that contain the general formula R-C6H11O. They have a camphorlike odor and are used in making soaps, insecticides, germicides, dry cleaning, and plasticizers.
The state wherein the person is well adjusted.
Disorders having the presence of physical symptoms that suggest a general medical condition but that are not fully explained by a another medical condition, by the direct effects of a substance, or by another mental disorder. The symptoms must cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other areas of functioning. In contrast to FACTITIOUS DISORDERS and MALINGERING, the physical symptoms are not under voluntary control. (APA, DSM-V)
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
A tetracyclic compound with antidepressant effects. It may cause drowsiness and hematological problems. Its mechanism of therapeutic action is not well understood, although it apparently blocks alpha-adrenergic, histamine H1, and some types of serotonin receptors.
Databases devoted to knowledge about specific chemicals.
The function of opposing or restraining the excitation of neurons or their target excitable cells.
Maladaptive reactions to identifiable psychosocial stressors occurring within a short time after onset of the stressor. They are manifested by either impairment in social or occupational functioning or by symptoms (depression, anxiety, etc.) that are in excess of a normal and expected reaction to the stressor.
Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)
The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.
Disorders in which the essential feature is a severe disturbance in mood (depression, anxiety, elation, and excitement) accompanied by psychotic symptoms such as delusions, hallucinations, gross impairment in reality testing, etc.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
A persistent increase in synaptic efficacy, usually induced by appropriate activation of the same synapses. The phenomenological properties of long-term potentiation suggest that it may be a cellular mechanism of learning and memory.
The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
A metabolite of AMITRIPTYLINE that is also used as an antidepressive agent. Nortriptyline is used in major depression, dysthymia, and atypical depressions.
Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.
The observable response an animal makes to any situation.
Disorders characterized by impairment of the ability to initiate or maintain sleep. This may occur as a primary disorder or in association with another medical or psychiatric condition.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
A subspecialty of psychiatry concerned with the mental health of the aged.
A basic science concerned with the composition, structure, and properties of matter; and the reactions that occur between substances and the associated energy exchange.
Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.
Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.
Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.
Any form of psychotherapy designed to produce therapeutic change within a minimal amount of time, generally not more than 20 sessions.
Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.
Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.
A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.
A form of therapy in which two or more patients participate under the guidance of one or more psychotherapists for the purpose of treating emotional disturbances, social maladjustments, and psychotic states.
Disorders related to substance abuse.
A syndrome characterized by depressions that recur annually at the same time each year, usually during the winter months. Other symptoms include anxiety, irritability, decreased energy, increased appetite (carbohydrate cravings), increased duration of sleep, and weight gain. SAD (seasonal affective disorder) can be treated by daily exposure to bright artificial lights (PHOTOTHERAPY), during the season of recurrence.
The prototypical tricyclic antidepressant. It has been used in major depression, dysthymia, bipolar depression, attention-deficit disorders, agoraphobia, and panic disorders. It has less sedative effect than some other members of this therapeutic group.
Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.
Disorders in which the symptoms are distressing to the individual and recognized by him or her as being unacceptable. Social relationships may be greatly affected but usually remain within acceptable limits. The disturbance is relatively enduring or recurrent without treatment.
Normal, appropriate sorrowful response to an immediate cause. It is self-limiting and gradually subsides within a reasonable time.
Inability to experience pleasure due to impairment or dysfunction of normal psychological and neurobiological mechanisms. It is a symptom of many PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS (e.g., DEPRESSIVE DISORDER, MAJOR; and SCHIZOPHRENIA).
Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
Learned expectation that one's responses are independent of reward and, hence, do not predict or control the occurrence of rewards. Learned helplessness derives from a history, experimentally induced or naturally occurring, of having received punishment/aversive stimulation regardless of responses made. Such circumstances result in an impaired ability to learn. Used for human or animal populations. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
Mood or emotional responses dissonant with or inappropriate to the behavior and/or stimulus.
Persons who receive ambulatory care at an outpatient department or clinic without room and board being provided.
Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.
A collection of NEURONS, tracts of NERVE FIBERS, endocrine tissue, and blood vessels in the HYPOTHALAMUS and the PITUITARY GLAND. This hypothalamo-hypophyseal portal circulation provides the mechanism for hypothalamic neuroendocrine (HYPOTHALAMIC HORMONES) regulation of pituitary function and the release of various PITUITARY HORMONES into the systemic circulation to maintain HOMEOSTASIS.
Organized services to provide mental health care.
The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.
Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.
NMR spectroscopy on small- to medium-size biological macromolecules. This is often used for structural investigation of proteins and nucleic acids, and often involves more than one isotope.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
An array of tests used to determine the toxicity of a substance to living systems. These include tests on clinical drugs, foods, and environmental pollutants.
A type of anxiety disorder characterized by unexpected panic attacks that last minutes or, rarely, hours. Panic attacks begin with intense apprehension, fear or terror and, often, a feeling of impending doom. Symptoms experienced during a panic attack include dyspnea or sensations of being smothered; dizziness, loss of balance or faintness; choking sensations; palpitations or accelerated heart rate; shakiness; sweating; nausea or other form of abdominal distress; depersonalization or derealization; paresthesias; hot flashes or chills; chest discomfort or pain; fear of dying and fear of not being in control of oneself or going crazy. Agoraphobia may also develop. Similar to other anxiety disorders, it may be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.
Chemical substances that are foreign to the biological system. They include naturally occurring compounds, drugs, environmental agents, carcinogens, insecticides, etc.
Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.
Large collections of small molecules (molecular weight about 600 or less), of similar or diverse nature which are used for high-throughput screening analysis of the gene function, protein interaction, cellular processing, biochemical pathways, or other chemical interactions.
The science concerned with the detection, chemical composition, and biological action of toxic substances or poisons and the treatment and prevention of toxic manifestations.
A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.
A class of ionotropic glutamate receptors characterized by affinity for N-methyl-D-aspartate. NMDA receptors have an allosteric binding site for glycine which must be occupied for the channel to open efficiently and a site within the channel itself to which magnesium ions bind in a voltage-dependent manner. The positive voltage dependence of channel conductance and the high permeability of the conducting channel to calcium ions (as well as to monovalent cations) are important in excitotoxicity and neuronal plasticity.
The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.
Exogenous agents, synthetic and naturally occurring, which are capable of disrupting the functions of the ENDOCRINE SYSTEM including the maintenance of HOMEOSTASIS and the regulation of developmental processes. Endocrine disruptors are compounds that can mimic HORMONES, or enhance or block the binding of hormones to their receptors, or otherwise lead to activating or inhibiting the endocrine signaling pathways and hormone metabolism.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.
The increase in a measurable parameter of a PHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESS, including cellular, microbial, and plant; immunological, cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, urinary, digestive, neural, musculoskeletal, ocular, and skin physiological processes; or METABOLIC PROCESS, including enzymatic and other pharmacological processes, by a drug or other chemical.
Computer systems utilized as adjuncts in the treatment of disease.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.
Former members of the armed services.
An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.
A learning situation involving more than one alternative from which a selection is made in order to attain a specific goal.
A loosely defined grouping of drugs that have effects on psychological function. Here the psychotropic agents include the antidepressive agents, hallucinogens, and tranquilizing agents (including the antipsychotics and anti-anxiety agents).
A microanalytical technique combining mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for the qualitative as well as quantitative determinations of compounds.
An electrophysiologic technique for studying cells, cell membranes, and occasionally isolated organelles. All patch-clamp methods rely on a very high-resistance seal between a micropipette and a membrane; the seal is usually attained by gentle suction. The four most common variants include on-cell patch, inside-out patch, outside-out patch, and whole-cell clamp. Patch-clamp methods are commonly used to voltage clamp, that is control the voltage across the membrane and measure current flow, but current-clamp methods, in which the current is controlled and the voltage is measured, are also used.
Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
Cell surface proteins that bind glutamate and act through G-proteins to influence second messenger systems. Several types of metabotropic glutamate receptors have been cloned. They differ in pharmacology, distribution, and mechanisms of action.
The interactions between the anterior pituitary and adrenal glands, in which corticotropin (ACTH) stimulates the adrenal cortex and adrenal cortical hormones suppress the production of corticotropin by the anterior pituitary.
The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.
The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.
The human ability to adapt in the face of tragedy, trauma, adversity, hardship, and ongoing significant life stressors.
Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.
Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.
Sympathectomy using chemicals (e.g., 6-hydroxydopamine or guanethidine) which selectively and reversibly destroy adrenergic nerve endings while leaving cholinergic nerve endings intact.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate excitatory amino acid receptors, thereby blocking the actions of agonists.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.
Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).
The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.
The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.
A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Benzene derivatives that include one or more hydroxyl groups attached to the ring structure.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.

No data available that match "cell depression chemical"


If sorrow turns into lasting depression, the bodys chemical reaction to that can affect the hardwiring of the brain. "In the ... "If this condition is prolonged, the consequences can be devastating: gray cells shrink…other parts of the brain lose so much ... In an email, he explained that human brains have evolved emotional mechanisms--mostly reactive chemicals--to help us survive ...
... or chemical that carries signals between nerve cells. Then scientists discovered the serotonin connection was more complicated ... Although problems with the mood-regulating brain chemical serotonin have long been linked to depression, scientists dont know ... Most depression medications used today are members of the Prozac family that work by making more serotonin available to brain ... cells. They stem from a theory that depression patients might not have enough serotonin, a neurotransmitter, ...
PTSD, anxiety and depression are mental health disorders that have many possible causes, including genetic vulnerability, ... Medication Safety Guide for Veterans Suffering From PTSD, Anxiety & Depression About 3.5% of U.S. adults have post- ... Chemicals inside and outside nerve cells are also involved. According to a Harvard Health Publishing article, there are " ... What Are PTSD, Anxiety and Depression?. PTSD, anxiety and depression are mental health disorders that have many possible causes ...
Is Ketamine the Next Big Depression Drug? - Scientific American, Apr 2013. Why Ketamine Makes You Happy - Science, Jun 15 2011 ... Chronic ketamine use kills bladder cells - New Scientist, June 15 2011. Worrying Link Between Ketamine Use And Severe Bladder ... CHEMICAL NAME. 2-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-(methylamino)-cyclohexanone. DESCRIPTION. Ketamine is a dissociative psychedelic used ... All About the Psychedelic Club Drug Being Used to Treat Depression - Health, Nov 4 2015 ...
... which are thought to be chemicals of the brain involved in depression. In turn, adding more fish to your diet is worth ... Yet, as previous research has shown, omega-3 fatty acids in fish is believed to alter the structure of brain cell membranes. ... The risk of depression for those in the study group who moderately followed a Mediterranean diet was about 25 to 30 percent ... While researchers cant explain the precise link between these dietary patterns and the risk of depression, it seems clear that ...
... a chemical that relays signals between nerve cells. ... Link Between OCD and Depression Depression in people with OCD ... Depression can be especially serious in people with OCD as it can affect their ability to adhere to the treatment of their OCD ... In the end, if you have been diagnosed with OCD and believe you have depression, do not wait for the feelings of sadness to ... The long-term association of OCD and depression and its moderators: A four-year follow up study in a large clinical sample. Eur ...
Our brain cells use chemicals called neurotransmitters to communicate with each other. Many sad or depressed people don’t ... Depression makes recovering from a stroke harder. The brain recovers its ability to direct the body’s movements over weeks ... The most commonly used drugs for depression; SRI’s increase the amount of serotonin available in the brain. ... A stress hormone, corticotrophin releasing factor (CTrf) can also be increased in depression. CTrf causes increased levels of ...
The neurological disorder typically occurs in people over age 60, when cells in the brain that produce a chemical called ... Other symptoms may include depression and other emotional changes; hallucinations and delusions; difficulty in swallowing, ...
The magnificent mineral magnesium is the second most abundant mineral in our cells, its involved in more than 300 chemical ... insomnia and depression. With increasing age, the risk factor for developing magnesium deficiency grows larger. A National ...
Most of all, it stimulates brain chemicals, which in turn allow nerve cells to establish strong communication. ... Based on the summarized findings by Peace Health, tyrosine has been studied and confirmed to alleviate stress, depression, and ... The best part? You dont have to rely on any harmful chemicals for treating the issue. Instead, you get a safe solution in the ... Many tinnitus sufferers have difficulty sleeping and/or concentrating, and sometimes suffer from depression. ...
These are present in every cell in the human body and are building blocks of chemical regulators. ... dementia and even depression and other mental illnesses. ...
Prozac for depression) and the way we behave work? ... narcotics affect a users mood by using chemicals to change the ... How Drugs Affect Us: Cells. How do drugs that affect our mood (for example, Prozac for depression) and the way we behave work? ... How do drugs that affect our mood (for example, Prozac for depression) and the way we behave work? ... Cells communicate with each other using transmitters, which are contained in the vesicles (represented by the pink circles). An ...
MD on acne-related depression and acne treatment Roslyn, NY, January 2011. In ... As it penetrates, ALA binds to the oil glands and sensitizes the cells to light. ... as are chemical peels that destroy parts of the skin in a controlled way so that new skin can grow in its place. ... Today Acne Troubles Are More Than Skin-Deep: NY Dermatologist Joshua Fox, MD on acne-related depression and acne treatment ...
"The wireless neural device enables chronic chemical and optical neuromodulation that has never been achieved before," said lead ... depression, and addiction. ... Brain Cells Manipulated Using A Smartphone. 1 year, 11 months ... Scientists provide new insight on how to stop the transcription of cancer cells. ... https://newsroom.uw.edu/news/scientists-manipulate-brain-cells-using-smartphone. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41551-019- ...
Can Earthing protect against cell phone frequencies? The protective potential of Earthing has not been tested yet on cell phone ... Anxiety, irritability, depression, chronic fatigue, and chronic inflammation may develop. This is but one scenario of how such ... In this situation, exposure to EMFs can be a stressor, as can possibly be exposure to multiple chemicals and certain foods. ... There is no research indicating that Earthing will or will not protect a person from exposure to cell phones signals, microwave ...
Somewhere in Martin Matzuks collection of two billion chemicals, he hopes, is one that might safely make a man temporarily ... Hes turning skin cells into stem cells that look and act like the sperm-making factory cells in the testes. Testing drugs on ... "Right now the chemical burden for contraception relies solely on the female. Thats an unfair balance in the equation," says ... one male contraceptive hormone was stopped early in 2011 after one participant committed suicide and others reported depression ...
Bipolar disorder, formerly known as manic depression, affects 5.7 million adults in the United States. It is caused by chemical ... scientists can coax these skin cells into behaving like embryonic stem cells. Known as induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPSC ... "We often think of stems cells being used in therapies to treat disease, but this is a great example of stem cells usefulness ... a professor of cell and developmental biology at the Medical School who leads the stem cell lab with Gary Smith, Ph.D, ...
Thus, these chemicals may stay for intended for a longer time generate pleasant emotions in case of depression and stress. In a ... from the body cells. ... Anxiousness and Depression will be two major mental conditions ... As we have discussed previous that CBD Olive oil may alleviate Anxiety and Depression. Both these health conditions might cause ... According to a research study, CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT can inhibit typically the uptake of? joyful chemicals? like Serotonin ...
Consumers dont realize how much of these chemicals are contained in residues on their store-bought food. Plastics can leech ... While trying to manage anxiety and depression, many of these pharmaceutical drugs actually lead users to dependency and even ... Neurotoxins like aspartame, found in many diet products, excite neuron cells to their death. Synthetic fragrances often give ... NaturalNews) In a culture so saturated in chemicals and synthetics, pesticides and plastics, fragrances and heavy metals, it ...
Mindset TMS is a leading depression center in Greeley CO providing NeuroStar Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation TMS Therapy. ... Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers that send signals between brain cells. A persons genetic make-up and life history ... Is there a depression cure? There is no known cure for depression but with effective treatment, many patients can remain ... What causes depression? The exact cause of depression is not known, but leading research in Neuroscience points to an imbalance ...
Mind Brain Institute is best depression therapist provides depression treatment in Las Vegas, Henderson and North Las Vegas. ... Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers that send signals between brain cells. Depression is most often treated with ... Depression Symptoms. Depression results in a persistent state of sadness or a loss of the ability to experience pleasure. Those ... Depression has no racial, ethnic or socioeconomic boundaries. About two-thirds of those who experience an episode of depression ...
... a chemical messenger) produced by nerve cells in the brain that is used by the nerves to communicate with one another. A nerve ... It is believed that some illnesses such as depression are caused by disturbances in the balance between serotonin and other ... The leading theory is that drugs such as sertraline restore the chemical balance among neurotransmitters in the brain. ... Zoloft is a prescription medicine used to treat depression, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (also called OCD) and ...
Depression is real and no joke! Most of us have suffered from some forms of it in the past, present, and also currently. There ... improving nerve cell connections, which helps relieve depression. ... High-intensity exercise helps release a feel good chemical called endorphins. Low-intensity exercise release proteins called ... I gave you a few ways exercise helps curb depression or depression symptoms. Of course this is not a remedy, but can help in ...
A grainy tape of Halls transfer on June 18, 2010, shows prison guards spraying chemicals into his cell, forcing him to come ... Hospital staff diagnosed Hall with serious depression.. In Mid-State prison, Hall was in and out of solitary confinement for ... June 18, 2010: Prison guards gas Hall out of his cell to move him to a maximum-security prison, where staff fail to give him a ... The new mental health units provide at least four hours of out-of-cell treatment a day, and speed up an inmates return to the ...
New research links serotonin and dopamine not just to addiction and depression, but to the ability to control genes. ... but cells also constantly turn specific genes on and off throughout life to make the proteins cells need to function. When a ... The term refers to the brain chemical dopamines ability, in addition to transmitting signals across synapses, to enter a ... One of its projects involves developing a fuel cell-based power and propulsion system for a new-build river vessel along ...
By comparison, your own cells only have one specific DNA - the same one copied over and over again in each cell. That means if ... SEE ALSO: Anxiety, Depression & Autism 100% Linked To Gut-Brain Axis And An Abnormal Microbiome In Intestines. .. ... SEE ALSO: For The First Time Ever Scientists Observe Newly Discovered Gut Bacteria Eating Up Brain Chemicals. SEE ALSO: The WOW ... SEE ALSO: Parkinsons Starts & Stops In The Gut, And How Cancer Cells & Their Environment "Talk" To Each Other. ...
... depression, general anxiety, and stress. As it becomes more mainstream, an increasing number of people are recognizing the life ... Depression and Mood Disorders. Neurotransmitters are our brains chemical messengers that send information via nerve cells. ... Yoga has been proven to help with insomnia, PTSD, depression, general anxiety, and stress. As it becomes more mainstream, an ... Recent studies show an association between regular yoga practice and increased GABA, which decreases depression and mood ...
Except that depression is a diagnosis Birdie considers insulting, so she shoots the medic her withered-lily look. My mother is ... Not to mention the obvious fact that we live near a cell-phone tower. Marqui did everything he could to turn our apartment into ... multiple chemical sensitivity, and ICEP, idiopathic chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, not to mention IBS, irritable bowel ... She would even be funny and cheerful if her depression, or EHS, take your pick, gave her a half a chance. Yes, you might as ...
Except that depression is a diagnosis Birdie considers insulting, so she shoots the medic her withered-lily look. My mother is ... Not to mention the obvious fact that we live near a cell-phone tower. Marqui did everything he could to turn our apartment into ... multiple chemical sensitivity, and ICEP, idiopathic chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, not to mention IBS, irritable bowel ... She would even be funny and cheerful if her depression, or EHS, take your pick, gave her a half a chance. Yes, you might as ...
Except that depression is a diagnosis Birdie considers insulting, so she shoots the medic her withered-lily look. My mother is ... Not to mention the obvious fact that we live near a cell-phone tower. Marqui did everything he could to turn our apartment into ... multiple chemical sensitivity, and ICEP, idiopathic chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, not to mention IBS, irritable bowel ... She would even be funny and cheerful if her depression, or EHS, take your pick, gave her a half a chance. Yes, you might as ...
  • So did a breed of mice, called ``helpless'' mice, that exhibit depression symptoms. (newson6.com)
  • For example, someone with anxiety may show symptoms of depression, while someone with a depressive disorder may show signs of an anxiety disorder. (worldhealth.net)
  • Depression can be especially serious in people with OCD as it can affect their ability to adhere to the treatment of their OCD symptoms . (verywellmind.com)
  • Most evidence also suggests that symptoms of depression are more actively linked to disturbing obsessions (negative thoughts you can't get rid of) rather than compulsions (repetitive behaviors you can't control). (verywellmind.com)
  • On the other hand, the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), commonly used to treat depression, is also known to be effective in managing many of the symptoms of OCD. (verywellmind.com)
  • If you feel you are experiencing any of these depression symptoms, contact our office and speak with them about your depression treatment options. (mindbrainlv.com)
  • 2. Weight lifting/resistance training- A recent study of 45 stroke survivors with depression found that a 10 week strength training program helped reduce symptoms of depression. (exerstheticonline.com)
  • 4. Tai Chi-A study of 14 older patients with depression showed that when participating in Tai Chi for 3 months, showed a significant decrease in depression symptoms. (exerstheticonline.com)
  • I gave you a few ways exercise helps curb depression or depression symptoms. (exerstheticonline.com)
  • This will result in symptoms of depression lessening dramatically. (smrthealth.com)
  • By optimizing gut health the symptoms of depression are more likely to be reduced. (smrthealth.com)
  • SSRIs help to alleviate symptoms of depression by blocking the reabsorption or reuptake of serotonin in the brain. (thomkesslertherapist.com)
  • Amitriptyline is a prescription medicine used to treat symptoms of depression. (speednicedating.com)
  • Use: Relief of symptoms of depression. (speednicedating.com)
  • While the NMDA receptor is rather well-researched, the action that this receptor plays in reducing the symptoms of depression, especially refractory depression, is unknown. (rxleaf.com)
  • Understanding the signs and symptoms of depression is the first step in getting help. (zenapticchiropractic.com)
  • Chronic depression shares the same symptoms as the other types of depression. (signsofdepressionuk.com)
  • The symptoms of chronic depression occurs on most days for at least two years. (signsofdepressionuk.com)
  • The bipolar type occurs when patients exhibit symptoms of bipolar disorder and the depressive type occurs when patients display symptoms of depression. (healthlinerx.org)
  • Symptoms of schizoaffective disorder include those of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression. (healthlinerx.org)
  • Common symptoms of depression include sadness, fatigue and persistent thoughts of suicide. (healthlinerx.org)
  • During the same period of illness, they also experience a manic episode (a period of unusually high energy, sometimes including uncontrollable excitement) or a mixed episode (symptoms of mania occur with or alternate with periods of depression). (healthlinerx.org)
  • It is used to treat schizophrenia and the manic symptoms of bipolar disorder (manic depression). (flbba.org)
  • Common symptoms of depression such as fatigue and lack of feeling happy can be traced back to the GBA because when the gut is overrun with bad bacteria the gut and brain cannot communicate effectively. (sincerelyonyi.com)
  • Because drugs that increase the amount of serotonin in the brain have been shown to reduce OCD symptoms, it is thought that people with OCD may have too little serotonin for their nerve cells to communicate effectively. (utahpsych.org)
  • Drugs may modify the chemical environment of the cells and often alleviate symptoms, but they do not get to the root of the trouble. (web.app)
  • Many doctors treat the obvious symptoms of depression, such as poor appetite, insomnia, and headaches, but overlook the real problem. (lifeextensionvitamins.com)
  • The woman presented the symptoms of depression with a lack of response to several antidepressants. (optimistminds.com)
  • Cholinesterase inhibitors may also improve neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as agitation or depression. (alimranmed.com)
  • This drug works in another brain cell communication network and slows the progression of symptoms with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease. (alimranmed.com)
  • SSRI Antidepressants ease symptoms of moderate to severe depression disorders. (islaws.com)
  • Having symptoms for two weeks or longer that do not meet full criteria for major depression. (counseling.info)
  • The symptoms of depression usually last longer than two weeks. (americastms.com)
  • A person diagnosed with persistent depressive disorder may have episodes of major depression along with periods of less severe symptoms, but symptoms must last for two years to be considered persistent depressive disorder. (americastms.com)
  • Postpartum depression is much more serious than the "baby blues" (relatively mild depressive and anxiety symptoms that typically clear within two weeks after delivery) that many women experience after giving birth. (americastms.com)
  • According to the World Health Organization (WHO), they reported that Depression is a common mental disorder and that globally, more than 265 million people of all ages suffer from the symptoms. (americastms.com)
  • It's common for people with anxiety or depression to have low levels of serotonin. (xue-da.com)
  • It's known as the "happy chemical" because low levels of serotonin are related to depression and anxiety. (sincerelyonyi.com)
  • Depression is associated with low levels of serotonin and norepinephrine, neurotransmitters, or chemical messengers, known to affect mood. (optimistminds.com)
  • Zoloft is a prescription medicine used to treat depression, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (also called OCD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (also called PTSD) in adults. (ubuntuforums.org)
  • Exercise is the most powerful strategy available to treat depression and improve mood. (smrthealth.com)
  • Some of the same drugs that are used to treat depression are used to treat OCD but typically required higher dosages than with depression. (utahpsych.org)
  • It's believed that SNRIs helps treat depression by keeping up the levels of these two chemical messengers in your brain. (optimistminds.com)
  • Zoloft is used to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). (withoutdoctr.com)
  • There are more than just antidepressants for treating your depression. (mindsettms.net)
  • Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are a class of antidepressant medications that share a similar chemical structure and biological effects. (thomkesslertherapist.com)
  • Scientists believe that by restoring the balance in these neurotransmitters in the brain that tricyclic antidepressants alleviate depression. (thomkesslertherapist.com)
  • In addition to relieving depression, tricyclic antidepressants also cause sedation and somewhat block effects of histamine. (thomkesslertherapist.com)
  • Tricyclic antidepressants are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating several types of depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, and bedwetting. (thomkesslertherapist.com)
  • Most modern antidepressants have an effect on the brain's chemical transmitters, in particular, noradrenaline and serotonin, which relay messages between brain cells. (fksg.org)
  • Antidepressants balance the chemicals in your brain. (signsofdepressionuk.com)
  • Scientists have discovered a mechanism that helps to explain resilience to stress, vulnerability to depression and how antidepressants work. (promisesbehavioralhealth.com)
  • activated brain cells to produce the brain chemical serotonin and altered the mice's behaviour in a similar way to antidepressants. (dailyhealthybox.com)
  • SSRI (selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors) Antidepressants are a class of compounds primarily used as antidepressants in the treatment of anxiety disorders, personality disorders and depression-related ailments. (islaws.com)
  • SSRI Antidepressants are thought to increase the extracellular level of the neurotransmitter serotonin through its ability to inhibit its reuptake into the presynaptic cell-a process that would effectively increase the level of serotonin in the synaptic cleft accessible to unite to the postsynaptic receptor. (islaws.com)
  • SSRI Antidepressants work (theoretically) in the treatment of depression disorders by altering neurotransmitters (chemical messengers) used to communicate between brain cells. (islaws.com)
  • The majority of antidepressants are effective in changing the levels of these naturally-occurring brain chemicals. (islaws.com)
  • St. John's wort reduces the rate at which brain cells reabsorb seratonin… the same major mechanism behind Prozac and similar antidepressants. (entrepremarketer.com)
  • The exact cause of depression is not known, but leading research in Neuroscience points to an imbalance in the brain's neurotransmitters as the manifestation of depression. (mindsettms.net)
  • Scientists believe that patients with depression may have an imbalance in neurotransmitters, chemicals that nerves make and use to communicate with other nerves. (thomkesslertherapist.com)
  • Depression is not simply the result of a chemical imbalance, for example, because a person has not enough or too much of a particular brain chemical. (fksg.org)
  • It is relevant to bodily adjustments in the brain, and linked to an imbalance of a sort of chemical that carries alerts in your mind and nerves. (customproducttraining.com)
  • A chemical imbalance is broadly deemed to be the main result in for despair. (customproducttraining.com)
  • An imbalance of brain chemicals may also be a factor in the development of the disorder. (healthlinerx.org)
  • They are suggesting this could explain why immune system imbalance could make some people vulnerable to mood disorders like depression. (dailyhealthybox.com)
  • SSRI's are great if your depression is caused by a chemical imbalance. (thedaobums.com)
  • SSRI's won't help with your depression if it's caused by trauma, healing practices won't cure your depression if it's caused by diet, improved diet won't cure it if it's caused by a chemical imbalance, etc. (thedaobums.com)
  • They stem from a theory that depression patients might not have enough serotonin, a neurotransmitter, or chemical that carries signals between nerve cells. (newson6.com)
  • Then scientists discovered the serotonin connection was more complicated, dependent on how well the neurotransmitter binds to receptors, or docking ports, on cell surfaces. (newson6.com)
  • Serotonin is a neurotransmitter (a chemical messenger) produced by nerve cells in the brain that is used by the nerves to communicate with one another. (ubuntuforums.org)
  • Serotonin is a naturally occurring neurotransmitter (chemical) that is used by brain cells to communicate. (thomkesslertherapist.com)
  • The incidence of most mental health disorders has been linked to neurotransmitter chemicals in the brain. (bitrebels.com)
  • For example, according to Wikipedia, SSRI's "are believed to increase the extracellular level of the neurotransmitter serotonin by inhibiting its reuptake into the presynaptic cell, increasing the level of serotonin in the synaptic cleft available to bind to the postsynaptic receptor. (thedaobums.com)
  • Cannabinoids are one of a diverse group of chemical compounds that act on cannabinoid receptors in cells to alter neurotransmitter release in the brain. (graphicspedia.net)
  • Bipolar disorder , formerly known as manic depression, affects 5.7 million adults in the United States. (bellenews.com)
  • Depression affects millions of Americans and is the second leading cause of disability. (mindsettms.net)
  • In this blog I will list different exercises that have been known to help with depression, but first let's identify how exercise affects the body. (exerstheticonline.com)
  • According to Grassroots Health (leader in Vitamin D research) Vitamin D is actually a hormone that affects over 3000 cell processes within your body . (smrthealth.com)
  • Amitriptyline affects certain chemical messengers (neurotransmitters) that communicate between brain cells and help regulate mood. (speednicedating.com)
  • Depression affects how people feel, think and act as well makes it more difficult to manage from day to day and interferes with relationships, work, and study. (fksg.org)
  • However, ketamine quickly affects depression as it leaves the body and is thought to prompt connections to regrow between brain cells that are involved in mood. (houstonmetronews.com)
  • A common but serious illness, depression affects 5-8 percent of adults in the United States, meaning about 25 million Americans will have an episode of major depression this year. (counseling.info)
  • Depression affects people in different ways. (counseling.info)
  • In fact, countless studies indicate that drugs used to control certain types of depression, anxiety, seizure, and other neurological conditions can lead to more life-threatening diseases, which are genuinely not worth the risk. (honeyheaven.co.uk)
  • Some types of depression tend to run in families. (counseling.info)
  • A national study of depression found that nearly all the respondents who reported a major depressive disorder also reported that their social and/or work lives were negatively affected by their illness. (mindsettms.net)
  • The company launched the infusion service for patients who suffer from severe depression, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, major depressive disorder, suicidal thoughts, chronic pain, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and more. (houstonmetronews.com)
  • Effexor is used to treat major depression or major depressive disorder. (optimistminds.com)
  • True clinical depression, also called major depression, unipolar depression and major depressive disorder, is a mood disorder in which feelings of sadness, loss, anger , or frustration interfere with everyday life for weeks or longer. (counseling.info)
  • Without treatment, people with minor depression are at high risk for developing major depressive disorder. (counseling.info)
  • Depression, whether it be clinical depression or major depressive disorder, is a serious but very common mood disorder. (americastms.com)
  • Other fatty acids in fish modify the activity of the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin - which are thought to be chemicals of the brain involved in depression. (creators.com)
  • The neurological disorder typically occurs in people over age 60, when cells in the brain that produce a chemical called dopamine become impaired or die. (fda.gov)
  • St. John's wort, unlike popular anti-depression drugs, also reduces the reabsorption of two other chemicals associated with mood regulation… dopamine and norepinephrine. (entrepremarketer.com)
  • Mice genetically altered to produce extra p11 acted in just the opposite way _ no depression-like behavior, and their brain cells carried extra serotonin-signaling receptors. (newson6.com)
  • It is caused by chemical imbalances in the brain and marked by significant changes in mood, thoughts, energy and behavior. (bellenews.com)
  • Often a debilitating disorder, depression results in a persistent state of sadness or loss of interest or pleasure which interferes with an individual's thoughts, behavior, mood, and physical health. (mindbrainlv.com)
  • Increased activity of neurons triggered by heightened sensitivity of AMPA receptors to glutamate increased susceptibility to stress-induced depression-like behavior. (promisesbehavioralhealth.com)
  • In childhood, depression often occurs along with behavior problems and mental health conditions, such as anxiety or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . (counseling.info)
  • Brain-imaging technologies, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have shown that the parts of the brain involved in mood, thinking, sleep, appetite, and behavior of people who have depression look different than those of people without depression. (counseling.info)
  • Neurotransmitters are our brain's chemical messengers that send information via nerve cells. (yogiapproved.com)
  • Your brain's chemical deficiencies could be preventing you from being happy. (zenapticchiropractic.com)
  • While these treatments also have an impact on the brain's chemical messaging process between nerve cells, the precise ways in which these treatments work is still being researched. (fksg.org)
  • Recent studies show an association between regular yoga practice and increased GABA, which decreases depression and mood disorders. (yogiapproved.com)
  • Schizoaffective disorder is a condition in which patients exhibit signs of both schizophrenia (including hallucinations and delusions) and mood disorders (such as depression or mania). (healthlinerx.org)
  • Mood disorders associated with schizoaffective disorder include bipolar disorder and depression. (healthlinerx.org)
  • Although external factors play a role, depression and other mood disorders arise primarily from subtle imbalances in brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. (lifeextensionvitamins.com)
  • Kids who experience severe stress are more likely to develop a host of physical and mental health problems by the time they reach adulthood, including anxiety, depression and mood disorders. (medicalxpress.com)
  • In the end, if you have been diagnosed with OCD and believe you have depression, do not wait for the feelings of sadness to pass. (verywellmind.com)
  • Depression results in a persistent state of sadness or a loss of the ability to experience pleasure. (mindbrainlv.com)
  • Depression is a disorder marked by feelings of sadness, anger and/or frustration that last for at least two weeks. (healthlinerx.org)
  • Generally, our feelings of sadness are proportional to our loss, and this "reactive depression," as doctors call it, goes away with time. (lifeextensionvitamins.com)
  • Do you ever experience periods of profound sadness and depression… or suffer from anxiety and tension? (entrepremarketer.com)
  • Depression can appear as anger and discouragement, rather than feelings of sadness. (counseling.info)
  • Depression is more than just feeling sad, but rather it is profound sadness and a sense of dispair. (americastms.com)
  • The feelings of extreme sadness, anxiety, and exhaustion that accompany postpartum depression may make it difficult for these new mothers to complete daily care activities for themselves and/or for their babies. (americastms.com)
  • We know, for example, that OCD and MDD are both characterized by changes in the production and activity of serotonin , a chemical that relays signals between nerve cells. (verywellmind.com)
  • Depression is most often treated with antidepressant medications. (mindbrainlv.com)
  • Research has demonstrated that CB1 activation results in antidepressant effects in mice that are comparable to traditional depression medication. (rxleaf.com)
  • Induction of deltaFosB was required for the antidepressant fluoxetine (Prozac) to reverse the stress-induced depression-like syndrome. (promisesbehavioralhealth.com)
  • Effexor and Wellbutrin are antidepressant agents with different pharmacologic profiles, each effective in the treatment of depression. (optimistminds.com)
  • That being said, each SSRI Antidepressant is composed of a different chemical structure, so one may affect a patient a little differently from another. (islaws.com)
  • Grof's studies demonstrate how perinatal trauma can negatively affect the health and wellbeing of people in later life (including the arising of 'disorders' such as psychosis, schizophrenia and depression). (scienceandnonduality.com)
  • I actually think almost all anxiety, depression, obsessive compulsive disorder bipolar disorder and most psychosis, and possible to a large extent psychopathy can be curde by cultivation and eastern medicine as long as it is actually done and done right. (thedaobums.com)
  • Occurs when a person has severe depression plus some form of psychosis , such as having delusions or hallucinations . (counseling.info)
  • Psychotic depression occurs when a person has severe depression plus some form of psychosis, such as having disturbing false fixed beliefs (delusions) or hearing or seeing upsetting things that others cannot hear or see (hallucinations). (americastms.com)
  • There is research to support a variety of health benefits from consuming omega-3 fatty acids, including that they can help lower risk of heart disease, Alzheimer's, stroke, dementia and even depression and other mental illnesses. (eyetique.com)
  • According to the researchers this soft neural implant is the first known wireless device that is capable of delivering multiple drugs and coloured lights, this technology may help to speed up research efforts to discover therapies for brain diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, pain, depression, and addiction. (worldhealth.net)
  • Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurologic disorder that causes the brain to shrink (atrophy) and brain cells to die. (alimranmed.com)
  • These drugs work by boosting levels of cell-to-cell communication by preserving a chemical messenger that is depleted in the brain by Alzheimer's disease. (alimranmed.com)
  • Studies conducted on the grandchildren of holocaust survivors (Yehmen, 2015) show how Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is carried through cells and chemicals. (scienceandnonduality.com)
  • Changes in neurotransmitters (chemical messengers) in the brain may also precipitate dysthymia. (signsofdepressionuk.com)
  • Genetics can play a role, people with family members who have depression or dysthymia are more likely to experience dysthymia, especially when it starts early in life (teens the to early 20s). (signsofdepressionuk.com)
  • These qualities could actually be triggered by lower-degree depression (called dysthymia). (customproducttraining.com)
  • When dysthymia (chronic mild depression) is included in the head count, the numbers rise to 18.8 million American adults, or about 9.5% of the population (Narrow 1998). (lifeextensionvitamins.com)
  • People with dysthymia may also experience one or more episodes of major depression during their lifetimes. (counseling.info)
  • Other medical treatments such as electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) may sometimes be recommended for people with severe depression who have not recovered with lifestyle change, social support, medication, and psychological therapy. (fksg.org)
  • "Currently the best treatments for bipolar disorder are only effective for 30 percent to 50 percent of patients," said Melvin McInnis, M.D., the Thomas B and Nancy Upjohn Woodworth Professor of Bipolar Disorder and Depression at the University of Michigan Medical School and associate director at the University of Michigan Depression Center. (bellenews.com)
  • They also were less likely to improve with depression medication. (newson6.com)
  • Medication for treating PTSD, anxiety and depression can help people live healthy, meaningful lives-if the medication is used safely. (worldhealth.net)
  • By its very nature, major depression tends to affect a person's ability to maintain adherence to drug therapy, not only those related to OCD but any chronic medication that requires daily drug-taking. (verywellmind.com)
  • Family members of people with OCD also have more than normal occurrences of major depression , bipolar illness , panic attacks , severe phobias, and neurological problems. (utahpsych.org)
  • There are also beneficial plants that will help you improve mood, and fight anxiety, depression, and prevent panic attacks. (1krecipes.com)
  • Generic Effexor Extended-Release is used for treating depression, panic disorder, generalized or social anxiety disorder. (qualitydrugstorenow24.com)
  • Scientists will be able to link new findings - such as how gene expression is affected by different medications - to extensive clinical and demographic data from the cell donors, who are also participants in an ongoing long-term study of hundreds of individuals with bipolar disorder. (bellenews.com)
  • However, for about 1.5 million Canadians the change in season brings about major clinical depression and for another 4.5 million Canadians it brings a mild depression. (smrthealth.com)
  • In the extreme, as in clinical depression, the neurohormones can transmit such negative messages that they can depress or shut down the immune system, making way for disease and death. (richardlaplante.com)
  • If sorrow turns into lasting depression, the body's chemical reaction to that can affect the hardwiring of the brain. (inc.com)
  • Neurotransmitters are the body's chemical messengers used by nerve cells or neurons to speak to one another. (healthstandnutrition.com)
  • The newly found protein, named p11, appears to regulate how brain cells respond to serotonin, researchers from Rockefeller University and Sweden's Karolinska Institute report Friday in the journal Science. (newson6.com)
  • Most depression medications used today are members of the Prozac family that work by making more serotonin available to brain cells. (newson6.com)
  • Known as induced pluripotent stem cells , or iPSC , these, in turn, can be manipulated to develop into different types of body cells, including brain cells. (bellenews.com)
  • Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers that send signals between brain cells. (mindsettms.net)
  • Brain cells are the only cells that do not reproduce. (mom2momflorida.com)
  • When your nerves are compressed, you are unable to produce enough serotonin to generate new brain cells. (zenapticchiropractic.com)
  • In addition, important neurotransmitters-chemicals that brain cells use to communicate-appear to be out of balance. (signsofdepressionuk.com)
  • This glutamine receptor alters ion channels in brain cells and sets off a chain of secondary events, increasing brain growth factors and regenerative pathways. (childpsychiatristdenver.com)
  • Deficiencies or excesses of certain vitamins or minerals can cause disorder in the functioning of brain cells, causing difficulty in memory, and problem-solving ability, changes in mood, and impairing function of the mind. (docgautham.com)
  • They speculated this could be because the bacteria were activating brain cells to release more serotonin. (dailyhealthybox.com)
  • Altering the serotonin levels is thought to help brain cells with their ability to send and receive chemical message, which in turn bolsters the user's mood. (islaws.com)
  • Activating these brain cells releases neurotransmitters. (mentalhealthclinichinsdale.com)
  • While difficult to prove, longstanding theories about depression suggest that important neurotransmitters-chemicals that brain cells use to communicate-are out of balance in depression. (counseling.info)
  • However, disturbances in normal chemical messaging processes between nerve cells in the brain are believed to contribute to depression. (fksg.org)
  • Donepezil improves the function of nerve cells in the brain. (qualitydrugstorenow24.com)
  • A number of psychiatric conditions, such as schizophrenia and depression, are widely thought to be caused at least partially by brain dysfunctions, although the nature of such brain anomalies is not well understood. (phys.org)
  • "We will be able to see if there are differences in how the neurons of a person with bipolar disorder make connections, determine how they respond to different medications and explore potential deficiencies in signaling pathways," explained Sue O'Shea, Ph.D., a professor of cell and developmental biology at the Medical School who leads the stem cell lab with Gary Smith, Ph.D, professor of obstetrics and gynecology. (bellenews.com)
  • The electrical and chemical current between neurons cannot connect to healthy cells. (mom2momflorida.com)
  • Serotonin is one of the chemical messengers (neurotransmitters) that carry signals between brain nerve cells (neurons). (sitelinks.info)
  • The AMPA receptor is a protein on neurons that boosts the cell's activity when it binds to the chemical messenger glutamate. (promisesbehavioralhealth.com)
  • The human brain has been estimated to contain 50-100 billion (1011) neurons[ citation needed ], of which about 10 billion (1010) are cortical pyramidal cells. (phys.org)
  • In this area the neurons are most likely pooly functioning which disregulates the communication between other nerve cells or nerve circuits leading to an increase difficulty to regulate our moods. (americastms.com)
  • Women with postpartum depression experience full-blown major depression during pregnancy or after delivery (postpartum depression). (americastms.com)
  • Depression is a struggle that can be won without medications. (mom2momflorida.com)
  • Even when damage or chemicals cause the depression you can handle without medications (that have their own side effects). (mom2momflorida.com)
  • This is thought to be how medications work for depression. (fksg.org)
  • The new research focuses on one of those receptors, dubbed the ``1B'' receptor, that seems to play a particularly big role in major depression. (newson6.com)
  • When the receptor receives a transmitter, it changes shape and triggers another electric signal in its cell and the process begins again, continuing the communication between cells. (psychologistworld.com)
  • Your brain needs new cells to create receptor sites. (zenapticchiropractic.com)
  • If you don't have enough receptor sites than your brain will have a shortage of tryptophan, the chemical that creates serotonin. (zenapticchiropractic.com)
  • It turns out that stress triggers the transcription factor in a different mix of nucleus accumbens cell types - working through different receptor types - than do drugs and natural rewards, likely accounting for the opposite effects. (promisesbehavioralhealth.com)
  • Among numerous target genes regulated by deltaFosB, a gene that makes a protein called the AMPA receptor is critical for resilience - or protecting mice from the depression-like syndrome. (promisesbehavioralhealth.com)
  • Every cell has receptor sites for the neurohormones produced by the brain. (richardlaplante.com)
  • One of the key second messenger pathways is mediated by the chemical glutamate, acting on a particular receptor called the NMDA receptor. (childpsychiatristdenver.com)
  • Two Scandinavian studies published this fall link acne and depression - even suicide - in profound ways. (advanceddermatologypc.com)
  • A trial of one male contraceptive hormone was stopped early in 2011 after one participant committed suicide and others reported depression. (technologyreview.com)
  • While trying to manage anxiety and depression, many of these pharmaceutical drugs actually lead users to dependency and even suicide, as listed as one of many harmful side effects of these drugs. (naturalnews.com)
  • Each year in the US, over 30,000 people die by suicide, 60% of whom suffer from depression. (mindsettms.net)
  • Like depression, patients with schizoaffective disorder are at increased risk of suicide. (healthlinerx.org)
  • In 1997, 30,535 people committed suicide, partly or largely as a result of depression, costing taxpayers billions of dollars. (lifeextensionvitamins.com)
  • Left untreated, depression can become more frequent and severe, leading to physical and emotional suffering, loss of job and relationships, and even to suicide. (lifeextensionvitamins.com)
  • This is caused by the chemical imbalances in the brain that control our mood. (americastms.com)
  • WASHINGTON (AP) _ Scientists have discovered a protein that seems to play a crucial role in developing depression, a finding that may lead to new treatments for the often debilitating illness _ and fundamental understanding of why it strikes. (newson6.com)
  • Although problems with the mood-regulating brain chemical serotonin have long been linked to depression, scientists don't know what causes the disease that afflicts some 18 million Americans _ or exactly what serotonin's role is. (newson6.com)
  • Scientists also believe there may be biochemical factors that contribute to depression. (verywellmind.com)
  • In the lab, scientists can coax these skin cells into behaving like embryonic stem cells. (bellenews.com)
  • Scientists have tried to create hepatocytes from iPSCs before, but such cells don't usually reach a fully mature state. (mit.edu)
  • Harvard Medical School scientists have successfully restored vision in mice by turning back the clock on aged eye cells in the retina to recapture youthful gene function. (medicalxpress.com)
  • While researchers can't explain the precise link between these dietary patterns and the risk of depression, it seems clear that people who don't follow these healthy eating patterns may be at a higher risk of depression because they are nutrient deficient. (creators.com)
  • googlead tip="vertical_mediu" aliniat="stanga"] The University of Michigan Health System researchers said stem cell could offer new hope for unlocking the secrets of bipolar disorder. (bellenews.com)
  • According to a University of Michigan Health System statement posted on its website on August 22, the new stem cell lines developed from the skin of adults living with bipolar disorder are providing researchers at the University of Michigan Health System an unprecedented opportunity to delve into the genetic and biological underpinnings of the devastating mood disorder. (bellenews.com)
  • In 2000, the economic burden of depression was estimated at $83.1 billion in the US and researchers estimate that by the year 2020, depression will be the second leading cause of disability worldwide. (mindbrainlv.com)
  • Indeed, mice susceptible to the depression-like syndrome show enhanced responses to drugs of abuse, the researchers have found. (promisesbehavioralhealth.com)
  • For, while an uptick in deltaFosB promotes addiction, the researchers have determined that it also protects against depression-inducing stress. (promisesbehavioralhealth.com)
  • The researchers explored the workings of deltaFosB in a mouse model of depression. (promisesbehavioralhealth.com)
  • Researchers identify compounds that help liver cells grow outside the body. (mit.edu)
  • MIT researchers have generated mature liver cells from induced pluripotent stem cells. (mit.edu)
  • However, researchers trying to exploit that ability in hopes of producing artificial liver tissue for transplantation have repeatedly been stymied: Mature liver cells, known as hepatocytes, quickly lose their normal function when removed from the body. (mit.edu)
  • Cells grown this way could help researchers develop engineered tissue to treat many of the 500 million people suffering from chronic liver diseases such as hepatitis C, according to the researchers. (mit.edu)
  • This allowed the researchers to perform large-scale, rapid studies of how 12,500 different chemicals affect liver-cell growth and function. (mit.edu)
  • After screening thousands of liver cells from eight different tissue donors, the researchers identified 12 compounds that helped the cells maintain those functions, promoted liver cell division, or both. (mit.edu)
  • Two of those compounds seemed to work especially well in cells from younger donors, so the researchers - including Robert Schwartz, an IMES postdoc, and Stephen Duncan, a professor of human and molecular genetics at the University of Wisconsin - also tested them in liver cells generated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). (mit.edu)
  • Other researchers are now testing them in a variety of cell types generated from iPSCs. (mit.edu)
  • Activation of cannabinoid receptors also reduces levels of cortisol, a stress hormone closely linked to depression. (rxleaf.com)
  • You don't have to rely on any harmful chemicals for treating the issue. (mediterranean-food.net)
  • On the other hand, the harmful bacteria are not happy with your food supply so they try to find food somewhere else by invading the cells lining your colon. (drmirkin.com)
  • The harmful bacteria can also convert nutrients in your colon to other chemicals that can be harmful and cause diseases. (drmirkin.com)
  • Significant harmful life events, such as going through a separation or divorce, losing a job, or being diagnosed with a serious illness, may also trigger depression, particularly among people who are already at risk because of developmental, genetic or other personal factors. (fksg.org)
  • Molecular hydrogen is a powerful antioxidant that defends cells and genes from damage caused by harmful free radicals. (stressnomore.co.uk)
  • Legal highs are prepared out of natural ingredients with no trace of harmful chemicals like LSD, BZP, MDMA and TFMPP in them. (greenpartypills.com)
  • Feelings of depression, stress, and anxiety often lead to physical tiredness and sleep disorders. (cgg.org)
  • Serotonin is also called a "feel-good" chemical because it's associated with positive feelings of well-being. (optimistminds.com)
  • Many tinnitus sufferers have difficulty sleeping and/or concentrating, and sometimes suffer from depression. (mediterranean-food.net)
  • About 5 percent of children and adolescents in the general population suffer from depression at any given point in time. (counseling.info)
  • Hydrogen permeates into the mitochondria and nucleus of a cell where DNA is stored - once there it neutralises and reduces the free radicals. (stressnomore.co.uk)
  • Surprisingly ashwagandha also reduces anxiety by altering chemical signals to the nervous system. (theheartandbrain.com)
  • A walk in the woods, they say, reduces the level of stress chemicals in the body and increases natural killer cells in the immune system, which fight tumors and viruses. (blogspot.com)
  • Allowing yourself to believe every thought you have is the prescription for anxiety disorders, depression, relationship problems, and prolonged grief. (amenclinics.com)
  • Children under stress, who experience loss, or who have attentional, learning, conduct or anxiety disorders are at a higher risk for depression. (counseling.info)
  • Brain nerve cells use neurotransmitters such as serotonin to send messages to each other. (utahpsych.org)
  • But Sharp noted that bouts of depression often are associated with serious stress, and that p11 is part of a protein family known to be sensitive to certain stress-related hormones. (newson6.com)
  • PTSD, anxiety and depression are mental health disorders that have many possible causes, including genetic vulnerability, stress, traumatic experiences and medical problems. (worldhealth.net)
  • What this suggests is that depression may be related to the personal stress of living with OCD or troubles that have developed at home or work as the result of the disease. (verywellmind.com)
  • Thus, these chemicals may stay for intended for a longer time generate pleasant emotions in case of depression and stress. (obatkadaskudiskurap.com)
  • It works because it increases the happy brain chemicals, increases energy, encourages better sleep and gives you an outlet to cope with stress. (smrthealth.com)
  • Yet there are terrific foods that bring real, long-lasting comfort when we are at risk of, or struggling with, stress or depression. (healthywomen.org)
  • Just being aware that some foods are better choices for stress and depression influences my food selection on a regular basis," Platts says. (healthywomen.org)
  • Eating spicy foods causes your brain to produce 'happy' hormones, like serotonin, which makes you better equipped to deal with depression, anxiety, anger, and stress. (lifehack.org)
  • Continuing difficulties, such as long-term unemployment, living in an uncaring or abusive relationship, loneliness or long-term isolation or prolonged exposure to stress at work can increase the risk of depression. (fksg.org)
  • Depression and generalized anxiety likely stem from dysregulation of pain mechanisms, the stress system regulated by the pituitary and adrenal glands, as well as the immune system. (yourbrain.health)
  • it protects mice from developing a depression-like syndrome following chronic social stress," explained Eric Nestler, M.D. , of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, who led the research team, which was funded by the National Institute of Health's National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). (promisesbehavioralhealth.com)
  • The new study in mice and human post-mortem brains confirms that the same reward circuitry is similarly corrupted (though to a lesser degree than with drugs of abuse) in depression via effects of stress on deltaFosB. (promisesbehavioralhealth.com)
  • The amount of deltaFosB induced by the stress determined susceptibility or resilience to developing the depression-like behaviors. (promisesbehavioralhealth.com)
  • Stress and its resultant anxiety may be a precursor for depression. (richardlaplante.com)
  • Chiropractic care can adjust your vertebra to remove the pressure from your nerves to naturally produce the chemicals that it needs. (zenapticchiropractic.com)
  • However, doctors are increasingly prescribing ketamine for depression. (rxleaf.com)
  • There is no known cure for depression but with effective treatment, many patients can remain symptom free. (mindsettms.net)
  • Studies have showed that most depressed patients who resolve their insomnia will have major improvements in their depression. (smrthealth.com)
  • Depressed patients often lack motivation and the ability to experience reward or pleasure - and depression and addiction often go together. (promisesbehavioralhealth.com)
  • CBD infused honey has led to improvements in patients who have suffered from depression and anxiety whether long or short term. (honeyheaven.co.uk)
  • Recent data indicate that combinations of selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors and Wellbutrin can convert partial response to full response in patients with treatment-resistant depression. (optimistminds.com)
  • Greengard and colleagues discovered that the p11 protein increases the numbers of these receptors on the surfaces of cells, mobilizing them so they're available for serotonin to do its job. (newson6.com)
  • But the discovery likely will aid research into other diseases that also depend on cell-based receptors. (newson6.com)
  • An electric signal is sent down a cell, triggering the release of transmitters, which travel to the receptors of the receiving cell. (psychologistworld.com)
  • CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT Oil alleviates Anxiety and Depression by interacting with CB2 endocannabinoid receptors. (obatkadaskudiskurap.com)
  • different receptors that bind to serotonin each working a different property of this highly multi-functional chemical messenger. (dailyhealthybox.com)
  • Said Oxford University pharmacologist Trevor Sharp, who reviewed the work: ``This finding represents compelling evidence that p11 has a pivotal role in both the cause of depression and perhaps its successful treatment. (newson6.com)
  • We specialize in treating Resistant Depression with newer treatment Modalities including Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and Spravato. (mindbrainlv.com)
  • Nutrition also plays a role in prevention of anxiety and depression and as part of a treatment plan. (healthstandnutrition.com)
  • Depression is often not recognized and can go on for months or even years if left untreated, so it is very important to seek support as early as possible, as the sooner a person gets treatment, the sooner they can recover. (fksg.org)
  • Without treatment, dysthymic disorder (mild depression) is so persistent that periods of normal mood may last only a few weeks at a time. (lifeextensionvitamins.com)
  • The clinic utilizes ketamine IV infusion treatments to combat treatment-resistant depression and other mental health conditions. (houstonmetronews.com)
  • A spokesperson for the company stated: "It has been about 6 months since my daughter completed treatment here for bipolar depression and the improvement has been astounding. (houstonmetronews.com)
  • Most who experience depression need treatment to get better. (counseling.info)
  • This can often lead to treatment resistant depression. (americastms.com)
  • [2] Depression is a life-long condition in which periods of wellness alternate with recurrences of illness. (counseling.info)
  • CBD isolate oils are those where certain chemical compounds are removed. (xue-da.com)
  • In a paper appearing in the June 2 issue of Nature Chemical Biology , they have identified a dozen chemical compounds that can help liver cells not only maintain their normal function while grown in a lab dish, but also multiply to produce new tissue. (mit.edu)
  • However, when treated with those two compounds, the cells matured more completely. (mit.edu)
  • Bhatia and her team wonder whether these compounds might launch a universal maturation program that could influence other types of cells as well. (mit.edu)
  • Untreated depression can have many negative effects on a person's life, including serious relationship and family problems, drug and alcohol problems or difficulty finding and holding down a job. (fksg.org)
  • Promising chemicals could then be fed to male mice to see if they cause infertility. (technologyreview.com)
  • Testing drugs on such human cells might provide more accurate leads than tests on mice, he thinks. (technologyreview.com)
  • How do drugs that affect our mood (for example, Prozac for depression) and the way we behave work? (psychologistworld.com)
  • Drugs such as anti-depression narcotics affect a user's mood by using chemicals to change the movement of transmitters like serotonin between cells. (psychologistworld.com)
  • The leading theory is that drugs such as sertraline restore the chemical balance among neurotransmitters in the brain. (ubuntuforums.org)
  • According to some medical professionals, and the latest research, capsaicin has the same effect on certain cancer cells as powerful cancer-fighting drugs do. (lifehack.org)
  • Studies have shown that exercise is superior to anti-depressant drugs with regard to treating depression. (richardlaplante.com)
  • Drugs used for treating OCD increase levels of a naturally occurring chemical in the brain called serotonin. (utahpsych.org)
  • He's turning skin cells into stem cells that look and act like the sperm-making factory cells in the testes. (technologyreview.com)
  • Bipolar disorder: new hope from stem cell research. (bellenews.com)
  • The induced pluripotent stem cells could offer new hope for unlocking the secrets of bipolar disorder. (bellenews.com)
  • But that is now changing because of the Prechter research program and advances in stem cell research. (bellenews.com)
  • The new stem cell lines - among the first to be created by the A. Alfred Taubman Medical Research Institute Consortium for Stem Cell Therapies - were made from fibroblasts from skin samples donated by adult research volunteers both with and without bipolar disorder. (bellenews.com)
  • We often think of stems cells being used in therapies to treat disease, but this is a great example of stem cells' usefulness for studying the mechanisms of disease. (bellenews.com)
  • Stem Cells. (lashtal.com)

No images available that match "cell depression chemical"