A semisynthetic cephamycin antibiotic that is administered intravenously or intramuscularly. The drug is highly resistant to a broad spectrum of beta-lactamases and is active against a wide range of both aerobic and anaerobic gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms.
Naturally occurring family of beta-lactam cephalosporin-type antibiotics having a 7-methoxy group and possessing marked resistance to the action of beta-lactamases from gram-positive and gram-negative organisms.
A semisynthetic cephamycin antibiotic with a broad spectrum of activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. It has a high rate of efficacy in many types of infection and to date no severe side effects have been noted.
A semisynthetic cephamycin antibiotic resistant to beta-lactamase.
Semisynthetic broad-spectrum cephalosporin with a tetrazolyl moiety that is resistant to beta-lactamase. It has been proposed especially against Pseudomonas infections.
A surgical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of disorders and abnormalities of the COLON; RECTUM; and ANAL CANAL.
Gram-negative bacteria occurring in the lower intestinal tracts of man and other animals. It is the most common species of anaerobic bacteria isolated from human soft tissue infections.
'Anaerobic Bacteria' are types of bacteria that do not require oxygen for growth and can often cause diseases in humans, including dental caries, gas gangrene, and tetanus, among others.
INFLAMMATION of the BREAST, or MAMMARY GLAND.
INFLAMMATION of the UDDER in cows.
A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.
A medical-surgical specialty concerned with the physiology and disorders primarily of the female genital tract, as well as female endocrinology and reproductive physiology.
Hospital department responsible for the administration and management of services provided for obstetric and gynecologic patients.
The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.
Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)

Cross-reactivity of cefotetan and ceftriaxone antibodies, associated with hemolytic anemia, with other: cephalosporins and penicillin. (1/39)

Most drug-induced immune hemolytic anemias since the late 1980s have been caused by the second- and third-generation cephalosporins, cefotetan and ceftriaxone, respectively. Cross-reactivity of cefotetan and ceftriaxone antibodies with other cephalosporins or penicillin has been studied only minimally. We tested 7 serum samples previously identified to contain cefotetan antibodies and one serum sample previously identified to contain ceftriaxone antibodies against 9 other cephalosporins, penicillin, and 7-aminocephalosporanic acid in the presence of RBCs and also used hapten inhibition to indicate cross-reactivity. Serum samples containing cefotetan antibodies showed some cross-reactivity with cephalothin and cefoxitin (and to a much lesser extent with penicillin and ceftazidime). The ceftriaxone antibodies showed very weak cross-reactivity with cefotaxime, cefamandole, and cefoperazone. There was very little cross-reactivity between cefotetan antibodies and the drugs tested in the present study. We have no data to determine whether the in vitro data relate to in vivo reactivity.  (+info)

Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome: a diagnosis to consider in women with right upper quadrant pain. (2/39)

Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome--inflammation of the liver capsule associated with genital tract infection--occurs in up to one fourth of patients with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Classically presenting as sharp, pleuritic right upper quadrant pain, usually but not always accompanied by signs of salpingitis, it can mimic many other common disorders such as cholecystitis and pyelonephritis.  (+info)

Pharmacokinetics and tissue penetration of single-dose cefotetan used for antimicrobial prophylaxis in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. (3/39)

The pharmacokinetics and tissue penetration of cefotetan were studied after a single injection of 2 g given intravenously for antimicrobial prophylaxis to 16 consecutive patients undergoing colorectal surgery. Concentrations in tissue greater than or equal to the MIC for 90% of the main pathogens tested were considered adequate. The elimination half-life at beta phase was 4.6 +/- 1.4 h, the total body clearance was 0.75 +/- 0.19 ml/kg/min, and the volume of distribution was 260 +/- 71 ml/kg. At the time of incision (33 +/- 16 min after the injection), cefotetan concentrations were 14.2 +/- 7 micrograms/g in abdominal-wall fat, 16.4 +/- 1 micrograms/g in epiploic fat, and 163 +/- 62 mg/liter in serum. At the time of surgical anastomosis (151 +/- 54 min), cefotetan concentrations were 33.3 +/- 6 micrograms/g in the colonic wall and 73 +/- 34 mg/liter in serum. Upon closure of the abdomen (216 +/- 76 min), cefotetan concentrations were 6.3 +/- 3 micrograms/g in abdominal-wall fat, 6.1 +/- 4 micrograms/g in epiploic fat, and 64 +/- 38 mg/liter in serum. Cefotetan tissue penetration was 10% into abdominal and epiploic fat and 46% into the colonic wall. Levels in tissue were compared with the MIC for 90% of the most frequently encountered pathogenic germs (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacteroides fragilis, and Escherichia coli). Adequate concentrations in tissue were obtained up to anastomosis but not upon closure. The authors therefore recommend the injection of an additional dose of 1 g before closure in order to ensure optimal efficacy throughout the surgical procedure.  (+info)

Evaluation of beta-lactamase inhibitors in disk tests for detection of plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamases in well-characterized clinical strains of Klebsiella spp. (4/39)

The diagnostic utility of the AmpC beta-lactamase inhibitors LN-2-128, 48-1220, and Syn 2190 in combination with cefotetan (CTT) or cefoxitin in a disk test for the detection of clinical isolates of Klebsiella spp. producing plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamases (pAmpCs) was evaluated. The combination of Syn 2190 and CTT had a sensitivity of 91%, a specificity of 100%, and a reproducibility of 100% and showed the best potential of using an inhibitor for detection of Klebsiella spp. producing pAmpCs.  (+info)

Radiation recall dermatitis with cefotetan: a case study. (5/39)

Radiation recall dermatitis (RRD) is an inflammatory skin reaction that occurs in a previously irradiated body part following drug administration. This phenomenon may occur from days to years following exposure to ionizing radiation. The case of a 54-year-old Caucasian woman who was initially treated with external-beam radiation to the right thoracic region following the diagnosis of a poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the right lung is reported. She received four cycles of consolidated chemotherapy with docetaxel and carboplatin. Four months later, she was admitted to the hospital for acute cholecystitis and was placed on cefotetan. She developed a tender, erythematous rash on the posterior region of her right thorax 48 hours later. The drug was withdrawn, supportive care was instituted, and the patient subsequently improved. RRD should be suspected in patients who develop an erythematous rash in a previously irradiated region. To our knowledge this entity has not been associated with cefotetan previously.  (+info)

Ertapenem versus cefotetan prophylaxis in elective colorectal surgery. (6/39)

BACKGROUND: Ertapenem, a long-acting carbapenem, may be an alternative to the recommended prophylactic antibiotic cefotetan. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind trial, we assessed the efficacy and safety of antibiotic prophylaxis with ertapenem, as compared with cefotetan, in patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery. A successful outcome was defined as the absence of surgical-site infection, anastomotic leakage, or antibiotic use 4 weeks postoperatively. All adverse events were collected until 14 days after the administration of antibiotic prophylaxis. RESULTS: Of the 1002 patients randomly assigned to study groups, 901 (451 in the ertapenem group and 450 in the cefotetan group) qualified for the modified intention-to-treat analysis, and 672 (338 in the ertapenem group and 334 in the cefotetan group) were included in the per-protocol analysis. After adjustment for strata, in the modified intention-to-treat analysis, the rate of overall prophylactic failure was 40.2% in the ertapenem group and 50.9% in the cefotetan group (absolute difference, -10.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], -17.1 to -4.2); in the per-protocol analysis, the failure rate was 28.0% in the ertapenem group and 42.8% in the cefotetan group (absolute difference, -14.8%; 95% CI, -21.9 to -7.5). Both analyses fulfilled statistical criteria for the superiority of ertapenem. In the modified intention-to-treat analysis, the most common reason for failure of prophylaxis in both groups was surgical-site infection: 17.1% in the ertapenem group and 26.2% in the cefotetan group (absolute difference, -9.1; 95% CI, -14.4 to -3.7). In the treated population, the overall incidence of Clostridium difficile infection was 1.7% in the ertapenem group and 0.6% in the cefotetan group (P=0.22). CONCLUSIONS: Ertapenem is more effective than cefotetan in the prevention of surgical-site infection in patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery but may be associated with an increase in C. difficile infection. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00090272 [ClinicalTrials.gov].).  (+info)

Interpretive criteria and quality control guidelines for Neisseria gonorrhoeae susceptibility test standardization for cefotetan. (7/39)

Cefotetan was tested in a multilaboratory study to standardize susceptibility testing criteria and quality control guidelines for Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Cefotetan was most active against penicillinase-producing and penicillin-susceptible strains (MIC for 50% of strains tested, 0.5 micrograms/ml) and was least active against the chromosomally resistant isolates (MIC for 50% of strains tested, 2 micrograms/ml). The recommended 30-micrograms disk cefotetan interpretive criteria were as follows: susceptible at greater than or equal to 26 mm (less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml), intermediate at 20 to 25 mm (4 micrograms/ml), and resistant at less than or equal to 19 mm (greater than or equal to 8 micrograms/ml). Quality control guidelines for agar dilution and disk diffusion tests were established by using numerous GC agar lots, three cefotetan 30-micrograms disk lots, two quality control organisms, and a volume of tests consistent with National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards M23-T guidelines.  (+info)

Antibiotic treatment and associated prolonged prothrombin time. (8/39)

The incidence and type of pathology causing a prolonged prothrombin time and clinical bleeding episodes were assessed in a multicentre study of 1109 patients receiving cefotetan, a N-methyl-thiotetrazole (NMTT), or equivalent antibiotics. There was no significant difference in the incidence of a prolonged prothrombin time (9.9% with cefotetan, 8.0% with comparable antibiotics) of clinical bleeding episodes. However, prothrombin time increases of greater than 12 seconds were significantly (p = 0.002) greater with cefotetan (3.8%) than with comparators (0.8%). In both antibiotic groups increases in prothrombin time were more likely following surgery and in patients who were older, with a high platelet count, low albumin, or higher urea and creatinine concentrations. All antibiotic treatment can be associated with prolonged prothrombin times and new agents should always be assessed in a large multicentre study before the practical, clinical importance of haemostatic defects can be defined.  (+info)

Cefotetan is a type of antibiotic known as a cephalosporin, which is used to treat various bacterial infections. It works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, leading to the death of the bacteria. Cefotetan has a broad spectrum of activity and is effective against many different types of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

Cefotetan is often used to treat intra-abdominal infections, gynecological infections, skin and soft tissue infections, and bone and joint infections. It is administered intravenously or intramuscularly, and the dosage and duration of treatment will depend on the type and severity of the infection being treated.

Like all antibiotics, cefotetan can cause side effects, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and allergic reactions. It may also increase the risk of bleeding, particularly in patients with impaired kidney function or those taking blood thinners. Therefore, it is important to be closely monitored by a healthcare provider while taking this medication.

Cephamycins are a subclass of cephalosporin antibiotics, which are derived from the fungus Acremonium species. They have a similar chemical structure to other cephalosporins but have an additional methoxy group on their side chain that makes them more resistant to beta-lactamases, enzymes produced by some bacteria that can inactivate other cephalosporins and penicillins.

Cephamycins are primarily used to treat infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus species, and Enterobacter species. They have a broad spectrum of activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, making them useful for treating a variety of infections.

The two main cephamycins that are used clinically are cefoxitin and cefotetan. Cefoxitin is often used to treat intra-abdominal infections, pelvic inflammatory disease, and skin and soft tissue infections. Cefotetan is primarily used for the treatment of surgical prophylaxis, gynecological infections, and pneumonia.

Like other cephalosporins, cephamycins can cause allergic reactions, including rashes, hives, and anaphylaxis. They should be used with caution in patients who have a history of allergies to penicillin or other beta-lactam antibiotics. Additionally, cephamycins can disrupt the normal gut flora, leading to secondary infections such as Clostridioides difficile (C. diff) diarrhea.

Cefmetazole is a second-generation cephalosporin antibiotic, which is used to treat various bacterial infections. It works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, leading to bacterial cell death. Cefmetazole has a broad spectrum of activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including many strains that are resistant to other antibiotics.

Common side effects of cefmetazole include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and headache. More serious side effects can include allergic reactions, seizures, and changes in blood cell counts or liver function. As with all antibiotics, it is important to take cefmetazole exactly as directed by a healthcare provider, and to complete the full course of treatment even if symptoms improve.

Cefoxitin is a type of antibiotic known as a cephamycin, which is a subclass of the larger group of antibiotics called cephalosporins. Cephalosporins are bactericidal agents that inhibit bacterial cell wall synthesis by binding to and disrupting the function of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs).

Cefoxitin has a broad spectrum of activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including many strains that are resistant to other antibiotics. It is commonly used to treat infections caused by susceptible organisms such as:

* Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus or MRSA)
* Streptococcus pneumoniae
* Escherichia coli
* Klebsiella spp.
* Proteus mirabilis
* Bacteroides fragilis and other anaerobic bacteria

Cefoxitin is available in both intravenous (IV) and intramuscular (IM) formulations, and it is typically administered every 6 to 8 hours. The drug is generally well tolerated, but potential side effects include gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, as well as allergic reactions, including rash, pruritus, and anaphylaxis.

It's important to note that the use of antibiotics should be based on the results of bacterial cultures and susceptibility testing whenever possible, to ensure appropriate therapy and minimize the development of antibiotic resistance.

Cefoperazone is a type of antibiotic known as a cephalosporin, which is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections. It works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, which is necessary for its survival. Without a functional cell wall, the bacteria are not able to grow and multiply, and are eventually destroyed by the body's immune system.

Cefoperazone is often used to treat infections of the respiratory tract, urinary tract, skin, and soft tissues. It may also be used to prevent infections during surgery. Like all antibiotics, cefoperazone should only be used under the direction of a healthcare professional, as misuse can lead to the development of drug-resistant bacteria.

It is important to note that cefoperazone, like other antibiotics, can have side effects, including gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. It may also cause allergic reactions in some people. If you experience any unusual symptoms while taking cefoperazone, it is important to contact your healthcare provider right away.

Colorectal surgery is a medical specialty that deals with the diagnosis and treatment of disorders affecting the colon, rectum, and anus. This can include conditions such as colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease (such as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis), diverticulitis, and anal fistulas or fissures.

The surgical procedures performed by colorectal surgeons may involve minimally invasive techniques, such as laparoscopic or robotic-assisted surgery, or more traditional open surgery. These procedures can range from removing polyps during a colonoscopy to complex resections of the colon, rectum, or anus.

Colorectal surgeons also work closely with other medical specialists, such as gastroenterologists, oncologists, and radiologists, to provide comprehensive care for their patients.

'Bacteroides fragilis' is a species of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in the human gastrointestinal tract. They are part of the normal gut flora and play an important role in maintaining a healthy digestive system. However, they can also cause infections when they enter other parts of the body, such as the abdomen or bloodstream, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems.

Bacteroides fragilis is known for its ability to produce enzymes that allow it to resist antibiotics and evade the host's immune system. This makes it a challenging bacterium to treat and can lead to serious and potentially life-threatening infections, such as abscesses, sepsis, and meningitis.

Proper hygiene, such as handwashing and safe food handling practices, can help prevent the spread of Bacteroides fragilis and other bacteria that can cause infections. If an infection does occur, it is typically treated with a combination of surgical drainage and antibiotics that are effective against anaerobic bacteria.

Anaerobic bacteria are a type of bacteria that do not require oxygen to grow and survive. Instead, they can grow in environments that have little or no oxygen. Some anaerobic bacteria can even be harmed or killed by exposure to oxygen. These bacteria play important roles in many natural processes, such as decomposition and the breakdown of organic matter in the digestive system. However, some anaerobic bacteria can also cause disease in humans and animals, particularly when they infect areas of the body that are normally oxygen-rich. Examples of anaerobic bacterial infections include tetanus, gas gangrene, and dental abscesses.

Mastitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the breast tissue, usually caused by an infection. It typically occurs in breastfeeding women, when bacteria from the baby's mouth enter the milk ducts through a cracked or damaged nipple, leading to infection and inflammation. However, mastitis can also occur in non-breastfeeding women, often as a result of blocked milk ducts or milk remaining in the breast after weaning.

Symptoms of mastitis may include breast pain, tenderness, swelling, warmth, redness, and fever. In some cases, pus or blood may be present in the breast milk. If left untreated, mastitis can lead to more severe complications such as abscess formation. Treatment typically involves antibiotics to clear the infection, pain relief medication, and continued breastfeeding or pumping to prevent further blockage of the milk ducts.

Bovine mastitis is a common inflammatory condition that affects the mammary gland (udder) of dairy cows. It's primarily caused by bacterial infections, with Escherichia coli (E. coli), Streptococcus spp., and Staphylococcus aureus being some of the most common pathogens involved. The infection can lead to varying degrees of inflammation, which might result in decreased milk production, changes in milk composition, and, if left untreated, potentially severe systemic illness in the cow.

The clinical signs of bovine mastitis may include:
- Redness and heat in the affected quarter (or quarters) of the udder
- Swelling and pain upon palpation
- Decreased milk production or changes in milk appearance (such as flakes, clots, or watery consistency)
- Systemic signs like fever, loss of appetite, and depression in severe cases

Mastitis can be classified into two main types: clinical mastitis, which is characterized by visible signs of inflammation, and subclinical mastitis, where the infection might not present with obvious external symptoms but could still lead to decreased milk quality and production.

Prevention and control measures for bovine mastitis include good milking practices, maintaining a clean and dry environment for the cows, practicing proper udder hygiene, administering antibiotics or other treatments as necessary, and regularly monitoring milk for signs of infection through somatic cell count testing.

Obstetrics is a branch of medicine and surgery concerned with the care of women during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postnatal period. It involves managing potential complications that may arise during any stage of pregnancy or delivery, as well as providing advice and guidance on prenatal care, labor and delivery, and postpartum care. Obstetricians are medical doctors who specialize in obstetrics and can provide a range of services including routine check-ups, ultrasounds, genetic testing, and other diagnostic procedures to monitor the health and development of the fetus. They also perform surgical procedures such as cesarean sections when necessary.

Gynecology is a branch of medicine that deals with the health of the female reproductive system. It includes the diagnosis, treatment, and management of conditions related to the female reproductive organs such as the vagina, cervix, uterus, ovaries, and fallopian tubes.

Gynecologists provide routine care for women, including Pap tests, breast exams, and family planning advice. They also treat a wide range of gynecological issues, from menstrual disorders and sexually transmitted infections to reproductive system cancers and hormonal imbalances. In addition, many gynecologists also provide obstetric care, making them both ob-gyns.

It's important for women to establish a relationship with a trusted gynecologist to ensure they receive regular checkups and are able to address any concerns or issues related to their reproductive health.

The Obstetrics and Gynecology (OB-GYN) Department in a hospital is responsible for providing healthcare services related to pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period, as well as gynecological care for women of all ages. This department is typically staffed with medical doctors who have specialized training in obstetrics and/or gynecology, including obstetricians, gynecologists, and maternal-fetal medicine specialists.

Obstetrics focuses on the care of pregnant women, including prenatal care, delivery, and postpartum care. Obstetricians provide medical care during pregnancy and childbirth to ensure the health and wellbeing of both the mother and the baby. They are trained to manage high-risk pregnancies, perform cesarean sections, and handle complications that may arise during labor and delivery.

Gynecology focuses on the health of the female reproductive system, including the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders related to the reproductive organs. Gynecologists provide routine care such as Pap tests, breast exams, and family planning services, as well as more complex care for conditions such as endometriosis, ovarian cysts, and menopause.

The OB-GYN department may also include specialized services such as reproductive endocrinology and infertility, which focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of infertility and other hormonal disorders related to reproduction. Additionally, some OB-GYN departments may offer midwifery services, providing a more natural approach to childbirth under the supervision of medical professionals.

Overall, the OB-GYN department plays a critical role in ensuring the health and wellbeing of women throughout their lives, from adolescence through menopause and beyond.

Medically, "milk" is not defined. However, it is important to note that human babies are fed with breast milk, which is the secretion from the mammary glands of humans. It is rich in nutrients like proteins, fats, carbohydrates (lactose), vitamins and minerals that are essential for growth and development.

Other mammals also produce milk to feed their young. These include cows, goats, and sheep, among others. Their milk is often consumed by humans as a source of nutrition, especially in dairy products. However, the composition of these milks can vary significantly from human breast milk.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Lawyers" is not a term that has a medical definition. The term "Lawyer" refers to a person who is qualified and authorized to practice law in a court of law. They offer advice on legal matters and represent clients in court or in other legal proceedings. If you have any questions about medical terminology, I would be happy to help!

... has a broad spectrum of activity and has been used to treat bacterial infections of the bone, skin, urinary tract, ... Cefotetan was developed by Yamanouchi. It is marketed outside Japan by AstraZeneca with the brand names Apatef and Cefotan. The ... Cefotetan is an injectable antibiotic of the cephamycin type for prophylaxis and treatment of bacterial infections. It is often ... "Cefotetan Susceptibility and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) Data" (PDF). Toku-e. Cefotan official web site run by ...
Cefoxitin, Cefotetan, and Other Cephamycins". In M. Lindsay Grayson; Cosgrove, Sara E.; Crowe, Suzanne; Hope, William; McCarthy ...
Cephamycins (cefoxitin and cefotetan) are not hydrolyzed by majority of ESBLs, but are hydrolyzed by associated AmpC-type β- ... cefoxitin and cefotetan); has been blocked by inhibitors such as clavulanate, sulbactam or tazobactam and did not involve ... cefotetan) but resistance to the third-generation cephalosporins and to aztreonam. Moreover, one should suspect these strains ... such as cefoxitin or cefotetan but are not affected by commercially available β-lactamase inhibitors, and can, in strains with ...
Ayoola, A.; Lee, Y. J. (2006). "Radiation recall dermatitis with cefotetan: a case study". The Oncologist. 11 (10): 1118-1120. ...
These include latamoxef (moxalactam), cefmenoxime, cefoperazone, cefamandole, cefmetazole, and cefotetan. This is thought to be ... and cefotetan are classed as second-generation cephalosporins. Cefalotin, cefazolin, cefalexin, cefapirin, cefradine, and ...
Clarke AM, Zemcov SJ (January 1983). "Antibacterial activity of the cephamycin cefotetan: an in-vitro comparison with other ... Cefoxitin Cefotetan Cefmetazole Oreste A. Mascaretti (2003). Bacteria Versus Antibacterial Agents: An Integrated Approach. ...
Typical regimens include cefoxitin or cefotetan plus doxycycline, and clindamycin plus gentamicin. An alternative parenteral ...
Typical antibiotics used are cefoxitin or cefotetan plus doxycycline, and clindamycin plus gentamicin. An alternative ...
Cefotetan-dependent hemolytic anemia mimicking an acute intravascular immune transfusion reaction". American Journal of ...
Examples of compounds bearing this functional group include the antibiotic Cefotetan and the pesticide Fosthietan. Block, E; ...
The recommended parenteral antibiotics are 1g ertapenem or 2g cefotetan, which can treat multi drug-resistant bacteria. if the ... casualty can tolerate oral fluids, 400mg moxifloxacin can be administered orally instead of ertapenem or cefotetan. Wounds. ...
... comparison of cefotetan plus doxycycline and cefoxitin plus doxycycline". American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 158 (3 ...
... cefotetan and vancomycin. A. senegalensis is one of the few species in the genus whose genome has been sequenced. The genome ...
Out of the cephalosporins, cefoxitin and cefotetan can be used to cover Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, and ...
... such as ceftriaxone and cefotetan), and ciprofloxacin.[citation needed] The most common antibody isotype involved in warm ...
... cefotetan (INN) cefotiam (INN) cefovecin sodium (USAN) cefoxazole (INN) cefoxitin (INN) cefozopran (INN) cefpimizole (INN) ...
... cefotetan MeSH D03.383.129.617.467 - losartan MeSH D03.383.129.617.700 - tetrazolium salts MeSH D03.383.129.617.700.500 - ...
... gentamicin Alternative Ampicillin/sulbactam Ticarcillin/clavulanate Cefoxitine Cefotetan Piperacillin/tazobactam Ertapenem ...
... cefprozil Cefaclor Cefamandole Cefuroxime Cefotetan Cefoxitin Cefixime Cefotaxime Cefpodoxime Ceftazidime Ceftriaxone Cefdinir ...
... cefotetan MeSH D02.065.589.099.249.250.222 - cefoxitin MeSH D02.065.589.099.374 - clavulanic acids MeSH D02.065.589.099.374.160 ...
... cefotetan, ceftriaxone, and latamoxef (moxalactam); thought to be due to common N-methylthiotetrazole metabolite. Chloral ...
... cefamandole and cefotetan, that have a N-methylthio-tetrazole moiety Griseofulvin, an oral antifungal drug Procarbazine ...
Cefroxadine J01DB12 Ceftezole J01DC01 Cefoxitin J01DC02 Cefuroxime J01DC03 Cefamandole J01DC04 Cefaclor J01DC05 Cefotetan ...
Certain other cephalosporin antibiotic medications, like cefotetan and cefazolin are metabolized to a compound that has similar ...
... cefotetan 1984 - temocillin 1985 - cefpiramide 1985 - imipenem/cilastatin, the first carbapenem 1985 - ofloxacin 1986 - ...
Cefotetan has a broad spectrum of activity and has been used to treat bacterial infections of the bone, skin, urinary tract, ... Cefotetan was developed by Yamanouchi. It is marketed outside Japan by AstraZeneca with the brand names Apatef and Cefotan. The ... Cefotetan is an injectable antibiotic of the cephamycin type for prophylaxis and treatment of bacterial infections. It is often ... "Cefotetan Susceptibility and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) Data" (PDF). Toku-e. Cefotan official web site run by ...
Cefotetan Injection: learn about side effects, dosage, special precautions, and more on MedlinePlus ... Use cefotetan injection until you finish the prescription, even if you feel better. If you stop using cefotetan injection too ... Cefotetan injection is also used before surgery to prevent infections. Cefotetan injection is in a class of medications called ... Before using cefotetan injection,. *tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to cefotetan injection; other ...
Find patient medical information for cefotetan in dextrose intravenous on WebMD including its uses, side effects and safety, ... Cefotetan In Dextrose Piggyback - Uses, Side Effects, and More Generic Name(S): cefotetan in dextrose. ... Cefotetan is an antibiotic used to treat a wide variety of bacterial infections. It may also be used before and during certain ... Cefotetan may cause live bacterial vaccines (such as typhoid vaccine) to not work well. Tell your health care professional that ...
Cefotetan was developed by Yamanouchi. It is marketed outside Japan by AstraZeneca with the brand names Apatef and Cefotan. ... Cefotetan is an injectable antibiotic of the cephamycin type for prophylaxis and treatment of bacterial infections. It is often ... Cefotetan has a broad spectrum of activity and has been used to treat bacterial infections of the bone, skin, urinary tract, ... The chemical structure of cefotetan, like that of several other cephalosporins, contains an N-methylthiotetrazole (NMTT or 1- ...
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Cefotetan. *View full drug information. Second-generation cephalosporin used as single-drug therapy to provide broad gram- ...
Find information on Cefotetan (Cefotan) in Daviss Drug Guide including dosage, side effects, interactions, nursing ... "CefoTEtan." Daviss Drug Guide, 18th ed., F.A. Davis Company, 2023. Emergency Central, emergency.unboundmedicine.com/emergency/ ... view/Davis-Drug-Guide/109022/all/cefoTEtan. Vallerand AHA, Sanoski CAC, Quiring CC. CefoTEtan. Daviss Drug Guide. F.A. Davis ... Vallerand, A. H., Sanoski, C. A., & Quiring, C. (2023). CefoTEtan. In Daviss Drug Guide (18th ed.). F.A. Davis Company. https ...
List of frequently occuring side effects for Cefotetan Disodium. Sources include the official FAERS database and social media ... Cefotetan Disodium Side Effects. Filter Table by Serious Outcome. ×. Filter by Serious Outcome. ... For more details, please use our Workbench for research on individual brands like Cefotetan. ... The following are comments from users that experienced side effects while taking Cefotetan Disodium ...
Cefotetan 1-2 g or cefoxitin 1-2 g plus oral neomycin 1 g and oral erythromycin 1 g (start 19 h preoperatively for 3 doses) ...
Find 1 user ratings and reviews for Cefotetan Injection on WebMD including side effects and drug interactions, medication ... User Reviews for cefotetan injection Comments & ratings on the side effects, benefits, and effectiveness of cefotetan injection ...
Find user ratings and reviews for cefotetan in dextrose intravenous on WebMD including side effects and drug interactions, ... Read user comments about the side effects, benefits, and effectiveness of cefotetan in dextrose intravenous. ...
Metronidazole, Tinidazole, Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole, and Cefotetan. These medicines are dangerous to take with alcohol. ...
The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above. ...
Because these cephalosporins are less active than cefotetan or cefoxitin against anaerobic bacteria, the addition of ...
J 01 DC 05 - cefotetan. *J 01 DC 06 - cefonicyd. *J 01 DC 07 - cefotiam ...
Cefotetan Disodium Injection (Currently in Shortage) *Cefotetan Disodium Injection, Powder, For Solution (Currently in Shortage ... Cefotetan Disodium Injection (Currently in Shortage) *Cefotetan Disodium Injection, Powder, For Solution (Currently in Shortage ...
AmpC enzymes hydrolyze most cephalosporins (except for cefepime), cephamycins (eg, cefoxitin, cefotetan), monobactams (eg, ...
If women do not improve and do not have an abscess, vancomycin 1 g IV every 12 hours or cefotetan 1 to 2 g IV every 12 hours to ...
... cefotetan 1 g IM in a single dose; and cefoxitin 2 g IM in a single dose. None of these injectable cephalosporins offers any ...
cefotetan disodium) For Injection, USP. DESCRIPTION. CEFOTAN™ (cefotetan for Injection, USP), as cefotetan diso dium, is a ... Each 1 gram vial contains cefotetan disodium equivalent to 1 gram cefotetan activity. Each 2 gram vial contains cefotetan ... CEFOTAN™ (cefotetan for Injection, USP) is supplied in vials containing 80 mg (3.5 mEq) of sodium per gram of cefotetan ... Cefotetan is excreted in human milk in very low concentrations. Caution should be exercised when cefotetan is administered to a ...
cefotetan. Minor (1)cefotetan increases toxicity of furosemide by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. ... cefotetan. cefotetan increases toxicity of furosemide by pharmacodynamic synergism. Minor/Significance Unknown. Increased risk ...
Cefotetan. When taken with amoxicillin, bromelain was shown to increase absorption of amoxicillin in humans. When 80 mg of ... Cefotetan in Dextrose. When taken with amoxicillin, bromelain was shown to increase absorption of amoxicillin in humans. When ... Cefotetan in Dextrose, Iso-osm. When taken with amoxicillin, bromelain was shown to increase absorption of amoxicillin in ...
cefotetan. Monitor Closely (1)probenecid will increase the level or effect of cefotetan by acidic (anionic) drug competition ... cefotetan. probenecid will increase the level or effect of cefotetan by acidic (anionic) drug competition for renal tubular ...
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955010-42-1 Side chain of Cefotetan 152089-12-8 DOCETAXEL SIDE CHAIN NO 1 133066-61-2 PACLITAXEL SIDE CHAIN NO 1 ...
Integrated Sciences is partnered with innovative and reliable brands and aims to meet the specialist needs of our customers.. ...
Cefotetan (Cefotan), 2 g IV every 12 hours, or cefoxitin (Mefoxin), 2 g IV every 6 hours. ...
In the first study, 82/98 (83.7%) patients treated with MEFOXIN and 71/95 (74.7%) patients treated with cefotetan experienced ... In the second study, 65/75 (86.7%) patients treated with MEFOXIN and 62/76 (81.6%) patients treated with cefotetan experienced ... Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of total and unbound cefoxitin and cefotetan in healthy volunteers. Journal of ... studies compared the efficacy of a single 2 gram intravenous dose of MEFOXIN to a single 2 gram intravenous dose of cefotetan ...
Aktuelle API Auditberichte • GMP-Audits der Herstelung pharmazeutischer Ausgangs- und Wirkstoffe nach ICH Q7 / EU GMP Guide Part II • Diapharm
  • The second-generation cephalosporins (cefamandole, cefaclor, cefotetan, cefoxitin, and cefuroxime) have an extended antibacterial spectrum that includes greater activity against additional species of gram-negative rods. (britannica.com)
  • Cefoxitin (30 mg/kg SQ q8h for dogs) and cefotetan (30 mg/kg SQ q12h for dogs) are second generation cephalosporins with good spectrum including anaerobes. (vin.com)
  • Cefoxitin and cefotetan have increasing rates of resistance in Bacteroides species and would not be used as monotherapy. (hopkinsguides.com)
  • Many recommend cefazolin + metronidazole, cefotetan , cefoxitin or ampicillin/sulbactam as surgical prophylaxis when anaerobic bacteria leakage is likely. (hopkinsguides.com)
  • CEFOTAN™ (cefotetan for Injection, USP) is supplied in vials containing 80 mg (3.5 mEq) of sodium per gram of cefotetan activity. (globalrph.com)
  • Reconstituted solutions of CEFOTAN™ (cefotetan for Injection, USP) are intended for intravenous and intramusc ular administration. (globalrph.com)
  • CEFOTAN™ (cefotetan for Injection, USP) is available in two vial strengths. (globalrph.com)
  • The chemical structure of cefotetan, like that of several other cephalosporins, contains an N-methylthiotetrazole (NMTT or 1-MTT) side chain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cefotetan, like other cephalosporins, has no activity against Chlamydia trachomatis. (globalrph.com)
  • Each 1 gram vial contains cefotetan disodium equivalent to 1 gram cefotetan activity. (globalrph.com)
  • Incompatibility of cefotetan disodium and promethazine hydrochloride. (stabilis.org)
  • Read user comments about the side effects, benefits, and effectiveness of cefotetan in dextrose intravenous. (webmd.com)
  • Cefotetan injection is in a class of medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cefotetan is a second-generation cephalosporin used as single-drug therapy to provide broad gram-negative coverage and anaerobic coverage. (medscape.com)
  • Cefotetan is an injectable antibiotic of the cephamycin type for prophylaxis and treatment of bacterial infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cefotetan is an antibiotic used to treat a wide variety of bacterial infections . (webmd.com)
  • Cefotetan injection is also used before surgery to prevent infections. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Antibiotics such as cefotetan injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cefotetan injection comes as a powder to be added to fluid and injected intravenously (into a vein) or it can be injected into a large muscle. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cefotetan injection is also available as a premixed product to be injected intravenously. (medlineplus.gov)
  • You may receive cefotetan injection in a hospital or you may administer the medication at home. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If you will be receiving cefotetan injection at home, your healthcare provider will show you how to use the medication. (medlineplus.gov)
  • You should begin to feel better during the first few days of treatment with cefotetan injection. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Use cefotetan injection until you finish the prescription, even if you feel better. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If you stop using cefotetan injection too soon or skip doses, your infection may not be completely treated and the bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Your doctor may tell you not to use cefotetan injection. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If you become pregnant while taking cefotetan injection, call your doctor. (medlineplus.gov)
  • remember you should not drink alcoholic beverages while using cefotetan injection and for 3 days after receiving cefotetan injection. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cefotetan injection may cause side effects. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cefotetan has a broad spectrum of activity and has been used to treat bacterial infections of the bone, skin, urinary tract, and lower respiratory tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, furthermore, cefotetan, particularly nitrates used in the treatment of heart disease amyl nitrite and levitra gruposembradores.com.co blood pressure medicines. (njacs.org)
  • The health care professional should then initiate IV access via another site, and continue cefotetan therapy slowly and with a diluted solute. (easynotecards.com)
  • While administering IV cefotetan to a patient to treat bacterial meningitis, the health care professional finds the IV insertion site warm and reddened. (easynotecards.com)
  • Cefotetan Susceptibility and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) Data" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • If women do not improve and do not have an abscess, vancomycin 1 g IV every 12 hours or cefotetan 1 to 2 g IV every 12 hours to cover resistant organisms should be considered. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Emergency Central , emergency.unboundmedicine.com/emergency/view/Davis-Drug-Guide/109022/all/cefoTEtan. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Cefotetan injection is in a class of medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Antibiotics such as cefotetan injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If you stop using cefotetan injection too soon or skip doses, your infection may not be completely treated and the bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics. (medlineplus.gov)
  • After a single 1 gram dose of cefotetan in 2 women, average cefotetan concentrations of 0.1 and 0.2 mg/L occurred at 2 and 4 hours after the dose, respectively. (nih.gov)
  • Five women were given 1 gram of cefotetan every 12 hours intramuscularly for 2 days. (nih.gov)
  • 16. A multicenter study to compare cefotetan alone with cefotetan and metronidazole as prophylaxis against infection in elective colorectal operations. (nih.gov)
  • There was very little cross-reactivity between cefotetan antibodies and the drugs tested in the present study. (medscape.com)
  • cefotetan increases toxicity of dronabinol by aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibition. (medscape.com)
  • Cefotetan Susceptibility and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) Data" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • High plasma levels of cefotetan are attained after intravenous and intramuscular administration of single doses to normal volunteers. (nih.gov)
  • The plasma elimination half-life of cefotetan is 3 to 4.6 hours after either intravenous or intramuscular administration. (nih.gov)
  • The penetration of intramuscular cefotetan disodium into human extra-vascular fluid and maternal milk secretion. (nih.gov)
  • 15. Prospective comparative study of cefotetan with piperacillin for prophylaxis against infection in elective colorectal surgery. (nih.gov)
  • 1. Effect of body mass index and ertapenem versus cefotetan prophylaxis on surgical site infection in elective colorectal surgery. (nih.gov)
  • 2. Ertapenem versus cefotetan prophylaxis in elective colorectal surgery. (nih.gov)
  • 3. Comparative costs of ertapenem and cefotetan as prophylaxis for elective colorectal surgery. (nih.gov)
  • 5. Infection after elective colorectal surgery: bacteriological analysis of failures in a randomized trial of cefotetan vs. ertapenem prophylaxis. (nih.gov)
  • 13. Double-blind comparison of single-dose alatrofloxacin and cefotetan as prophylaxis of infection following elective colorectal surgery. (nih.gov)
  • Discontinue cefotetan at least 14 days before starting dronabinol solution and do not administer cefotetan within 7 days of completing treatment with dronabinol solution. (medscape.com)
  • Amoderate amount of information indicates that cefotetan produces low levels in milk that are not expected to cause adverse effects in breastfed infants. (nih.gov)
  • Milk cefotetan levels were undetectable 1 hour after the first dose. (nih.gov)
  • Medicine Central , im.unboundmedicine.com/medicine/view/Davis-Drug-Guide/109022/all/cefoTEtan. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Cefotetan is no longer marketed in the United States. (nih.gov)
  • 8. Cefotetan versus conventional triple antibiotic prophylaxis in elective colorectal cancer surgery. (nih.gov)