A semisynthetic cephamycin antibiotic with a broad spectrum of activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. It has a high rate of efficacy in many types of infection and to date no severe side effects have been noted.
Naturally occurring family of beta-lactam cephalosporin-type antibiotics having a 7-methoxy group and possessing marked resistance to the action of beta-lactamases from gram-positive and gram-negative organisms.
A semisynthetic cephamycin antibiotic that is administered intravenously or intramuscularly. The drug is highly resistant to a broad spectrum of beta-lactamases and is active against a wide range of both aerobic and anaerobic gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms.
A semisynthetic cephamycin antibiotic resistant to beta-lactamase.
A semisynthetic cephalosporin antibiotic which can be administered intravenously or by suppository. The drug is highly resistant to a broad spectrum of beta-lactamases and is active against a wide range of both aerobic and anaerobic gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. It has few side effects and is reported to be safe and effective in aged patients and in patients with hematologic disorders.
A neuropsychological disorder related to alterations in DOPAMINE metabolism and neurotransmission involving frontal-subcortical neuronal circuits. Both multiple motor and one or more vocal tics need to be present with TICS occurring many times a day, nearly daily, over a period of more than one year. The onset is before age 18 and the disturbance is not due to direct physiological effects of a substance or a another medical condition. The disturbance causes marked distress or significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. (From DSM-IV, 1994; Neurol Clin 1997 May;15(2):357-79)
Historical term for a chronic, but fluctuating, disorder beginning in early life and characterized by recurrent and multiple somatic complaints not apparently due to physical illness. This diagnosis is not used in contemporary practice.
The behavior of performing an act persistently and repetitively without it leading to reward or pleasure. The act is usually a small, circumscribed behavior, almost ritualistic, yet not pathologically disturbing. Examples of compulsive behavior include twirling of hair, checking something constantly, not wanting pennies in change, straightening tilted pictures, etc.
A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.
An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent obsessions or compulsions. Obsessions are the intrusive ideas, thoughts, or images that are experienced as senseless or repugnant. Compulsions are repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior which the individual generally recognizes as senseless and from which the individual does not derive pleasure although it may provide a release from tension.
"The History of Nursing is a field of study that examines the evolution and development of nursing as a profession, including its theories, practices, educators, institutions, and social context from ancient times to the present."
Disorders characterized by recurrent TICS that may interfere with speech and other activities. Tics are sudden, rapid, nonrhythmic, stereotyped motor movements or vocalizations which may be exacerbated by stress and are generally attenuated during absorbing activities. Tic disorders are distinguished from conditions which feature other types of abnormal movements that may accompany another another condition. (From DSM-IV, 1994)

Sub-minimal inhibitory concentrations of cefmetazole enhance serum bactericidal activity in vitro by amplifying poly-C9 deposition. (1/42)

Serum-resistant organisms grown in sub-minimal inhibitory concentrations (subMICs) of antibiotics in vitro may be rendered sensitive to complement-mediated, serum bactericidal activity. We measured 125I-C3 and 125I-C9 deposition on genetically serum resistant Salmonella montevideo SH5770 (SH5770) that was rendered serum sensitive by growth in sub-MICs of cefmetazole (CMZ), a parenteral, second generation, cephamycin-group antibiotic. Three times as much C3 and over six times as much C9 bound to SH5770 grown in one-fourth the MIC of CMZ compared to broth-grown bacteria. SDS-PAGE analysis and autoradiography showed that neither the ratio of C3b:iC3b (approximately 1:2.5) nor the nature of the C3-bacterial bond was changed by growing the organisms in CMZ. Large amounts of complement membrane attack complexes containing poly-C9 were seen only on CMZ-grown SH5770 by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. Poly-C9 was also detected only on CMZ-grown bacteria by indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA using a murine monoclonal antibody directed against a neoantigen of poly-C9. Bacterial hydrophobicity increased after growth in CMZ, and transmission electron micrographs of CMZ-grown SH5770 showed cell wall disruption and blebbing. These results indicate that growth in subMICs of CMZ increases bacterial hydrophobic domains available for interacting with the membrane attack complex, C5b-9, allowing formation and stable insertion of bactericidal complexes containing poly-C9.  (+info)

Inhibition of biliary cholesterol and phospholipid secretion by cefmetazole. The role of vesicular transport and of canalicular events. (2/42)

A number of organic anions selectively inhibit the biliary secretion of cholesterol and phospholipids without affecting bile acid secretion. We studied the effect of cefmetazole, a third-generation cephalosporin, on biliary lipid secretion in the rat. Injection of cefmetazole at a dose of 200 mumol/kg body wt. induced a choleretic effect and a significant decrease in the biliary output of cholesterol and phospholipid, without changes in bile acid secretion. The decrease was more marked for cholesterol than for phospholipid secretion, with a significant decrease in their molar ratio in bile. The effects were apparently unrelated to an inhibition of intracellular vesicular transport because, after injection of horseradish peroxidase, both the time course and total amount secreted of the protein did not significantly differ between control animals and those receiving cefmetazole. The secretory rate of the lysosomal marker acid phosphatase was not affected by cefmetazole administration. Biliary outputs of the plasma-membrane enzymes alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyltransferase were significantly decreased by the antibiotic. These results point to an effect of cefmetazole at the level of the canalicular membrane.  (+info)

Verification of cefmetazole and cefpodoxime proxetil contamination to other pharmaceuticals by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. (3/42)

Cross-contamination is a critical issue for pharmaceutical manufacturing, especially for beta-lactam antibiotics. Thus, an analytical method for the simultaneous determination of beta-lactam antibiotics cefmetazole (CMZ) and cefpodoxime proxetil (CPDXPR) contaminants in non-beta-lactam pharmaceuticals was developed using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The developed method was found to be sensitive at the detection limit of 0.002 ppm for both compounds. Mean recoveries of CMZ and CPDXPR from olmesartan medoxomil (OLM) tablets were 96.7 to 102.2% and 88.9 to 94.2%, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for the verification of CMZ and CPDXPR contamination to actually manufactured OLM tablets.  (+info)

Humanization of excretory pathway in chimeric mice with humanized liver. (4/42)

The liver of a chimeric urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)(+/+)/severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse line recently established in Japan could be replaced by more than 80% with human hepatocytes. We previously reported that the chimeric mice with humanized liver could be useful as a human model in studies on drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics. In the present study, the humanization of an excretory pathway was investigated in the chimeric mice. Cefmetazole (CMZ) was used as a probe drug. The CMZ excretions in urine and feces were 81.0 and 5.9% of the dose, respectively, in chimeric mice and were 23.7 and 59.4% of the dose, respectively, in control uPA(-/-)/SCID mice. Because CMZ is mainly excreted in urine in humans, the excretory profile of chimeric mice was demonstrated to be similar to that of humans. In the chimeric mice, the hepatic mRNA expression of human drug transporters could be quantified. On the other hand, the hepatic mRNA expression of mouse drug transporters in the chimeric mice was significantly lower than in the control uPA(-/-)/SCID mice. In conclusion, chimeric mice exhibited a humanized profile of drug excretion, suggesting that this chimeric mouse line would be a useful animal model in excretory studies.  (+info)

Susceptibilities of Mycobacterium fortuitum biovar. fortuitum and the two subgroups of Mycobacterium chelonae to imipenem, cefmetazole, cefoxitin, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. (5/42)

MICs of imipenem, cefoxitin, cefmetazole, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid were determined against 100 strains of Mycobacterium fortuitum and 200 strains of Mycobacterium chelonae. Imipenem and cefmetazole were more active against M. fortuitum than cefoxitin was, and imipenem (which inhibited 39% of strains at 8 micrograms/ml) was the only beta-lactam active against M. chelonae subsp. chelonae.  (+info)

Comparative evaluation of the pharmacokinetics of N-methylthiotetrazole following administration of cefoperazone, cefotetan, and cefmetazole. (6/42)

The comparative pharmacokinetics and in vivo production of N-methylthiotetrazole (NMTT) were evaluated following administration of cefoperazone, cefotetan, and cefmetazole. In a randomized-crossover manner, 11 healthy male volunteers received single 2-g intravenous doses of each agent and serial blood and urine samples were collected. Concentrations of NMTT and the parent compound in plasma, urine, and the reconstituted antibiotic solution were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The amounts of NMTT administered were 6.06 +/- 0.46, 14.4 +/- 0.87, and 17.4 +/- 1.06 mg for cefoperazone, cefotetan, and cefmetazole, respectively (P less than 0.05). The mean NMTT plasma concentration-time profiles following administration of each cephalosporin were markedly different. Six hours after dosing, NMTT concentrations in plasma following cefoperazone administration were higher than those following administration of cefmetazole and cefotetan. Urinary recoveries of NMTT averaged 137.0 +/- 37.1, 38.3 +/- 6.98, and 25.2 +/- 5.95 mg following administration of cefoperazone, cefotetan, and cefmetazole, respectively (P less than 0.01). The apparent amount of NMTT produced in vivo, calculated by subtracting the amount of NMTT administered from the amount of NMTT excreted in urine, was significantly lower following cefmetazole administration than after administration of cefoperazone and cefotetan (P less than 0.01). The discrepancy between in vitro NMTT production (cefmetazole greater than cefotetan greater than cefoperazone) and the amount of NMTT formed in vivo and excreted unchanged (cefoperazone greater than cefotetan greater than cefmetazole) suggests that in vivo production of NMTT is dependent on the disposition of the parent cephalosporin. These results further suggest that cephalosporins which undergo extensive biliary excretion, such as cefoperazone, are associated with the greatest amount of in vivo NMTT release, whereas cephalosporins which are primarily renally excreted, such as cefmetazole, are associated with the lowest in vivo production of NMTT.  (+info)

Effect of ampicillin, cefmetazole and minocycline on the adherence of Branhamella catarrhalis to pharyngeal epithelial cells. (7/42)

Using pharyngeal epithelial cells from a healthy adult and eight strains of Branhamella catarrhalis (B. catarrhalis) isolated from eight patients with respiratory infection the effect of subminimal inhibitory concentrations of cefmetazole, ampicillin and minocycline on adherence was examined. Cefmetazole-treated bacterial attachment (44 +/- 28; mean +/- S.D.) decreased significantly (p less than 0.05) compared to the control (84 +/- 27). Statistically no significant difference in adherence was found between ampicillin-treated bacteria (63 +/- 36) and the control (95 +/- 40) or minocycline-treated bacteria (91 +/- 39) and the control (109 +/- 40). Large bacteria was observed after cefmetazole and ampicillin treatment. In addition to diplococci, tetrads were observed after cefmetazole treatment. Significant correlation between the MICs and adherence ability was not found. The results suggests that these three antibiotics were not responsible for the increase in B. catarrhalis infection by increasing adherence ability.  (+info)

A successfully treated case of Vibrio vulnificus septicemia with shock. (8/42)

Vibrio vulnificus infection often causes serious or fatal disease. Recently, in Japan there have been numerous reports of Vibrio vulnificus infection. Here, we report a successfully treated case of Vibrio vulnificus septicemia with shock, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and necrotizing cellulitis in a middle-aged heavy drinker with chronic alcoholic liver disease. On reviewing 38 cases in Japan including ours, the overall mortality rate was 68%. Although the incidence is relatively low, it is recommended to warn patients in the high risk category, such as liver disease patients, to avoid raw fish and shellfish and limit sea water exposure.  (+info)

Cefmetazole is a second-generation cephalosporin antibiotic, which is used to treat various bacterial infections. It works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, leading to bacterial cell death. Cefmetazole has a broad spectrum of activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including many strains that are resistant to other antibiotics.

Common side effects of cefmetazole include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and headache. More serious side effects can include allergic reactions, seizures, and changes in blood cell counts or liver function. As with all antibiotics, it is important to take cefmetazole exactly as directed by a healthcare provider, and to complete the full course of treatment even if symptoms improve.

Cephamycins are a subclass of cephalosporin antibiotics, which are derived from the fungus Acremonium species. They have a similar chemical structure to other cephalosporins but have an additional methoxy group on their side chain that makes them more resistant to beta-lactamases, enzymes produced by some bacteria that can inactivate other cephalosporins and penicillins.

Cephamycins are primarily used to treat infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus species, and Enterobacter species. They have a broad spectrum of activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, making them useful for treating a variety of infections.

The two main cephamycins that are used clinically are cefoxitin and cefotetan. Cefoxitin is often used to treat intra-abdominal infections, pelvic inflammatory disease, and skin and soft tissue infections. Cefotetan is primarily used for the treatment of surgical prophylaxis, gynecological infections, and pneumonia.

Like other cephalosporins, cephamycins can cause allergic reactions, including rashes, hives, and anaphylaxis. They should be used with caution in patients who have a history of allergies to penicillin or other beta-lactam antibiotics. Additionally, cephamycins can disrupt the normal gut flora, leading to secondary infections such as Clostridioides difficile (C. diff) diarrhea.

Cefotetan is a type of antibiotic known as a cephalosporin, which is used to treat various bacterial infections. It works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, leading to the death of the bacteria. Cefotetan has a broad spectrum of activity and is effective against many different types of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

Cefotetan is often used to treat intra-abdominal infections, gynecological infections, skin and soft tissue infections, and bone and joint infections. It is administered intravenously or intramuscularly, and the dosage and duration of treatment will depend on the type and severity of the infection being treated.

Like all antibiotics, cefotetan can cause side effects, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and allergic reactions. It may also increase the risk of bleeding, particularly in patients with impaired kidney function or those taking blood thinners. Therefore, it is important to be closely monitored by a healthcare provider while taking this medication.

Cefoxitin is a type of antibiotic known as a cephamycin, which is a subclass of the larger group of antibiotics called cephalosporins. Cephalosporins are bactericidal agents that inhibit bacterial cell wall synthesis by binding to and disrupting the function of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs).

Cefoxitin has a broad spectrum of activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including many strains that are resistant to other antibiotics. It is commonly used to treat infections caused by susceptible organisms such as:

* Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus or MRSA)
* Streptococcus pneumoniae
* Escherichia coli
* Klebsiella spp.
* Proteus mirabilis
* Bacteroides fragilis and other anaerobic bacteria

Cefoxitin is available in both intravenous (IV) and intramuscular (IM) formulations, and it is typically administered every 6 to 8 hours. The drug is generally well tolerated, but potential side effects include gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, as well as allergic reactions, including rash, pruritus, and anaphylaxis.

It's important to note that the use of antibiotics should be based on the results of bacterial cultures and susceptibility testing whenever possible, to ensure appropriate therapy and minimize the development of antibiotic resistance.

Ceftizoxime is a type of antibiotic known as a third-generation cephalosporin. It works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, which is necessary for its survival. Ceftizoxime is effective against a wide range of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including many that are resistant to other antibiotics.

It is commonly used to treat various types of infections, such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, skin infections, and intra-abdominal infections. Ceftizoxime is available in both intravenous (IV) and oral forms, although the IV form is more commonly used in clinical practice.

Like all antibiotics, ceftizoxime should be used only to treat bacterial infections, as it has no effect on viral infections. Overuse or misuse of antibiotics can lead to the development of antibiotic resistance, which makes it more difficult to treat infections in the future.

It is important to note that ceftizoxime should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare provider, who will determine the appropriate dosage and duration of treatment based on the patient's individual needs and medical history.

Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurological disorder characterized by the presence of multiple motor tics and at least one vocal (phonic) tic. These tics are sudden, repetitive, rapid, involuntary movements or sounds that occur for more than a year and are not due to substance use or other medical conditions. The symptoms typically start before the age of 18, with the average onset around 6-7 years old.

The severity, frequency, and types of tics can vary greatly among individuals with TS and may change over time. Common motor tics include eye blinking, facial grimacing, shoulder shrugging, and head or limb jerking. Vocal tics can range from simple sounds like throat clearing, coughing, or barking to more complex phrases or words.

In some cases, TS may be accompanied by co-occurring conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), anxiety, and depression. These associated symptoms can sometimes have a greater impact on daily functioning than the tics themselves.

The exact cause of Tourette Syndrome remains unclear, but it is believed to involve genetic factors and abnormalities in certain brain regions involved in movement control and inhibition. There is currently no cure for TS, but various treatments, including behavioral therapy and medications, can help manage the symptoms and improve quality of life.

The term "hysteria" is an outdated and discredited concept in medicine, particularly in psychiatry and psychology. Originally, it was used to describe a condition characterized by dramatic, excessive emotional reactions and physical symptoms that couldn't be explained by a medical condition. These symptoms often included things like paralysis, blindness, or fits, which would sometimes be "hysterical" in nature - that is, they seemed to have no physical cause.

However, the concept of hysteria has been largely abandoned due to its lack of scientific basis and its use as a catch-all diagnosis for symptoms that doctors couldn't explain. Today, many of the symptoms once attributed to hysteria are now understood as manifestations of other medical or psychological conditions, such as conversion disorder, panic attacks, or malingering. It's important to note that using outdated and stigmatizing terms like "hysteria" can be harmful and misleading, so it's best to avoid them in favor of more precise and respectful language.

Compulsive behavior is a type of repetitive behavior that an individual feels driven to perform, despite its negative impact on their daily life and mental health. It is often driven by an overwhelming urge or anxiety, and the person may experience distress if they are unable to carry out the behavior. Compulsive behaviors can be associated with various psychiatric conditions, including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), body dysmorphic disorder, eating disorders, and impulse control disorders.

Examples of compulsive behaviors include:

1. Excessive handwashing or cleaning
2. Repeatedly checking locks, light switches, or appliances
3. Ordering or arranging items in a specific way
4. Compulsive hoarding
5. Compulsive shopping or spending
6. Compulsive eating or purging behaviors (such as those seen in bulimia nervosa)
7. Compulsive sexual behavior (sex addiction)
8. Compulsive exercise
9. Compulsive hair pulling (trichotillomania)
10. Compulsive skin picking (excoriation disorder)

Treatment for compulsive behaviors typically involves a combination of medication, psychotherapy (such as cognitive-behavioral therapy), and lifestyle changes to help manage the underlying causes and reduce the urge to engage in the compulsive behavior.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "France" is not a medical term or concept. France is the largest country in Western Europe and the third-largest in Europe after Russia and Ukraine. It has been a major player in world affairs for centuries, with a significant cultural and artistic influence. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those for you.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a mental health disorder characterized by the presence of obsessions and compulsions. Obsessions are recurrent and persistent thoughts, urges, or images that are intrusive, unwanted, and often distressing. Compulsions are repetitive behaviors or mental acts that an individual feels driven to perform in response to an obsession or according to rigid rules, and which are aimed at preventing or reducing anxiety or distress, or preventing some dreaded event or situation. These obsessions and/or compulsions cause significant distress, take up a lot of time (an hour or more a day), and interfere with the individual's daily life, including social activities, relationships, and work or school performance. OCD is considered a type of anxiety disorder and can also co-occur with other mental health conditions.

A "History of Nursing" in a medical context generally refers to the documentation of a patient's past experiences with nursing care, including any previous hospitalizations, treatments, medications, and interactions with nursing staff. This information is used by nurses to assess a patient's current health status, identify potential risks or complications, and develop an individualized plan of care.

The history of nursing can include information about the patient's medical history, surgical history, family medical history, social history, and lifestyle factors that may impact their health. It is important for nurses to gather this information accurately and thoroughly, as it can help them provide safe and effective care, communicate with other healthcare providers, and promote positive health outcomes for their patients.

In addition to its clinical importance, the history of nursing also plays a critical role in nursing education and research, helping to inform best practices, advance nursing science, and shape the future of the profession.

Tic disorders are a group of conditions characterized by the presence of repetitive, involuntary movements or sounds, known as tics. These movements or sounds can vary in complexity and severity, and they may be worsened by stress or strong emotions.

There are several different types of tic disorders, including:

1. Tourette's disorder: This is a neurological condition characterized by the presence of both motor (movement-related) and vocal tics that have been present for at least one year. The tics may wax and wane in severity over time, but they do not disappear for more than three consecutive months.
2. Persistent (chronic) motor or vocal tic disorder: This type of tic disorder is characterized by the presence of either motor or vocal tics (but not both), which have been present for at least one year. The tics may wax and wane in severity over time, but they do not disappear for more than three consecutive months.
3. Provisional tic disorder: This type of tic disorder is characterized by the presence of motor or vocal tics (or both) that have been present for less than one year. The tics may wax and wane in severity over time, but they do not disappear for more than three consecutive months.
4. Tic disorder not otherwise specified: This category is used to describe tic disorders that do not meet the criteria for any of the other types of tic disorders.

Tic disorders are thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and they often co-occur with other conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Treatment for tic disorders may include behavioral therapy, medication, or a combination of both.

... is a broad-spectrum cephalosporin antimicrobial and has been effective in treating bacteria responsible for causing ... Cefmetazole is a cephamycin antibiotic, usually grouped with the second-generation cephalosporins. The chemical structure of ... "Cefmetazole, free acid Susceptibility and Concentration Range (μg/ml) Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) Data" (PDF). The ... cefmetazole, like that of several other cephalosporins, contains an N-methylthiotetrazole (NMTT or 1-MTT) side chain. As the ...
These include latamoxef (moxalactam), cefmenoxime, cefoperazone, cefamandole, cefmetazole, and cefotetan. This is thought to be ... Cefoxitin, cefuroxime, cefaclor, cefprozil, and cefmetazole are classed as second-generation cephems. Ceftazidime, ceftriaxone ...
Benlloch M, Torres A, Soriano F (October 1982). "Cefmetazole (CS-1170): a new cephamycin with activity against gram-negative ... Cefoxitin Cefotetan Cefmetazole Oreste A. Mascaretti (2003). Bacteria Versus Antibacterial Agents: An Integrated Approach. ...
... doxycycline and tobramycin and variable susceptibility to cefmetazole, cefoxitin and clarithromycin. They are resistant to ...
... variably susceptible to cefmetazole, cefoxitin, chloramphenicol and clarithromycin, and resistant to isoniazid, rifampin and ...
... cefmetazole (INN) cefminox (INN) Cefobid cefodizime (INN) cefonicid (INN) cefoperazone (INN) ceforanide (INN) cefoselis (INN) ...
... cefmetazole MeSH D02.065.589.099.249.250.199 - cefotetan MeSH D02.065.589.099.249.250.222 - cefoxitin MeSH D02.065.589.099.374 ...
... cefmetazole, cefonicid, cefoperazone, cefotetan, ceftriaxone, and latamoxef (moxalactam); thought to be due to common N- ...
Cefamandole J01DC04 Cefaclor J01DC05 Cefotetan J01DC06 Cefonicide J01DC07 Cefotiam J01DC08 Loracarbef J01DC09 Cefmetazole ...
... cefmetazole 1980 - cefotaxime 1980 - piperacillin 1981 - co-amoxiclav (amoxicillin/clavulanic acid) 1981 - cefoperazone 1981 - ...
Cefmetazole is a broad-spectrum cephalosporin antimicrobial and has been effective in treating bacteria responsible for causing ... Cefmetazole is a cephamycin antibiotic, usually grouped with the second-generation cephalosporins. The chemical structure of ... "Cefmetazole, free acid Susceptibility and Concentration Range (μg/ml) Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) Data" (PDF). The ... cefmetazole, like that of several other cephalosporins, contains an N-methylthiotetrazole (NMTT or 1-MTT) side chain. As the ...
Cefmetazole. Recovered. *AML, Acute myeloid leukemia; COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; EBV, Epstein-Barr virus; NA ...
c. Cefmetazole (Zefazone). d. Cefotetan (Cefotan). 6. People on anticonvulsants. a. Phenytoin (Dilantin) ...
세프메타졸(cefmetazole) 세포티암(cefotiam). 세푸록심(cefuroxime) 세포탁심(cefotaxime). 세프트리악손(ceftriaxone) 세프타지딤(ceftazidime) ...
CEFMETAZOLE 91068 CEFTAZIDIME 91069 CEFTRIAXONE 91070 CEFUROXIME 91072 DILTIAZEM HCL 91073 DIMETHYL SULFOXIDE 91074 ENALAPRIL ...
Cefmetazole Susc Islt 3 LOINC_Long_Common_Name LOINC Long Common Name Cefmetazole [Susceptibility] ...
He was started on cefmetazole and heparin. Antibiotic and anticoagulation therapy were initiated. He had a complete recovery ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Stability of Cefmetazole Sodium in 5% dextrose Injection and 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection Gupta Vishnu D, Maswoswe J, Bailey ...
Cefmetazole D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177 D3.633.100.300.249.250.177 Cefonicid D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.177 D3.633.100.300. ...
Cefmetazole CAS:56796-20-4. *Demethylchlortetracycline and Lederle. *Rolitetracycline (Reverin) CAS:751-97-3 ...
The Sankyo Company Ltd had conducted a postmarketing surveillance programme on cefmetazole sodium since its marketing ... Cefmetazole postmarketing surveillance in Japan A Saito. J Antimicrob Chemother. 1989 Apr. ... A suspicious case of cefmetazole-induced hypoprothrombinemia. Kodama N, Matsumoto S, Matsubayashi S. Kodama N, et al. J Gen Fam ... Cefmetazole sodium: pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and clinical trials. Schentag JJ. Schentag JJ. Pharmacotherapy. 1991;11(1): ...
The Sankyo Company Ltd had conducted a postmarketing surveillance programme on cefmetazole sodium since its marketing ... Cefmetazole postmarketing surveillance in Japan A Saito. J Antimicrob Chemother. 1989 Apr. ... A suspicious case of cefmetazole-induced hypoprothrombinemia. Kodama N, Matsumoto S, Matsubayashi S. Kodama N, et al. J Gen Fam ... Cefmetazole sodium: pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and clinical trials. Schentag JJ. Schentag JJ. Pharmacotherapy. 1991;11(1): ...
Cefmetazole. ,=27. 28-32. ,=33. ,=8. ,=2. Cefotetan. ,=19. 20-25. ,=26. ,=8. ,=2. ...
Cefmetazole. Zero days. Four days. No difference in initial treatment failure or recurrence however study underpowered. Park [ ... Cefmetazole + metronidazole. One day. Four days. Noninferior with significantly shorter hospital length of stay. Park [56] ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Other second-generation cephalosporins, such as cefotetan and cefmetazole, have a longer half-life than cefoxitin and are as ...
Cefmetazole Sodium,N0000004495, cefepime hydrochloride,N0000004494, cefepime,N0000004493, cefdinir,N0000004492, Cefazolin ... Cefmetazole,N0000006096, Triclosan,N0000006097, tetrahydrozoline,N0000006098, Cefotetan,N0000006099, Scarlet Red,N0000006100, ...
Product containing cefmetazole (medicinal product). Code System Preferred Concept Name. Product containing cefmetazole ( ... Product containing cefmetazole (medicinal product) {397422004 , SNOMED-CT } Parent/Child (Relationship Type) Product containing ... cefmetazole in parenteral dose form (medicinal product form) {768942003 , SNOMED-CT } Product containing only cefmetazole ( ...
Cefmetazole. Recovered. *AML, Acute myeloid leukemia; COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; EBV, Epstein-Barr virus; NA ...
Cefmetazole Sodium Narrower Concept UI. M0351019. Registry Number. 37Y9VR4W7A. Terms. Cefmetazole Sodium Preferred Term Term UI ... Cefmetazole Monosodium Salt Cefmetazole Sodium Cefmetazon U-72791A Zefazone Pharm Action. Anti-Bacterial Agents. Registry ... Cefmetazole Monosodium Salt Term UI T359720. Date09/13/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1999). ... Cefmetazole Preferred Term Term UI T045022. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID ...
Cefmetazole Sodium Narrower Concept UI. M0351019. Registry Number. 37Y9VR4W7A. Terms. Cefmetazole Sodium Preferred Term Term UI ... Cefmetazole Monosodium Salt Cefmetazole Sodium Cefmetazon U-72791A Zefazone Pharm Action. Anti-Bacterial Agents. Registry ... Cefmetazole Monosodium Salt Term UI T359720. Date09/13/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1999). ... Cefmetazole Preferred Term Term UI T045022. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177. D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.250.177. Cefonicid D2.886.675.966. ...
No difference in susceptibility to antibiotics affecting cell walls (vancomycin, teicoplanin, cefarotin, cefmetazole, and ...
D4.75.80.875.99.221.249.190.190.125 Cefmetazole D2.886.675.966.500.249.250.177 D2.886.665.74.250.177 D4.75.80.875.99.221. ...
  • Cefmetazole, free acid Susceptibility and Concentration Range (μg/ml) Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) Data" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • The Sankyo Company Ltd had conducted a postmarketing surveillance programme on cefmetazole sodium since its marketing introduction in Japan. (nih.gov)
  • Two data collection approaches were used: a survey in which participating physicians provided complete information on all their patients who received cefmetazole for treatment of infection, and two voluntary reporting systems--one sponsored by Sankyo and the other by the Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare. (nih.gov)