Cecropins: Antimicrobial peptides that form channels in membranes that are more permeable to anions than cations. They resemble MAGAININS, with their N-terminal region forming a positively charged amphipathic alpha helix, but containing an additional C-terminal segment.Insect Hormones: Hormones secreted by insects. They influence their growth and development. Also synthetic substances that act like insect hormones.Insect Proteins: Proteins found in any species of insect.Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides: Small cationic peptides that are an important component, in most species, of early innate and induced defenses against invading microbes. In animals they are found on mucosal surfaces, within phagocytic granules, and on the surface of the body. They are also found in insects and plants. Among others, this group includes the DEFENSINS, protegrins, tachyplesins, and thionins. They displace DIVALENT CATIONS from phosphate groups of MEMBRANE LIPIDS leading to disruption of the membrane.Lepidoptera: A large order of insects comprising the butterflies and moths.Moths: Insects of the suborder Heterocera of the order LEPIDOPTERA.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Wolbachia: A genus of bacteria comprised of a heterogenous group of gram-negative small rods and coccoid forms associated with arthropods. (From Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, vol 1, 1984)Dengue Virus: A species of the genus FLAVIVIRUS which causes an acute febrile and sometimes hemorrhagic disease in man. Dengue is mosquito-borne and four serotypes are known.Dengue: An acute febrile disease transmitted by the bite of AEDES mosquitoes infected with DENGUE VIRUS. It is self-limiting and characterized by fever, myalgia, headache, and rash. SEVERE DENGUE is a more virulent form of dengue.Aedes: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) frequently found in tropical and subtropical regions. YELLOW FEVER and DENGUE are two of the diseases that can be transmitted by species of this genus.Reactive Oxygen Species: Molecules or ions formed by the incomplete one-electron reduction of oxygen. These reactive oxygen intermediates include SINGLET OXYGEN; SUPEROXIDES; PEROXIDES; HYDROXYL RADICAL; and HYPOCHLOROUS ACID. They contribute to the microbicidal activity of PHAGOCYTES, regulation of signal transduction and gene expression, and the oxidative damage to NUCLEIC ACIDS; PROTEINS; and LIPIDS.Symbiosis: The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.Wasps: Any of numerous winged hymenopterous insects of social as well as solitary habits and having formidable stings.Immunity, Innate: The capacity of a normal organism to remain unaffected by microorganisms and their toxins. It results from the presence of naturally occurring ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS, constitutional factors such as BODY TEMPERATURE and immediate acting immune cells such as NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Microbiology: The study of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, algae, archaea, and viruses.Anti-Infective Agents: Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Plasmodium falciparum: A species of protozoa that is the causal agent of falciparum malaria (MALARIA, FALCIPARUM). It is most prevalent in the tropics and subtropics.Malaria, Falciparum: Malaria caused by PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM. This is the severest form of malaria and is associated with the highest levels of parasites in the blood. This disease is characterized by irregularly recurring febrile paroxysms that in extreme cases occur with acute cerebral, renal, or gastrointestinal manifestations.Factor XI: Stable blood coagulation factor involved in the intrinsic pathway. The activated form XIa activates factor IX to IXa. Deficiency of factor XI is often called hemophilia C.Severe Dengue: A virulent form of dengue characterized by THROMBOCYTOPENIA and an increase in vascular permeability (grades I and II) and distinguished by a positive pain test (e.g., TOURNIQUET PAIN TEST). When accompanied by SHOCK (grades III and IV), it is called dengue shock syndrome.Silk: A continuous protein fiber consisting primarily of FIBROINS. It is synthesized by a variety of INSECTS and ARACHNIDS.Miller Fisher Syndrome: A variant of the GUILLAIN-BARRE SYNDROME characterized by the acute onset of oculomotor dysfunction, ataxia, and loss of deep tendon reflexes with relative sparing of strength in the extremities and trunk. The ataxia is produced by peripheral sensory nerve dysfunction and not by cerebellar injury. Facial weakness and sensory loss may also occur. The process is mediated by autoantibodies directed against a component of myelin found in peripheral nerves. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1313; Neurology 1987 Sep;37(9):1493-8)Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Beloniformes: An order of fish in the group SMEGMAMORPHA, comprising adrianichthyids, medakas (ORYZIAS), needlefishes, halfbeaks, and flying fishes.Antibody Specificity: The property of antibodies which enables them to react with some ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS and not with others. Specificity is dependent on chemical composition, physical forces, and molecular structure at the binding site.West Nile virus: A species of FLAVIVIRUS, one of the Japanese encephalitis virus group (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES, JAPANESE). It can infect birds and mammals. In humans, it is seen most frequently in Africa, Asia, and Europe presenting as a silent infection or undifferentiated fever (WEST NILE FEVER). The virus appeared in North America for the first time in 1999. It is transmitted mainly by CULEX spp mosquitoes which feed primarily on birds, but it can also be carried by the Asian Tiger mosquito, AEDES albopictus, which feeds mainly on mammals.Culex: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) commonly found in tropical regions. Species of this genus are vectors for ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS as well as many other diseases of man and domestic and wild animals.Culicidae: A family of the order DIPTERA that comprises the mosquitoes. The larval stages are aquatic, and the adults can be recognized by the characteristic WINGS, ANIMAL venation, the scales along the wing veins, and the long proboscis. Many species are of particular medical importance.Anopheles gambiae: A species of mosquito in the genus Anopheles and the principle vector of MALARIA in Africa.West Nile Fever: A mosquito-borne viral illness caused by the WEST NILE VIRUS, a FLAVIVIRUS and endemic to regions of Africa, Asia, and Europe. Common clinical features include HEADACHE; FEVER; maculopapular rash; gastrointestinal symptoms; and lymphadenopathy. MENINGITIS; ENCEPHALITIS; and MYELITIS may also occur. The disease may occasionally be fatal or leave survivors with residual neurologic deficits. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, p13; Lancet 1998 Sep 5;352(9130):767-71)Simuliidae: Several species of the genus Simulium (family Simuliidae) that act as intermediate hosts (vectors) for the parasitic disease ONCHOCERCIASIS.ArchivesBiological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Onchocerciasis, Ocular: Filarial infection of the eyes transmitted from person to person by bites of Onchocerca volvulus-infected black flies. The microfilariae of Onchocerca are thus deposited beneath the skin. They migrate through various tissues including the eye. Those persons infected have impaired vision and up to 20% are blind. The incidence of eye lesions has been reported to be as high as 30% in Central America and parts of Africa.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Directories as Topic: Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Houseflies: Flies of the species Musca domestica (family MUSCIDAE), which infest human habitations throughout the world and often act as carriers of pathogenic organisms.Diptera: An order of the class Insecta. Wings, when present, number two and distinguish Diptera from other so-called flies, while the halteres, or reduced hindwings, separate Diptera from other insects with one pair of wings. The order includes the families Calliphoridae, Oestridae, Phoridae, SARCOPHAGIDAE, Scatophagidae, Sciaridae, SIMULIIDAE, Tabanidae, Therevidae, Trypetidae, CERATOPOGONIDAE; CHIRONOMIDAE; CULICIDAE; DROSOPHILIDAE; GLOSSINIDAE; MUSCIDAE; TEPHRITIDAE; and PSYCHODIDAE. The larval form of Diptera species are called maggots (see LARVA).Immunogenetic Phenomena: GENETIC PHENOMENA characterizing IMMUNITY and the immune response.Insecticide Resistance: The development by insects of resistance to insecticides.Insecticides: Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Muscidae: A family of the order DIPTERA with over 700 species. Important species that may be mechanical vectors of disease include Musca domesticus (HOUSEFLIES), Musca autumnalis (face fly), Stomoxys calcitrans (stable fly), Haematobia irritans (horn fly) and Fannia spp.

Structure and expression analysis of the cecropin-E gene from the silkworm, Bombyx mori. (1/14)

Cecropins belong to the antibacterial peptides family and are induced after injection of bacteria or their cell-wall components. By silkworm cDNA microarray analysis, a novel type of Cecropin family gene was identified as a cDNA up-regulated in early embryo, 1 day after oviposition. The cDNA isolated was 394 bp with 198 ORF translating 65 amino acids, encoding BmCecropin-E (BmCec-E). Using Southern hybridization and genome search analysis, the number of BmCec-E gene was estimated to be at least two per haploid, which consisted of two exons, as in other Cecropin family members. BmCec-E mRNA was expressed transiently 1 day after egg-laying (AEL, germ-band formation stage), and was specifically expressed in the degenerating intestine during the pre-pupal and pupal stages, unlike other Cecropin family genes. Immune challenge analysis showed that BmCec-E gene expression was more strongly induced by Escherichia coli (gram-negative) than by Micrococus luteus (gram-positive), and not by virus injection. By bacterial challenge, expression of BmCec-E mRNA was induced 12 h after injection, and was maintained for 24 h. Expression of BmCec-E after immune challenge was observed strongly in excretory organs, such as hindgut and malphigian, slightly in fat body, skin, and midgut.  (+info)

Anionic C-terminal proregion of nematode antimicrobial peptide cecropin P4 precursor inhibits antimicrobial activity of the mature peptide. (2/14)

Recently, an anionic proregion was found to be conserved at the C terminus of the antimicrobial peptide, nematode cecropin. Our results suggest that the antimicrobial activity of mature peptide is suppressed by the proregion in its precursor and is released from inhibition after processing. Inhibition is not likely to be due to direct suppression of membrane disruption.  (+info)

CpxRA contributes to Xenorhabdus nematophila virulence through regulation of lrhA and modulation of insect immunity. (3/14)

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Novel expression vector for secretion of cecropin AD in Bacillus subtilis with enhanced antimicrobial activity. (4/14)

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Characterization of expression, activity and role in antibacterial immunity of Anopheles gambiae lysozyme c-1. (5/14)

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Expression of a synthesized gene encoding cationic peptide cecropin B in transgenic tomato plants protects against bacterial diseases. (6/14)

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Pore forming properties of cecropin-melittin hybrid peptide in a natural membrane. (7/14)

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Characterization and cDNA cloning of a cecropin-like antimicrobial peptide, papiliocin, from the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus. (8/14)

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Lysozymes have primarily a bacteriolytic function; those in tissues and body fluids are associated with the monocyte-macrophage system and enhance the activity of immunoagents. In the intestine they may also have a digestive function.
Lysozymes have primarily a bacteriolytic function; those in tissues and body fluids are associated with the monocyte-macrophage system and enhance the activity of immunoagents.
SWISS-MODEL Template Library (SMTL) entry for 2la2.1. Solution structure of papiliocin isolated from the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus
Rhopalocera Exotica, being Illustrations of New, Rare, and Unfigured Species of Butterflies Rhop. Exot. [1] 1: (Ornithoptera) 1-2, pl. 1 (1887), [1] 2: (Ornithoptera) 3-4, pl. 2 (1892), [1] 3: (Ornithoptera) [5-6] 1-2, pl. 3 (1900), [1] 3: (Ornithoptera) 7-8, pl. 4 (1901), [1] 1: (Papilio) 1-2, pl. 1 (1887), [1] 1: (Papilio) 3-5,7-14, pl. 2-6 (1888), [1] 1: (Papilio) 15-20, pl. 7-9 (1890), [1] 1: (Papilio) 21-25, pl. 10-11 (1891), [1] 2: (Papilio) 27-31, pl. 12-13 (1893), [1] 2: (Papilio) 33-35, pl. 14 (1894), [1] 2: (Papilio) 37-38, pl. 15 (1895), [1] 2: (Papilio) 39-40, pl. 16 (1897), [1] 3: (Papilio) 41-46, pl. 17-19 (1899), [1] 3: (Papilio) 47-48, pl. 20 (1900), [1] 3: (Papilio) 49-50, pl. 21 (1901), [1] 3: (Papilio) 51-55, pl. 22-23 (1902), [1] 1: (Delias) 1-3, pl. 1 (1889), [1] 2: (Delias) 5-7, 9-11, pl. 2-3 (1893), [1] 2: (Delias) 12-18, pl. 4-5 (1895), [1] 2: (Delias) 20-22, pl. 6 (1896), [1] 3: (Delias) 24-26, pl. 7 (1897), [1] 3: (Delias) 28-35, pl. 8-9 (1901), [1] 3: (Delias) 36-38, ...
Rhopalocera Exotica, being Illustrations of New, Rare, and Unfigured Species of Butterflies Rhop. Exot. [1] 1: (Ornithoptera) 1-2, pl. 1 (1887), [1] 2: (Ornithoptera) 3-4, pl. 2 (1892), [1] 3: (Ornithoptera) [5-6] 1-2, pl. 3 (1900), [1] 3: (Ornithoptera) 7-8, pl. 4 (1901), [1] 1: (Papilio) 1-2, pl. 1 (1887), [1] 1: (Papilio) 3-5,7-14, pl. 2-6 (1888), [1] 1: (Papilio) 15-20, pl. 7-9 (1890), [1] 1: (Papilio) 21-25, pl. 10-11 (1891), [1] 2: (Papilio) 27-31, pl. 12-13 (1893), [1] 2: (Papilio) 33-35, pl. 14 (1894), [1] 2: (Papilio) 37-38, pl. 15 (1895), [1] 2: (Papilio) 39-40, pl. 16 (1897), [1] 3: (Papilio) 41-46, pl. 17-19 (1899), [1] 3: (Papilio) 47-48, pl. 20 (1900), [1] 3: (Papilio) 49-50, pl. 21 (1901), [1] 3: (Papilio) 51-55, pl. 22-23 (1902), [1] 1: (Delias) 1-3, pl. 1 (1889), [1] 2: (Delias) 5-7, 9-11, pl. 2-3 (1893), [1] 2: (Delias) 12-18, pl. 4-5 (1895), [1] 2: (Delias) 20-22, pl. 6 (1896), [1] 3: (Delias) 24-26, pl. 7 (1897), [1] 3: (Delias) 28-35, pl. 8-9 (1901), [1] 3: (Delias) 36-38, ...
ID A0A194QD04_PAPXU Unreviewed; 839 AA. AC A0A194QD04; DT 05-OCT-2016, integrated into UniProtKB/TrEMBL. DT 05-OCT-2016, sequence version 1. DT 07-JUN-2017, entry version 6. DE RecName: Full=V-type proton ATPase subunit a {ECO:0000256,RuleBase:RU361189}; GN ORFNames=RR46_02787 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KPJ02860.1}; OS Papilio xuthus (Asian swallowtail butterfly). OC Eukaryota; Metazoa; Ecdysozoa; Arthropoda; Hexapoda; Insecta; OC Pterygota; Neoptera; Holometabola; Lepidoptera; Glossata; Ditrysia; OC Papilionoidea; Papilionidae; Papilioninae; Papilio. OX NCBI_TaxID=66420 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KPJ02860.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000053268}; RN [1] {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KPJ02860.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000053268} RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=Yaa_city_454_Px {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KPJ02860.1}; RC TISSUE=Whole body {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KPJ02860.1}; RX PubMed=26354079; DOI=10.1038/ncomms9212; RA Li X., Fan D., Zhang W., Liu G., Zhang L., Zhao L., Fang X., Chen L., RA Dong Y., Chen Y., Ding ...
This comprehensive database for antimicrobial peptides is manually curated based on a set of data-collection criteria. There are 139 human host defense peptides, 305 from mammals annotated, 1087 active peptides from amphibians (1018 from frogs), 134 fish peptides, 45 reptile peptides, 42 from birds, 559 from arthropods, [310 from insects, 69 from crustaceans, 7 from myriapods, 171 from chelicerata, (43 from spiders, 88 from scorpions)], 45 from molluscs, 6 AMPs from protozoa, and more. Of the 428 unique NMR/X-ray diffracted 3D structures annotated for host defense peptides in the APD, 301 with coordinates deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) can be directly rotated, zoomed, and viewed. Top left: Amphibian α-helical magainin II; Top right: bovine β-sheet lactoferricin; Bottom left: plant αβ-PsD1; Bottom right: bovine non-αβ indolicidin. This original database consists of a pipeline of search functions for innate immune peptides. You can search for peptide information using APD ID, ...
The over-expression of Arabidopsis CAX1 and CAX2 causes transgenic tomato plants to reveal severe Ca2+ deficiency-like symptoms such as tip-burn and/or blossom end rot, despite there being sufficient
TY - JOUR. T1 - Improvement of outer membrane-permeabilizing and lipopolysaccharide- binding activities of an antimicrobial cationic peptide by C-terminal modification. AU - Piers, K. L.. AU - Brown, M. H.. AU - Hancock, Robert. PY - 1994/1/1. Y1 - 1994/1/1. N2 - Antimicrobial cationic peptides have been discovered in many different organisms and often possess a broad range of activity. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of actions of melittin and two synthetic peptides, CEME (a cecropin-melittin hybrid) and CEMA, against gram-negative bacteria. CEMA was produced by recombinant DNA procedures and is an analog of CEME with a modified C terminus resulting in two additional positive charges. All three peptides showed good antimicrobial activity against four different gram-negative bacteria, but only CEMA was able to somewhat augment the activity of some conventional antibiotics in synergy studies. Studies using the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae showed that the ...
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Synonyms for Musca domestica in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for Musca domestica. 2 synonyms for Musca domestica: house fly, housefly. What are synonyms for Musca domestica?
Looking for Musca domestica? Find out information about Musca domestica. common name of the fly fly, name commonly used for any of a variety of winged insects, but properly restricted to members of the order Diptera, the true... Explanation of Musca domestica
Although substrate-specific CYP6B1 and CYP6B3 enzymes in Papilio polyxenes contribute to specialization on furanocoumarin-containing host plants, CYP6B4 and CYP6B17 enzymes in the polyphagous Papilio glaucus and Papilio canadensis have a broader range of substrates. Papilio multicaudatus, an oligophage with one furanocoumarin-containing host, is putatively ancestral to polyphagous Papilio species. Furanocoumarin-inducible CYP6B33-CYP6B37 and CYP6AB6 were characterized from this species. Heterologous expression of CYP6B33 revealed furanocoumarin metabolism resembling that of CYP6B4-CYP6B17 enzymes from P. glaucus and P. canadensis. Molecular models of CYP6B33 and CYP6B4 indicate that seven conserved aromatic side chains stabilize their hydrophobic catalytic sites and that a Lys484-Ser484 substitution enlarges the CYP6B4 active site pocket to increase the predicted distance between the substrate and reactive oxygen relative to CYP6B1. Loss of specialization in this lineage may have resulted from ...
The mosquito has multiple lines of defense against invading pathogens, but the most potent is found in its blood, called hemolymph. Parasites migrate through the gut epithelium in order to escape the harsh digestive conditions of the gut lumen. Here they come into contact with the hemolymph. Two leucine-rich repeat (LRR) containing proteins, LRIM1 and APL1C, are essential for mosquito immune defense in this compartment. We recently found that these proteins circulate in the mosquito hemolymph in a disulfide-bonded multimeric complex [1]. If either LRIM1 or APL1C is knocked-down by RNAi, the entire complex is lost and parasite survival is increased. Before parasites are killed, the complement-like protein TEP1 is localized on their surface, marking them for destruction. The LRIM1/APL1C complex interacts with TEP1 and is required for its localization to parasites during midgut invasion. When the LRIM1/APL1C complex is knocked-down, TEP1 fails to localize and the invading parasites are not killed. ...
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1D9M: NMR structural characterization of cecropin A(1-8) - magainin 2(1-12) and cecropin A (1-8) - melittin (1-12) hybrid peptides.
abstract = {During the development of Plasmodium sp. within the mosquito midgut, the parasite undergoes a series of developmental changes. The elongated ookinete migrates through the layers of the midgut where it forms the oocyst under the basal lamina. We demonstrate here that if Aedes aegypti or Anopheles gambiae, normally susceptible to Plasmodium gallinaceum and P. berghei, respectively, are immune activated by the injection of bacteria into the hemocoel, and subsequently are fed on an infectious bloodmeal, there is a significant reduction in the prevalence and mean intensity of infection of oocysts on the midgut. Only those mosquitoes immune activated prior to, or immediately after, parasite ingestion exhibit this reduction in parasite development. Mosquitoes immune activated 2-5 days after bloodfeeding show no differences in parasite burdens compared with naive controls. Northern analyses reveal that transcriptional activity for mosquito defensins is not detected in the whole bodies of Ae. ...
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Many insect species have a well-developed visual system with the capacity to see colour, i.e. objects in their environment are discriminated by their spectral content. Butterflies are considered to be highly visual animals and are generally believed to possess colour vision. Nevertheless, definitive evidence for colour vision was only recently obtained for two papilionid species, the Japanese yellow swallowtail Papilio xuthus (Kinoshita et al., 1999) and the Australian orchard butterfly Papilio aegeus (Kelber and Pfaff, 1999). In the classical example of insect colour vision, the honeybee Apis mellifera, three photoreceptors form the standard set of photoreceptors underlying colour vision, with spectral sensitivities in the ultraviolet, blue and green, respectively (Menzel and Backhaus, 1989), corresponding well with the absorption spectra of three identified rhodopsins (Townson et al., 1998). These rhodopsins are assumed to be expressed in anatomically well-defined photoreceptors (Menzel and ...
Dear group, I have some H.papilio, a Dutch strain, which are blooming now. While I read on Thad Howards and the recent Veronica Reads books this species carries 2-3 flowers per scape, the first one of mine has 4 and 6 and a third scape is still growing; all the other bulbs have 2 or 3 scape emerging too. But the shape of flowers is different and they dont have those two wide tepals as shown on the photos on those books and from photos of all US folks, but they look rather like the cybister hybrid Lima. On the other hand, this hybrid isnt thought to be so vigorous, according on V.Read. I wonder if it is the true species or an hybrid now. The seller is a reputable source and the bulbs where extra large (28cm+ girt) and they also listed Lima among the hybrids, but papilio was listed separately. Last year I got a papilio and Lima from an Italian retail company, but I thought I had mixed the labels when I saw this flower. http://pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/files/… Oh, BTW this photo ...
Cecropins constitute a main part of the cell-free immunity of insects. Cecropins are small proteins of about 31 - 37 amino acid ... Some of the cecropins (e.g. cecropin A, and cecropin B) have anticancer properties and are called anticancer peptides (ACPs). ... Cecropins at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Lauwers A, Twyffels L, Soin R, Wauquier C, ... Cecropins are antimicrobial peptides. They were first isolated from the hemolymph of Hyalophora cecropia, whence the term ...
Several species of insect produce antimicrobial peptides known as defensins and cecropins. In invertebrates, pattern ...
... s are sometimes/often classified as cecropins since they are found in insects. Iwai, H.; Nakajima, Y.; Natori, S.; ...
Some of the cecropins (e.g. cecropin A, and cecropin B) have anticancer properties and are called anticancer peptides (ACPs). ... "Preliminary experimental anticancer activity of cecropins", Peptide Research, 7 (5): 265-269, PMID 7849420 Nikaido, H. (October ...
Isolation and Structure of Cecropins B and D from Pupae of the Chinese Oak Silk Moth, Antheraea pernyi". European Journal of ...
... such as cecropins, diptericin, drosocin, metchnikowin and attacin serves as a first line defense in case of septic wounds. ...
... and cecropins that help to inhibit dengue virus proliferation. Wolbachia infection can also increase mosquito resistance to ...
M. domestica shares four antimicrobial families with D. melanogaster, the attacins, diptericins, cecropins, and defensins (D. ... 12 cecropins in M. domestica, 5 in D. melanogaster (including andropin); 5 defensins in M. domestica, 1 in D. melanogaster; 2 ... The classes included are: several antimicrobial peptides (attacins, cecropins, defensins, diptericins), CLIP-domain serine ...
Cecropins / metabolism. Defensins / metabolism. Dengue / immunology, virology. Dengue Virus / physiology*. Fat Body / ... aegypti and the RNAi depletion approach has been instrumental in proving the role of defensins and cecropins in the resistance ... 0/Antioxidants; 0/Cecropins; 0/Defensins; 0/Insect Proteins; 0/Reactive Oxygen Species; 0/Toll-Like Receptors ... This immune pathway also is responsible for activation of antimicrobial peptides-defensins and cecropins. We provide evidence ...
Moore, A. J., Devine, D. A., and Bibby, M. C. (1994). Preliminary experimental anticancer activity of cecropins. Pept. Res. 7, ... such as cecropins), cysteine-rich and β-sheet AMPs (such as defensins). It is also common to find AMPs rich in His, Arg, Pro, ... such as cecropins and magainins. The second group contains ACPs that act against all three types of cells: microbial, normal ... such as defensins and cecropins (Steiner et al., 1988; Cociancich et al., 1993). Membrane disruption by AMPs can occur through ...
In our current study, we have demonstrated that Aedes defensins and cecropins are strongly induced by the Wolbachia-mediated ... aegypti and the RNAi depletion approach has been instrumental in proving the role of defensins and cecropins in the resistance ... aegypti and the RNAi depletion approach have been instrumental in proving the role of defensins and cecropins in resistance to ... Roles of defensins and cecropins in the inhibition of DENV proliferation. Viral infection was detected by plaque assay in C6/36 ...
Putsep, K., Normark, S., and Boman, H.G., The Origin of Cecropins; Implications from Synthetic Peptides Derived from Ribosomal ...
Channel-forming activity of cecropins in lipid bilayers: effect of agents modifying the membrane dipole potential. Langmuir. ... Bechinger B. Structure and functions of channel-forming peptides: magainins, cecropins, melittin and alamethicin. J Membr Biol ... Chemical synthesis and enzymic processing of precursor forms of cecropins A and B. J Biol Chem. 1989;264(10):5852-60.PubMed ...
Cecropins constitute a main part of the cell-free immunity of insects. Cecropins are small proteins of about 31 - 37 amino acid ... Some of the cecropins (e.g. cecropin A, and cecropin B) have anticancer properties and are called anticancer peptides (ACPs). ... Cecropins at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Lauwers A, Twyffels L, Soin R, Wauquier C, ... Cecropins are antimicrobial peptides. They were first isolated from the hemolymph of Hyalophora cecropia, whence the term ...
Cecropins include a class of small and basic peptides of about 31-37 amino acid residues. They were first isolated from the ... Gwadz, R. W., Kaslow, D., Lee, J. Y., Maloy, W. L., Zasloff, M., and Miller, L. H. (1989). Effects of magainins and cecropins ... Among all classes of proteic molecules, only three have been studied for this purpose: apidaecins, cecropins, and melittins ( ... However, it was demonstrated that the insect produces three classes of anti-malarial peptides: cecropins, defensins, and ...
antimicrobial peptides such as cecropins, defensins, thionins, and cathelicidins . The pharmaceutical formulation may comprise ...
Cecropins. Search for additional papers on this topic. Explore Further: Topics Discussed in This Paper. ...
LPS treatment of Drosophila SL2 cells leads to rapid expression of antimicrobial peptides, such as Cecropins (Cec). SL2 cells ... Cecropins have both antibacterial and antifungal activities; (3) Drosocin and Defensin are predominantly active against Gram- ...
... similarity and phylogenic analysis results indicated that lebocins form a multiple gene family in silkworm as cecropins. ...
They include the magainins, cecropins, melittins, defensins, bacteriocidins, etc. The proteins in each family within this ...
Bechinger, B. (1997). Structure and functions of channel-forming peptides: magainins, cecropins, melittin and alamethicin. J. ... They include the magainins, cecropins, melittins, defensins, bacteriocidins, etc. Certain common structural features observed ...
Cecropins were one to three orders more effective than tetracycline. Xylella fastidiosa incubated with Cecropin A and B at 1 uM ...
... including some magainins and cecropins, can dirupt bacterial membranes by forming carpet-like clusters of peptides. The ...
Some, like the insect cecropins and the frog magainins, contain only α helices. Others contain a high content of a given amino ... Drosomycin is potently antifungal, whereas the others (cecropins, diptericin, drosocin, attacin, defensin, and metchnikowin) ... antimicrobial defensins and cecropins, binding proteins, and other putative members of innate immune cascades have been ...
Several species of insect produce antimicrobial peptides known as defensins and cecropins. In invertebrates, pattern ...
aegypti and the RNAi depletion approach has been instrumental in proving the role of defensins and cecropins in the resistance ... This immune pathway also is responsible for activation of antimicrobial peptides-defensins and cecropins. We provide evidence ...
Publications] Y.Yamano: Cloning of cDNAs for cecropins A and B,and expression of the genes in the silkworm,Bombyx mori. ... Publications] Yamano, Y.: Cloning of cDNAs for cecropins A and B,and expression of the genes in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. ...
... a protease from Bacillus thuringiensis which degrades attacins and cecropins, two classes of antibacterial proteins in insect. ...
Cecropins are produced by insects, particularly under conditions of infection. Cecropins are bioactive peptides that exhibit ... Cecropins A, B and D are close homologues consisting of 35-39 residues. They are found in the pupae of the cecropin moth, but ...
aegypti, cecropins are upregulated in DENV-2 infected mosquitoes [66]. Furthermore, cecropins exhibit antiviral activity ... Other possible modes of killing by cecropins include inhibition of nucleic acid and protein synthesis and inhibition of ... As for cecropins, these positively charged peptides bind to the lipids in the membrane that are negatively charged, thus ... cecropins (α-helical peptides), diptericin (glycine-rich peptides), attacin (glycine-rich peptides) and gambicin (cysteine-rich ...
Effects of magainins and cecropins on the sporogonic development of malaria parasites in mosquitoes. Infect Immun. 1989;57:2628 ...
These cecropins, as expected, have their best matches to other Simulium and mosquito cecropins. The cecropin peptides (Sg-368 ... Cecropins are small secreted basic proteins of 3 kDa mol wt, rich in aliphatic AAs, mainly Val, with highest conservation in ... Ten ESTs from the S. guianense sialotranscriptome code for two closely related, possibly allelic, cecropins. ...
  • aegypti and the RNAi depletion approach has been instrumental in proving the role of defensins and cecropins in the resistance of Wolbachia-infected Ae. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The antimalarial peptides reviewed here consist of (i) cationic, amphipathic 'host-defence' peptides including some (e.g. defensins and cecropins) that are naturally produced by mosquitos, (ii) other membrane-active peptide antibiotics such as gramicidins, (iii) hydrophobic peptides, most notably cyclosporins, (iv) thiopeptides, such as thiostrepton, and (v) some other naturally occurring or synthetic peptides. (tcd.ie)
  • Gwadz R. W.t Kaslow D., Lee J.-Y. et al The effects of magainins and cecropins on the sporogonic development of malaria parasites in mosquitoes ff Infect, and Immun. (bio-cat.ru)
  • Cecropins are bioactive peptides that exhibit activities by interacting with membranes and forming transmembrane channels that allow the free flow of electrolytes, metabolites and water across the phospholipid bilayers. (genetex.com)
  • Cecropins at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Lauwers A, Twyffels L, Soin R, Wauquier C, Kruys V, Gueydan C (January 2009), "Post-transcriptional regulation of genes encoding anti-microbial peptides in Drosophila", J. Biol. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chemical synthesis and enzymic processing of precursor forms of cecropins A and ff J. Biol. (bio-cat.ru)
  • Sequence similarity and phylogenic analysis results indicated that lebocins form a multiple gene family in silkworm as cecropins. (hindawi.com)