Aeromonas caviae: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacteria that is found in domestic and wild animals including birds, and fish. In humans it causes GASTROENTERITIS in young children and some adults.Aeromonas: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs singly, in pairs, or in short chains. Its organisms are found in fresh water and sewage and are pathogenic to humans, frogs, and fish.Chlamydia: A genus of the family CHLAMYDIACEAE whose species cause a variety of diseases in vertebrates including humans, mice, and swine. Chlamydia species are gram-negative and produce glycogen. The type species is CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS.Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.Nocardia: A genus of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria whose species are widely distributed and are abundant in soil. Some strains are pathogenic opportunists for humans and animals.Chlamydophila: A genus of the family CHLAMYDIACEAE comprising gram-negative non CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS-like species infecting vertebrates. Chlamydophila do not produce detectable quantities of glycogen. The type species is CHLAMYDOPHILA PSITTACI.Aeromonas hydrophila: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that may be pathogenic for frogs, fish, and mammals, including man. In humans, cellulitis and diarrhea can result from infection with this organism.Nocardia Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus NOCARDIA.Chlamydiaceae: A family of gram-negative, coccoid microorganisms, in the order CHLAMYDIALES, pathogenic for vertebrates. Genera include CHLAMYDIA and CHLAMYDOPHILA.Reproductive Tract Infections: Infections of the genital tract in females or males. They can be caused by endogenous, iatrogenic, or sexually transmitted organisms.Mycetoma: A chronic progressive subcutaneous infection caused by species of fungi (eumycetoma), or actinomycetes (actinomycetoma). It is characterized by tumefaction, abscesses, and tumor-like granules representing microcolonies of pathogens, such as MADURELLA fungi and bacteria ACTINOMYCETES, with different grain colors.Neisseria: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, coccoid bacteria whose organisms are part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, nasopharynx, and genitourinary tract. Some species are primary pathogens for humans.Enoyl-CoA Hydratase: An enzyme that catalyzes reversibly the hydration of unsaturated fatty acyl-CoA to yield beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA. It plays a role in the oxidation of fatty acids and in mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis, has broad specificity, and is most active with crotonyl-CoA. EC 4.2.1.17.Cytotoxins: Substances that are toxic to cells; they may be involved in immunity or may be contained in venoms. These are distinguished from CYTOSTATIC AGENTS in degree of effect. Some of them are used as CYTOTOXIC ANTIBIOTICS. The mechanism of action of many of these are as ALKYLATING AGENTS or MITOSIS MODULATORS.Xylan Endo-1,3-beta-Xylosidase: A xylosidase that catalyses the random hydrolysis of 1,3-beta-D-xylosidic linkages in 1,3-beta-D-xylans.Xylosidases: A group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of alpha- or beta-xylosidic linkages. EC 3.2.1.8 catalyzes the endo-hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-xylosidic linkages; EC 3.2.1.32 catalyzes the endo-hydrolysis of 1,3-beta-D-xylosidic linkages; EC 3.2.1.37 catalyzes the exo-hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-linkages from the non-reducing termini of xylans; and EC 3.2.1.72 catalyzes the exo-hydrolysis of 1,3-beta-D-linkages from the non-reducing termini of xylans. Other xylosidases have been identified that catalyze the hydrolysis of alpha-xylosidic bonds.L Forms: Bacterial variants, unable to form a complete cell wall, which are formed in cultures by various bacteria; granules (L bodies) appear, unite, and grow into amorphous bodies which multiply and give rise to bacterial cells morphologically indistinguishable from the parent strain.Nocardia asteroides: A species of bacterium of the family NOCARDIACEAE, producing pulmonary infections in man.Houseflies: Flies of the species Musca domestica (family MUSCIDAE), which infest human habitations throughout the world and often act as carriers of pathogenic organisms.Polyesters: Polymers of organic acids and alcohols, with ester linkages--usually polyethylene terephthalate; can be cured into hard plastic, films or tapes, or fibers which can be woven into fabrics, meshes or velours.Hemolysin Proteins: Proteins from BACTERIA and FUNGI that are soluble enough to be secreted to target ERYTHROCYTES and insert into the membrane to form beta-barrel pores. Biosynthesis may be regulated by HEMOLYSIN FACTORS.2,2'-Dipyridyl: A reagent used for the determination of iron.Chlamydia Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus CHLAMYDIA.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Bacterial Adhesion: Physicochemical property of fimbriated (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) and non-fimbriated bacteria of attaching to cells, tissue, and nonbiological surfaces. It is a factor in bacterial colonization and pathogenicity.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Lethal Dose 50: The dose amount of poisonous or toxic substance or dose of ionizing radiation required to kill 50% of the tested population.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Flagellin: A protein with a molecular weight of 40,000 isolated from bacterial flagella. At appropriate pH and salt concentration, three flagellin monomers can spontaneously reaggregate to form structures which appear identical to intact flagella.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Enterotoxins: Substances that are toxic to the intestinal tract causing vomiting, diarrhea, etc.; most common enterotoxins are produced by bacteria.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Bacterial Toxins: Toxic substances formed in or elaborated by bacteria; they are usually proteins with high molecular weight and antigenicity; some are used as antibiotics and some to skin test for the presence of or susceptibility to certain diseases.Guinea Pigs: A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Genetic Complementation Test: A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid: The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.HeLa Cells: The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
... is a synonym of Aeromonas caviae. The bacterium is found in sewage, fresh water and in animals. http://www. ...
Other species of medical interest are N. brasiliensis and N. caviae. Because it is acid-fast to some degree, it stains only ...
Beaman BL, Scates SM (September 1981). "Role of L-forms of Nocardia caviae in the development of chronic mycetomas in normal ... For example, L-form organisms have been observed in mouse lungs after experimental inoculation with Nocardia caviae, and a ... Beaman BL (July 1980). "Induction of L-phase variants of Nocardia caviae within intact murine lungs". Infect. Immun. 29 (1): ...
Schubert, R. H.; Hegazi, M. (1988). "Aeromonas eucrenophila species nova Aeromonas caviae a later and illegitimate synonym of ... "Aeromonas eucrenophila species nova aeromonas caviae a later and illegitimate synonym of aeromonas punctata". Zentralblatt für ...
The most important pathogens are A. hydrophila, A. caviae, and A. veronii biovar sobria. The organisms are ubiquitous in fresh ...
2011] Species C. caviae Everett, Bush & Andersen 1999 ["Chlamydia caviae" (Everett, Bush & Andersen 1999) Kuo et al. 2011] ...
... specific enoyl coenzyme A hydratase involved in polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis by Aeromonas caviae". J. Bacteriol. 180: 667- ... specific enoyl-CoA hydratase from Aeromonas caviae involved in polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis". Acta Crystallogr. D. 57: 145 ...
... pneumoniae Chlamydophila pecorum Chlamydophila felis Chlamydophila psittaci Chlamydophila abortus Chlamydophila caviae J.P. ...
A. hydrophila, A. caviae, and A. sobria are all considered to be opportunistic pathogens, meaning they rarely infect healthy ...
Prior to the discovery of A. dhakensis, the most prevalent species identified were A. hydrophila, A. caviae, and A. veronii. ...
2003). "Genome sequence of Chlamydophila caviae (Chlamydia psittaci GPIC): examining the role of niche-specific genes in the ...
C. caviae Everett et al. 1999 C. abortus Everett et al. 1999 ...
... caviae, and C. felis. Chlamydophila species do not produce detectable glycogen and have one ribosomal operon. These species are ...
Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas caviae, Aeromonas sobria Prevention is mainly the role of the state, through the definition of ...
Examples of necrotrophs include Staphylococcus aureus which feed on Cryptococcus neoformans, Aeromonas caviae which feed on ...
... a chlamydial species that causes abortion in mammals Chlamydophila caviae, a chlamydial species found in Guinea pigs ...
... caviae M. cavipharyngis M. citelli M. cloacale M. coccoides M. collis M. columbinasale M. columbinum M. columborale M. ...
... beta Balantidium bicavata Balantidium blattarum Balantidium bovis Balantidium cameli Balantidium caprae Balantidium caviae ...
... beckeri Giardia beltrani Giardia botauri Giardia bovis Giardia bradypi Giardia canis Giardia caprae Giardia cati Giardia caviae ...
C. caviae infects primarily the mucosal epithelium and is not invasive. C. caviae is markedly specific for Guinea pigs, as ... C. caviae has a relativelly small genome that contains 1.17 Mbp with 998 protein coding genes. Additionally, C. caviae strain ... It is also possible to infect the genital tract of Guinea pigs with C. caviae and elicit a disease that is very similar to ... Chlamydophila caviae is a bacterium that can be recovered from the conjunctiva of Guinea pigs suffering from ocular ...
... is a Gram-negative bacterium of the genus Aeromonas isolated from epizootic guinea pigs. LPSN bacterio.net ... eol Type strain of Aeromonas caviae at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase. ... "Genome Sequence of the Emerging Pathogen Aeromonas caviae". Journal of Bacteriology. 193 (5): 1286-1287. doi:10.1128/JB.01337- ... Straininfo of Aeromonas caviae Taxonomy Browser ATCC Beatson SA; das Graças de Luna M; Bachmann NL; Alikhan NF; Hanks KR; ...
... is a Gram-negative bacterium in the genus Moraxella, which was isolated from the pharyngeal region and mouth ... LPSN bacterio.net Straininfo of Moraxella caviae Taxonomy Browser George M. Garrity (2010-11-24). Bergey's Manual® of ... Type strain of Moraxella caviae at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase. ...
Monfort and Baleux (1990) Dynamics of Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas sobria, and Aeromonas caviae in a Sewage Treatment Pond, ...
... species are often found in research laboratories as contaminants in cell culture. Mycoplasmal cell culture contamination occurs due to contamination from individuals or contaminated cell culture medium ingredients.[15] Mycoplasma cells are physically small - less than 1 µm, so are difficult to detect with a conventional microscope.. Mycoplasmae may induce cellular changes, including chromosome aberrations, changes in metabolism and cell growth. Severe Mycoplasma infections may destroy a cell line. Detection techniques include DNA Probe, enzyme immunoassays, PCR, plating on sensitive agar and staining with a DNA stain including DAPI or Hoechst.. An estimated 11 to 15% of U.S. laboratory cell cultures are contaminated with mycoplasma. A Corning study showed that half of U.S. scientists did not test for Mycoplasma contamination in their cell cultures. The study also stated that, in former Czechoslovakia, 100% of cell cultures that were not routinely tested were contaminated while only ...
A. veronii biotype sobria was isolated in nine patients, A. caviae in seven patients, and A. jandai and A. hydrophila in one ... A. caviae. Overalla. Watery diarrhea. 9/9. 7/7. 16/18. ...
caviae, and A. veronii bv. sobria, often have been associated with several categories of human infections. Clinical ... Rabaan, A.A.; Gryllos, I.; Tomas, J.M.; Shaw, J.G. Motility and polar flagellum are required for Aeromonas caviae adherence to ... caviae, A. sobria, and A. veronii have been described as important fish pathogens. They cause chronic disease with open dermal ...
... brasiliensis and Nocardia caviae from different sources. Sabouraudia, 20: 295-302, 1982. [ Links ]. 3. CARINI, A. - Um caso de ...
caviae. Soft, Small white to yellow. Streptomyces. somaliensis. Soft, Yellow/brown. The definitive diagnosis of mycetoma is ...
All isolates were multidrug resistance (MDR), but A. caviae showed the highest number of MDR per isolate. In most isolates, ... The isolates were biochemically identified as Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas sobria or Aeromonas caviae and AMR was determined ... The association between AMR and Aeromonas complex (A. hydrophila, A. sobria, A. caviae), source of the isolates (farmed or wild ... The probability of detecting resistance to cephaloridine was higher in A. caviae and A. hydrophyla than in an A. sobria complex ...
C. caviae infects primarily the mucosal epithelium and is not invasive. C. caviae is markedly specific for Guinea pigs, as ... C. caviae has a relativelly small genome that contains 1.17 Mbp with 998 protein coding genes. Additionally, C. caviae strain ... It is also possible to infect the genital tract of Guinea pigs with C. caviae and elicit a disease that is very similar to ... Chlamydophila caviae is a bacterium that can be recovered from the conjunctiva of Guinea pigs suffering from ocular ...
Aeromonas caviae is a Gram-negative bacterium of the genus Aeromonas isolated from epizootic guinea pigs. LPSN bacterio.net ... eol Type strain of Aeromonas caviae at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase. ... "Genome Sequence of the Emerging Pathogen Aeromonas caviae". Journal of Bacteriology. 193 (5): 1286-1287. doi:10.1128/JB.01337- ... Straininfo of Aeromonas caviae Taxonomy Browser ATCC Beatson SA; das Graças de Luna M; Bachmann NL; Alikhan NF; Hanks KR; ...
Aeromonas punctata caviae. ›Aeromonas punctata subsp. caviae (Scherago 1936) Schubert 1964. ›Aeromonas punctata subsp. caviae. ... "Aeromonas caviae" Eddy 1962. ›Aeromonas caviae (ex Eddy 1962) Popoff 1984. ›Aeromonas dourgesi anaerogene. ›Aeromonas formicans ... "Pseudomonas caviae" Scherago 1936. ›Pseudomonas caviae. ›Pseudomonas punctata. ›"Pseudomonas punctata" (Zimmermann 1890) ...
Entameba caviae synonyms, Entameba caviae pronunciation, Entameba caviae translation, English dictionary definition of Entameba ... caviae. n., pl. -bae -bas. any protozoan of the genus Entamoeba, members of which are parasitic in vertebrates, including the ... redirected from Entameba caviae). Also found in: Medical. ent•a•me•ba. or ent•a•moe•ba. (ˌɛn təˈmi bə) n., pl. -bae (-bi) -bas. ... Entameba caviae - definition of Entameba caviae by The Free Dictionary https://www.thefreedictionary.com/Entameba+caviae ...
Homologous recombination - Chlamydophila caviae [ Pathway menu , Organism menu , Pathway entry , Download KGML , Show ...
Panel F; HeLa cell transfected with pCcCWT (C. caviae incC) and infected with C. caviae at MOI 1.0. The scale bar in F ... Examples of aberrant C. caviae inclusions formed in cells transfected with pcDN3.1(+) encoding C. caviae IncA. IncA is labeled ... Cells transfected with plasmids expressing Chlamydophila caviae incA were not productively infected by C. caviae. Expression of ... caviae shown in Fig. 1 and Fig. 5, as compared to transfection with a plasmid expressing wild type (WT) of C. caviae incA. ...
What is Chlamydophila caviae? Meaning of Chlamydophila caviae medical term. What does Chlamydophila caviae mean? ... Looking for online definition of Chlamydophila caviae in the Medical Dictionary? Chlamydophila caviae explanation free. ... redirected from Chlamydophila caviae). Also found in: Wikipedia. Chlamydophila. (kla-mid-ō-filă), A bacterial genus with a ... Genome sequence of Chlamydophila caviae (Chlamydia psittaci GPIC): examining the role of niche-specific genes in the evolution ...
Chemical mutagenesis and isolation of a PHA-negative mutant ofA. caviae. A. caviae FA440 was treated withN-methyl-N′-nitro-N- ... One such mutant, A. caviae AC004, was used for further analysis. The wild-type strain of A. caviae produced P(3HB-co-3HHx), up ... caviae FA440. (b) The ability of PJRDEE32 and its deleted clones to complement a PHA-negative mutant of A. caviae (AC004). PHA ... The resultant C4 to C6 (R)-3HA-CoA molecules are acceptable as substrates for PHA synthase of A. caviaeencoded by phaCAc, and ...
The more genetically distant C. caviae GPIC is a natural pathogen of guinea pigs and induces upper genital … ... Plasmid-cured Chlamydia Caviae Activates TLR2-dependent Signaling and Retains Virulence in the Guinea Pig Model of Genital ... In contrast to plasmid-cured C. muridarum and C. trachomatis, plasmid-cured C. caviae strain CC13 signaled via TLR2 in vitro ... These data indicate that either the plasmid is not involved in expression or regulation of virulence in C. caviae or that ...
Zoonotic Chlamydia caviae Tied to Community-Acquired Pneumonia by Physicians Weekly , Sep 8, 2017 , 0 comments ... "Both veterinarians and physicians should be aware of the zoonotic potential of C. caviae. Although the extent to which C. ... 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) - Three cases of community-acquired pneumonia involving Chlamydia caviae after exposure to ill guinea ... caviae. There were no other causes of community-acquired pneumonia detected. All three of the patients recovered after being ...
Microbial safety and sensory quality, as well as the survival of inoculated Listeria monocytogenes and Aeromonas caviae, were ... Nevertheless, growth of yeast and A. caviae seem to be stimulated by superatmospheric O2, whereas growth of psychrotrophic ... Effect of Superatmospheric Oxygen Packaging on Sensorial Quality, Spoilage, and Listeria monocytogenes and Aeromonas caviae ...
The results suggest that the ,italic,A. caviae,/italic, isolates MB3 and MB7 should be considered novel subspecies, while the ... A study of unusual metabolic variants of ,italic,Aeromonas caviae,/italic, and ,italic,Aeromonas hydrophila,/italic, using a ... Therefore, pure cultures of non-lactose fermenting ,italic,Aeromonas caviae,/italic,, a cause of waterborne infections in ... These metabolic variants of ,italic,A. caviae,/italic, and ,italic,A. hydrophila,/italic, were studied for phenotypic ...
... caviae Protects Against Genital Chlamydial Infection.Groups (5 per group) of guinea pigs were immunized i.n. with 1×105 IFU ... C. caviae infection in guinea pigs, we i.n. immunized guinea pigs with 1×105C. caviae EBs. Guinea pigs administrated PBS i.n. ... C. caviae infection in guinea pigs, we i.n. immunized guinea pigs with 1×105C. caviae EBs. Guinea pigs administrated PBS i.n. ... caviae EBs. As shown in Fig. 1, C. caviae EB vaccinated animals cleared the infection at day 3 post challenge whereas mock ...
The adherence of A. caviae may be related to accessibility of host cell basolateral receptors. Aggregative A. caviae isolates, ... including Aeromonas caviae. However, the virulence factors of A. caviae remain, for the most part, poorly known. This study ... Furthermore, A. caviae were observed free in the cytosol of Caco-2 cells, suggesting escape form cytoplasmatic vacuoles. ... Furthermore, monolayers pre-incubated with 43-kDa outer-membrane protein (OMP) or A. caviae strains pre-incubated with rabbit ...
All isolates were Aeromonas caviae, comprising 4 different PFGE types. The carbapenemase genes were blaVIM-1 and blaVIM-35; ... Our aims were to describe the molecular characteristics of the first cases of VIM-producing Aeromonas caviaeisolated from human ...
The results showed that the three strains of taxon 25 represent a novel species for which the name Mannheimia caviae sp. nov. ... Mannheimia caviae sp. nov., isolated from epidemic conjunctivitis and otitis media in guinea pigs * H. Christensen1, A. M. ... The results showed that the three strains of taxon 25 represent a novel species for which the name Mannheimia caviae sp. nov. ... Mannheimia caviae sp. nov., isolated from epidemic conjunctivitis and otitis media in guinea pigs ...
Chlamydophila caviae Everett et al. (ATCC® VR-2575™) ATCC® Number: VR-2575™ Classification: Chlamydiaceae ...
Trixacarus caviae Fain, Howell & Hyatt 1972 (Acari: Sarcoptidae) as a cause of mange in guinea-pigs and papular urticaria in ... Trixacarus caviae Fain, Howell & Hyatt 1972 (Acari: Sarcoptidae) as a cause of mange in guinea-pigs and papular urticaria in ... The clinical symptoms of infestation with Trixacarus caviae in guinea-pigs are described. In general large areas of thickened, ...
... specific enoyl-CoA hydratase from Aeromonas caviae involved in polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis ... R)-HYDRATASE FROM A. CAVIAE INVOLVED IN PHA BIOSYNTHESIS. *DOI: 10.2210/pdb1iq6/pdb ...
Aeromonas caviae (ex Eddy) Popoff (ATCC® 15468™) ATCC® Number: 15468™ Deposited As Aeromonas punctata subsp. caviae (Scherago) ...
  • All isolates were multidrug resistance (MDR), but A. caviae showed the highest number of MDR per isolate. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Additionally, C. caviae strain GPIC contains an extrachromosomal plasmid, pCpGP1. (wikipedia.org)
  • To examine the contribution of pCpGP1 to C. caviae pathogenesis, a cured derivative of GPIC, strain CC13, was derived and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. (nih.gov)
  • In contrast to plasmid-cured C. muridarum and C. trachomatis, plasmid-cured C. caviae strain CC13 signaled via TLR2 in vitro and elicited cytokine production in vivo similar to wild-type C. caviae. (nih.gov)
  • Nevertheless, growth of yeast and A. caviae seem to be stimulated by superatmospheric O2, whereas growth of psychrotrophic bacteria and L. monocytogenes was not affected. (csic.es)
  • The bottled tap waters showed only two types of Gram-negative bacteria, Burkholderia glumae and Moraxella caviae. (livestrong.com)
  • C. caviae was not previously known as a bacteria that could infect humans, said the lead author of the report, Dr. Bart Ramakers. (kait8.com)
  • Recently, we have cloned and analyzed the PHA biosynthesis genes of A. caviae and have suggested that ORF3 located downstream of the PHA synthase gene ( phaC Ac ) encodes ( R )-specific enoyl-CoA hydratase ( 11 ). (asm.org)
  • Effect of cytosolic expression of incA and incC from C. caviae or C. trachomatis . (nih.gov)
  • C. muridarum and C. caviae were isolated from mice and guinea pigs, respectively ( 3 , 4 ), and are not known to infect humans. (asm.org)
  • C. caviae is markedly specific for Guinea pigs, as attempts to infect mice, hamsters, rabbits and gerbils have been unsuccessful, except for one experimentally infected gerbil. (wikipedia.org)
  • E . caviae were detected only from guinea pigs at 16 weeks of age. (academicjournals.org)
  • In this paper, we report direct evidence that ORF3 is essential for PHA biosynthesis from alkanoic acids in A. caviae . (asm.org)
  • In humans C. caviae has been linked to eye infections, although respiratory infections had not previously been documented. (wur.nl)
  • The NEJM article has now alerted doctors all over the world to the fact that C. caviae may cause serious respiratory infections in humans. (wur.nl)
  • The article will now alert doctors around the world, enabling them to identify infections earlier and prompting them to make more information on the incidence of C. caviae available. (wur.nl)
  • It is not yet clear how frequently C. caviae causes respiratory infections. (wur.nl)
  • Transcriptional profiling of CC13 revealed only partial conservation of previously identified plasmid-responsive chromosomal loci (PRCL) in C. caviae. (nih.gov)
  • Our aims were to describe the molecular characteristics of the first cases of VIM-producing Aeromonas caviae isolated from human samples from two hospitals. (confex.com)