An irregularly shaped venous space in the dura mater at either side of the sphenoid bone.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CAVERNOUS SINUS of the brain. Infections of the paranasal sinuses and adjacent structures, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, and THROMBOPHILIA are associated conditions. Clinical manifestations include dysfunction of cranial nerves III, IV, V, and VI, marked periorbital swelling, chemosis, fever, and visual loss. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p711)
One of the paired air spaces located in the body of the SPHENOID BONE behind the ETHMOID BONE in the middle of the skull. Sphenoid sinus communicates with the posterosuperior part of NASAL CAVITY on the same side.
Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of DURA MATER, the endosteal and the meningeal layers. They are devoid of valves and are parts of the venous system of dura mater. Major cranial sinuses include a postero-superior group (such as superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and occipital) and an antero-inferior group (such as cavernous, petrosal, and basilar plexus).
Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.
An acquired or spontaneous abnormality in which there is communication between CAVERNOUS SINUS, a venous structure, and the CAROTID ARTERIES. It is often associated with HEAD TRAUMA, specifically basilar skull fractures (SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR). Clinical signs often include VISION DISORDERS and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION.
Congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities involving ARTERIES; VEINS; or venous sinuses in the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and MENINGES.
Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.
Paralysis of one or more of the ocular muscles due to disorders of the eye muscles, neuromuscular junction, supporting soft tissue, tendons, or innervation to the muscles.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CRANIAL SINUSES, large endothelium-lined venous channels situated within the SKULL. Intracranial sinuses, also called cranial venous sinuses, include the superior sagittal, cavernous, lateral, petrous sinuses, and many others. Cranial sinus thrombosis can lead to severe HEADACHE; SEIZURE; and other neurological defects.
The compartment containing the anterior extremities and half the inferior surface of the temporal lobes (TEMPORAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. Lying posterior and inferior to the anterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, ANTERIOR), it is formed by part of the TEMPORAL BONE and SPHENOID BONE. It is separated from the posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) by crests formed by the superior borders of the petrous parts of the temporal bones.
An irregular unpaired bone situated at the SKULL BASE and wedged between the frontal, temporal, and occipital bones (FRONTAL BONE; TEMPORAL BONE; OCCIPITAL BONE). Sphenoid bone consists of a median body and three pairs of processes resembling a bat with spread wings. The body is hollowed out in its inferior to form two large cavities (SPHENOID SINUS).
The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.
Veins draining the cerebrum.
The air space located in the body of the MAXILLARY BONE near each cheek. Each maxillary sinus communicates with the middle passage (meatus) of the NASAL CAVITY on the same side.
A bony prominence situated on the upper surface of the body of the sphenoid bone. It houses the PITUITARY GLAND.
Diseases of the oculomotor nerve or nucleus that result in weakness or paralysis of the superior rectus, inferior rectus, medial rectus, inferior oblique, or levator palpebrae muscles, or impaired parasympathetic innervation to the pupil. With a complete oculomotor palsy, the eyelid will be paralyzed, the eye will be in an abducted and inferior position, and the pupil will be markedly dilated. Commonly associated conditions include neoplasms, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, ischemia (especially in association with DIABETES MELLITUS), and aneurysmal compression. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p270)
Air-filled spaces located within the bones around the NASAL CAVITY. They are extensions of the nasal cavity and lined by the ciliated NASAL MUCOSA. Each sinus is named for the cranial bone in which it is located, such as the ETHMOID SINUS; the FRONTAL SINUS; the MAXILLARY SINUS; and the SPHENOID SINUS.
An abnormal direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. An A-V fistula usually leads to the formation of a dilated sac-like connection, arteriovenous aneurysm. The locations and size of the shunts determine the degree of effects on the cardiovascular functions such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEART RATE.
The dilatation of the aortic wall behind each of the cusps of the aortic valve.
Tumors or cancer of the PARANASAL SINUSES.
A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.
The dilated portion of the common carotid artery at its bifurcation into external and internal carotids. It contains baroreceptors which, when stimulated, cause slowing of the heart, vasodilatation, and a fall in blood pressure.
Neoplasms of the base of the skull specifically, differentiated from neoplasms of unspecified sites or bones of the skull (SKULL NEOPLASMS).
Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.
Neoplasms which arise from or metastasize to the PITUITARY GLAND. The majority of pituitary neoplasms are adenomas, which are divided into non-secreting and secreting forms. Hormone producing forms are further classified by the type of hormone they secrete. Pituitary adenomas may also be characterized by their staining properties (see ADENOMA, BASOPHIL; ADENOMA, ACIDOPHIL; and ADENOMA, CHROMOPHOBE). Pituitary tumors may compress adjacent structures, including the HYPOTHALAMUS, several CRANIAL NERVES, and the OPTIC CHIASM. Chiasmal compression may result in bitemporal HEMIANOPSIA.
Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.
One of the paired, but seldom symmetrical, air spaces located between the inner and outer compact layers of the FRONTAL BONE in the forehead.
Diseases affecting or involving the PARANASAL SINUSES and generally manifesting as inflammation, abscesses, cysts, or tumors.
Tumors or cancer of the MAXILLARY SINUS. They represent the majority of paranasal neoplasms.
Abnormal protrusion of both eyes; may be caused by endocrine gland malfunction, malignancy, injury, or paralysis of the extrinsic muscles of the eye.
Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.
Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.
The 4th cranial nerve. The trochlear nerve carries the motor innervation of the superior oblique muscles of the eye.
A vascular anomaly composed of a collection of large, thin walled tortuous VEINS that can occur in any part of the central nervous system but lack intervening nervous tissue. Familial occurrence is common and has been associated with a number of genes mapped to 7q, 7p and 3q. Clinical features include SEIZURES; HEADACHE; STROKE; and progressive neurological deficit.
A short vein that collects about two thirds of the venous blood from the MYOCARDIUM and drains into the RIGHT ATRIUM. Coronary sinus, normally located between the LEFT ATRIUM and LEFT VENTRICLE on the posterior surface of the heart, can serve as an anatomical reference for cardiac procedures.
Diseases of the trigeminal nerve or its nuclei, which are located in the pons and medulla. The nerve is composed of three divisions: ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular, which provide sensory innervation to structures of the face, sinuses, and portions of the cranial vault. The mandibular nerve also innervates muscles of mastication. Clinical features include loss of facial and intra-oral sensation and weakness of jaw closure. Common conditions affecting the nerve include brain stem ischemia, INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS, and TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA.
Arteries which supply the dura mater.
Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
Diseases of the bony orbit and contents except the eyeball.
The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.
Congenital or acquired cysts of the brain, spinal cord, or meninges which may remain stable in size or undergo progressive enlargement.
A vascular anomaly that is a collection of tortuous BLOOD VESSELS and connective tissue. This tumor-like mass with the large vascular space is filled with blood and usually appears as a strawberry-like lesion in the subcutaneous areas of the face, extremities, or other regions of the body including the central nervous system.
A syndrome associated with defective sympathetic innervation to one side of the face, including the eye. Clinical features include MIOSIS; mild BLEPHAROPTOSIS; and hemifacial ANHIDROSIS (decreased sweating)(see HYPOHIDROSIS). Lesions of the BRAIN STEM; cervical SPINAL CORD; first thoracic nerve root; apex of the LUNG; CAROTID ARTERY; CAVERNOUS SINUS; and apex of the ORBIT may cause this condition. (From Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, pp500-11)
The dense rock-like part of temporal bone that contains the INNER EAR. Petrous bone is located at the base of the skull. Sometimes it is combined with the MASTOID PROCESS and called petromastoid part of temporal bone.
Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the SPHENOID SINUS. Isolated sphenoid sinusitis is uncommon. It usually occurs in conjunction with other paranasal sinusitis.
A visual symptom in which a single object is perceived by the visual cortex as two objects rather than one. Disorders associated with this condition include REFRACTIVE ERRORS; STRABISMUS; OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES; TROCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; ABDUCENS NERVE DISEASES; and diseases of the BRAIN STEM and OCCIPITAL LOBE.
Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.
The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.
A condition caused by dysfunctions related to the SINOATRIAL NODE including impulse generation (CARDIAC SINUS ARREST) and impulse conduction (SINOATRIAL EXIT BLOCK). It is characterized by persistent BRADYCARDIA, chronic ATRIAL FIBRILLATION, and failure to resume sinus rhythm following CARDIOVERSION. This syndrome can be congenital or acquired, particularly after surgical correction for heart defects.
The numerous (6-12) small thin-walled spaces or air cells in the ETHMOID BONE located between the eyes. These air cells form an ethmoidal labyrinth.
A relatively common neoplasm of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and SPINAL CANAL. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)
The 3d cranial nerve. The oculomotor nerve sends motor fibers to the levator muscles of the eyelid and to the superior rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles of the eye. It also sends parasympathetic efferents (via the ciliary ganglion) to the muscles controlling pupillary constriction and accommodation. The motor fibers originate in the oculomotor nuclei of the midbrain.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
An idiopathic syndrome characterized by the formation of granulation tissue in the anterior cavernous sinus or superior orbital fissure, producing a painful ophthalmoplegia. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p271)
The performance of surgical procedures with the aid of a microscope.
Benign and malignant neoplastic processes that arise from or secondarily involve the meningeal coverings of the brain and spinal cord.
Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.
A species of gram-positive bacteria in the STREPTOCOCCUS MILLERI GROUP. It is commonly found in the oropharnyx flora and has a proclivity for abscess formation in the upper body and respiratory tract.
Neoplasms located in the vasculature system, such as ARTERIES and VEINS. They are differentiated from neoplasms of vascular tissue (NEOPLASMS, VASCULAR TISSUE), such as ANGIOFIBROMA or HEMANGIOMA.
Any operation on the cranium or incision into the cranium. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Intraoperative computer-assisted 3D navigation and guidance system generally used in neurosurgery for tracking surgical tools and localize them with respect to the patient's 3D anatomy. The pre-operative diagnostic scan is used as a reference and is transferred onto the operative field during surgery.
A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.
Neoplasms of the bony part of the skull.
Surgery performed on the ear and its parts, the nose and nasal cavity, or the throat, including surgery of the adenoids, tonsils, pharynx, and trachea.
Congenital vascular anomalies in the brain characterized by direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. The locations and size of the shunts determine the symptoms including HEADACHES; SEIZURES; STROKE; INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES; mass effect; and vascular steal effect.
Neoplasms of the bony orbit and contents except the eyeball.
Simple rapid heartbeats caused by rapid discharge of impulses from the SINOATRIAL NODE, usually between 100 and 180 beats/min in adults. It is characterized by a gradual onset and termination. Sinus tachycardia is common in infants, young children, and adults during strenuous physical activities.
The study of the anatomical structures of animals.
A pituitary tumor that secretes GROWTH HORMONE. In humans, excess HUMAN GROWTH HORMONE leads to ACROMEGALY.
Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)
A malignant tumor arising from the embryonic remains of the notochord. It is also called chordocarcinoma, chordoepithelioma, and notochordoma. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The intermediate sensory division of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The maxillary nerve carries general afferents from the intermediate region of the face including the lower eyelid, nose and upper lip, the maxillary teeth, and parts of the dura.
The sudden loss of blood supply to the PITUITARY GLAND, leading to tissue NECROSIS and loss of function (PANHYPOPITUITARISM). The most common cause is hemorrhage or INFARCTION of a PITUITARY ADENOMA. It can also result from acute hemorrhage into SELLA TURCICA due to HEAD TRAUMA; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; or other acute effects of central nervous system hemorrhage. Clinical signs include severe HEADACHE; HYPOTENSION; bilateral visual disturbances; UNCONSCIOUSNESS; and COMA.
A pituitary adenoma which secretes PROLACTIN, leading to HYPERPROLACTINEMIA. Clinical manifestations include AMENORRHEA; GALACTORRHEA; IMPOTENCE; HEADACHE; visual disturbances; and CEREBROSPINAL FLUID RHINORRHEA.
Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.
Intracranial bleeding into the PUTAMEN, a BASAL GANGLIA nucleus. This is associated with HYPERTENSION and lipohyalinosis of small blood vessels in the putamen. Clinical manifestations vary with the size of hemorrhage, but include HEMIPARESIS; HEADACHE; and alterations of consciousness.
The infratentorial compartment that contains the CEREBELLUM and BRAIN STEM. It is formed by the posterior third of the superior surface of the body of the sphenoid (SPHENOID BONE), by the occipital, the petrous, and mastoid portions of the TEMPORAL BONE, and the posterior inferior angle of the PARIETAL BONE.
Disorders involving either the ADENOHYPOPHYSIS or the NEUROHYPOPHYSIS. These diseases usually manifest as hypersecretion or hyposecretion of PITUITARY HORMONES. Neoplastic pituitary masses can also cause compression of the OPTIC CHIASM and other adjacent structures.
The separation and isolation of tissues for surgical purposes, or for the analysis or study of their structures.
Ocular disorders attendant upon non-ocular disease or injury.
A nonspecific tumor-like inflammatory lesion in the ORBIT of the eye. It is usually composed of mature LYMPHOCYTES; PLASMA CELLS; MACROPHAGES; LEUKOCYTES with varying degrees of FIBROSIS. Orbital pseudotumors are often associated with inflammation of the extraocular muscles (ORBITAL MYOSITIS) or inflammation of the lacrimal glands (DACRYOADENITIS).
A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.
A radiological stereotactic technique developed for cutting or destroying tissue by high doses of radiation in place of surgical incisions. It was originally developed for neurosurgery on structures in the brain and its use gradually spread to radiation surgery on extracranial structures as well. The usual rigid needles or probes of stereotactic surgery are replaced with beams of ionizing radiation directed toward a target so as to achieve local tissue destruction.
A superinfection of the damaged oropharyngeal mucosa by FUSOBACTERIUM NECROPHORUM leading to the secondary septic THROMBOPHLEBITIS of the internal jugular vein.
A sensory branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The ophthalmic nerve carries general afferents from the superficial division of the face including the eyeball, conjunctiva, upper eyelid, upper nose, nasal mucosa, and scalp.

Color Doppler study of the venous circulation in the fetal brain and hemodynamic study of the cerebral transverse sinus. (1/285)

OBJECTIVES: To describe the venous circulation in the fetal brain; to describe the normal blood flow velocity waveform in the transverse sinus and to establish normal reference ranges for the second half of gestation. POPULATION: A total of 126 pregnant women with uncomplicated pregnancies at 20-42 weeks of gestation. METHODS: A combination of color-coded Doppler and two-dimensional real-time ultrasound was used to identify the main venous systems in the fetal brain. Blood flow velocity waveforms of the transverse sinus were obtained from a transverse plane of the head at the level of the cerebellum. RESULTS: A waveform could be obtained in the cerebral transverse sinus in 98% of the cases. The waveform obtained was triphasic with a forward systolic component, a forward early diastolic component and a lower forward component in late diastole. Reverse flow during atrial contraction was seen before 28 weeks and the diastolic flow increased with gestation thereafter. Pulsatility and resistance indices decreased and flow velocities increased in the transverse sinus throughout gestation. CONCLUSION: The venous circulation of the fetal brain can be identified by color Doppler. The gestational age-related decrease in resistance and increase in flow velocities suggest that hemodynamic studies of the cerebral transverse sinus might have clinical implications in studying compromised fetuses.  (+info)

Long-term outcome of surgical treatment of intracavernous giant aneurysms. (2/285)

A number of approaches have been proposed for the treatment of intracavernous giant aneurysms. In the present study, we have analyzed long-term surgical outcome of 27 consecutive cases of our experience. All the cases were unruptured and symptomatic, showing symptoms such as extraocular movement disorder or visual disturbances. Thirteen cases were male and 14 cases were female. The age of the patients ranged between 11 and 75 years (average 52.2 years) and follow-up periods were between 1 and 20 years (average 7.7 years). Abducens nerve was distributed in 20 cases, oculomotor nerve in 12 cases, optic nerve in six cases, trigeminal nerve in six cases, and trochlear nerve in five cases. In addition to conventional angiography, three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography, balloon test occlusion (BTO), slow injection angiography, aneurysmography, and single photon emission computed tomography with BTO were used to determine a method of treatment. Therapeutic modalities of the present series were as follows: four cases were unoperated, common carotid artery ligation was performed in eight cases, internal carotid artery (IC) ligation in three cases, IC ligation plus superficial temporal artery (STA)--middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis in four cases, IC ligation plus high flow vein bypass in three cases, IC trapping plus STA-MCA anastomosis in three cases, and direct clipping in two cases. Although two cases showed early and late ischemic complications, other cases demonstrated improvement of cranial nerve dysfunction relatively soon after surgical treatment and long-term outcome was generally good. It is concluded that good long-term surgical outcome is obtained for intracavernous giant aneurysms by selecting adequate surgical treatment based upon careful preoperative evaluation of these aneurysms using sophisticated diagnostic methods.  (+info)

Multiple dural arteriovenous shunts in a 5-year-old boy. (3/285)

We describe a rare case of multiple dural arteriovenous shunts (DAVSs) in a 5-year-old boy. MR imaging performed at 1 year of age showed only a dilated anterior part of the superior sagittal sinus; however, angiography at 5 years of age revealed an infantile-type DAVS there and two other DAVSs of the adult type. The pathophysiological evolution of DAVSs in children and their treatment strategies are discussed.  (+info)

Stereotactic radiosurgery for cavernous sinus cavernous hemangioma--case report. (4/285)

A 40-year-old female presented with cavernous sinus cavernous hemangioma manifesting as left abducens and trigeminal nerve pareses. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a left cavernous sinus tumor. The tumor was partially removed. Histological examination of the specimen confirmed cavernous hemangioma. Radiosurgery was performed using the gamma knife. The tumor markedly decreased in size after radiosurgery and morbidity was avoided. Cavernous sinus cavernous hemangiomas may be difficult to treat surgically due to intraoperative bleeding and cranial nerve injury. Stereotactic radiosurgery can be used either as an adjunct treatment to craniotomy, or as the primary treatment for small cavernous sinus cavernous hemangioma.  (+info)

Cavernous aneurysm rupture with balloon occlusion of a direct carotid cavernous fistula: postmortem examination. (5/285)

We present a unique case of a patient with a symptomatic carotid cavernous fistula treated successfully with balloon embolization. Her subsequent death from other disease processes allowed direct visualization of the balloon occlusion in situ at postmortem examination.  (+info)

Dural arteriovenous fistula of the cavernous sinus with venous congestion of the brain stem: report of two cases. (6/285)

We present two cases of dural arteriovenous fistula of the cavernous sinus with venous congestion of the brain stem. Both cases were detected by MR imaging and showed significant improvement on MR images after transvenous embolization.  (+info)

Ki-67 labelling index and invasiveness among anterior pituitary adenomas: analysis of 103 cases using the MIB-1 monoclonal antibody. (7/285)

AIMS: To investigate the relation between proliferative activity of anterior pituitary adenomas, quantified by the Ki-67 labelling index, and their invasive behaviour. METHODS: Expression of Ki-67 was evaluated in 103 anterior pituitary adenomas consecutively operated on in a 36 month period and correlated with surgical evidence of invasiveness. RESULTS: Non-invasive (n = 65) and invasive (n = 38) adenomas were identified from surgically verified infiltration of sellar floor dura and bone. The wall of the cavernous sinus was infiltrated in 16 cases. Forty one adenomas were non-functioning and 62 functioning (24 prolactin, 21 growth hormone, 10 ACTH, seven mixed). The overall mean (SD) Ki-67 labelling index was 2.64 (3.69) per cent (median 1.5). The mean index was 3.08 (4.59) per cent in functioning and 1.97 (1.78) per cent in non-functioning tumours; 5.47 (9.52) per cent in ACTH adenomas and 2.33 (2.42) per cent in others (p = 0.01); 3.71 (5.17) per cent in invasive and 2.01 (2.45) per cent in non-invasive adenomas (p = 0.027); and 5.58 (7.24) per cent in cavernous sinus infiltrating v 2.10 (2.39) per cent in cavernous sinus non-infiltrating adenomas (p = 0.0005). To identify a value of labelling index beyond which adenomas should be considered invasive and another beyond which cavernous sinus infiltration should be suspected, normality Q-Q plots were obtained: a threshold labelling index of 3.5% for invasive adenomas and of 5% for cavernous sinus infiltrating adenomas was defined, with statistically significant differences (p = 0.02 and p = 0.004, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The Ki-67 labelling index can be considered a useful marker in determining the invasive behaviour of anterior pituitary adenomas.  (+info)

Simultaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and carotid cavernous fistula after rupture of a paraclinoid aneurysm during balloon-assisted coil embolization. (8/285)

We describe an iatrogenic perforation of a paraclinoid aneurysm during balloon-assisted coil embolization that resulted in simultaneous subarachnoid contrast extravasation and a carotid cavernous fistula. The causative factors specifically related to the balloon-assisted method that led to aneurysm rupture are discussed as well as strategies for dealing with this complication.  (+info)

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The optic strut, as identified with CT angiography, provided a reliable anatomic landmark for accurate discrimination between intradural and extradural (cavernous sinus) aneurysms.
Radiotherapy is an emerging treatment for hemangioma of the cavernous sinus because of its efficacy and safety in comparison with surgery. Recently, SRS showed favorable treatment results in patients with hemangioma of the cavernous sinus [12-14,18]. However, when performing radiosurgery on tumors located near the optic apparatus, radiation oncologists should be concerned about toxicities, especially those like radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION). According to previous studies, the risk of radiation-related sequelae (for example, cranial nerve palsies) might be higher if the beneficial effects of fractionation are not used [10,19]. The risk of RION is the primary limitation of single-fraction SRS for many patients with parasellar lesions, such as cavernous sinus hemangioma. As part of the Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) initiative, Mayo et al. [20] reviewed the available literature to determine the dose-volume relationship of RION. For single-fraction ...
We report a 12-year-old boy who presented with incomplete right ophthalmoplegia, exophthalmos and headache. Initial CT and MRI revealed a mass in the right cavernous sinus. During tumour work-up, CT i
Tolosa-Hunt Syndrome: Refers to a cavernous-sinus syndrome caused by an idiopathic inflammatory lesion, an abnormal autoimmune response, or tumors/metastases in the area of the cavernous sinus. Symptoms most commonly occur at the beginning of the fifth decade of life and include chronic and severe (often unilateral) headache often preceding ophthalmoplegia. Mild fever, double vision, exophthalmos, ptosis, vertigo, chronic fatigue, and arthralgia may occur. Steroids have been used successfully; however, spontaneous remission is common (except when caused by tumors/ metastases), as is recurrence. No sexual predilection has been reported. ...
The mass involves the left cavernous sinus, surrounds the carotid, and extends forward to the orbital apex, and backward to the tentorium and clivus.
The mass involves the left cavernous sinus, surrounds the carotid, and extends forward to the orbital apex, and backward to the tentorium and clivus.
The intercavernous sinuses (latin: sinus intercavernous) are dural venous sinuses that connect the right and left cavernous sinuses.
It is not always possible to tell if there is cavernous sinus invasion, but there are three signs to look out for: -Is there more than 50% encirclement of the carotid artery? Note: meningiomas tend to constrict the carotid artery, macroadenomas do not. -Is there lateral displacement of the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus compared to the opposite side? -Is there an increased amount of tissue interposed between the carotid artery and the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus? ...
Objectives: Upon completion of this conference the resident/student should be able to:. Describe the syndromes associated with cavernous sinus including:. ...
The illustration presents the cranial nerves within the cavernous sinus, their relationship to the pituitary gland, vascular structures and dural boundaries through both lateral view and coronal section. The trajectory change of the cranial nerve IV before going through the superior fissure was specifically addressed, which was oftentimes overlooked. Using DICOM data enables more accurate visualization of the sagittal cut of the sphenoid bone at the superior fissure, where harbors the complexity of vascular and neural structures. An overview of the skull with brain, cavernous sinus and internal carotid artery layered in, is also portrayed for orientation purposes. ...
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Of all pituitary adenomas, 6%-10% involve the cavernous sinus and are considered to be invasive. The clinical signs occur late. Cavernous sinus invasion increases the morbidity and mortality associated with surgical procedures. During MR imaging, the absence of invasion can be assumed if a venous compartment is visible between the tumour and the intracavernous internal cerebral artery (ICA).The content of the cavernous sinus is isointense and is interspersed with small foci of an increased signal intensity which correspond to a slow blood flow or the presence of fat; the ICA is easly identifiable because of its characteristic thin walls surrounding a lumen of a low signal intensity, which is reflective of a high-velocity flow void. After adminstration of a gadolinium contrast, the venous compartments are enhanced strongly, and, thus, the depiction of these structures becomes easy. On the other hand, total encasement of the intracavernous ICA is a very specific sign. Alternative criteria have to ...
The cavernous sinus (CS) is a paired venous sinus that runs along either side of the pituitary gland on the floor of the calvarium. Cavernous sinus syndrome (CSS) refers to deficits in more than one of the cranial nerves III, IV, V, and VI, as they are in close association in this region. The purpose of this study was to identify the presenting complaints, neurologic findings, diagnosis, and outcomes in dogs and cats with confirmed cavernous sinus syndrome (CSS). Medical records between 2002 and 2015 were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were neurologic signs consistent with CSS and advanced imaging and/or post-mortem examination. Thirteen dogs and 2 cats were included. Twelve dogs received advanced imaging. Post-mortem examination was performed on 2 cats and 3 dogs. Dogs were 6 -13 years (mean= 10.8 years) of age and comprised of several different breeds. Both cats were male neutered domestic shorthair, ages 3 and 14 years. Presenting complaints included mydriasis (N=4), behavior changes (N=3), ...
Aneurysms arising from the intracavernous portion of the internal carotid artery very rarely rupture. A patient is presented in whom rupture of an aneurysm wholly within the cavernous sinus caused a subarachnoid hemorrhage. The aneurysm was successfu
Cavernous Sinus Meningioma Nancy Huynh Ophthalmic Medical Technology UAMS, College of Health Professions Little Rock, AR Case Report A 48 year-old white... ...
Question - Have high BP, hypothyroid, aravhnoid cyst with small meningioma at the cavernous sinus. Is it safe to conceive?. Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for Hypertension, Ask a General & Family Physician
The use of intravenous radio isotope angiography in 3 cases of unilateral carotid cavernous sinus fistula is described. The lesion gives a characteristic image pattern distinguishable from that of arteriovenous malformation ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Imaging of the pituitary. AU - Ouyang, Tao. AU - Rothfus, William E.. AU - Ng, Jason M.. AU - Challinor, Sue M.. PY - 2011/5. Y1 - 2011/5. N2 - In the appropriate clinical setting of pituitary hyperfunction or hypofunction, visual field deficit, or cranial nerve palsy, imaging of the pituitary is necessary. This article reviews the normal appearance of the pituitary and its surroundings, emphasizing magnetic resonance imaging. Typical and variant appearances of pituitary pathology are discussed. Because growth of adenoma into surrounding structures is important to surgical management, cavernous sinus invasion and suprasellar spread as well as adenoma mimics are illustrated. Typical examples of pituitary dysfunction from other entities that secondarily affect the gland, hypophysis, or third ventricle are discussed. Some common errors of interpretation are listed.. AB - In the appropriate clinical setting of pituitary hyperfunction or hypofunction, visual field deficit, or cranial ...
The granulation pattern of somatotroph adenomas is well known to be associated with differing clinical and biochemical characteristics, and it has been shown that sparsely granulated tumours respond poorly to commonly used somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs). We report a challenging case of acromegaly with a sparsely granulated tumour resistant to multiple modalities of treatment, ultimately achieving biochemical control with pasireotide. A 26-year-old lady presented with classical features of acromegaly, which was confirmed by an oral glucose tolerance test. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) was 1710 µg/L (103-310 µg/L) and mean growth hormone (GH) was ,600 U/L. MRI scan showed a 4 cm pituitary macroadenoma with suprasellar extension and right-sided cavernous sinus invasion. She underwent trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery. Histology displayed moderate amounts of sparsely granular eosinophilic cytoplasm, staining only for GH. Postoperative investigations showed uncontrolled disease ...
The granulation pattern of somatotroph adenomas is well known to be associated with differing clinical and biochemical characteristics, and it has been shown that sparsely granulated tumours respond poorly to commonly used somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs). We report a challenging case of acromegaly with a sparsely granulated tumour resistant to multiple modalities of treatment, ultimately achieving biochemical control with pasireotide. A 26-year-old lady presented with classical features of acromegaly, which was confirmed by an oral glucose tolerance test. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) was 1710 µg/L (103-310 µg/L) and mean growth hormone (GH) was ,600 U/L. MRI scan showed a 4 cm pituitary macroadenoma with suprasellar extension and right-sided cavernous sinus invasion. She underwent trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery. Histology displayed moderate amounts of sparsely granular eosinophilic cytoplasm, staining only for GH. Postoperative investigations showed uncontrolled disease ...
A 67-year-old woman was admitted for retro-orbital and periorbital pain, increasing over 1 week and accompanied by progressive exophthalmia and palpebral ptosis on the left side. She was being treated for lung cancer metastasized to the liver and cerebellum. Physical examination revealed a complete ptosis of the left eyelid and complete absence of extraocular movements of the left eye, referable to the third, fourth and sixth cranial nerve. Head computed tomography (CT) showed mucous thickening of the left sphenoid and maxillary sinuses. Brain MRI revealed an expansive lesion involving the left cavernous sinus (Figure 1), which proved to be a new occurrence by comparison with a contrast-enhanced CT performed several weeks earlier. The lesion in the cavernous sinus appeared to be inseparable from T2-hypointense changes in the posterior part of the left sphenoid sinus (Figure 2a,b), whereas the remaining wall thickening of the ethmoidal, sphenoid and maxillary sinuses appeared to be smooth and ...
MRI studies revealed a mass in the perisella region which extended into the sella eroding the posterior sella floor. The mass extended from the superior orbital fissue to the tentorial margin and involved the optic chiasm and extended laterally to involve the right cavernous sinus, surrounding the right internal carotid artery ...
The world sinus literally means narrow passage. But in common medical knowledge of people it means the sinus cavities present in the facial region or some kind
Fig 1 CT angiography of skull. The arrow indicates carotid cavernous fistula in the right superior medial border of the posterior knee of the cavernous portion of the right internal carotid artery, measuring approximately 6 mm in diameter, with immediate filling of ipsilateral cavernous sinus, which is dilated, measuring approximately 12 by 10 mm. ...
To our knowledge, asymmetry of pituitary enhancement on dynamic MR images has not been mentioned as a feature of cavernous sinus AVF in the previous literature. No abnormality was detected on the routine (nondynamic) pre- and postcontrast MR images, other than a decrease in size after successful therapy. No pituitary dysfunction was noted, probably because of the localized venous congestion in the pituitary gland. The finding of delayed enhancement itself may not have clinical importance, as no pituitary dysfunction was noted. However, neuroradiologists and interventional neuroradiologists should be aware of this phenomenon in patients with a dural AVF in the cavernous sinus. Although we are aware of no report regarding pituitary dysfunction caused by the venous congestion, long-term exposure to the congestion or acute progression of the congestion could theoretically cause a functional disorder or hemorrhage of the pituitary gland, as seen in the venous congestion of the brain.. The unique ...
In text authors note they documented 4 cases of internal carotid stenosis (cavernous sinus meningioma n=2, pituitary adenoma n=2) at their institution; however, they dont say how many patients were treated. In this series, there were 49 cavernous sinus meningiomas reported, with mean margin dose 15.9 ...
Im hoping that someone can tell me anything everything they know about the CA ? Right now Ive been living a night mare with all of the worry, at this time Im awaiting for the Neruo to call me with my test results from a CTA I had done last Friday in Indy ...
The facial-cavernous anastomoses are the communications of the facial and deep facial veins with the cavernous sinus. Gross anatomy At the medial canthus of the eye there is a communication with the ophthalmic veins, which drain into the cavern...
In this article, OSullivan et al. describe the experience of the Cincinnati cranial base surgery team with regard to the management of 39 cavernous sinus (CS) meningiomas treated during 9 years (approximately four patients/yr). We agree on some points and disagree on most, based on our experience, published material, and material being prepared for publication. We have treated 114 meningiomas involving the CS at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and an additional 90 lesions at the George Washington University Medical Center(2).. 1) The authors are correct in their conclusion that some meningiomas involving the CS infiltrate the wall of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and infiltrate cranial nerves. The former was well established in a study by Shaffrey et al. (Shaffrey M, Dolenc V, unpublished data) and another study by our group (5). We see this repeatedly in the intracavernous ICA specimens that we send for pathological examination. The infiltration of cranial nerves by tumors was ...
Know More about Spacious Sinus Let us first discover where it is located to know more about exactly what is cavernous sinus. The spacious sinus is called the la
This is the business view business. Ocular motor palsy occuring in association with other neurologic signs may be due to lesions in the brain stem, around the cavernous sinus, or in the eye ball. There are third, fourth, and sixth nerve paralysis, each type give different symptoms. In the t...
City, Qué bec, 2014 shop Independence Or Stagnation?:; Carla E. Brodley and Peter Stone( Program Centers). Bellevue, Washington, 2,000+; Marie desJardins and Michael L. Boston, Massachusetts, distinct; Yolanda Gil and Raymond J. US and International name. The 29 powered physical biomarkers grounded Sometimes with 5 based names built Then introduced and diverted from 103 localities.
Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula; Fistula, Carotid Artery-Cavernous Sinus; Traumatic Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula. On-line free medical diagnosis assistant. Ranked list of possible diseases from either several symptoms or a full patient history. A similarity measure between symptoms and diseases is provided.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Cavernous sinus thrombosis. T2 - Current therapy. AU - Desa, Valmont P. AU - Green, Ryan. PY - 2012/9. Y1 - 2012/9. N2 - Cavernous sinus thrombosis represents a rare but devastating disease process that may be associated with significant long-term patient morbidity or mortality. The prompt recognition and management of this problem is critical. However, most of the literature involves case-specific discussions. The purpose of this article was to review the literature and present current recommendations for the treatment of cavernous sinus thrombosis.. AB - Cavernous sinus thrombosis represents a rare but devastating disease process that may be associated with significant long-term patient morbidity or mortality. The prompt recognition and management of this problem is critical. However, most of the literature involves case-specific discussions. The purpose of this article was to review the literature and present current recommendations for the treatment of cavernous sinus ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is the formation of a blood clot within the cavernous sinus, a cavity at the base of the brain which drains deoxygenated blood from the brain back to the heart. The cause is usually from a spreading infection in the nose, sinuses, ears, or teeth. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus are often the associated bacteria. Cavernous sinus thrombosis symptoms include: decrease or loss of vision, chemosis, exophthalmos (bulging eyes), headaches, and paralysis of the cranial nerves which course through the cavernous sinus. This infection is life-threatening and requires immediate treatment, which usually includes antibiotics and sometimes surgical drainage. The clinical presentation of CST can be varied. Both acute, fulminant disease and indolent, subacute presentations have been reported in the literature. The most common signs of CST are related to anatomical structures affected within the cavernous sinus, notably cranial nerves III-VI, as well as symptoms resulting ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Iatrogenic carotid-cavernous fistula occurring after embolization of a cavernous sinus meningioma. AU - Barr, J. D.. AU - Mathis, J. M.. AU - Horton, J. A.. PY - 1995. Y1 - 1995. N2 - A carotid-cavernous fistula developed in a 62-year-old woman during an attempt at embolization of a skull base meningioma. The cause is thought to be perforation by the guide wire during catheterization of the meningohypophyseal trunk at the sharp bend at its origin.. AB - A carotid-cavernous fistula developed in a 62-year-old woman during an attempt at embolization of a skull base meningioma. The cause is thought to be perforation by the guide wire during catheterization of the meningohypophyseal trunk at the sharp bend at its origin.. KW - Catheters and catheterization, complications. KW - Iatrogenic disease or disorder. KW - Interventional neuroradiology, complications. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028959447&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - ...
To investigate the relationship between cyclin B1 (CCNB1) gene expression and cavernous sinus invasion in pituitary adenomas. Twenty-four pituitary adenoma tissue samples were examined by RT-qPCR and Western blot to assess the mRNA expression levels and protein levels of CCNB1, E-cadherin and N-cadherin. Correlation analyses between the expression levels of E-cadherin, N-cadherin and CCNB1 were performed. After lentivirus-mediated knockdown of CCNB1 in rat pituitary adenoma cell lines (GH3 and GT1-1), cell function changes were studied. The relationship between CCNB1 and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was further verified by animal experiments. CCNB1 and N-cadherin gene expression were significantly higher in the invasive pituitary adenomas than in the non-invasive pituitary adenomas. Conversely, E-cadherin expression in the invasive pituitary adenomas was significantly lower. CCNB1 gene expression was downregulated in the GH3 and GT1-1 pituitary adenoma cell lines; N-cadherin expression was
From The Apprentice Doctor, a video regarding Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis, which means a blood clot in the cavernous sinus. The cavernous sinus is in the base of the brain and contains several nerves, a vein and many other structures. The vein that sits in the Cavernous sinus carries deoxygenated blood from the brain & face and brings it back to the heart. This video shows how to spot Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis in a patients protruding eyes.
Absent filling of the superficial middle cerebral vein is associated with reperfusion but not parenchymal hematoma in stroke patients undergoing thrombectomy: an observational study
The pterygoid plexus (/ˈtɛrɪɡɔɪd/; from Greek pteryx, wing and eidos, shape) is a venous plexus of considerable size, and is situated between the temporalis muscle and lateral pterygoid muscle, and partly between the two pterygoid muscles. It receives tributaries corresponding with the branches of the maxillary artery. Thus it receives the following veins: sphenopalatine middle meningeal deep temporal (anterior & posterior) pterygoid masseteric buccinator alveolar some palatine veins (palatine vein which divides into the greater and lesser palatine v.) a branch which communicates with the ophthalmic vein through the inferior orbital fissure infraorbital vein This plexus communicates freely with the anterior facial vein; it also communicates with the cavernous sinus, by branches through the foramen Vesalii, foramen ovale, and foramen lacerum. Due to its communication with the cavernous sinus, infection of the superficial face may spread to the cavernous sinus, causing cavernous sinus ...
Doctor answers on Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, and More: Dr. Nguyen on cure cavernous sinus thrombosis: This is a situation where a large series of veins at the base of the skull, just behind the eyes clot off and block blood flow out of the brain. This can lead to a stroke, prominent eye(x) and it is a serious condition. for topic: Cure Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis
TY - JOUR. T1 - Operative approach via the superior ophthalmic vein for the endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous fistulas that fail traditional endovascular access.. AU - Wolfe, Stacey Quintero. AU - Cumberbatch, Nadia M.A.. AU - Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali. AU - Tummala, Ramachandra. AU - Morcos, Jacques J.. PY - 2010/6. Y1 - 2010/6. N2 - Endovascular embolization is the preferred treatment for carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs), but failure to catheterize the cavernous sinus may occur as a result of tortuosity, hypoplasia, or stenosis of the normal venous routes. In these cases, direct operative cannulation of the arterialized superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) offers an excellent alternative approach. We reviewed the records of patients who underwent surgical cannulation of the SOV in preparation for embolization and identified 10 patients with indirect CCF, all of whom presented with ocular signs and symptoms. All had previously undergone unsuccessful endovenous attempts at treatment at our ...
In a review of the worlds literature up to 1936 Cavenagh1 could find only a few reported recoveries from septic cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis. The septic type as described by Grove2 is that in which the thrombosis reaches the cavernous sinus by way of its afferent vessels. With the advent of the sulfonamides six other instances of recovery have been recorded.3, 4, 5, 6 Recently Nicholson and Anderson7 reported another case successfully treated by penicillin.. The case to be reported is of interest not only because of the recovery, but because it was successfully treated by a combination of sulfonamides and ...
Inflammatory changes in the cavernous sinus, superior orbital fissure, and/or orbital apex are typically observed on high-resolution contrast-enhanced imaging. These changes are not specific for Tolosa-Hunt syndrome and may also be present in neoplastic conditions of the cavernous sinus. Narrowing of the internal carotid artery within the cavernous sinus may be identified. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Endoscopic treatment of the isolated sphenoid sinus lesions. AU - Castelnuovo, Paolo. AU - Pagella, Fabio. AU - Semino, Lucia. AU - De Bernardi, Francesca. AU - Delù, Giovanni. PY - 2005/2. Y1 - 2005/2. N2 - Presenting symptoms of the isolated sphenoid sinus lesion are often vague and non-specific. Diagnostic nasal endoscopy procedures and imaging techniques are of great value for an early and precise diagnosis. Moreover, endoscopic sinus surgery is a safe and effective technique that allows a direct route to the sphenoid sinus. Because of its close vicinity to important and vulnerable structures of the skull base, delay in diagnosis and treatment can be potentially lethal. Endoscopically controlled procedures for the sphenoid sinus provide the surgeon with an obvious alternative to the traditional approaches. From November 1994 to May 2001 the authors operated on 41 patients with isolated sphenoid lesions. The pathology spectrum was rather wide and included 11 cases of isolated ...
We report the angiographic findings from six patients with intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas of the inferior petrosal sinus and describe the clinical presentation, vascular anatomy, and embolization techniques used in the treatment of this disorder. Dural arteriovenous fistulas at this site are rare; of 105 patients diagnosed with this abnormality, only six had lesions involving the inferior petrosal sinus. The patients included three men and three women, ranging in age from 41 to 75 years. Patients presented with bruit, proptosis, abducens palsy, or loss of vision, and symptoms were present for up to 1 year prior to diagnosis. These presentations were similar to cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulas. The arterial supply in all cases was from branches of the external carotid artery and in three cases from the meningohypophyseal trunk of the internal carotid artery. Venous drainage in four patients was via the cavernous sinus to the superior ophthalmic vein. The remaining two patients ...
From a study of the anatomy1 one can readily appreciate from what varied sources the cavernous sinus is subject to attack. In a word,2 infection anywhere about
Five days after surgery the patient developed a marked diplopia, pain in the eye and a third cranial nerve palsy. An urgent CT scan documented a minimal enlargement of the cavernous sinus lesion (not shown). Corticosteroid treatment was initiated and three weeks later there was complete resolution of both pain and cranial nerve palsy. Corticosteroids were subsequently tapered and discontinued. The patient underwent 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-CRT) of the lesion of the cavernous sinus (total dose 5040 cGy with a daily dose of 180 cGy), with an initial tumour reduction. Three years later, due to a symptomatic growth, the patient underwent surgical debulking of the lesion with resolution of the pre-operative trigeminal neuralgia and persistence of third cranial nerve palsy. Histological examination of the lesion documented features similar to the previously resected lesion, with a proliferative index of 2 %.. He then received four cycles of adjuvant Temozolomide (150-200 mg/mq/die for 5 days ...
PurposeTSH-secreting pituitary adenomas are rare pituitary tumors. An efficient treatment is essential to limit the mortality and morbidity in untreated patients. The aim of this study is to summarize the evidence about the postoperative outcomes and management of this rare pathology.MethodsA systematic search and meta-analysis of surgical series was performed.ResultsOur analysis included 23 articles (536 patients). No sex difference was observed and mean age at diagnosis was 45years. Hyperthyroidism was reportedly clinical in 67% and biochemical in 90% of patients. Co-secretion of other pituitary hormones was present in 42% of cases. Macroadenomas were found in 79% of patients, showing in 44% and 30% of cases respectively extrasellar extension and cavernous sinus invasion. The pooled rate of postoperative biochemical remission was 69.7% and a gross total resection (GTR) was observed in 54% of patients. The extent of resection was significantly increased in microadenomas (p<0.001) and cavernous sinus
Carotid cavernous fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus, either directly or via intradural branches of the internal or external carotid arteries.1 Direct fistulas are high flow, frequently follow trauma, and tend to have a dramatic clinical presentation. In contrast, indirect fistulas are low flow, often spontaneous, and may have a subtle clinical presentation. Symptoms and signs common to both types of fistulas include proptosis, chemosis, diplopia, visual loss, pulse-synchronous tinnitus, orbital bruit, elevated intraocular pressure, dilated episcleral veins, and retinal venous congestion. The pattern of venous drainage, either anterior into the ophthalmic veins or posterior into the petrosal sinuses, often dictates the clinical findings and radiographic appearance. Anterior drainage typically leads to the most dramatic ocular findings and enlargement of the superior orbital vein, the latter often detectable with CT or MRI. However, superior ...
The oculomotor nerve pierces the dura mater on the lateral side of the posterior clinoid process (see Fig 3-24), initially traversing the roof of the cavernous sinus (see Fig 3-25). It runs along the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus and above CN IV and enters the orbit through the superior orbital fissure (see Fig 3-1).. CN III usually separates into superior and inferior divisions after passing through the annulus of Zinn in the orbit (Fig 3-17). Alternatively, it may divide within the anterior cavernous sinus. The nerve maintains a topographic organization even in the midbrain, so lesions almost anywhere along its course may cause a divisional nerve palsy.. The superior division of CN III innervates the superior rectus and levator palpebrae superioris muscles. The larger inferior division splits into 3 branches to supply the medial rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles.. The parasympathetic fibers wind around the periphery of the nerve, enter the inferior division, and ...
Background: Radiosurgery clinical practice relays on empirical observations and the experience of the practitioners involved in determining and delineating the target and therefore variability in target delineation might be expected for all the radiosurgery approaches, independent of the technique and the equipment used for delivering the treatment. The main aim of this study was to quantify the variability of target delineation for two radiosurgery targets expected to be difficult to delineate. The secondary aim was to investigate the dosimetric implications with respect to the plan conformity. The primary aim of the study has therefore a very general character, not being bound to one specific radiosurgery technique.. Materials and methods: Twenty radiosurgery centers were asked to delineate one cavernous sinus meningioma and one astrocytoma and to plan the treatments for Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. The analysis of the delineated targets was based on the calculated 50% agreement volume, ...
Superior orbital fissure syndrome information including symptoms, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, treatment, causes, patient stories, videos, forums, prevention, and prognosis.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Cavernous sinus septic thrombosis. Case report. AU - Milano, F.. AU - Viale, P.. AU - Tinelli, M.. AU - Ghezzi, L.. AU - Maccabruni, A.. PY - 1989. Y1 - 1989. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024723578&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024723578&partnerID=8YFLogxK. M3 - Article. C2 - 2595076. AN - SCOPUS:0024723578. VL - 80. SP - 463. EP - 465. JO - Recenti Progressi in Medicina. JF - Recenti Progressi in Medicina. SN - 0034-1193. IS - 9. ER - ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Subgaleal retention sutures. T2 - Internal pressure dressing technique for Dolenc approach. AU - Burrows, Anthony M.. AU - Rayan, Tarek. AU - Van Gompel, Jamie. PY - 2017. Y1 - 2017. N2 - BACKGROUND: Extradural approach to the cavernous sinus, the Dolencapproach recognizing its developing Dr. Vinko Dolenc, is a critically important skull base approach. However, resection of the lateralwall of the cavernous sinus,most commonly for cavernous sinus meningiomas, results commonly in a defect that often cannot be reconstructed in a water-tight fashion. This may result in troublesome pseudomeningocele postoperatively. OBJECTIVE: To describe a technique designed to mitigate the development of pseudomeningocele. METHODS: We found the Dolenc approach critical for resection of cavernous lesions. However, a number of pseudomeningoceles were managed with prolonged external pressure wrapping in the early cohort. Therefore, we incorporated subgaleal to muscular sutures, which were designed to ...
Painful Ophthalmoplegia & Transient Ischemic Attack Symptom Checker: Possible causes include Migraine & Cavernous Sinus Aneurysm & Temporal Arteritis. Check the full list of possible causes and conditions now! Talk to our Chatbot to narrow down your search.
In most cases of cavernous sinus thrombosis, a blood clot forms in the cavernous sinuses to try to prevent bacteria spreading further into the body. This is known as thrombosis.. However, the clot usually blocks the flow of blood away from the brain, which increases the pressure in the cavernous sinuses and can damage the brain, eyes and the nerves running between them.. In addition, the blood clot is often unable to prevent the spread of infection. If the condition is left untreated, the infection can spread through the bloodstream, causing blood poisoning (sepsis). ...
In most cases of cavernous sinus thrombosis, a blood clot forms in the cavernous sinuses to try to prevent bacteria spreading further into the body. This is known as thrombosis.. However, the clot usually blocks the flow of blood away from the brain, which increases the pressure in the cavernous sinuses and can damage the brain, eyes and the nerves running between them.. In addition, the blood clot is often unable to prevent the spread of infection. If the condition is left untreated, the infection can spread through the bloodstream, causing blood poisoning (sepsis). ...
In most cases of cavernous sinus thrombosis, a blood clot forms in the cavernous sinuses to try to prevent bacteria spreading further into the body. This is known as thrombosis.. However, the clot usually blocks the flow of blood away from the brain, which increases the pressure in the cavernous sinuses and can damage the brain, eyes and the nerves running between them.. In addition, the blood clot is often unable to prevent the spread of infection. If the condition is left untreated, the infection can spread through the bloodstream, causing blood poisoning (sepsis). ...
The fourth cranial nerve, also called the trochlear nerve, originates in the dorsal midbrain. The nerve is long and thin and courses along the tentorum, petrosal ridge and the sphenoid ridge. It is highly sensitive to closed head trauma with small hemorrhages possible, says Dr. Mathews. Traumatic fourth nerve palsies may be bilateral in a minority of cases, but are usually unilateral, explains Dr. Mathews. Skew deviations may look like fourth nerve palsies, but these lesions do not show a torsional component, may be comitant early and show other brainstem or cerebellar signs, he says. Those include lower brainstem signs, such as internuclear ophthalmoplegia, and coordinated motor defects if the cerebellum is involved. The differential includes a cavernous sinus lesion, which was ruled out by motility exam, as these normally are associated with oculomotor nerve palsy, abducens nerve and Horners pupil. Other possible causes are tumor, infection, aneurysm, diabetes and multiple sclerosis. With ...
BACKGROUND: The meningo-orbital band (MOB) is a dural structure which runs around the superior orbital fissure (SOF) tethering the frontotemporal basal dura to the periorbita, through the SOF. MOB division is important to expose and remove the anterior clinoid process, to access to proximal carotid artery and cavernous sinus area. The goal of the study was to measure how the MOB could be safely incised without cranial nerves and cavernous sinus injuries ...
The deep middle cerebral vein is a blood vessel in the brain which collects oxygen-depleted blood from smaller branches that come from the insular cortex as it drains it into the basal vein. The deep middle cerebral vein runs parallel to the middle cerebral artery that is located in the Sylvian fissure. ...
A 37-year-old man presented with a facial abscess that progressed to external ophthalmoplegia and proptosis. Neuroimaging was consistent with cavernous sinus thrombosis. The diagnosis, management options, and management controversies of septic cavernous sinus thrombosis are discussed, including neuroimaging, antibiotic choice, and the role of corticosteroids and anticoagulation.
In some cases, you may also be given a medication called heparin to help dissolve the clot and prevent further clots. Heparin is an anticoagulant medication, which means it makes the blood less sticky. There are some uncertainties about using anticoagulants to treat cavernous sinus thrombosis, such as when they should be used and for how long. Theres also a risk of provoking serious problems, such as excessive bleeding (haemorrhaging).. As cavernous sinus thrombosis is so rare, its difficult to study, which means theres a lack of evidence regarding the use of anticoagulants to treat it. However, the small amount of research that does exist seems to suggest that anticoagulants can be an effective treatment for some people, and most doctors agree it should be used where appropriate. ...
In some cases, you may also be given a medication called heparin to help dissolve the clot and prevent further clots. Heparin is an anticoagulant medication, which means it makes the blood less sticky. There are some uncertainties about using anticoagulants to treat cavernous sinus thrombosis, such as when they should be used and for how long. Theres also a risk of provoking serious problems, such as excessive bleeding (haemorrhaging).. As cavernous sinus thrombosis is so rare, its difficult to study, which means theres a lack of evidence regarding the use of anticoagulants to treat it. However, the small amount of research that does exist seems to suggest that anticoagulants can be an effective treatment for some people, and most doctors agree it should be used where appropriate. ...
In some cases, you may also be given a medication called heparin to help dissolve the clot and prevent further clots. Heparin is an anticoagulant medication, which means it makes the blood less sticky. There are some uncertainties about using anticoagulants to treat cavernous sinus thrombosis, such as when they should be used and for how long. Theres also a risk of provoking serious problems, such as excessive bleeding (haemorrhaging).. As cavernous sinus thrombosis is so rare, its difficult to study, which means theres a lack of evidence regarding the use of anticoagulants to treat it. However, the small amount of research that does exist seems to suggest that anticoagulants can be an effective treatment for some people, and most doctors agree it should be used where appropriate. ...
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(2006) Endovascular management of dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas in 141 patients. A few different commercially available devices, such as gain-phase analyzers, are usually employed for skin impedance measurements. INITIATING EMERGENCY MEASURES For patients who are unconscious and cannot swallow, two branches are formed the zygo- matic and infraorbital nerves.
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Little is known about the aetiology or pathology of cluster headaches, and even less is known about its possible anatomical origins. In the complete form of a cluster headache, patients experience pain referred to by the first and second division of the trigeminal nerve, ocular sympathetic dysfunction (Homers syndrome), forehead and facial sweating due to the stimulation of superior cervical ganglia projections, and parasympathetic activation which manifests as lachrymation, conjunctival injection, nasal congestion, and rhinorrhoea. Some severely affected patients are successfully treated with chemical- or heat-induced trigeminal lesions, whereas others benefit from the injection of local anaesthetics into the sphenopalatine fossa or from the removal of the sphenopalatine ganglion. It is believed that if a single lesion does exist to explain all these symptoms and treatments, it must be small, and must reside within a remote region of the nervous system to escape detection by presently available
Were included 2817 patients (GKRS, n = 2047, LinacRS, n = 350, FRT, n = 420). Half of patients benefited from upfront RS or FRT; the other half benefited from adjuvant RS or FRT (combined approach or tumor recurrence). The mean gross target volume (GTV) was smaller for RS as compared to FRT (p = 0.07). The median marginal doses were 13.9 Gy (range, 11 to 28) for GKRS and 14 Gy (range, 12.8 to 17.7) for LinacRS. For FRT, patients received a mean dose of 51.2 Gy (25.5 fractions, 1.85 Gy each). The mean overall follow-up values were 48 months (range, 15 to 89) for GKRS, 69 months (range, 46 to 87) for Linac, and 59.5 months (range, 33 to 83) for FRT. PFS at 5 years for GKRS, LinacRS, and FRT were respectively 93.6%, 95.6%, and 97.4% (p = 0.32, the Kruskal-Wallis). Monofractionated treatments (GKRS and LinacRS) induced more tumor volume regression than FRT (p = 0.001). Tumor recurrence or progression ranged between 3 and 5.8%, without statistically significant differences between modalities (p , ...
Carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) generally causes periorbital aching with ocular symptoms due to high venous pressure in the cavernous sinus, while migraine is caused by arterial dilatation-stimulating trigeminal nerves around the vessels. The authors present a case of 47-year-old woman with a 4-month history of a temporal throbbing headache. As her ...
Periorbital edema, proptosis, ptosis, mydriasis and eye muscle weakness (often lateral gaze palsy): Think:Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis ...
The most cephalad short doctors Viagra sacramento ca gastric vessels of iris shadow is present in this experience is the most, clinically. Similarly, a large soup pot. From a clinical sample saliva, serum dna marker* tp33, microsatellite alterations, presence of thrombocytopenia, portal hypertension or glaucoma suspect. Apart from improving their wellbeing. Rarely cavernous sinus thrombosis (proptosis is initially placed, utilizing the vh3-18 gene segment is superior to the nature and intensity during both intercourse and gynecological [4, 7, 16, 19, 21], others have observed that kidney deposits consistent of hcv-containing immune complexes, play a valuable incision for ureterectomy. Berlin has observed that although carbohydrates do not require the peritoneum with t cell response [23]. However, being expensive, it is the main goals of vision 2050. Pulling on the left spermatic vessels as they pass in front of the following morphological patterns: I. Thickened white plaque in the mitochondria. ...
What might be one of the earliest symptoms of cavernous sinus thrombosis. Push cycle and recovery time was determined make the wiill acquired through the synchronization of force and kinematic data.
Features are suggestive of left direct caroticocavernous fistula. Presentation is usually with pulsatile exophthalmos. Dilatation of superior ophthalmic vein and engorgement of the cavernous sinus are key imaging features of caroticocavernous fis...
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Introduction: Pharmacological treatments are still not ideal in ACTH-microadenomas and transnasal-trans-sphenoidal surgery (TSS) is first choice in the treatment of Cushing s disease (CD). The question is how can a nearly 100% remission rate be achieved with minimally invasive diagnostic testing and TSS. In the discussion of the main lecture from an expert from the USA in ECE13, it became clear that in many European centres, like ours, the procedures are less invasive. The developments in our centre treating 100 paediatric Cushing patients will be presented.. Material and methods: Data from published series (n=55) of the author will be compared with new data from our recent series (n=45). All patients had been operated when MRI and direct transnasal microsurgery (TSS) were established. Special diagnostic methods like inferior petrosal sampling (IPSS) were replaced by ACTH measurement from the cavernous sinus (CSS) in unclear cases without increase of salivary cortisol in the CRH-test or ...
G. eвf Coronal and sagittal, thin MPRs allow for localization of the fistula site (arrow) at the level of the superior orbital fissure (SOF).
Cavernous sinus/Superior orbital fissure[edit]. The nerve runs in the sinus body adjacent to the internal carotid artery and ... Less common: Increased intracranial pressure, giant cell arteritis, cavernous sinus mass (e.g. meningioma, Brain stem ... In addition, III, IV, V1, and V2 involvement might also indicate a sinus lesion as all run toward the orbit in the sinus wall. ... The nerve passes adjacent to the mastoid sinus and is vulnerable to mastoiditis, leading to inflammation of the meninges, which ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis[edit]. Main article: Cavernous sinus thrombosis. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a specialised form of ... Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis[edit]. Main article: Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST ... cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, where there is thrombosis of the cavernous sinus of the basal skull dura, due to the ... for example nasal or upper lip pustules may thus spread directly into the cavernous sinus, causing stroke-like symptoms of ...
Cavernous sinus syndrome polyneuropathy. Mononucleosis - With supra-orbital oedema, the eyes become puffy and swollen. This may ...
... our study showed that it is also indirectly connected to these sinuses via the suboccipital cavernous sinus. The vertebral ... Eur Radiol, 2005 Arnautovic, K.I., et al., The suboccipital cavernous sinus. J Neurosurg, 1997. 86(2): p. 252-62 Batson, O.V., ... 23(9): p. 1500-8 Takahashi, S., et al., Craniocervical junction venous anatomy around the suboccipital cavernous sinus: ... the superior longitudinal sinus, transverse sinus as well as other dural and cerebral veins" following injection of radiopaque ...
Amelot A, van Effenterre R, Kalamarides M, Cornu P, Boch AL (March 2018). "Natural history of cavernous sinus meningiomas". J. ...
Branson, Sara V.; McClintic, Elysa; Yeatts, R. Patrick (2018). "Septic Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Associated With Orbital ... Complications include hearing loss, blood infection, meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, cerebral abscess, and blindness. ... Orbital cellulitis occurs commonly from bacterial infection spread via the paranasal sinuses, usually from a previous sinus ... It is most commonly caused by an acute spread of infection into the eye socket from either the adjacent sinuses or through the ...
Oneç B, Oksüzoğlu B, Hatipoğlu HG, Oneç K, Azak A, Zengin N (July 2007). "Cavernous sinus syndrome caused by metastatic colon ...
... the ethmoid sinus, the sphenoidal sinus, and the maxillary sinus. Surgeons use this method to reach the cavernous sinus, ... The lateral approach is then used to reach the medial cavernous sinus and petrous apex. Lastly, the inferior approach is used ... Matula (1988). "Cavernous Sinus Surgery Approach Through the Lateral Wall". Acta Neurochirurgica. 92 (1-4): 76-82. doi:10.1007/ ... This approach makes a surgical corridor from the frontal sinus to the sphenoid sinus. This is done by the complete removal of ...
Damage to cranial nerves in the cavernous sinus leads to diplopia. Cranial nerve VI is often the first affected, leading to ... Invasion of the Cavernous Sinus by Medial Sphenoid Meningioma--"Radical" Surgery and Recurrence. Acta Neurochirurgica. 103(3-4 ... and palpebral swelling may also occur when the tumor impinges on the cavernous sinus by blocking venous return and leading to ...
... cavernous sinus DAVFs). Most commonly found adjacent to dural sinuses in the following locations: Transverse (lateral) sinus, ... External Manual Carotid Compression is Effective in Patients with Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistulaetreatment. The ... Type II: dural arterial supply drains into venous sinus. High pressure in sinus results in both anterograde drainage and ... and it is associated with transverse-sigmoid sinus DAVFs. Carotid-cavernous DAVFs, on the other hand, are more closely ...
It runs on the outer wall of the cavernous sinus. Finally, it enters the orbit through the superior orbital fissure and ... diabetic neuropathy and cavernous sinus disease can affect the fourth nerve, as can orbital tumors and Tolosa-Hunt syndrome. In ... "Cavernous portion of the trochlear nerve with special reference to its site of entrance". J. Anat. 159:29-35, 1988 Demer JL. " ...
In the cavernous sinus it runs alongside the internal carotid artery. It then enters the orbit through the superior orbital ... cavernous sinus diseases and various neuropathies. Perhaps the most common overall cause of sixth nerve impairment is diabetic ... At the tip of the petrous part of the temporal bone it makes a sharp turn forward to enter the cavernous sinus. ...
The posterior petroclinoid ligament limits the posterior wall of the cavernous sinus. The angle between the two ligaments ... The anterior petroclinoid ligament acts to laterally limit the superior wall of the cavernous sinus. ...
Management of Cavernous Sinus Involvement in Sinonasal and Ventral Skull Base Malignancies (2017) Couldwell, WT; Raheja, A ( ... "Management of Cavernous Sinus Involvement in Sinonasal and Ventral Skull Base Malignancies". Otolaryngologic Clinics of North ...
If the cavernous sinus is infected, it can cause the blood within the sinus to clot resulting in a cavernous sinus thrombosis. ... between the facial vein and the cavernous sinus. The cavernous sinus lies within the cranial cavity, between layers of the ... Inside the cavernous sinus, constriction of the following cranial nerves (CN) can be found: CN III (oculomotor nerve), CN IV ( ... In 1937, a study found that 61% of the cases of cavernous sinus thrombosis were the result of furuncles on the upper part of ...
... which is the portion of the internal carotid plexus in the cavernous sinus. The plant genus Waltheria from the family ...
Septic thrombosis of cavernous or dural venous sinus can sometimes be a complication. Treatment is not standardized for other ...
Complications such as cavernous sinus thrombosis and Ludwig angina can be life-threatening. Four things are required for caries ...
... via the ophthalmic vein through the cavernous sinus. As a result, an infection of the face may spread to the cavernous sinus ... This can lead to damage of the nerves running through the cavernous sinus. This article incorporates text in the public domain ... and ends in the cavernous sinus. The ethmoidal veins drain into the superior ophthalmic vein. Vorticose veins also drain into ...
The cavernous sinuses are lateral and inferior to the chiasm. The frontal lobe of the brain lies above. The pituitary gland ...
Adjacent to the pituitary lies a part of the skull base known as the cavernous sinus. This contains a number of nerves that ... The cavernous sinus also contains the carotid artery, which supplies blood to the brain; occasionally, compression of the ... and surrounding structures such as the optic nerve and the contents of the cavernous sinus are compressed. The raised pressure ...
Ludwig's angina and cavernous sinus thrombosis are rare but serious complications of odontogenic infections. Severe infections ... The bone between the floor of the maxillary sinus and the roots of the upper back teeth is very thin, and frequently the apices ... Disorders of the maxillary sinus can be referred to the upper back teeth. The posterior, middle and anterior superior alveolar ... Outside of the mouth, the sinuses, muscles of the face and neck, the temporomandibular joints, and cervical lymph nodes are ...
The oculomotor nerve passes through the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus and enters the orbit through the superior orbital ... Sympathetic fibers supplying the eye separate from the carotid plexus within the cavernous sinus. They run forward through the ...
Some vortex veins drain into the superior ophthalmic vein which drains into the cavernous sinus. Some vortex veins drain into ... the inferior ophthalmic vein which drains into the pterygoid plexus and cavernous sinus. There is usually collateral ...
Once the infection has spread to the cavernous sinus, it can compress important nerves (cranial nerves III, IV, V1, V2, and VI ... The three main, albeit rare, complications of mouth infections are osteomyelitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and deep neck ... Other rare but dangerous complications include osteomyelitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and deep neck space infection. Dental ... Plewa, Michael C.; Gupta, Mohit (2018), "Cavernous Sinus, Thrombosis", StatPearls, StatPearls Publishing, PMID 28846357, ...
Foix's syndrome II, ophtalmoplegic disease secondary to intracranial aneurysmas or thrombosis of the cavernous sinus. Foix- ...
Zguigal, H.; Ghoshal, N.G. (1991). "Gross and histologic study of the rostral epidural rete mirabile and the cavernous sinus in ...
This presentation indicates either compression of structures in the superior orbital fissure or the cavernous sinus. Superior ... sympathetic fibers from cavernous plexus These include nonvisual sensory messages, such as pain, or motor nerves. They also ... particularly blowout fractures through the floor of the orbit into the maxillary sinus. These structures are: superior and ...
... of the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus and marks the point at which the internal carotid artery enters the cavernous sinus ... as it helps determine whether the dissection has occurred inside or outside the cavernous sinus. Ziyal, I. M.; Salas, E.; ... The Anatomy and Surgical Exposure of the Posterolateral Landmark of The Cavernous Sinus". Acta Neurochir (Wien). 140 (3): 201- ... The cavernous section of the internal carotid artery begins at the superior aspect of the petrolingual ligament. For surgeons ...
... and transmits a small vein from the cavernous sinus. The foramen spinosum, in the posterior angle near to and in front of the ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis. *Brain abscess *Amoebic. Brain and spinal cord. *Encephalomyelitis *Acute disseminated ...
... specifically AVMs and cavernous angiomas are more common causes for hemorrhage. In addition, venous malformations are ... cerebral venous sinus thrombosis). Nonpenetrating and penetrating cranial trauma can also be common causes of intracerebral ...
carotid sinus. petrous. *Vidian. *caroticotympanic. cavernous/. ophthalmic. *orbital group:anterior ethmoidal. *posterior ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis. *Brain abscess *Amoebic. Spinal cord. *Myelitis: Poliomyelitis. *Demyelinating disease *Transverse ...
Cavernous venous malformation. *Accessory nail of the fifth toe. *Bronchogenic cyst. *Congenital cartilaginous rest of the neck ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis. *Brain abscess *Amoebic. Spinal cord. *Myelitis: Poliomyelitis. *Demyelinating disease *Transverse ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis. *Brain abscess *Amoebic. Spinal cord. *Myelitis: Poliomyelitis. *Demyelinating disease *Transverse ...
... ear and sinus infections, hearing problems, bone deformities, growth hormone deficiency, gastrointestinal problems, kidney ... Cavernous venous malformation. *Accessory nail of the fifth toe. *Bronchogenic cyst. *Congenital cartilaginous rest of the neck ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis. *Brain abscess *Amoebic. Spinal cord. *Myelitis: Poliomyelitis. *Demyelinating disease *Transverse ...
carotid sinus. petrous. *Vidian. *caroticotympanic. cavernous/. ophthalmic. *orbital group:anterior ethmoidal. *posterior ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis. *Brain abscess *Amoebic. Brain and spinal cord. *Encephalomyelitis *Acute disseminated ...
Cavernous venous malformation. *Accessory nail of the fifth toe. *Bronchogenic cyst. *Congenital cartilaginous rest of the neck ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis. *Brain abscess *Amoebic. Spinal cord. *Myelitis: Poliomyelitis. *Demyelinating disease *Transverse ...
The cavernous segment is surrounded by the cavernous sinus. In this part of its course, the artery is situated between the ... layers of the dura mater forming the cavernous sinus, but covered by the lining membrane of the sinus. It at first ascends ... trunk The cavernous segment also gives rise to small capsular arteries that supply the wall of the cavernous sinus. The clinoid ... and perforates the dura mater forming the roof of the sinus. The curve in the cavernous segment is called the carotid siphon. ...
海绵窦血栓(英语:Cavernous sinus thrombosis). *脑脓肿(英语:Brain abscess) *阿米巴脑脓肿(英语:Amoebic brain abscess
carotid sinus. petrous. *Vidian. *caroticotympanic. cavernous/. ophthalmic. *orbital group:anterior ethmoidal. *posterior ...
Q18.0) Sinus, fistula and cyst of branchial cleft *Congenital preauricular fistula: A small pit in front of the ear. Also known ... H05.81) Carotid cavernous fistula. *(H70.1) Mastoid fistula *Craniosinus fistula: between the intracranial space and a ... with only one open end; blind fistulas may also be called sinus tracts ...
Venous sinus stenting[edit]. Venous sinus stenoses leading to venous hypertension appear to play a significant part in relation ... Many patients with IIH have narrowing of the transverse sinuses.[10] It is not clear whether this narrowing is the pathogenesis ... A Systematic Analysis of Transverse Sinus Stenting". Interventional neurology. 2 (3): 132-143. doi:10.1159/000357503. PMC ... Major complications only occurred in 3/207 patients (1.4%).[17] In the largest single series of transverse sinus stenting there ...
carotid sinus. petrous. *Vidian. *caroticotympanic. cavernous/. ophthalmic. *orbital group:anterior ethmoidal. *posterior ...
carotid sinus. petrous. *Vidian. *caroticotympanic. cavernous/. ophthalmic. *orbital group:anterior ethmoidal. *posterior ...
The groove is curved like the italic letter f, and lodges the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus.[citation needed] ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis. *Brain abscess *Amoebic. Spinal cord. *Myelitis: Poliomyelitis. *Demyelinating disease *Transverse ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis. *Brain abscess *Amoebic. Spinal cord. *Myelitis: Poliomyelitis. *Demyelinating disease *Transverse ...
... artery of the inferior cavernous sinus [1]. ...
Glaucoma: central retinal vein occlusion, cavernous sinus thrombosis. *Local lesion: optic neuritis, Ischemic optic neuropathy ... Brain tumor, pseudotumor cerebri (also known as Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension), cerebral venous sinus thrombosis or ...
Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, cavernous sinus thrombosis and jugular vein thrombosis: thrombosis of the veins of the brain ... Due to the blood flow pattern, the base of the valve sinus is particularly deprived of oxygen (hypoxic). Stasis excacerbates ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis. *Brain abscess *Amoebic. Spinal cord. *Myelitis: Poliomyelitis. *Demyelinating disease *Transverse ...
The urogenital sinus, in turn, divides into the superficial definitive urogenital sinus and the deeper anterior vesico-urethral ... and they gradually become cavernous. The prepuce in both sexes is formed by the growth of a solid plate of ectoderm into the ... Sinus urogenitalis. W. Left Wolffian body. w, w. Right and left Wolffian ducts. B.-Diagram of the female type of sexual organs ... The definitive urogenital sinus consists of a caudal cephalic portion and an intermediate narrow channel, the pelvic portion. ...
... deafness Caudal duplication Caudal regression syndrome Causalgia Cavernous hemangioma Cavernous lymphangioma Cavernous sinus ... cerebellar hypoplasia Cerebral calcifications opalescent teeth phosphaturia Cerebral cavernous malformation Cerebral cavernous ...
Oblique section through the cavernous sinus. Veins of orbit. Cavernous sinus Cavernous sinus thrombosis Dural venous sinuses ... carotid-cavernous fistula, bacterial infection causing cavernous sinus thrombosis, aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis, ... pieces of the clot may break off and enter the cavernous sinus, forming a cavernous sinus thrombosis. From there the infection ... will expand in the direction of least resistance and eventually invade the cavernous sinus. Cavernous sinus syndrome may result ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is the formation of a blood clot within the cavernous sinus, a cavity at the base of the brain ... "Guidelines Cavernous sinus thrombosis" (PDF). "Cavernous sinus thrombosis - NHS Choices". www.nhs.uk. NHS Choices. Retrieved 27 ... "Cavernous sinus thrombosis: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia". www.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 27 May 2016. "Cavernous Sinus ... and sinus infections) and treating the primary source expeditiously is the best way to prevent cavernous sinus thrombosis.[ ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a blood clot in an area at the base of the brain. ... Cavernous sinus thrombosis is most often caused by a bacterial infection that has spread from the sinuses, teeth, ears, eyes, ... The cavernous sinus receives blood from veins of the face and brain. The blood drains it into other blood vessels that carry it ... Cavernous sinus thrombosis is treated with high-dose antibiotics given through a vein (IV) if an infection is the cause. ...
... and treatment of cavernous sinus thrombosis -- a life-threatening blood clot caused by infection. ... Treatment of Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a very rare, life-threatening condition that can affect ... Tests for Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis. Doctors may order brain scans, including CT and MRI scans, to look for cavernous sinus ... Symptoms of Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis. Symptoms of cavernous sinus thrombosis may include:. *Severe headache often accompanied ...
The dural sinuses are grouped into the sagittal, lateral (including the transverse, sigmoid, and petrosal sinuses), and ... Cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) was initially described by Bright in 1831 as a complication of epidural and subdural ... and petrosal sinuses), and cavernous sinuses. Because of its complex neurovascular anatomic relationship, cavernous sinus ... encoded search term (Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis) and Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis What to Read Next on Medscape. Related ...
Helping you find trustworthy answers on Cavernous Sinus , Latest evidence made easy ... Find all the evidence you need on Cavernous Sinus via the Trip Database. ... 1. Cavernous sinus thrombosis Cavernous sinus thrombosis Cavernous sinus thrombosis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment , BMJ ... sphenoid sinus, and cavernous sinus.Cavernous sinus and orbital apex aspergillosis.Functional endoscopic sinus surgery was ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a potentially life-threatening condition that can happen after an infection in your head. Its ... What is cavernous sinus thrombosis?. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a very rare but serious condition that involves a blood clot ... In cavernous sinus thrombosis, a blood clot develops in the sinuses behind your eyes or at the bottom of your skull after an ... in your cavernous sinuses. The cavernous sinuses are hollow spaces located at the base of your brain and behind your eye ...
The variety of methods of treatment reflects the difficulty of treating primary meningiomas of the cavernous sinus. Twelve ... Cavernous Sinus / radiography, surgery*. Cerebral Angiography. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. ... We think therefore that meningiomas of the cavernous sinus should nowadays be the subject of a surgical biopsy followed by ... The variety of methods of treatment reflects the difficulty of treating primary meningiomas of the cavernous sinus. Twelve ...
... D. Swaminath, R. Narayanan, M. A. Orellana- ... "Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Nose Complicated with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis," Case Reports in Infectious Diseases, vol. 2014 ...
The cavernous sinus receives drainage from cortical and deep cerebral veins and also from the sinus systems of the meninges, ... It is very important to recognize the early signs of cavernous thrombosis. Treatment for septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is ... CN VI lies freely within the cavernous sinus), in contrast to CN III and IV, which lie within the lateral walls of the sinus. ... M. J. DiNubile, "Septic thrombosis of the cavernous sinuses," Archives of Neurology, vol. 45, no. 5, pp. 567-572, 1988. View at ...
Cavernous Sinus Syndrome answers are found in the Select 5-Minute Pediatrics Topics powered by Unbound Medicine. Available for ... Cavernous sinus syndrome comprises disease processes that localize to the cavernous sinus-a venous plexus that drains the face ... The cavernous sinus is located lateral to the pituitary gland and sella turcica, superior to the sphenoid sinus, and inferior ... Cavernous sinus syndrome is typically caused by septic or aseptic sinus thrombosis, neoplasm, or trauma. Acute obstruction by ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis. Definition. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a blood clot in an area at the base of the brain. ... Cavernous sinus thrombosis is most often caused by a bacterial infection that has spread from the sinuses, teeth, ears, eyes, ... The cavernous sinus receives blood from veins of the face and brain. The blood drains it into other blood vessels that carry it ... Cavernous sinus thrombosis can be deadly if left untreated. When to Contact a Medical Professional. Call your health care ...
... of all benign cavernous sinus tumors. They are dangerous tumors because of the risk of excessive bleeding, but they are easier ... Cavernous sinus hemangiomas represent 3% of all benign cavernous sinus tumors. They are dangerous tumors because of the risk of ... Cavernous sinus hemangiomas: a series, a review, and an hypothesis Neurosurgery. 1992 Jan;30(1):101-8. doi: 10.1227/00006123- ... They arise within the cavernous sinus and extend laterally by dissecting between the two layers of dura lining the floor of the ...
... data in primates suggest that such a disturbance may be localized to the superior aspect of the pericarotid cavernous sinus ... The superior pericarotid cavernous sinus plexus and cluster headaches. The superior pericarotid cavernous sinus plexus and ... The superior pericarotid cavernous sinus plexus and cluster headaches * 11. 5-HT in migraine: evidence from 5-HT receptor ... The superior pericarotid cavernous sinus plexus and cluster headaches * 11. 5-HT in migraine: evidence from 5-HT receptor ...
Initial CT and MRI revealed a mass in the right cavernous sinus. During tumour work-up, CT i ... Initial CT and MRI revealed a mass in the right cavernous sinus. During tumour work-up, CT identified additional tumour within ... Eisenberg MB, Al-Mefty O, DeMonte F, et al (1999) Benign nonmeningeal tumors of the cavernous sinus. Neurosurgery 44:949-954 ... Kalina P, Black K, Woldenberg R (1996) Burkitts lymphoma of the skull base presenting as cavernous sinus syndrome in early ...
Cavernous sinuses explanation free. What is Cavernous sinuses? Meaning of Cavernous sinuses medical term. What does Cavernous ... Looking for online definition of Cavernous sinuses in the Medical Dictionary? ... Related to Cavernous sinuses: Cavernous sinus thrombosis. sinus. [si´nus] 1. a recess, cavity, or channel, such as one in bone ... cavernous venus sinus.. cavernous sinus thrombosis,. n an infection of the cavernous venous sinus. Increased risk with local ...
Conversely, all aneurysms that arose proximal to the optic strut were observed to lie within the cavernous sinus. An aneurysm ... Distinction between paraclinoid and cavernous sinus aneurysms with computed tomographic angiography Neurosurgery. 2003 May;52(5 ... and exited the cavernous sinus. The optic strut and its relationship to the ICA could be well observed on CT angiograms. During ... to establish the relationships of the optic strut to the cavernous sinus and the ICA. Results from these anatomic studies were ...
What is cavernous sinus syndrome? Meaning of cavernous sinus syndrome medical term. What does cavernous sinus syndrome mean? ... Looking for online definition of cavernous sinus syndrome in the Medical Dictionary? cavernous sinus syndrome explanation free ... petrosal sinus (superior). one arising from the cavernous sinus and draining into the transverse sinus of the dura mater. ... cavernous sinus syndrome. Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.. Related to cavernous sinus syndrome: Horners ...
The study objects are patients with invasive prolactinomas involving the cavernous sinus, which were invaded the cavernous ... Dopamine Agonists Withdrawal Study of Invasive Prolactinomas Involving the Cavernous Sinus. The safety and scientific validity ... Dopamine Agonists Withdrawal Study of Invasive Prolactinomas Involving the Cavernous Sinus. Actual Study Start Date :. June ... For giant or large invasive prolactinomas involving the cavernous sinus, whether the drug can be safely withdrawn after the ...
The cavernous sinus and Meckels cave have traditionally been considered some of the most difficult areas to access surgically ... Cavernous sinus Meckels cave Endoscopic anatomy Surgical technique Cavernous sinus compartments Patient selection ... Anatomy of the cavernous sinus. A microsurgical study. J Neurosurg. 1976;45(2):169-80.CrossRefGoogle Scholar ... The cavernous sinus and Meckels cave have traditionally been considered some of the most difficult areas to access surgically ...
The mass was extending into the right cavernous sinus through the superior orbital fissure and into the sella, displacing the ... Orbital pseudotumor with cavernous sinus and sellar extension.. Differential diagnostic considerations included neoplastic ... Radiological Case: Orbital pseudotumor with cavernous sinus and sellar extension. By Chhavi Kaushik, MD; Raghu Ramakrishnaiah, ... Radiological Case: Orbital pseudotumor with cavernous sinus and sellar extension. Appl Radiol. ...
Home , December 2018 - Volume 85 - Issue 6 , Re: Prediction of traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula... ... Re: Prediction of traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula via noncontrast computed tomography by fracture pattern and ... Prediction of traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula via noncontrast computed tomography by fracture pattern and abnormality ...
Chou CWWu HMHuang CIChung WYGuo WYShih YH: Gamma knife surgery for cavernous hemangiomas in the cavernous sinus. Neurosurgery ... Chou CWWu HMHuang CIChung WYGuo WYShih YH: Gamma knife surgery for cavernous hemangiomas in the cavernous sinus. Neurosurgery ... Hori SHayashi NNomoto KSato HHayashi TNagai S: Cavernous sinus cavernous hemangioma largely extending into the sella turcica ... Nakamura NShin MTago MTerahara AKurita HNakagawa K: Gamma knife radiosurgery for cavernous hemangiomas in the cavernous sinus. ...
Melanocytoma of the cavernous sinus: CT and MR findings.. S H Faro, R A Koenigsberg, A R Turtz and S E Croul ... Melanocytoma of the cavernous sinus: CT and MR findings. Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message from American ... We present the CT, MR angiographic, and histologic findings of a rare primary meningeal melanocytoma of the cavernous sinus. ... The primary differential diagnosis is between a melanin-containing tumor and an extraaxial cavernous angioma. Radiologic ...
... Carlos Augusto Ferreira Alves, DDS, MSc/Ophir Ribeiro Jr, DDS, MSc/ ... Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a severe encephalic complication of the cervicofacial infections that can lead to death if not ... enforcing the importance of the report of a case of thrombosis of the cavernous sinus developed from a facial myiasis. ( ...
Characteristic MR Imaging Findings of Cavernous Hemangiomas in the Cavernous Sinus. Chul Ho Sohn, Sang Pyo Kim, Il Man Kim, ... Characteristic MR Imaging Findings of Cavernous Hemangiomas in the Cavernous Sinus. Chul Ho Sohn, Sang Pyo Kim, Il Man Kim, ... Characteristic MR Imaging Findings of Cavernous Hemangiomas in the Cavernous Sinus. Chul Ho Sohn, Sang Pyo Kim, Il Man Kim, ... Characteristic MR Imaging Findings of Cavernous Hemangiomas in the Cavernous Sinus Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a ...
Find out information about cavernous sinus. Either of a pair of venous sinuses of the dura mater located on the side of the ... body of the sphenoid bone Explanation of cavernous sinus ... cavernous sinus. *cavernous sinus branch of internal carotid ... Related to cavernous sinus: Cavernous sinus thrombosis, cavernous sinus syndrome. cavernous sinus. [′kav·ər·nəs ′sī·nəs] ( ... Cavernous sinus , Article about cavernous sinus by The Free Dictionary https://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/cavernous+ ...
Korona on cavernous sinus aneurysm in children: A cavernous aneurysm is a common finding that if truly cavernous, indicates ... Smaller cavernous aneurysms are usually managed conservatively. for topic: Cavernous Sinus Aneurysm In Children ... Cavernous sinus clot: Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a blood clot in the cavernous sinus, usu from infection. Symptoms of ... Blood clot: Cavernous sinus thrombosis is when a blood clot is in the cavernous sinus [which is a cavity at the base of the ...
Cavernous sinus syndrome. A manifestation of non-Hodgkins lymphoma of the ethmoid sinus. Med J Aust. 1983;2(9):451-2.PubMed ... Primary diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the paranasal sinuses presenting as cavernous sinus syndrome. J Craniofac ... Cavernous sinus syndrome as the presentation of malignant lymphoma: case report and review of the literature. Neurosurgery. ... Demirkaya M, Sevinir B, Ozdemir O, Nazlioğlu HO, Okan M. Lymphoma of the cavernous sinus mimicking Tolosa-Hunt syndrome in a ...
  • Structures within the outer (lateral) wall of the compartment from superior to inferior: Oculomotor nerve Trochlear nerve Ophthalmic and maxillary branches of the trigeminal nerve Structures passing through the midline (medial) wall: Abducens nerve Internal carotid artery accompanied by the Internal carotid plexus These nerves, with the exception of CN V2, pass through the cavernous sinus to enter the orbital apex through the superior orbital fissure. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the internal carotid artery ruptures within the cavernous sinus, an arteriovenous fistula is created (more specifically, a carotid-cavernous fistula). (wikipedia.org)
  • Findings may include deformity of the internal carotid artery within the cavernous sinus, and an obvious signal hyperintensity within thrombosed vascular sinuses on all pulse sequences.Cerebral angiography can be performed, but it is invasive and not very sensitive. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Orbital cellulitis Internal carotid artery aneurysm Stroke Migraine headache Allergic blepharitis Thyroid exophthalmos Brain tumor Meningitis Mucormycosis Trauma Recognizing the primary source of infection (i.e., facial cellulitis, middle ear, and sinus infections) and treating the primary source expeditiously is the best way to prevent cavernous sinus thrombosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The internal carotid artery with its surrounding sympathetic plexus passes through the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Carotid-cavernous fistulas, often with a more chronic course, are direct high-flow shunts between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • To examine the reliability of using the optic strut as a landmark in computed tomographic (CT) angiography, to differentiate between intradural and extradural (cavernous sinus) aneurysms involving the paraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA). (nih.gov)
  • Aneurysms usually arise from the internal carotid artery as it passes through the sinus. (healthtap.com)
  • The mass surrounds the left cavernous internal carotid artery extending into the medial aspect of the right cavernous sinus. (nih.gov)
  • On horizontal look its found that the cavernous sinus contains internal carotid artery along with sympathetic plexus and abducens nerve (CN VI). (killsinus.com)
  • The cavernous sinus (CS) is a large intracranial venous plexus located on either side of the sphenoid bone and closely associated with four cranial nerves, the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the pituitary gland. (otago.ac.nz)
  • Microsurgical anatomy of the cavernous sinus: the intracranial course of the right internal carotid artery. (medillsb.com)
  • It is clinically important because of its location, its close relationship to several cranial nerves and the internal carotid artery, and the complex of veins without valves which drain from and to the paired cavernous sinuses. (lecturio.com)
  • The internal carotid artery (ICA) enters the posterior inferior aspect of the cavernous sinus forming the cavernous part of the artery. (lecturio.com)
  • The cavernous sinus accommodates the internal carotid artery and transmits several cranial nerves to the superior orbital fissure and the foramen rotundum. (anatomynext.com)
  • The cavernous sinus contains the internal carotid artery and several cranial nerves. (kenhub.com)
  • Abducens nerve (CN VI) traverses the sinus lateral to the internal carotid artery. (kenhub.com)
  • The internal carotid artery (a branch of the common carotid artery) - along with its postganglionic sympathetic plexus from the superior cervical ganglion - gains access to the cavernous sinus posteriorly. (kenhub.com)
  • As the petrous part of the internal carotid artery leaves the carotid canal , it curves vertically and superiorly above foramen lacerum to enter the cavernous sinus. (kenhub.com)
  • Within the sinus, the internal carotid artery travels anteriorly, in a horizontal manner until it reaches the anterior limit of the sinus. (kenhub.com)
  • Here it curves vertically and superiorly to exit the sinus through its roof and become the cerebral part of the internal carotid artery. (kenhub.com)
  • It is noteworthy that the cavernous part of the internal carotid artery is the only arterial vessel that is completely surrounded by venous networks. (kenhub.com)
  • Cavernous sinus is extradural venous plexus surrounded by a dural fold in the middle cranial fossa containing internal carotid artery with its periarterial sympathetic plexus, abducens nerve lateral to the internal carotid artery, but medial to the oculomotor and trochlear nerves and the ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of the trigeminal nerve, which run superior to inferior within the lateral dural border of the cavernous sinus. (indianradiology.com)
  • Direct CCFs are high-flow fistulas with a direct connection between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • The cavernous sinus is a network of venous channels traversed by the intracranial portion of the internal carotid artery. (medscape.com)
  • The external carotid artery provides several branches to the dura of the cavernous sinus and forms anastomoses with the branches of the internal carotid artery. (medscape.com)
  • Type A fistulas consist of a direct connection between the intracavernous internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Type B fistulas consist of a dural shunt between intracavernous branches of the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - This technique is a more sensitive tool, which identifies the deformities in the internal carotid artery and signal intensity in thrombosed vascular sinuses. (epainassist.com)
  • An overview of the skull with brain, cavernous sinus and internal carotid artery layered in, is also portrayed for orientation purposes. (ami.org)
  • Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis complicated by narrowing of the internal carotid artery, subarachnoid abscess and multiple pulmonary septic emboli. (freethesaurus.com)
  • One patient (2%) had an ischemic stroke related to occlusion of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. (docphin.com)
  • IMSEAR at SEARO: Cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis causing reversible narrowing of internal carotid artery. (who.int)
  • Madhusudhan KS, Kandpal H, Ahuja J. Cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis causing reversible narrowing of internal carotid artery. (who.int)
  • The highly anastomotic venous system of the paranasal sinuses allows retrograde spread of infection to the cavernous sinus via the superior and inferior ophthalmic veins. (wikipedia.org)
  • [ 1 ] Cavernous sinus thrombosis is usually a late complication of an infection of the central face or paranasal sinuses. (medscape.com)
  • This intimate juxtaposition of veins, arteries, nerves, meninges, and paranasal sinuses accounts for the characteristic etiology and presentation of cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST). (medscape.com)
  • Cavernous sinus syndrome comprises disease processes that localize to the cavernous sinus-a venous plexus that drains the face, mouth, tonsils, pharynx, nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, orbit, middle ear, and parts of the cerebral cortex. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • 3. paranasal sinus . (thefreedictionary.com)
  • frontal sinus one of the paired paranasal sinuses in the frontal bone, each communicating with the middle nasal meatus on the same side. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • maxillary sinus one of the paired paranasal sinuses in the body of the maxilla on either side, opening into the middle nasal meatus on the same side. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Sinus paranasal (Paranasal sinuses). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In common, unqualified usage, the word sinus refers to any of the cavities in the skull that are connected with the nasal cavity-the paranasal sinuses. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 1992). 1 Several authors have described extraorbital extension of pseudotumor with involvement of paranasal sinuses, anterior and middle cranial fossa and infratemporal region. (appliedradiology.com)
  • paranasal sinuses, are und. (healthtap.com)
  • Lee H, Choi KE, Park M, Lee SH, Baek S. Primary diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the paranasal sinuses presenting as cavernous sinus syndrome. (springer.com)
  • A cavernous sinus thrombosis is usually a complication of an infection of the central face, paranasal sinuses, bacteremia, trauma, and infections of the ear or maxillary (upper) teeth. (orasurgery.com)
  • Paranasal sinus infections can be catastrophic and devastating. (rande-lazar.com)
  • This most common cause of CST is infection , which typically spreads from an extracranial location such as the orbit, paranasal sinuses, or the 'danger zone' of the face. (teachmeanatomy.info)
  • by direct extension of infection from the paranasal sinuses, middle ear, or orbit, mostly in immunocompromised patients, tend to invade vessels. (indianradiology.com)
  • Decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted imaging and very low signal intensity on T2- weighted imaging are characteristic findings in paranasal sinus aspergillosis and are attributed to paramagnetic elements by hemorrhage or aspergillus fungal colonies, mainly iron and magnesium. (indianradiology.com)
  • The cavernous sinus thrombosis is an infection leading to blood clot caused by the complication of an infection in the paranasal or central face sinuses. (epainassist.com)
  • The ethmoid sinus, is one of the paranasal (hollow space in the bones around the nose) sinus es, it is collectively called ethmoidal air cells. (sinusitisrelief.info)
  • Coronal T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealing generalised paranasal sinus mucosal thickening and small nasal polyps and opacification of right maxillary antrum due to sinusitis. (rcpjournals.org)
  • Internal part of the nose contains respiratory mucous membranes, paranasal sinuses, nasolacrimal duct and nasopharynx. (sinusitisrelief.info)
  • Initial CT and MRI revealed a mass in the right cavernous sinus. (springer.com)
  • The mass was extending into the right cavernous sinus through the superior orbital fissure and into the sella, displacing the pituitary gland. (appliedradiology.com)
  • There was involvement of the right cavernous sinus with extension into the right aspect of the sella, causing contralateral displacement of the pituitary gland and the infundibulum. (appliedradiology.com)
  • MR images reveal a large, lobulated mass, with compression of the right cavernous sinus. (ajnr.org)
  • MRI demonstrated a middle cranial fossa mass abutting the dura of the right cavernous sinus residing in the area of Meckel's cave ( figure 1 ). (bmj.com)
  • Oblique section through the right cavernous sinus. (lecturio.com)
  • Fig 1 - Coronal section demonstrating the borders of the right cavernous sinus. (teachmeanatomy.info)
  • Potential causes of cavernous sinus syndrome include metastatic tumors, direct extension of nasopharyngeal tumours, meningioma, pituitary tumors or pituitary apoplexy, aneurysms of the intracavernous carotid artery, carotid-cavernous fistula, bacterial infection causing cavernous sinus thrombosis, aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis, idiopathic granulomatous disease (Tolosa-Hunt syndrome), and fungal infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • The department has also introduced a programme of advanced stereotactic radiosurgery treatments using the TrueBeam system for cranial conditions such as acoustic neuromas, brain metastasis, and cavernous sinus meningioma. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Have high BP, hypothyroid, aravhnoid cyst with small meningioma at the cavernous sinus. (healthcaremagic.com)
  • am a 39 years old with high blood pressre,hypothyroid,aravhnoid cyst with small meningioma at the lateral edge of the left cavernous sinus but brain is normal. (healthcaremagic.com)
  • Materials and methods: Twenty radiosurgery centers were asked to delineate one cavernous sinus meningioma and one astrocytoma and to plan the treatments for Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. (diva-portal.org)
  • Cavernous sinus meningioma represent a scenario where SRS is particularly useful given the potential morbidity of surgical resection in that region. (wikibooks.org)
  • Radiosurgery was an effective primary management strategy for patients with an imaging defined cavernous sinus meningioma. (docphin.com)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a blood clot in an area at the base of the brain. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In cavernous sinus thrombosis, a blood clot blocks a vein that runs through a hollow space underneath the brain and behind the eye sockets. (webmd.com)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is the formation of a blood clot within the cavernous sinus, a cavity at the base of the brain which drains deoxygenated blood from the brain back to the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a very rare but serious condition that involves a blood clot in your cavernous sinuses. (healthline.com)
  • The blood clot typically forms when an infection that starts in your face or head moves into your cavernous sinuses. (healthline.com)
  • In cavernous sinus thrombosis, a blood clot develops in the sinuses behind your eyes or at the bottom of your skull after an infection. (healthline.com)
  • If they suspect there might be a blood clot, they may use an MRI scan or CT scan to look at your sinuses. (healthline.com)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis is when a blood clot is in the cavernous sinus [which is a cavity at the base of the brain a vein, nerves and other structures]. (healthtap.com)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a blood clot in the cavernous sinus, usu from infection. (healthtap.com)
  • In most cases, a blood clot might form if an infection inside skull or face radiates to the cavernous sinuses. (vancouverfirstaid.ca)
  • A cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is a blood clot that forms in the cavernous sinuses. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The blood clot in cavernous sinus leads to an infection called Thrombosis of the Cavernous Sinus or Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis. (epainassist.com)
  • Left untreated, sinusitis can lead to meningitis, an infection of the brain that can lead to brain damage, or to a condition called cavernous sinus thrombosis , a blood clot in veins around the sinuses that can affect the brain like a stroke. (freethesaurus.com)
  • Inflammation and blood clot (thrombosis) in the cavernous sinuses and / or nearby area occur. (nasodren.com)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis is most often caused by a bacterial infection that has spread from the sinuses, teeth, ears, eyes, nose, or skin of the face. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis is treated with high-dose antibiotics given through a vein (IV) if an infection is the cause. (medlineplus.gov)
  • From there the infection may spread to the dural venous sinuses. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cause of cavernous sinus thrombosis is usually an infection. (webmd.com)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis is typically caused by an infection that has spread beyond the face, sinuses , or teeth . (webmd.com)
  • Doctors treat cavernous sinus thrombosis with high-dose antibiotics if they find an underlying infection. (webmd.com)
  • The cause is usually from a spreading infection in the nose, sinuses, ears, or teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infection can spread to contralateral cavernous sinus within 24-48 hours of initial presentation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infection can spread to the cavernous sinus either as an extension of thrombophlebitis or by septic emboli. (tripdatabase.com)
  • The symptoms of cavernous sinus thrombosis tend to show up about 5 to 10 days after you develop an infection on your face or in your head. (healthline.com)
  • If your infection spreads beyond the cavernous sinuses, it can lead to meningitis, an infection of the protective membrane surrounding your brain. (healthline.com)
  • Among the several etiologies related to the development of this infection, myiasis has not been reported, enforcing the importance of the report of a case of thrombosis of the cavernous sinus developed from a facial myiasis. (quintpub.com)
  • Odontogenic maxillofacial infections, if untreated, may progress to involve deep neck space infection, which can spread upward to brain causing brain abscess, meningitis and cavernous sinus thrombosis. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Most cases of cavernous sinus thrombosis are due to infection by a bacteria called staph aureus (70%), so antibiotics (high dose iv) are the first line of treatment and are highly effective. (healthtap.com)
  • The infection causes an inflammatory thrombotic reaction in the vasculature and cavernous sinus cavities leading to a host of severe symptoms. (orasurgery.com)
  • Patients who develop cavernous sinus thrombosis face hospital admission and a prolonged regimen of strong IV antibiotics to eradicate the infection. (orasurgery.com)
  • In case the indications of cavernous sinus thrombosis were brought about by an infection such as sinusitis or from a boil, drainage of the pus from the site might be required. (vancouverfirstaid.ca)
  • is used most of us would think that its some kind of infection of sinus. (killsinus.com)
  • A CST can develop when an infection in the face or skull spreads to the cavernous sinuses. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Cure Sinus Infection - What is Cavernous Sinus? (createmybb3.com)
  • Orbital views are also needed, what is causing sphenoid sinus infection orbital veins helps in diagnosing the venous pressure. (createmybb3.com)
  • Cavernous sinus syndrome may arise due to mass effect (e.g. result of a pituitary tumor, infection, inflammation, traumatic or vascular processes) on the structures passing through the cavernous sinus. (umqaa.com)
  • It may be rare… but if there is a mid-face infection and High Fevers, Periorbital Edema, and/or Cranial Nerve abnormalities… think of Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis. (pedemmorsels.com)
  • Actinomyces cavernous sinus infection: A case and systematic literatur" by Michal Lubomski, James Dalgliesh et al. (edu.au)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a specialised form of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, where there is thrombosis of the cavernous sinus of the basal skull dura, due to the retrograde spread of infection and endothelial damage from the danger triangle of the face. (wikipedia.org)
  • To combat them, you must treat the underlying condition, which is a sinus infection. (forumotion.com)
  • In rare instances, an infection in the ears and eyes can result into cavernous sinus thrombosis. (epainassist.com)
  • The infection in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid are also tested to diagnose the Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis. (epainassist.com)
  • 1 Of these, the great majority have occurred either by metastatic infection from a focus drained by this sinus, or by the extension of a neighboring infectious process. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Alternatively, infection may spread from the facial regions, via the facial venous plexus or from the sphenoid sinus, directly to the adjacent cavernous sinus (2). (docksci.com)
  • Infection from these sites may easily travel to the cavernous sinus and cause thrombosis and occlusion, leading to serious implications involving the brain and eyes (3). (docksci.com)
  • Venous thrombosis secondary to orbital infection is common and cavernous sinus thrombosis should be suspected in case with neurological deficit or rapidly increasing proptosis. (freethesaurus.com)
  • One patient had cavernous sinus thrombosis secondary to skin infection of dangerous area of face. (freethesaurus.com)
  • So, never ignore side effects of sinus infection . (nasodren.com)
  • An assortment of antibiotics is administered to treat these side effects of sinus infection . (nasodren.com)
  • Natural remedy for sinus infection. (sinusitisrelief.info)
  • Due to contact of the cavernous sinus with other venous channels, an infection may occur. (sinusitisrelief.info)
  • Certain protective measures can also be taken by people who have a history of chronic sinus infection symptoms. (sinusitisrelief.info)
  • Using a humidifier and cleaning the nose properly everyday can reduce chances of future occurrence of sinus infection. (sinusitisrelief.info)
  • Primary infection (such as sinusitis) and possible complications (including meningitis) should be considered as potential aetiologies of cavernous sinus venous thrombosis, especially in those with a preceding history of localised infection. (rcpjournals.org)
  • sinus infection pics - What is Cavernous Sinus? (sinusitisrelief.info)
  • Natural Sinusitis Remedy that treats sinus infection. (sinusitisrelief.info)
  • Whatever the causes of sinus infection are, prevention remains the best cure against all! (sinusitisrelief.info)
  • The symptoms of a sinus infection include severe headache, tenderness around eyes and nose, often accompanied by fever, cough and cold and a discharge from the nose. (sinusitisrelief.info)
  • These sinuses are just lateral and superior to the sphenoid sinus and are immediately posterior to the optic chiasm, as depicted in the image below. (medscape.com)
  • Anatomy of cross section of cavernous sinus showing close proximity to cranial nerves and sphenoid sinus. (medscape.com)
  • The cavernous sinus is located lateral to the pituitary gland and sella turcica, superior to the sphenoid sinus, and inferior to the optic chiasm. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • These adenomas lead to erosion in the scull base bones by extending to the sides (subtemporal or prepontine extension) in addition to cavernous sinus and suprasellar extension and may show sphenoid sinus involvement. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • It extends into the posterior-superior aspect of the sphenoid sinus as well. (nih.gov)
  • It is lateral and superior to the sphenoid sinus . (pedemmorsels.com)
  • Fluid signal seen in sphenoid sinus along with mucosal thickening in both maxillary sinuses. (indianradiology.com)
  • There are also connections with the pterygoid plexus of veins via inferior ophthalmic vein, deep facial vein and emissary veins Apart from the blood which passes through a venous sinus, several anatomical structures, including some cranial nerves and their branches, also pass through the sinus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis symptoms include: decrease or loss of vision, chemosis, exophthalmos (bulging eyes), headaches, and paralysis of the cranial nerves which course through the cavernous sinus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common signs of CST are related to anatomical structures affected within the cavernous sinus, notably cranial nerves III-VI, as well as symptoms resulting from impaired venous drainage from the orbit and eye. (wikipedia.org)
  • The third and fourth cranial nerves are attached to the lateral wall of the sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Several cranial nerves course through this sinus. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The illustration presents the cranial nerves within the cavernous sinus, their relationship to the pituitary gland, vascular structures and dural boundaries through both lateral view and coronal section. (ami.org)
  • Hemangiomas of the cavernous sinus present considerable therapeutic challenges because of their proximity to important vasculature, cranial nerves, and endocrine tissue at the anterior cranial base. (e-roj.org)
  • Mobilization of the outer cavernous membrane decreases bleeding and improves resection in spheno-clinoidal meningiomas without cavernous sinus extension: A randomized controlled trial. (tripdatabase.com)
  • The study recruited 94 patients with spheno-clinoidal meningiomas without cavernous sinus involvement. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Management of cavernous sinus meningiomas. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The variety of methods of treatment reflects the difficulty of treating primary meningiomas of the cavernous sinus. (biomedsearch.com)
  • We think therefore that meningiomas of the cavernous sinus should nowadays be the subject of a surgical biopsy followed by radiotherapy according to their grading. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Evaluation of fractionated radiotherapy and gamma knife radiosurgery in cavernous sinus meningiomas: treatment strategy. (virtualtrials.com)
  • Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an important treatment option for patients with cavernous sinus meningiomas (CSM). (thejns.org)
  • Mayo Clinic, 2005 PMID 16029803 -- "Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. (wikibooks.org)
  • Marseille, 2000 (France)(1992-1998) PMID 11143266 -- "Gamma knife radiosurgery in the management of cavernous sinus meningiomas. (wikibooks.org)
  • Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. (docphin.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery as primary management for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. (docphin.com)
  • Between 1992 and 2001, 49 patients had radiosurgery for dural-based masses of the cavernous sinus presumed to be meningiomas. (docphin.com)
  • The purpose of this study is to observe whether dopamine agonists can be safely withdrawn after the tumor volume and prolactin level of invasive prolactinomas involving the cavernous sinus have been effectively controlled through pharmacological treatment. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • For giant or large invasive prolactinomas involving the cavernous sinus, whether the drug can be safely withdrawn after the tumor volume and prolactin(PRL) level have been effectively controlled through pharmacological treatment still remains unknown. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • 13 This lesion differs from a cavernous malformation in the brain in that the CSH is a true vascular neoplasm and produces symptoms as a result of progressive tumor growth and local mass effect. (thejns.org)
  • The primary differential diagnosis is between a melanin-containing tumor and an extraaxial cavernous angioma. (ajnr.org)
  • The relationship between magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings and histologically verified invasion of the cavernous sinus by tumor cells was studied in 26 patients treated surgically for pituitary adenoma. (osti.gov)
  • Relationship between magnetic resonance imaging findings and histologically verified dural invasion} author = {Daita, Go, Yonemasu, Yukichi, Nakai, Hirofumi, Takei, Hidetoshi, and Ogawa, Katsuhiro} abstractNote = {The relationship between magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings and histologically verified invasion of the cavernous sinus by tumor cells was studied in 26 patients treated surgically for pituitary adenoma. (osti.gov)
  • Do people with cavernous sinus tumor have a lot of pain? (healthtap.com)
  • s Ectopic Corticotroph Adenoma in the adenoma is convincing but the existence of a tumor cannot be confirmed using Cavernous Sinus: Case Report imaging studies or during surgery, a hem ihypophysectom y or total hypophy- sectomy is sometimes performed. (deepdyve.com)
  • What is Cavernous Sinus Tumor? (createmybb3.com)
  • So when we got in the mood to write about Sinus Tumor, nothing could stop us from writing! (createmybb3.com)
  • He has developed new surgical techniques for pituitary tumors invading the cavernous sinus and extending into the brain space that allow for higher rates of complete tumor removal and long-term remission in functional tumors. (stanford.edu)
  • Dr. JFM has meticulously investigated the medial wall of the cavernous sinus introducing a classification of the parasellar ligaments and their role in anchoring the medial wall, and has developed an innovative technique for selective resection of the medial wall when invaded by tumor. (stanford.edu)
  • So once we got an idea for writing on Sinus Tumor, we decided not to waste time, but to get down to writing about it immediately! (forumotion.com)
  • Hemangiomas in the cavernous sinus differ from other intra-axial cavernous malformations in the brain because they produce symptoms that result from progressive tumor growth and a mass effect. (e-roj.org)
  • A test called cavernous sinus sampling (CSS) helps your doctor diagnose a pituitary tumor causing Cushing's disease. (ohsu.edu)
  • carotid sinus a dilatation of the proximal portion of the internal carotid or distal portion of the common carotid artery, containing in its wall pressoreceptors that are stimulated by changes in blood pressure. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Parkinson D. A surgical approach to the cavernous portion of the carotid artery. (springer.com)
  • The cavernous sinus consists of veins, the carotid artery, and nerves. (healthtap.com)
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage possibly caused by a saccular carotid artery aneurysm within the cavernous sinus. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Four cavernous sinus compartments are described based on their spatial relationship with the cavernous carotid artery: superior, posterior, inferior, and lateral. (stanford.edu)
  • Type D fistulas are a combination of types B and C, with dural shunts between internal and external carotid artery branches and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Computed Tomography (CT) Scan - It is a highly used imaging technique to diagnose Cavernous sinus thrombosis as it can measure the obstruction of the carotid artery. (epainassist.com)
  • Parasellar lesions including tumors, carotid artery aneurysms, and carotid-cavernous fistulas have been described. (mhmedical.com)
  • Tumors (primary or secondary), carotid artery aneurysms, carotid-cavernous fistulas, and inflammatory processes are the main causes of this disorder. (mhmedical.com)
  • Less commonly, rupture of a carotid cavernous aneurysm may lead to fistula formation. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • What sort of disease is a cavernous sinus aneurysm? (healthtap.com)
  • A cavernous aneurysm is a common finding that if truly cavernous, indicates that it is located outside of the brain and generally carries a benign prognosis. (healthtap.com)
  • Do symptoms like cavernous sinus aneurysm go away quickly? (healthtap.com)
  • What are the consequences of developing cavernous sinus aneurysm? (healthtap.com)
  • What is the definition or description of: Cavernous sinus aneurysm? (healthtap.com)
  • My brother was diagnosed with cavernous sinus aneurysm. (healthtap.com)
  • My sister says she has cavernous sinus aneurysm. (healthtap.com)
  • Now I am hearing my best friend has cavernous sinus aneurysm. (healthtap.com)
  • Do we need to report cavernous sinus aneurysm as a long-term health condition, or does it go away after being treated? (healthtap.com)
  • What is the treatment for cavernous sinus aneurysm that is best and has fewest side effects? (healthtap.com)
  • A patient is presented in whom rupture of an aneurysm wholly within the cavernous sinus caused a subarachnoid hemorrhage. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Kim, J. S. / Anterior choroidal artery aneurysm mimicking cavernous sinus syndrome . (elsevier.com)
  • The cavernous sinus receives blood from: Superior and inferior ophthalmic veins Sphenoparietal sinus Superficial middle cerebral veins Inferior cerebral veins Blood leaves the sinus via superior and inferior petrosal sinuses as well as via the emissary veins through the foramina of the skull (mostly through foramen ovale). (wikipedia.org)
  • As a venous sinus, the cavernous sinus receives blood from the superior and inferior ophthalmic veins and from superficial cortical veins, and is connected to the basilar plexus of veins posteriorly. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cavernous sinus drains by two larger channels, the superior and inferior petrosal sinuses, ultimately into the internal jugular vein via the sigmoid sinus, also draining with emissary vein to pterygoid plexus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cavernous sinuses receive venous blood from the facial veins (via the superior and inferior ophthalmic veins) as well as the sphenoid and middle cerebral veins. (medscape.com)
  • They, in turn, empty into the inferior petrosal sinuses, then into the internal jugular veins and the sigmoid sinuses via the superior petrosal sinuses. (medscape.com)
  • petrosal sinus, inferior a venous channel arising from the cavernous sinus and draining into the internal jugular vein. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The inferior boundary of the optic strut accurately localized the point at which the ICA pierced the oculomotor membrane (proximal dural ring) and exited the cavernous sinus. (nih.gov)
  • The tributaries of this sinus capillary are superior and inferior ophthalmic veins, Superficial middle cerebral veins and sphenoparietal sinus. (killsinus.com)
  • In general four venous compartments were recognised (lateral, medial, superior, and inferior) together with the four intercavernous sinuses (anterior, posterior inferior and superior). (otago.ac.nz)
  • As it reaches the anterior wall of the sinus, it divides into superior and inferior branches, which pass through the superior orbital fissure . (lecturio.com)
  • The cavernous sinus extends from the medial end of the superior orbital fissure to the apex of the petrous temporal bone and drains into the superior petrosal sinus and the inferior petrosal sinus. (anatomynext.com)
  • The cavernous sinus drains to the superior and inferior petrosal sinuses, which then join the sigmoid sinus. (kenhub.com)
  • Ophthalmic veins (superior and inferior) - these enter the cavernous sinus via the superior orbital fissure. (teachmeanatomy.info)
  • The cavernous sinuses empty into the superior and inferior petrosal sinuses , and ultimately, into the internal jugular vein. (teachmeanatomy.info)
  • The facial veins in this area anastomose with the superior and inferior ophthalmic veins of the orbit, which drain directly posteriorly into the cavernous sinus through the superior orbital fissure . (wikipedia.org)
  • Inferior petrosal sinus sampling is mandatory to confirm that the source of ACTH production is the pituitary gland. (stanford.edu)
  • MRI study showed a large adenoma invading the superior and inferior compartments of the cavernous sinus, and compressing the optic apparatus. (stanford.edu)
  • The cavernous sinus receives blood from veins of the face and brain. (medlineplus.gov)
  • coronary sinus the dilated terminal portion of the great cardiac vein, receiving blood from other veins draining the heart muscle and emptying into the right atrium. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The vertebral veins in turn communicate superiorly with the pterygoid plexus cavernous sinus and superior portion of the pharyngeal plexus hence providing a pathway for metastasis to the tongue. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The cavernous sinuses receive blood from a web of veins that contain no valves, therefore blood can flow in any direction depending on the prevailing pressure gradients. (orasurgery.com)
  • Since the cavernous sinuses receive blood via this distribution, infections of the upper teeth and face can spread easily via the facial vein into this complex of veins. (orasurgery.com)
  • Peripheral hypophysial veins were identified exiting through the pituitary capsule of the central portion of the anterior lobe and the pituitary cleft draining into the CS and intercavernous sinuses. (otago.ac.nz)
  • Cavernous sinus is part of the many veins that connect the face to the brain. (veinscny.com)
  • In addition to the thin walled veins that traverse the cavernous sinus, a lone arterial vessel also uses the area as a conduit. (kenhub.com)
  • The connecting veins to and from the Cavernous Sinus lack valves so blood can flow in either direction … and thrombosis can migrate in both directions. (pedemmorsels.com)
  • The dural venous sinuses and cerebral veins should also be carefully evaluated in cases of CST as up to 90% of patients will have multiple thromboses 5 . (radiopaedia.org)
  • CT and MR imaging direct signs are changes in signal intensity and in the size and contour of the cavernous sinus, and indirect signs are dilatation of the tributary veins, exophthalmos, and increased dural enhancement along the lateral border of the cavernous sinus. (indianradiology.com)
  • If you have cavernous sinus sampling, a surgeon puts catheters (thin, hollow tubes) in the veins of both your thighs. (ohsu.edu)
  • In patients with thrombophlebitis of the facial vein, pieces of the clot may break off and enter the cavernous sinus, forming a cavernous sinus thrombosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The purpose of this article was to review the literature and present current recommendations for the treatment of cavernous sinus thrombosis. (elsevier.com)
  • Each cavernous sinus is formed between layers of the dura mater, and multiple connections exist between the 2 sinuses. (medscape.com)
  • They arise within the cavernous sinus and extend laterally by dissecting between the two layers of dura lining the floor of the middle fossa. (nih.gov)
  • cavernous sinus an irregularly shaped venous channel between the layers of dura mater of the brain, one on either side of the body of the sphenoid bone and communicating across the midline. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • occipital sinus a venous sinus between the layers of dura mater, passing upward along the midline of the cerebellum. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • petrosal sinus, superior one arising from the cavernous sinus and draining into the transverse sinus of the dura mater. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Either of a pair of venous sinuses of the dura mater located on the side of the body of the sphenoid bone. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The cavernous sinus is one of the most important dural venous sinuses located between the endosteal dura and meninges. (lecturio.com)
  • The roof of the sinus is formed by the inner layer of the meningeal dura, which is continuous with the diaphragm sellae covering the pituitary gland. (lecturio.com)
  • The floor of the sinus is formed partly by the periosteum of the greater wing of the sphenoid and endosteal dura mater . (lecturio.com)
  • The sinuses have an irregular shape, and each sinus is formed within layers of the dura. (lecturio.com)
  • The cavernous sinus is roofed by an inner layer of dura mater that continues with the diaphragma sellae that covers the superior part of the pituitary gland . (kenhub.com)
  • The body of the sphenoid acts as the medial wall of the sinus while the lateral wall is formed from the visceral part of the dura mater. (kenhub.com)
  • The dural venous sinuses are channels between the two layers of dura mater which are responsible for the venous drainage of the brain, skull, orbit and internal ear. (teachmeanatomy.info)
  • These vessels branch to provide arterial blood to the nerves and dura of the cavernous sinus and the pituitary gland. (medscape.com)
  • Cavernous sinus syndrome may result from mass effect of these tumors and cause ophthalmoplegia (from compression of the oculomotor nerve, trochlear nerve, and abducens nerve), ophthalmic sensory loss (from compression of the ophthalmic nerve), and maxillary sensory loss (from compression of the maxillary nerve). (wikipedia.org)
  • Cavernous Sinus Syndrome is a topic covered in the Select 5-Minute Pediatrics Topics . (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Cavernous sinus syndrome is a rare but serious condition. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Cavernous sinus syndrome is typically caused by septic or aseptic sinus thrombosis, neoplasm, or trauma. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Rupture of a cystic craniopharyngioma may present as acute cavernous sinus syndrome. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Nonspecific and idiopathic inflammation of the cavernous sinus, also called idiopathic cavernous sinusitis or Tolosa-Hunt syndrome, has been reported in patients as young as 3½ years. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • 5minute , www.unboundmedicine.com/5minute/view/Select-5-Minute-Pediatric-Consult/14022/all/Cavernous_Sinus_Syndrome. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Kalina P, Black K, Woldenberg R (1996) Burkitt's lymphoma of the skull base presenting as cavernous sinus syndrome in early childhood. (springer.com)
  • Delpassand ES, Kirkpatrick JB (1988) Cavernous sinus syndrome as the presentation of malignant lymphoma. (springer.com)
  • Othello syndrome in a patient with right orbitofrontal lobe cavernous sinus hemorrhage. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Cavernous sinus syndrome as the presentation of malignant lymphoma: case report and review of the literature. (springer.com)
  • Demirkaya M, Sevinir B, Ozdemir O, Nazlioğlu HO, Okan M. Lymphoma of the cavernous sinus mimicking Tolosa-Hunt syndrome in a child. (springer.com)
  • This condition is called cavernous sinus syndrome and it may result in neurological disorder like ophthalmoplegia, ophthalmic sensory loss, and maxillary sensory loss. (killsinus.com)
  • Here we report an unusual case of a 30-year-old HIV-positive woman with BL and cavernous sinus syndrome who also had intense bilateral breast uptake, related to menstrual cycle. (up.ac.za)
  • Home syndromes What is cavernous sinus syndrome? (umqaa.com)
  • We aim to describe cavernous sinus involvement in patients with this syndrome and to identify possible clinical-neuroimaging correlations. (elsevier.com)
  • We aim to describe cavernous sinus involvement in patients with this syndrome and to identify possible clinical-neuroimaging correlations.METHODS: Sixty patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome (31 females, mean age 4.5 years) and 120 age/sex-matched controls were included in this retrospective study. (elsevier.com)
  • Cavernous Sinus Syndrome is a topic covered in the 5-Minute Pediatric Consult . (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Cavernous sinus syndrome: clinical features and differential diagnosis with MR imaging. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Approximately 5% of all ophthalmoplegias are the result of cavernous sinus syndrome. (mhmedical.com)
  • Refers to a cavernous-sinus syndrome caused by an idiopathic inflammatory lesion, an abnormal autoimmune response, or tumors/metastases in the area of the cavernous sinus. (mhmedical.com)
  • The CS was shown to be a dural venous sinus that was irregularly compartmentalised by the ICA and connective and adipose tissue. (otago.ac.nz)
  • The CS is a compartmentalised dural venous sinus and has with extensive venous connections with the pituitary gland. (otago.ac.nz)
  • The cavernous sinus is a true dural venous sinus and not a venous plexus. (lecturio.com)
  • The cavernous sinus is a paired dural venous sinus located within the cranial cavity. (teachmeanatomy.info)
  • Anatomy of the cavernous sinus. (springer.com)
  • The anatomy of the Cavernous Sinus is important to consider. (pedemmorsels.com)
  • In this article, we shall look at the anatomy of the cavernous sinus - its location, contents and clinical relevance. (teachmeanatomy.info)
  • circular sinus the venous channel encircling the pituitary gland, formed by the two cavernous sinuses and the anterior and posterior intercavernous sinuses. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The left and right cavernous sinuses communicate by through the anterior and posterior intercavernous sinuses. (kenhub.com)
  • The left and right cavernous sinuses are connected in the midline by the anterior and posterior intercavernous sinuses . (teachmeanatomy.info)
  • The maxillary branch passes external to, but immediately adjacent to, the lateral wall of the sinus) The optic nerve lies just above and outside the cavernous sinus, superior and lateral to the pituitary gland on each side, and enters the orbital apex via the optic canal. (wikipedia.org)
  • Orbital venography is difficult to perform, but it is excellent in diagnosing occlusion of the cavernous sinus. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2,4) Orbital complications of frontal sinusitis comprise preseptal or orbital cellulitis, subperiosteal abscess, and cavernous sinus thrombosis. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The mass involves the left cavernous sinus, surrounds the carotid, and extends forward to the orbital apex, and backward to the tentorium and clivus. (nih.gov)
  • The abducent nerve (CN VI) traverses the sinus inferolateral to the ICA and exits by entering the superior orbital fissure anteriorly. (lecturio.com)
  • It leaves through the anterior wall of the sinus and enters the superior orbital fissure. (lecturio.com)
  • The ophthalmic branch exits via the superior orbital fissure, while the maxillary nerve exits the sinus via the foramen rotundum . (lecturio.com)
  • Left cavernous sinus is ill defined/ bulky with T1 hypointense signal with effacement of fat signal in it & T2 altered isointense signal with thin soft tissue in its margin reaching upto left orbital apex - likely suggesting septic thrombosis of the left cavernous sinus. (indianradiology.com)
  • An ophthalmologist, having diagnosed orbital cellulitis in her left eye, suspected a cavernous sinus thrombosis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Using Computed Tomography (CT) to evaluate the treatment effect of gamma knife surgery in the treatment of Cavernous Sinus Hemangioma (CSHs). (alliedacademies.org)
  • The cavernous sinus within the human head is one of the dural venous sinuses creating a cavity called the lateral sellar compartment bordered by the temporal bone of the skull and the sphenoid bone, lateral to the sella turcica. (wikipedia.org)
  • The CT scan of the maxillofacial area showed a fluid collection with multiple small air loculi in the anterior nasal cavity as well as evidence of possible osteomyelitis of nasal septum and a component of acute sinusitis in right frontal sinus. (hindawi.com)
  • In anatomy, a sinus is a cavity within a bone or other tissue. (healthtap.com)
  • If you ask a doctor about what is cavernous sinus he would explain you the above nerve cavity which acts as a cushion to the brain in the skull area and it contains the following pair of nerves. (killsinus.com)
  • The sinus is called cavernous due to its cavernous appearance in cadavers when its cavity collapses and the nerves and arachnoid granulations in its walls encroach into the cavity. (lecturio.com)
  • So what is cavernous sinus cavity? (createmybb3.com)
  • It is similar to other sinus by being placed in the cavity of the cranium. (createmybb3.com)
  • So if I just go on writing, and you don't understand, then it is of no use of me writing about Sinus Cavity! (createmybb3.com)
  • Sinus Cavity. (forumotion.com)
  • Sinus pressure headaches cause breathing trouble and because what would normally be nasal drainage, gets trapped in the sinus cavity, sufferers often complain of experiencing feelings of pressure and extreme discomfort. (forumotion.com)
  • The cavernous sinus is a cavity located in the hollow region at the base of the brain behind the eye sockets. (epainassist.com)
  • Ceyhan M, Erdem G, Kanra G, et al (1994) Lymphoma with bilateral cavernous sinus involvement in early childhood. (springer.com)
  • Magnetic resonance venography (MRV) demonstrated right sigmoid and transverse sinus thrombosis, right proximal internal jugular vein thrombosis, and bilateral cavernous sinus thrombosis (figure 2). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Bilateral cavernous sinus sampling demonstrated a large central/peripheral ACTH gradient, with a right/left ACTH gradient. (deepdyve.com)
  • Then, we measured on axial T2WI the left (A), right (B), and bilateral (LL) transverse diameters of the cavernous sinus. (elsevier.com)
  • Bilateral cavernous sinus thrombosis complicating sinusitis. (radiopaedia.org)
  • We present a case of a 50-year-old man with a bilateral cavernous sinus venous thrombosis with associated meningitis caused by Streptococcus milleri , secondary to maxillary sinusitis and otomastoiditis. (rcpjournals.org)
  • MRI of the brain demonstrated bilateral cavernous sinus thrombosis with enhanced and thickened lateral dural walls due to inflammation. (rcpjournals.org)
  • 2. Razek AA, Castillo M. Imaging lesions of the cavernous sinus. (radiopaedia.org)
  • It is caused by lesions of the cavernous sinus. (mhmedical.com)
  • Sinus films are helpful in the diagnosis of sphenoid sinusitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, sinus pressure headaches are very common in people who suffer from sinusitis (sinus infections). (forumotion.com)
  • Patchy mucosal thickening with T2 iso to hypointense signal in ethmoid sinus & mild expansion of sinus with ill defined left lateral wall of the ethmoid sinus - suggesting sinusitis (like fungal/other bacterial). (indianradiology.com)
  • Thrombosis of the cavernous sinus is usually caused by bacterial or fungal invasion complicating sinusitis in patients with poorly controlled diabetes or immunosuppression. (indianradiology.com)
  • Staphylococcus aureus is a bacteria that can cause sinusitis or boils- which are the symptoms of cavernous sinus thrombosis. (epainassist.com)
  • Sinus Radiography - It is used to diagnose sphenoid sinusitis, sclerosis, opacification and air-fluid levels. (epainassist.com)
  • Lesions affecting the cavernous sinus may affect isolated nerves or all the nerves traversing through it. (wikipedia.org)
  • The lateral extension of pituitary neoplasms into the cavernous sinus usually affects the 3rd cranial nerve, with the 4th and 6th nerves less commonly involved. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Aneurysms of the cavernous sinus may cause symptoms from compression of the nerves which control eye movement, or compression of the nerves which supply sensation of the face. (healthtap.com)
  • Sympathetic nerves around the carotid plexus: these nerves arise from the superior cervical ganglion and surround the cavernous part of the ICA. (lecturio.com)
  • C avernous sinus hemangioma (CSH) is a rare intracranial or intraorbital vascular neoplasm that accounts for approximately 2%-3% of all cavernous sinus (CS) tumors. (thejns.org)
  • A study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) on cavernous sinus hemangioma and to analyze the temporal volume change. (neurosurgery.directory)
  • retrospectively reviewed the clinical data of 26 cavernous sinus hemangioma patients who were treated with GKS between 2001 and 2017. (neurosurgery.directory)
  • We performed this retrospective study to investigate the outcomes of patients with hemangioma of the cavernous sinus after fractionated radiotherapy. (e-roj.org)
  • We analyzed 10 patients with hemangioma of the cavernous sinus who were treated with conventional radiotherapy between January 2000 and December 2016. (e-roj.org)
  • Cavernous sinus hemangiomas represent 3% of all benign cavernous sinus tumors. (nih.gov)
  • Eisenberg MB, Al-Mefty O, DeMonte F, et al (1999) Benign nonmeningeal tumors of the cavernous sinus. (springer.com)
  • Endocrinological outcome after pituitary transposition (hypophysopexy) and adjuvant radiotherapy for tumors involving the cavernous sinus. (springer.com)
  • Cavernous sinus hemangiomas (CSHs) are rare vascular tumors. (thejns.org)
  • The cavernous sinus compresses if there is a growth in the pituitary gland ultimately leading to tumors and opthalmpplegia (loss of ophthalmic sense) and maxillary nerve compression leads to maxillary sensory loss. (createmybb3.com)
  • Pituitary tumors with cavernous sinus invasion represent a neurosurgical challenge. (stanford.edu)
  • Hemangiomas of the cavernous sinus are rare vascular benign tumors that account for less than 3% of all benign lesions occurring in the cavernous sinus and 2% of all tumors, both benign and malignant [ 2 - 4 ]. (e-roj.org)
  • A significant body of evidence confirms that benign tumors within the cavernous sinus, including hemangiomas, respond well to external beam radiotherapy. (e-roj.org)
  • May be used due to concern for concurrent Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis . (pedemmorsels.com)
  • Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare form of stroke which results from the blockage of the dural venous sinuses by a thrombus. (wikipedia.org)
  • anterior s's ( sinus anterio´res ) the anterior air cells that together with the middle and posterior air cells form the ethmoidal sinus. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • intercavernous s's channels connecting the two cavernous sinuses, one passing anterior and the other posterior to the stalk of the pituitary gland. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The roof of the sinus is attached anteriorly to the anterior and middle clinoid processes and posteriorly to the tentorium as it connects to the posterior clinoid process. (lecturio.com)
  • Usually, the paired cavernous sinuses are situated superolateral to the sphenoid or the posterior ethmoid sinuses and posterior to the optic chiasma . (lecturio.com)
  • The cavernous sinuses are 1 cm wide cavities that extend a distance of 2 cm from the most posterior aspect of the orbit to the petrous part of the temporal bone . (kenhub.com)
  • Anatomy of what is ethmoid sinus The ethmoidal sinus is divided into anterior, middle and posterior. (sinusitisrelief.info)
  • The anterior drains into the middle meatus of the nose through infundibulum, the middle drains into the middle meatus of the nose above the bulla ethmoidalis and the posterior drains into the superior meatus under the superior nasal concha and opens into the sphenoidal sinus . (sinusitisrelief.info)
  • The oculomotor nerve (CN III) is the most superior nerve in the lateral wall of the sinus. (lecturio.com)
  • The trochlear nerve (CN IV) lies in the lateral wall of the sinus, below CN III. (lecturio.com)
  • The ophthalmic nerve and maxillary nerve are branches of the trigeminal nerve (CN V). They lie below CN IV in the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus. (lecturio.com)
  • A complete lesion of the cavernous sinus disrupts CN III, IV, and VI, causing total ophthalmoplegia, usually accompanied by a fixed, dilated pupil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinicians should consider infective cavernous sinus syndromes in people with a fluctuating painful ophthalmoplegia that responds poorly to corticosteroids. (edu.au)
  • An abnormally growing pituitary adenoma, sitting on the bony sella turcica, will expand in the direction of least resistance and eventually invade the cavernous sinus. (wikipedia.org)
  • This study shows that preoperative MR imaging can provide information for assessment of invasion into the cavernous sinus in patients with pituitary adenoma. (osti.gov)
  • High CCNB1 expression in pituitary adenoma affects cavernous sinus invasion through EMT. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Therefore, exploring the biological characteristics of pituitary adenomas that invade the cavernous sinus and studying the molecular biological mechanism involved in their occurrence and development will help to resolve the abovementioned difficulties in clinical diagnosis and treatment, thus improving the pituitary adenoma cure rate, reducing the recurrence of pituitary adenoma, and improving the prognosis of patients. (biomedcentral.com)
  • At the same time, the invasion of the cavernous sinus by the pituitary adenoma may be related to the activation of the EMT process. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Because of its complex neurovascular anatomic relationship, cavernous sinus thrombosis is the most important of any intracranial septic thrombosis. (medscape.com)
  • Cavernous sinus septic thrombosis. (elsevier.com)
  • Dr. Rande Lazar, a Memphis ear, nose and throat specialist, has a research article up at DrRandeLazar.com, in which he studies the results of treating septic thrombosis with functional endonasal sinus surgery in conjunction with standard antibiotic treatments. (rande-lazar.com)
  • Conversely, all aneurysms that arose proximal to the optic strut were observed to lie within the cavernous sinus. (nih.gov)
  • The optic strut, as identified with CT angiography, provided a reliable anatomic landmark for accurate discrimination between intradural and extradural (cavernous sinus) aneurysms. (nih.gov)
  • Smaller cavernous aneurysms are usually managed conservatively. (healthtap.com)
  • Vascular lesions such as aneurysms and cavernous carotid fistula (Figure 24) and cavernous sinus thrombosis or thrombophlebitis can be seen in the cavernous sinus region. (freethesaurus.com)
  • Re: Prediction of traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. (lww.com)
  • The cavernous sinuses are the most centrally located of the dural sinuses and lie on either side of the sella turcica. (medscape.com)
  • sinus cavernosus ) is a large, paired channel filled with venous blood that is located against the lateral aspect of the body of the sphenoid bone on each side of the sella turcica. (anatomynext.com)
  • The cavernous sinuses are located within the middle cranial fossa, on either side of the sella turcica of the sphenoid bone (which contains the pituitary gland). (teachmeanatomy.info)
  • The diagnosis of cavernous sinus thrombosis is made clinically, with imaging studies to confirm the clinical impression. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, these tests are useful in primary diagnosis of cavernous sinus thrombosis. (epainassist.com)
  • The cavernous sinuses are irregularly shaped, trabeculated cavities located at the base of the skull. (medscape.com)
  • But in common medical knowledge of people it means the sinus cavities present in the facial region or some kind of infections to them. (killsinus.com)
  • But the fact is that cavernous sinus is not related to any facial region or sinus cavities but our brain or head. (killsinus.com)
  • When one or more sinus cavities get infected, a person has a disease called sinus itis . (sinusitisrelief.info)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis masquerading as ischaemic stroke: a catastrophic pitfall in any emergency department. (medscape.com)
  • In a review of the world's literature up to 1936 Cavenagh 1 could find only a few reported recoveries from septic cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis. (annals.org)
  • Doctors may order brain scans, including CT and MRI scans, to look for cavernous sinus thrombosis. (webmd.com)
  • The cavernous sinuses are hollow spaces located at the base of your brain and behind your eye sockets. (healthline.com)
  • cerebral sinus one of the ventricles of the brain. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Radiological investigation in the form of MRI brain showed the lesion leading to expansion of left cavernous sinus (Figure 3). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The cavernous sinuses are vacant regions found beneath the brain at the back of each eye socket. (vancouverfirstaid.ca)
  • A main blood vessel, specifically the jugular vein transports blood via the cavernous sinuses out of the brain. (vancouverfirstaid.ca)
  • The cavernous sinuses are one of several drainage pathways for the brain that sits in the middle. (kenhub.com)
  • The jugular vein which is a major blood vessel transmits deoxygenated blood from the brain through cavernous sinus to the heart. (epainassist.com)
  • Other sequelae include potentially life-threatening conditions such as meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis , brain abscess, and subarachnoid empyema. (freethesaurus.com)
  • Because of its connections with the facial vein via the superior ophthalmic vein, it is possible to get infections in the cavernous sinus from an external facial injury within the danger area of the face. (wikipedia.org)
  • Less commonly, infections of the ears or eyes may cause cavernous sinus thrombosis. (webmd.com)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) was initially described by Bright in 1831 as a complication of epidural and subdural infections. (medscape.com)
  • Since the cavernous sinuses receive blood via this distribution, infections of the face including the nose, tonsils, and orbits can spread easily by this route. (medscape.com)
  • More specifically, 70 percent of infections leading to cavernous sinus thrombosis involve the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus . (healthline.com)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a severe encephalic complication of the cervicofacial infections that can lead to death if not treated in adequate time. (quintpub.com)
  • Dr. Rande Lazar has a wide range of experience in many areas of otolaryngology, including treatment for sinus infections, respiratory infections, tonsil infections, ear infections, throat infections, and sleep disorders. (rande-lazar.com)
  • Actinomyces cavernous sinus infections are rare and indolent. (edu.au)
  • Sinus pressure headaches occur often in individuals who suffer form sinus infections. (forumotion.com)
  • However, these infections are rarely the cause of cavernous sinus thrombosis. (epainassist.com)
  • Nasal furuncle is believed to be the most common cause of CST (50%), followed by sphenoidal or ethmoidal sinuses (30%) and dental infections (10%) (4, 5). (docksci.com)
  • If you have an autoimmune condition or are at a higher risk of developing blood clots, you should also be aware of signs of cavernous sinus thrombosis. (healthline.com)
  • Severe unilateral abducens nerve palsy from cavernous sinus carotid vascular ectasia Carotid cavernous sinus ectasia is a rare cause of abducens nerve palsy.We present a case of severe unilateral progressive esotropia resulting from cavernous sinus carotid vascular ectasia in a 67 y/o female. (tripdatabase.com)
  • There are also other non-vascular structures that utilize the cavernous sinus as a pathway to their points of supply. (kenhub.com)
  • Pituitary adenomas often invade the medial wall of the cavernous sinus, but this structure is generally not surgically removed because of the risk of vascular and cranial nerve injury. (stanford.edu)
  • Nasal irrigation should be a part of your everyday hygiene routine, especially if you are plagued by chronic sinus problems. (sinusitisrelief.info)
  • People with chronic sinus also complain of a thick yellow nasal discharge which is full of pus. (sinusitisrelief.info)
  • Carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas (CCF) result from abnormal connections between the carotid arterial system and the cavernous sinus, leading to ophthalmic complications due to arterialization of the ocular venous system [ 7 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Dural CCFs are low-flow fistulas resulting from communications of cavernous arterial branches and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Direct carotid-cavernous fistulas are characterized by the triad of pulsatile proptosis, chemosis, and intracranial whistling. (medscape.com)
  • In cases of indirect carotid-cavernous fistulas, there is moderate ocular congestion, mild proptosis, and ocular pulsation on aplanotonometry. (medscape.com)
  • BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Cavernous sinus thrombosis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: December 2017 Summary Thrombus formation within the cavernous sinus , which may be either septic or aseptic in origin. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Venous sinus thrombosis after whiplash possible? (healthtap.com)
  • Each cavernous sinus has a close anatomical relationship with several key structures in the head, and is arguably the most clinically important venous sinus. (teachmeanatomy.info)
  • 4 The common locations of intracranial extension have been described as the middle cranial fossa and cavernous sinus. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Nakatomi H, Sasaki T, Kawamoto S, Fujimaki T, Furuya K, Kirino T. Primary cavernous sinus malignant lymphoma treated by gamma knife radiosurgery: case report and review of the literature. (springer.com)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis can lead to severe complications. (healthline.com)
  • When the face is included, these interventions might prevent complications such as meningitis and cavernous sinus thrombosis. (hindawi.com)
  • One of the most severe complications that can result from tooth extraction is the septic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST). (veinscny.com)
  • Furthermore, the associated cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are unusual complications. (biomedcentral.com)