Dyspnea, Paroxysmal: A disorder characterized by sudden attacks of respiratory distress in at rest patients with HEART FAILURE and PULMONARY EDEMA. It usually occurs at night after several hours of sleep in a reclining position. Patients awaken with a feeling of suffocation, coughing, a cold sweat, and TACHYCARDIA. When there is significant WHEEZING, it is called cardiac asthma.Dyspnea: Difficult or labored breathing.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Food Dispensers, Automatic: Mechanical food dispensing machines.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Postal Service: The functions and activities carried out by the U.S. Postal Service, foreign postal services, and private postal services such as Federal Express.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Dictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Dictionaries, ChemicalAsphyxia: A pathological condition caused by lack of oxygen, manifested in impending or actual cessation of life.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Computer Peripherals: Various units or machines that operate in combination or in conjunction with a computer but are not physically part of it. Peripheral devices typically display computer data, store data from the computer and return the data to the computer on demand, prepare data for human use, or acquire data from a source and convert it to a form usable by a computer. (Computer Dictionary, 4th ed.)Cellular Phone: Analog or digital communications device in which the user has a wireless connection from a telephone to a nearby transmitter. It is termed cellular because the service area is divided into multiple "cells." As the user moves from one cell area to another, the call is transferred to the local transmitter.Lunch: The meal taken at midday.Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Ventricular Pressure: The pressure within a CARDIAC VENTRICLE. Ventricular pressure waveforms can be measured in the beating heart by catheterization or estimated using imaging techniques (e.g., DOPPLER ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY). The information is useful in evaluating the function of the MYOCARDIUM; CARDIAC VALVES; and PERICARDIUM, particularly with simultaneous measurement of other (e.g., aortic or atrial) pressures.Echocardiography, Doppler: Measurement of intracardiac blood flow using an M-mode and/or two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiogram while simultaneously recording the spectrum of the audible Doppler signal (e.g., velocity, direction, amplitude, intensity, timing) reflected from the moving column of red blood cells.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Ultrafiltration: The separation of particles from a suspension by passage through a filter with very fine pores. In ultrafiltration the separation is accomplished by convective transport; in DIALYSIS separation relies instead upon differential diffusion. Ultrafiltration occurs naturally and is a laboratory procedure. Artificial ultrafiltration of the blood is referred to as HEMOFILTRATION or HEMODIAFILTRATION (if combined with HEMODIALYSIS).Cooking and Eating UtensilsWater-Electrolyte Imbalance: Disturbances in the body's WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Food Services: Functions, equipment, and facilities concerned with the preparation and distribution of ready-to-eat food.Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.X-Rays: Penetrating electromagnetic radiation emitted when the inner orbital electrons of an atom are excited and release radiant energy. X-ray wavelengths range from 1 pm to 10 nm. Hard X-rays are the higher energy, shorter wavelength X-rays. Soft x-rays or Grenz rays are less energetic and longer in wavelength. The short wavelength end of the X-ray spectrum overlaps the GAMMA RAYS wavelength range. The distinction between gamma rays and X-rays is based on their radiation source.Cardiomyopathy, Restrictive: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease in which the ventricular walls are excessively rigid, impeding ventricular filling. It is marked by reduced diastolic volume of either or both ventricles but normal or nearly normal systolic function. It may be idiopathic or associated with other diseases (ENDOMYOCARDIAL FIBROSIS or AMYLOIDOSIS) causing interstitial fibrosis.Pericarditis, Constrictive: Inflammation of the PERICARDIUM that is characterized by the fibrous scarring and adhesion of both serous layers, the VISCERAL PERICARDIUM and the PARIETAL PERICARDIUM leading to the loss of pericardial cavity. The thickened pericardium severely restricts cardiac filling. Clinical signs include FATIGUE, muscle wasting, and WEIGHT LOSS.Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Cardiomyopathy, Dilated: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease, characterized by left and/or right ventricular hypertrophy (HYPERTROPHY, LEFT VENTRICULAR; HYPERTROPHY, RIGHT VENTRICULAR), frequent asymmetrical involvement of the HEART SEPTUM, and normal or reduced left ventricular volume. Risk factors include HYPERTENSION; AORTIC STENOSIS; and gene MUTATION; (FAMILIAL HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY).Rare Diseases: A large group of diseases which are characterized by a low prevalence in the population. They frequently are associated with problems in diagnosis and treatment.Endomyocardial Fibrosis: A condition characterized by the thickening of the ventricular ENDOCARDIUM and subendocardium (MYOCARDIUM), seen mostly in children and young adults in the TROPICAL CLIMATE. The fibrous tissue extends from the apex toward and often involves the HEART VALVES causing restrictive blood flow into the respective ventricles (CARDIOMYOPATHY, RESTRICTIVE).Precipitating Factors: Factors associated with the definitive onset of a disease, illness, accident, behavioral response, or course of action. Usually one factor is more important or more obviously recognizable than others, if several are involved, and one may often be regarded as "necessary". Examples include exposure to specific disease; amount or level of an infectious organism, drug, or noxious agent, etc.Acupuncture Therapy: Treatment of disease by inserting needles along specific pathways or meridians. The placement varies with the disease being treated. It is sometimes used in conjunction with heat, moxibustion, acupressure, or electric stimulation.Acupuncture: The occupational discipline of the traditional Chinese methods of ACUPUNCTURE THERAPY for treating disease by inserting needles along specific pathways or meridians.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Acupuncture Points: Designated locations along nerves or organ meridians for inserting acupuncture needles.Acupuncture Analgesia: Analgesia produced by the insertion of ACUPUNCTURE needles at certain ACUPUNCTURE POINTS on the body. This activates small myelinated nerve fibers in the muscle which transmit impulses to the spinal cord and then activate three centers - the spinal cord, midbrain and pituitary/hypothalamus - to produce analgesia.Peripartum Period: The period shortly before, during, and immediately after giving birth.Puerperal Disorders: Disorders or diseases associated with PUERPERIUM, the six-to-eight-week period immediately after PARTURITION in humans.Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a cardiovascular disease. The disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Carotid Body: A small cluster of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery. The carotid body, which is richly supplied with fenestrated capillaries, senses the pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and plays a crucial role in their homeostatic control.Chemoreceptor Cells: Cells specialized to detect chemical substances and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Chemoreceptor cells may monitor external stimuli, as in TASTE and OLFACTION, or internal stimuli, such as the concentrations of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE in the blood.Blood Gas Analysis: Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.Mechanoreceptors: Cells specialized to transduce mechanical stimuli and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Mechanoreceptor cells include the INNER EAR hair cells, which mediate hearing and balance, and the various somatosensory receptors, often with non-neural accessory structures.Neurons, Afferent: Neurons which conduct NERVE IMPULSES to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
p.1446 Mukerji, bVaskar (1990). "Dyspnea, Orthopnea, and Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea". In Walker, H. Kenneth; Hall, W. Dallas ... See pronunciation information at dyspnea. Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea Trepopnea "orthopnea" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary ... Orthopnea or orthopnoea is shortness of breath (dyspnea) that occurs when lying flat, causing the person to have to sleep ...
Dyspnea (shortness of breath) on exertion. *Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. *Peripheral edema[21] (swelling of lower legs) ... In the acute form, the baby develops dyspnea and cyanosis and soon dies of heart failure. These symptoms may be described in ... dyspnoea: 42%, thoracic pain: 35%), and edemas of the lower limbs (51%). With treatment the rate of healing was about 97%.[47] ...
"Rostan's asthma": Known today as paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. A type of cardiac asthma associated with heart disease, such as ...
Heart failure - Dyspnea, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, and edema. Hypotension - Seizure, mental status change, ... Low cardiac output - Fatigue, weakness, dyspnea on exertion, lethargy, and lightheadedness. Hemodynamic - Pulsation in the neck ...
Orthopnea Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea Platypnea Tsunezuka, Yoshio; Sato, Hideo; Tsukioka, Toshihide; Shimizu, Hiroshi (2000 ... Trepopnea /tre·pop·nea/ (tre″pop-ne´ah) is dyspnea (shortness of breath) that is sensed while lying on one side but not on the ...
The consequences of this are dyspnea (shortness of breath), orthopnea and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. ... Another symptom of heart failure is paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea: a sudden nighttime attack of severe breathlessness, usually ... and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea.. In severe cardiomyopathy, the effects of decreased cardiac output and poor perfusion become ... Additionally, BNP can be used to differentiate between causes of dyspnea due to heart failure from other causes of dyspnea. If ...
See pronunciation information at dyspnea. Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea Trepopnea Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary (32 ... Platypnea or platypnoea is shortness of breath (dyspnea) that is relieved when lying down, and worsens when sitting or standing ...
The consequences of this are dyspnea (shortness of breath), orthopnea and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. The symptoms of heart ... and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. In severe cardiomyopathy, the effects of decreased cardiac output and poor perfusion become ...
... paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea).[citation needed] Congestive heart failure is the most common result of fluid overload. Also, it ... dyspnea) or enters pleural space by transudation (pleural effusion which also causes dyspnea), which is the best indicator of ...
... and/or paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea (episodes of severe sudden breathlessness at night). These are common presenting symptoms ...
... orthopnea and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea (PND) Palpitations Chest pain Hemoptysis Thromboembolism in later stages when the ... Play media Signs and symptoms of mitral stenosis include the following: Heart failure symptoms, such as dyspnea on exertion, ...
Dyspnea on exertion Orthopnea Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea Palpitations Angina pectoris Cyanosis (in acute cases) In terms of ...
... paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea and orthopnea, exercise intolerance, fatigue, elevated jugular venous pressure, and edema. ... of HFpEF are similar to those observed in HFrEF and include shortness of breath including exercise induced dyspnea, ...
Difficulty breathing in the upright position with relief in the supine position Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea - Breathing ...
Symptoms of a cardiac myxoma include: Dyspnea on exertion Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea Fever Weight loss (see cachexia) ...
... paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea) Acute pulmonary edema Other cardiac symptoms of heart failure include chest pain/pressure and ... dyspnea), leg or feet swelling, and fatigue. ADHF is a common and potentially serious cause of acute respiratory distress. The ... exertional dyspnea) Difficulty breathing while lying flat (orthopnea) Episodes of waking up from sleep gasping for air ( ...
... on exertion Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea Peripheral edema (swelling of lower legs) Gastrointestinal beriberi causes abdominal ... In the acute form, the baby develops dyspnea and cyanosis and soon dies of heart failure. These symptoms may be described in ... dyspnoea: 42%, thoracic pain: 35%), and edemas of the lower limbs (51%). With treatment the rate of healing was about 97%. ... and high output cardiac failure Elevated jugular venous pressure Dyspnea (shortness of breath) ...
Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, orthopnea, and hemoptysis (sign of pulmonary venous congestion): this symptoms are less frequent ... and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea (shortness of breath during sleep), orthopnea (difficulty in breathing while lying down), and ...
... may refer to: P n D Pickups and deliveries Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea, a breathing disorder PartyNextDoor, a Canadian ...
"Dyspnea, Orthopnea, and Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea. Butterworth Publishers. Archived from the original on 27 April 2018. ... dyspnea. dys- + -pnea. /dɪspˈniːə/ disp-NEE-ə,[37][38][39] /ˈdɪspniə/ DISP-nee-ə[36][35] ... and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea.[2] It affects between 1-2% of the general United States population and occurs in 10% of those ... Look up dyspnea, dyspnoea, breathlessness, or respiratory distress in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...
Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea or paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea (PND) refers to attacks of severe shortness of breath and ... Treatment for paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea depends on the underlying cause. Options often include oxygen, diuretics, heart ...
... paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria) Cancer (due to secretion of pro-coagulants) After a first PE, the search for secondary ... dyspnea or hemodynamic instability such as tachycardia. Larger PEs, which tend to lodge centrally, typically cause dyspnea, ... Play media Symptoms of pulmonary embolism are typically sudden in onset and may include one or many of the following: dyspnea ( ... The classic presentation for PE with pleuritic pain, dyspnea and tachycardia is likely caused by a large fragmented embolism ...
About 90% of people with ALS die peacefully.[110] In the final days of life, opioids can be used to treat pain and dyspnea, ... they should then have nocturnal pulse oximetry to look for hypoxemia during sleep.[5] ... dyspnea) with exertion, at rest, or while lying down (orthopnea).[32] Spinal and bulbar symptoms tend to be mild or absent at ... opioids can be used to treat pain and dyspnea, while benzodiazepines can be used to treat anxiety.[14] ...
Finally, the red blood cell deficiency leads to anemia, which may cause dyspnea and pallor. ... Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. *Refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia. CFU-Mast. Mastocytoma. *Mast cell ...
Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnoea. Br Med J 1965; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.5457.361-b (Published 07 August 1965) Cite ...
Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea (PND) causes sudden shortness of breath during sleep. Well tell you what causes it and how its ... Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea vs. sleep apnea. PND is a symptom that can be caused by a number of different respiratory and ... Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea (PND) causes sudden shortness of breath during sleep. As a result, you wake up gasping for air. It ... There is a lack of consensus over the term "paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea." Some medical professionals use it to refer ...
Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea or paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea (PND) refers to attacks of severe shortness of breath and ... Treatment for paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea depends on the underlying cause. Options often include oxygen, diuretics, heart ...
People who awaken suddenly at night feeling short of breath and gasping for air could be suffering from paroxysmal nocturnal ... heartdisease.about.com/od/lesscommonheartproblems/g/Paroxysmal-Nocturnal-Dyspnea-Pnd.htm. 3) Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea. How ... Chapter 11 Dyspnea, Orthopnea, and Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea. Clinical Methods: The History, Physical, and Laboratory ... What Is Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea?. By Michele Blacksberg RN HERWriter Average Select rating. Poor. Fair. Average. Good. ...
Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea is a sign of heart failure that makes people have trouble breathing while lying down. Learn about ... paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea is a sign of heart failure.. Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea can be accompanied by swelling of the ... The scientific term for this occurrence is paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. Paroxysmal means sudden attacks that recur, ... Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea is also sometimes called cardiac asthma because its signs and symptoms mimic those of asthma. This ...
Directions to Hospitals Treating Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea Risk calculators and risk factors for Paroxysmal nocturnal ... Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea (PND) is defined as sudden, severe shortness of breath at night that awakens a person from sleep, ... Powerpoint slides on Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea Images of Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea Photos of Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea ... Minutiello L (1996). "[Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea as a severe expression of the pacemaker syndrome]". Minerva Cardioangiol. ...
... Tristan E. Knight ... Tristan E. Knight, Bruce Shiramizu, Princeton Ly, Karen S. Thompson, and Venu Reddy, "Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea Secondary to ...
... Tristan E. Knight ... A 14-month-old male presented with paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea and grade III/VI systolic ejection murmur at the upper left ... However, the presentation of such a tumor with paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea is novel; prior cases have presented with ... A 14-month-old male presented with 3 months of worsening paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, with multiple sleep interruptions ...
Diagnostic checklist, medical tests, doctor questions, and related signs or symptoms for Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea. ... List of 10 disease causes of Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea, patient stories, diagnostic guides. ... Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea and Energy symptoms (5 causes) *Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea and Fatigue (5 causes) *Paroxysmal ... Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea and Edema (3 causes) *Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea and Exercise symptoms (3 causes) *Paroxysmal ...
Found Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea 1 time.. Displaying results 1 to 10.. 1. Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. This is the shortness ...
Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea ialah sign of heart failure(biasanya left side heart failure).. Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea ni ... Paroxysmal = Sudden attack. Nocturnal = Occur at night. Dyspnea= Shortness of breath (SOB). Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea ni ... Cara nk reduce Paroxysmal nocturnal Dyspnea ni ialah dgn tinggikan kepala,letakla bantal ke kt bahagian kepala. ...
With Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea you should establish dietary habits, thus observe a low-sodium diet to avoid fluid retention ... Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea (PND) is sometimes called cardiac asthma. It is manifested by acute shortness of breath ... You may be suffering from a serious medical problem called Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea (PND), it might not be lethal but it ... People who commonly experience Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea (PND) at night is in a reclining position. They usually wake up ...
Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea by Healthcare™ (Symptoms, Treatment, Home Remedies) ... Learn what is Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea (PND), its medical abbreviation, definition, symptoms, treatment, and causes. ... Paroxysmal Dyspnea or Nocturnal Dyspnea. Lets look at what is Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea defination:. Paroxysmal Nocturnal ... Lets dig into more details of Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea, Paroxysmal Dyspnea, Nocturnal Dyspnea in the following:. What is ...
Define paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea documents Files for free and learn more about Define paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea documents ... Define paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea documents. List of ebooks and manuels about Define paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea documents ... Similar Books to Define paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea documents define race around condition define race around condition in ... You can download PDF versions of the users guide, manuals and ebooks about Define paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea documents, you ...
Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea or PND : Classical attack. Editor October 5, 2010 No Comments cardiac asthmaorthopneaparoxysmal ... nocturnal dyspneaPND Describing the attack of PND. Normally after 30 minutes to 2 hours of lying in bed for sleep, the patient ...
Nocturnal Paroxysmal Dyspnea & Tachycardia during Pain Episodes Symptom Checker: Possible causes include Coronary ... paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea - dyspnea with exertion - orthopnea B) exertional dyspnea - orthopnea - paroxysmal nocturnal ... Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea usually occurs at night and is defined as the sudden awakening of the ... Cardiac asthma is a medical symptom, also known as paroxysmal dyspnea or paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea (PND). [morebooks.de] ...
Dyspnea (shortness of breath) on exertion. *Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. *Peripheral edema[21] (swelling of lower legs) ... In the acute form, the baby develops dyspnea and cyanosis and soon dies of heart failure. These symptoms may be described in ... dyspnoea: 42%, thoracic pain: 35%), and edemas of the lower limbs (51%). With treatment the rate of healing was about 97%.[47] ...
paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea). Retrieved from "https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=DPN&oldid=50785452" ...
A type of breathing difficulty while lying down is paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. This condition causes a person to wake up ... Waking at night short of breath; Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea; PND; Difficulty breathing while lying down; Orthopnea; Heart ... Braithwaite SA, Perina D. Dyspnea. In: Walls RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill M, eds. Rosens Emergency Medicine: Concepts and ...
Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea: Severe shortness of breath and coughing fits. These usually occur at night, and disrupt sleep. ...
... daytime dyspnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, and other worsened signs or symptoms. ...
Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea results from increased left ventricular filling pressures (due to nocturnal fluid redistribution ... Dyspnoea. Exertional breathlessness is a frequent presenting symptom in heart failure, although it is a common symptom in the ... Nocturnal ischaemic chest pain may also be a manifestation of heart failure, so left ventricular systolic dysfunction should be ... Dyspnoea is therefore moderately sensitive, but poorly specific, for the presence of heart failure. Orthopnoea is a more ...
Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. *Oxygen requirement. *Significant pulmonary disease (e.g., chronic obstructive/restrictive ...
Dyspnea. Orthopnea. Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. PND. Peripheral edema. Rales. Jugular venous distension. JVD. Hypoxia. ... paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea (PND), peripheral edema, rales, jugular venous distension (JVD), hypoxia (pulse ox , 90% on room ... In addition, patients should have 2 or more signs and symptoms of fluid overload such as: dyspnea, orthopnea, ...
Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea * Abdominal discomfort or liver tenderness * Chest pain, primarily in patients with amyloidosis or ...
  • however, large regurgitant volume in the presence of dilated right ventricle may be associated with exertional dyspnea, easy fatigability, and intermittent chest pain. (bmj.com)
  • A cardiopulmonary test could be useful to assess the workload that the patient can achieve, the degree of dyspnea experienced, the peak oxygen uptake, cardiac output (calculated from carbon dioxide production and oxygen uptake), and relationship of minute ventilation to carbon dioxide production. (acc.org)
  • In approximately two thirds of patients presenting with dyspnea, the underlying cause is cardiopulmonary disease. (aafp.org)
  • This article reviews the salient features of the history, physical examination, laboratory testing, office spirometry, and imaging in patients with dyspnea, as well as more specialized testing that is required if the cause remains unexplained after initial evaluation. (aafp.org)
  • After the CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristin, prednisone) regimen plus Methotrexate as initial therapeutic modality for one course and then CHOP for another two course, her dyspnea and other signs of congestive heart failure were improved. (ispub.com)