Anemia: A reduction in the number of circulating ERYTHROCYTES or in the quantity of HEMOGLOBIN.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Anemia, Aplastic: A form of anemia in which the bone marrow fails to produce adequate numbers of peripheral blood elements.Anemia, Hemolytic: A condition of inadequate circulating red blood cells (ANEMIA) or insufficient HEMOGLOBIN due to premature destruction of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES).Fanconi Anemia: Congenital disorder affecting all bone marrow elements, resulting in ANEMIA; LEUKOPENIA; and THROMBOPENIA, and associated with cardiac, renal, and limb malformations as well as dermal pigmentary changes. Spontaneous CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE is a feature of this disease along with predisposition to LEUKEMIA. There are at least 7 complementation groups in Fanconi anemia: FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCD1, FANCD2, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, and FANCL. (from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/dispomim.cgi?id=227650, August 20, 2004)Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune: Acquired hemolytic anemia due to the presence of AUTOANTIBODIES which agglutinate or lyse the patient's own RED BLOOD CELLS.Anemia, Hypochromic: Anemia characterized by a decrease in the ratio of the weight of hemoglobin to the volume of the erythrocyte, i.e., the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration is less than normal. The individual cells contain less hemoglobin than they could have under optimal conditions. Hypochromic anemia may be caused by iron deficiency from a low iron intake, diminished iron absorption, or excessive iron loss. It can also be caused by infections or other diseases, therapeutic drugs, lead poisoning, and other conditions. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Miale, Laboratory Medicine: Hematology, 6th ed, p393)Anemia, Macrocytic: Anemia characterized by larger than normal erythrocytes, increased mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and increased mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH).Anemia, Pernicious: A megaloblastic anemia occurring in children but more commonly in later life, characterized by histamine-fast achlorhydria, in which the laboratory and clinical manifestations are based on malabsorption of vitamin B 12 due to a failure of the gastric mucosa to secrete adequate and potent intrinsic factor. (Dorland, 27th ed)Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Anemia, Sickle Cell: A disease characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, episodic painful crises, and pathologic involvement of many organs. It is the clinical expression of homozygosity for hemoglobin S.Anemia, Sideroblastic: Anemia characterized by the presence of erythroblasts containing excessive deposits of iron in the marrow.Anemia, Megaloblastic: A disorder characterized by the presence of ANEMIA, abnormally large red blood cells (megalocytes or macrocytes), and MEGALOBLASTS.Hemoglobins: The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.Infectious Anemia Virus, Equine: A species of LENTIVIRUS, subgenus equine lentiviruses (LENTIVIRUSES, EQUINE), causing acute and chronic infection in horses. It is transmitted mechanically by biting flies, mosquitoes, and midges, and iatrogenically through unsterilized equipment. Chronic infection often consists of acute episodes with remissions.Anemia, Refractory: A severe sometimes chronic anemia, usually macrocytic in type, that does not respond to ordinary antianemic therapy.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Anemia, Hemolytic, Congenital: Hemolytic anemia due to various intrinsic defects of the erythrocyte.Equine Infectious Anemia: Viral disease of horses caused by the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV; INFECTIOUS ANEMIA VIRUS, EQUINE). It is characterized by intermittent fever, weakness, and anemia. Chronic infection consists of acute episodes with remissions.Erythropoietin: Glycoprotein hormone, secreted chiefly by the KIDNEY in the adult and the LIVER in the FETUS, that acts on erythroid stem cells of the BONE MARROW to stimulate proliferation and differentiation.Chicken anemia virus: The type species of GYROVIRUS, a small, non-enveloped DNA virus originally isolated from contaminated vaccines in Japan. It causes chicken infectious anemia and may possibly play a key role in hemorrhagic anemia syndrome, anemia dermatitis, and blue wing disease.Anemia, Dyserythropoietic, Congenital: A familial disorder characterized by ANEMIA with multinuclear ERYTHROBLASTS, karyorrhexis, asynchrony of nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation, and various nuclear abnormalities of bone marrow erythrocyte precursors (ERYTHROID PRECURSOR CELLS). Type II is the most common of the 3 types; it is often referred to as HEMPAS, based on the Hereditary Erythroblast Multinuclearity with Positive Acidified Serum test.Anemia, Diamond-Blackfan: A rare congenital hypoplastic anemia that usually presents early in infancy. The disease is characterized by a moderate to severe macrocytic anemia, occasional neutropenia or thrombocytosis, a normocellular bone marrow with erythroid hypoplasia, and an increased risk of developing leukemia. (Curr Opin Hematol 2000 Mar;7(2):85-94)Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group Proteins: A diverse group of proteins whose genetic MUTATIONS have been associated with the chromosomal instability syndrome FANCONI ANEMIA. Many of these proteins play important roles in protecting CELLS against OXIDATIVE STRESS.Iron: A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Pregnancy Complications, Hematologic: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a blood disease (HEMATOLOGIC DISEASES) which involves BLOOD CELLS or COAGULATION FACTORS. The hematologic disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.Anemia, Neonatal: The mildest form of erythroblastosis fetalis in which anemia is the chief manifestation.Hematinics: Agents which improve the quality of the blood, increasing the hemoglobin level and the number of erythrocytes. They are used in the treatment of anemias.Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts: Chronic refractory anemia with granulocytopenia, and/or thrombocytopenia. Myeloblasts and progranulocytes constitute 5 to 40 percent of the nucleated marrow cells.Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group C Protein: A Fanconi anemia complementation group protein that regulates the activities of CYTOCHROME P450 REDUCTASE and GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE. It is found predominately in the CYTOPLASM, but moves to the CELL NUCLEUS in response to FANCE PROTEIN.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group D2 Protein: A Fanconi anemia complementation group protein that undergoes mono-ubiquitination by FANCL PROTEIN in response to DNA DAMAGE. Also, in response to IONIZING RADIATION it can undergo PHOSPHORYLATION by ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein. Modified FANCD2 interacts with BRCA2 PROTEIN in a stable complex with CHROMATIN, and it is involved in DNA REPAIR by homologous RECOMBINATION.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group A Protein: A Fanconi anemia complementation group protein that is the most commonly mutated protein in FANCONI ANEMIA. It undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION by PROTEIN KINASE B and forms a complex with FANCC PROTEIN in the CELL NUCLEUS.Fetal Heart: The heart of the fetus of any viviparous animal. It refers to the heart in the postembryonic period and is differentiated from the embryonic heart (HEART/embryology) only on the basis of time.Erythropoiesis: The production of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES). In humans, erythrocytes are produced by the YOLK SAC in the first trimester; by the liver in the second trimester; by the BONE MARROW in the third trimester and after birth. In normal individuals, the erythrocyte count in the peripheral blood remains relatively constant implying a balance between the rate of erythrocyte production and rate of destruction.Erythrocyte Count: The number of RED BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Pallor: A clinical manifestation consisting of an unnatural paleness of the skin.Anemia, Hemolytic, Congenital Nonspherocytic: Any one of a group of congenital hemolytic anemias in which there is no abnormal hemoglobin or spherocytosis and in which there is a defect of glycolysis in the erythrocyte. Common causes include deficiencies in GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE ISOMERASE; PYRUVATE KINASE; and GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE.Erythrocyte Indices: ERYTHROCYTE size and HEMOGLOBIN content or concentration, usually derived from ERYTHROCYTE COUNT; BLOOD hemoglobin concentration; and HEMATOCRIT. The indices include the mean corpuscular volume (MCV), the mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC).Ferritins: Iron-containing proteins that are widely distributed in animals, plants, and microorganisms. Their major function is to store IRON in a nontoxic bioavailable form. Each ferritin molecule consists of ferric iron in a hollow protein shell (APOFERRITINS) made of 24 subunits of various sequences depending on the species and tissue types.Heart Valves: Flaps of tissue that prevent regurgitation of BLOOD from the HEART VENTRICLES to the HEART ATRIA or from the PULMONARY ARTERIES or AORTA to the ventricles.Hemoglobinometry: Measurement of hemoglobin concentration in blood.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group G Protein: A Fanconi anemia complementation group protein that undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION by CDC2 PROTEIN KINASE during MITOSIS. It forms a complex with other FANCONI ANEMIA PROTEINS and helps protect CELLS from DNA DAMAGE by genotoxic agents.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Coombs Test: A test to detect non-agglutinating ANTIBODIES against ERYTHROCYTES by use of anti-antibodies (the Coombs' reagent.) The direct test is applied to freshly drawn blood to detect antibody bound to circulating red cells. The indirect test is applied to serum to detect the presence of antibodies that can bind to red blood cells.Reticulocyte Count: The number of RETICULOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD. The values are expressed as a percentage of the ERYTHROCYTE COUNT or in the form of an index ("corrected reticulocyte index"), which attempts to account for the number of circulating erythrocytes.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Iron, Dietary: Iron or iron compounds used in foods or as food. Dietary iron is important in oxygen transport and the synthesis of the iron-porphyrin proteins hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochromes, and cytochrome oxidase. Insufficient amounts of dietary iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Iron Compounds: Organic and inorganic compounds that contain iron as an integral part of the molecule.Hepcidins: Forms of hepcidin, a cationic amphipathic peptide synthesized in the liver as a prepropeptide which is first processed into prohepcidin and then into the biologically active hepcidin forms, including in human the 20-, 22-, and 25-amino acid residue peptide forms. Hepcidin acts as a homeostatic regulators of iron metabolism and also possesses antimicrobial activity.Erythrocytes, Abnormal: Oxygen-carrying RED BLOOD CELLS in mammalian blood that are abnormal in structure or function.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Heart Arrest, Induced: A procedure to stop the contraction of MYOCARDIUM during HEART SURGERY. It is usually achieved with the use of chemicals (CARDIOPLEGIC SOLUTIONS) or cold temperature (such as chilled perfusate).Erythrocyte Transfusion: The transfer of erythrocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Heart Function Tests: Examinations used to diagnose and treat heart conditions.Vitamin B 12 Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of VITAMIN B 12 in the diet, characterized by megaloblastic anemia. Since vitamin B 12 is not present in plants, humans have obtained their supply from animal products, from multivitamin supplements in the form of pills, and as additives to food preparations. A wide variety of neuropsychiatric abnormalities is also seen in vitamin B 12 deficiency and appears to be due to an undefined defect involving myelin synthesis. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p848)Erythrocyte Aging: The senescence of RED BLOOD CELLS. Lacking the organelles that make protein synthesis possible, the mature erythrocyte is incapable of self-repair, reproduction, and carrying out certain functions performed by other cells. This limits the average life span of an erythrocyte to 120 days.beta-Thalassemia: A disorder characterized by reduced synthesis of the beta chains of hemoglobin. There is retardation of hemoglobin A synthesis in the heterozygous form (thalassemia minor), which is asymptomatic, while in the homozygous form (thalassemia major, Cooley's anemia, Mediterranean anemia, erythroblastic anemia), which can result in severe complications and even death, hemoglobin A synthesis is absent.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Isavirus: A genus in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE containing one species: Infectious salmon anemia virus.Pancytopenia: Deficiency of all three cell elements of the blood, erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Thalassemia: A group of hereditary hemolytic anemias in which there is decreased synthesis of one or more hemoglobin polypeptide chains. There are several genetic types with clinical pictures ranging from barely detectable hematologic abnormality to severe and fatal anemia.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Phenylhydrazines: Diazo derivatives of aniline, used as a reagent for sugars, ketones, and aldehydes. (Dorland, 28th ed)Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group F Protein: A Fanconi anemia complementation group protein. It is an essential component of a nuclear core complex that protects the GENOME against CHROMOSOMAL INSTABILITY. It interacts directly with FANCG PROTEIN and helps stabilize a complex with FANCA PROTEIN and FANCC PROTEIN.Myocytes, Cardiac: Striated muscle cells found in the heart. They are derived from cardiac myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, CARDIAC).Blood Cell Count: The number of LEUKOCYTES and ERYTHROCYTES per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD. A complete blood count (CBC) also includes measurement of the HEMOGLOBIN; HEMATOCRIT; and ERYTHROCYTE INDICES.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group E Protein: A Fanconi anemia complementation group protein that interacts with FANCC PROTEIN and FANCD2 PROTEIN. It promotes the accumulation of FANCC protein in the CELL NUCLEUS.Fetal Hemoglobin: The major component of hemoglobin in the fetus. This HEMOGLOBIN has two alpha and two gamma polypeptide subunits in comparison to normal adult hemoglobin, which has two alpha and two beta polypeptide subunits. Fetal hemoglobin concentrations can be elevated (usually above 0.5%) in children and adults affected by LEUKEMIA and several types of ANEMIA.Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Folic Acid Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of FOLIC ACID in the diet. Many plant and animal tissues contain folic acid, abundant in green leafy vegetables, yeast, liver, and mushrooms but destroyed by long-term cooking. Alcohol interferes with its intermediate metabolism and absorption. Folic acid deficiency may develop in long-term anticonvulsant therapy or with use of oral contraceptives. This deficiency causes anemia, macrocytic anemia, and megaloblastic anemia. It is indistinguishable from vitamin B 12 deficiency in peripheral blood and bone marrow findings, but the neurologic lesions seen in B 12 deficiency do not occur. (Merck Manual, 16th ed)Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Vitamin B 12: A cobalt-containing coordination compound produced by intestinal micro-organisms and found also in soil and water. Higher plants do not concentrate vitamin B 12 from the soil and so are a poor source of the substance as compared with animal tissues. INTRINSIC FACTOR is important for the assimilation of vitamin B 12.Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Splenomegaly: Enlargement of the spleen.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Iron Overload: An excessive accumulation of iron in the body due to a greater than normal absorption of iron from the gastrointestinal tract or from parenteral injection. This may arise from idiopathic hemochromatosis, excessive iron intake, chronic alcoholism, certain types of refractory anemia, or transfusional hemosiderosis. (From Churchill's Illustrated Medical Dictionary, 1989)Erythroblasts: Immature, nucleated ERYTHROCYTES occupying the stage of ERYTHROPOIESIS that follows formation of ERYTHROID PRECURSOR CELLS and precedes formation of RETICULOCYTES. The normal series is called normoblasts. Cells called MEGALOBLASTS are a pathologic series of erythroblasts.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Heart Failure, Systolic: Heart failure caused by abnormal myocardial contraction during SYSTOLE leading to defective cardiac emptying.Antilymphocyte Serum: Serum containing GAMMA-GLOBULINS which are antibodies for lymphocyte ANTIGENS. It is used both as a test for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY and therapeutically in TRANSPLANTATION.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Osmotic Fragility: RED BLOOD CELL sensitivity to change in OSMOTIC PRESSURE. When exposed to a hypotonic concentration of sodium in a solution, red cells take in more water, swell until the capacity of the cell membrane is exceeded, and burst.Cardiac Output, Low: A state of subnormal or depressed cardiac output at rest or during stress. It is a characteristic of CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES, including congenital, valvular, rheumatic, hypertensive, coronary, and cardiomyopathic. The serious form of low cardiac output is characterized by marked reduction in STROKE VOLUME, and systemic vasoconstriction resulting in cold, pale, and sometimes cyanotic extremities.Reticulocytes: Immature ERYTHROCYTES. In humans, these are ERYTHROID CELLS that have just undergone extrusion of their CELL NUCLEUS. They still contain some organelles that gradually decrease in number as the cells mature. RIBOSOMES are last to disappear. Certain staining techniques cause components of the ribosomes to precipitate into characteristic "reticulum" (not the same as the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM), hence the name reticulocytes.Parasitemia: The presence of parasites (especially malarial parasites) in the blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)Ferrous Compounds: Inorganic or organic compounds that contain divalent iron.Mitomycin: An antineoplastic antibiotic produced by Streptomyces caespitosus. It is one of the bi- or tri-functional ALKYLATING AGENTS causing cross-linking of DNA and inhibition of DNA synthesis.Receptors, Transferrin: Membrane glycoproteins found in high concentrations on iron-utilizing cells. They specifically bind iron-bearing transferrin, are endocytosed with its ligand and then returned to the cell surface where transferrin without its iron is released.Heinz Bodies: Abnormal intracellular inclusions, composed of denatured hemoglobin, found on the membrane of red blood cells. They are seen in thalassemias, enzymopathies, hemoglobinopathies, and after splenectomy.Hookworm Infections: Infection of humans or animals with hookworms other than those caused by the genus Ancylostoma or Necator, for which the specific terms ANCYLOSTOMIASIS and NECATORIASIS are available.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Hemoglobinopathies: A group of inherited disorders characterized by structural alterations within the hemoglobin molecule.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Thrombocytopenia: A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Heart Failure, Diastolic: Heart failure caused by abnormal myocardial relaxation during DIASTOLE leading to defective cardiac filling.Cardiomegaly: Enlargement of the HEART, usually indicated by a cardiothoracic ratio above 0.50. Heart enlargement may involve the right, the left, or both HEART VENTRICLES or HEART ATRIA. Cardiomegaly is a nonspecific symptom seen in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HEART FAILURE) or several forms of CARDIOMYOPATHIES.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Hemoglobin, Sickle: An abnormal hemoglobin resulting from the substitution of valine for glutamic acid at position 6 of the beta chain of the globin moiety. The heterozygous state results in sickle cell trait, the homozygous in sickle cell anemia.Perfusion: Treatment process involving the injection of fluid into an organ or tissue.Malaria, Falciparum: Malaria caused by PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM. This is the severest form of malaria and is associated with the highest levels of parasites in the blood. This disease is characterized by irregularly recurring febrile paroxysms that in extreme cases occur with acute cerebral, renal, or gastrointestinal manifestations.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Intrinsic Factor: A glycoprotein secreted by the cells of the GASTRIC GLANDS that is required for the absorption of VITAMIN B 12 (cyanocobalamin). Deficiency of intrinsic factor leads to VITAMIN B 12 DEFICIENCY and ANEMIA, PERNICIOUS.alpha-Thalassemia: A disorder characterized by reduced synthesis of the alpha chains of hemoglobin. The severity of this condition can vary from mild anemia to death, depending on the number of genes deleted.Heart, Artificial: A pumping mechanism that duplicates the output, rate, and blood pressure of the natural heart. It may replace the function of the entire heart or a portion of it, and may be an intracorporeal, extracorporeal, or paracorporeal heart. (Dorland, 28th ed)Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Spherocytosis, Hereditary: A group of familial congenital hemolytic anemias characterized by numerous abnormally shaped erythrocytes which are generally spheroidal. The erythrocytes have increased osmotic fragility and are abnormally permeable to sodium ions.Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Cardiotonic Agents: Agents that have a strengthening effect on the heart or that can increase cardiac output. They may be CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES; SYMPATHOMIMETICS; or other drugs. They are used after MYOCARDIAL INFARCT; CARDIAC SURGICAL PROCEDURES; in SHOCK; or in congestive heart failure (HEART FAILURE).Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides: Small cationic peptides that are an important component, in most species, of early innate and induced defenses against invading microbes. In animals they are found on mucosal surfaces, within phagocytic granules, and on the surface of the body. They are also found in insects and plants. Among others, this group includes the DEFENSINS, protegrins, tachyplesins, and thionins. They displace DIVALENT CATIONS from phosphate groups of MEMBRANE LIPIDS leading to disruption of the membrane.Rh Isoimmunization: The process by which fetal Rh+ erythrocytes enter the circulation of an Rh- mother, causing her to produce IMMUNOGLOBULIN G antibodies, which can cross the placenta and destroy the erythrocytes of Rh+ fetuses. Rh isoimmunization can also be caused by BLOOD TRANSFUSION with mismatched blood.Hemolysis: The destruction of ERYTHROCYTES by many different causal agents such as antibodies, bacteria, chemicals, temperature, and changes in tonicity.Folic Acid: A member of the vitamin B family that stimulates the hematopoietic system. It is present in the liver and kidney and is found in mushrooms, spinach, yeast, green leaves, and grasses (POACEAE). Folic acid is used in the treatment and prevention of folate deficiencies and megaloblastic anemia.Cardiomyopathy, Dilated: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.Parvovirus B19, Human: The type species of ERYTHROVIRUS and the etiological agent of ERYTHEMA INFECTIOSUM, a disease most commonly seen in school-age children.Heart Valve Prosthesis: A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.Tanzania: A republic in eastern Africa, south of UGANDA and north of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Dar es Salaam. It was formed in 1964 by a merger of the countries of TANGANYIKA and ZANZIBAR.Nutritional Status: State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.Antisickling Agents: Agents used to prevent or reverse the pathological events leading to sickling of erythrocytes in sickle cell conditions.Heart Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the heart.Erythroid Precursor Cells: The cells in the erythroid series derived from MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS or from the bi-potential MEGAKARYOCYTE-ERYTHROID PROGENITOR CELLS which eventually give rise to mature RED BLOOD CELLS. The erythroid progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by ERYTHROPOIETIN, and then further differentiate into ERYTHROBLASTS when stimulated by other factors.Pregnancy Complications, Parasitic: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and parasitic diseases. The parasitic infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Heart Rate, Fetal: The heart rate of the FETUS. The normal range at term is between 120 and 160 beats per minute.Heart Septum: This structure includes the thin muscular atrial septum between the two HEART ATRIA, and the thick muscular ventricular septum between the two HEART VENTRICLES.Pica: The persistent eating of nonnutritive substances for a period of at least one month. (DSM-IV)Rheumatic Heart Disease: Cardiac manifestation of systemic rheumatological conditions, such as RHEUMATIC FEVER. Rheumatic heart disease can involve any part the heart, most often the HEART VALVES and the ENDOCARDIUM.Renal Dialysis: Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Myocardial Reperfusion Injury: Damage to the MYOCARDIUM resulting from MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION (restoration of blood flow to ischemic areas of the HEART.) Reperfusion takes place when there is spontaneous thrombolysis, THROMBOLYTIC THERAPY, collateral flow from other coronary vascular beds, or reversal of vasospasm.Parvoviridae Infections: Virus infections caused by the PARVOVIRIDAE.Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.Malnutrition: An imbalanced nutritional status resulted from insufficient intake of nutrients to meet normal physiological requirement.Hemoglobins, Abnormal: Hemoglobins characterized by structural alterations within the molecule. The alteration can be either absence, addition or substitution of one or more amino acids in the globin part of the molecule at selected positions in the polypeptide chains.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal: A condition characterized by the recurrence of HEMOGLOBINURIA caused by intravascular HEMOLYSIS. In cases occurring upon cold exposure (paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria), usually after infections, there is a circulating antibody which is also a cold hemolysin. In cases occurring during or after sleep (paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria), the clonal hematopoietic stem cells exhibit a global deficiency of cell membrane proteins.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Splenectomy: Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.Transferrin: An iron-binding beta1-globulin that is synthesized in the LIVER and secreted into the blood. It plays a central role in the transport of IRON throughout the circulation. A variety of transferrin isoforms exist in humans, including some that are considered markers for specific disease states.Hematologic Diseases: Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.Dietary Supplements: Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.Kidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A disease-producing enzyme deficiency subject to many variants, some of which cause a deficiency of GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE activity in erythrocytes, leading to hemolytic anemia.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Salmo salar: A commercially important species of SALMON in the family SALMONIDAE, order SALMONIFORMES, which occurs in the North Atlantic.Reticulocytosis: An increase in circulating RETICULOCYTES, which is among the simplest and most reliable signs of accelerated ERYTHROCYTE production. Reticulocytosis occurs during active BLOOD regeneration (stimulation of red bone marrow) and in certain types of ANEMIA, particularly CONGENITAL HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA.Ventricular Remodeling: The geometric and structural changes that the HEART VENTRICLES undergo, usually following MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. It comprises expansion of the infarct and dilatation of the healthy ventricle segments. While most prevalent in the left ventricle, it can also occur in the right ventricle.Hematologic Tests: Tests used in the analysis of the hemic system.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Kenya: A republic in eastern Africa, south of ETHIOPIA, west of SOMALIA with TANZANIA to its south, and coastline on the Indian Ocean. Its capital is Nairobi.Adrenergic beta-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic beta-antagonists are used for treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, glaucoma, migraine headaches, and anxiety.Bone Marrow DiseasesRats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.American Heart Association: A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of heart and vascular diseases.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Sickle Cell Trait: The condition of being heterozygous for hemoglobin S.Mice, Inbred C57BLBone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Blood Transfusion, Intrauterine: In utero transfusion of BLOOD into the FETUS for the treatment of FETAL DISEASES, such as fetal erythroblastosis (ERYTHROBLASTOSIS, FETAL).5-Aminolevulinate Synthetase: An enzyme of the transferase class that catalyzes condensation of the succinyl group from succinyl coenzyme A with glycine to form delta-aminolevulinate. It is a pyridoxyal phosphate protein and the reaction occurs in mitochondria as the first step of the heme biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme is a key regulatory enzyme in heme biosynthesis. In liver feedback is inhibited by heme. EC 2.3.1.37.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Renal Insufficiency: Conditions in which the KIDNEYS perform below the normal level in the ability to remove wastes, concentrate URINE, and maintain ELECTROLYTE BALANCE; BLOOD PRESSURE; and CALCIUM metabolism. Renal insufficiency can be classified by the degree of kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE.Glucaric Acid: A sugar acid derived from D-glucose in which both the aldehydic carbon atom and the carbon atom bearing the primary hydroxyl group are oxidized to carboxylic acid groups.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Thrombocytosis: Increased numbers of platelets in the peripheral blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Oxymetholone: A synthetic hormone with anabolic and androgenic properties. It is used mainly in the treatment of anemias. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002), this compound may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Natriuretic Peptide, Brain: A PEPTIDE that is secreted by the BRAIN and the HEART ATRIA, stored mainly in cardiac ventricular MYOCARDIUM. It can cause NATRIURESIS; DIURESIS; VASODILATION; and inhibits secretion of RENIN and ALDOSTERONE. It improves heart function. It contains 32 AMINO ACIDS.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Pancytopenia, aplastic anemia, reversible agranulocytosis, low blood platlets, neutropenia. Chloroquine has not been shown to ... and congestive heart failure. The changes may be irreversible. Only two cases have been reported requiring heart ...
... or heart arrhythmias (palpitations). Serious, though rare, side effects include aplastic anemia, pancreatitis, agranulocytosis ... "Heart Failure and Cor Pulmonale". In Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 15th ed., edited by Dennis L. Kasper et al. ... It is primarily used to treat congestive heart failure and high blood pressure. Metolazone indirectly decreases the amount of ... One of the primary uses of metolazone is for treating edema (fluid retention) associated with congestive heart failure (CHF). ...
Tests following surgery indicated blood abnormalities and a diagnosis of aplastic anemia, which resulted in gallstone problems ... His health problems started in September 2002 when he suffered a heart attack and underwent bypass surgery. ...
In 1st to die, she is diagnosed with Negli's aplastic anaemia, a blood disease related to leukaemia. Her off-and-on partner on ... After opening up her heart and bed to him, he is murdered. In the following books, she starts dating Joe Molinari, Deputy ...
Also, some diseases related to hematopoietic system, such as aplastic anemia and complete bone marrow failure, are not ... Another study in a mouse model shows that stem cells do age and their aging can lead to heart failure. Findings of the study ... Diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, end-stage renal failure and heart disease are caused by different mechanisms that are not ... "Diabetes Promotes Cardiac Stem Cell Aging and Heart Failure, Which Are Prevented by Deletion of the p66shc Gene". Circ. Res. 99 ...
Unacceptably high risk of irreversible, fatal aplastic anemia and gray baby syndrome causes systemically administered ... Colistin Linezolid Levosimendan - used in acutely decompensated severe chronic heart failure in situations where conventional ...
... anemia Children with achondroplasia and cretinism Children after a severe episode of enteritis Pernicious anemia Aplastic ... an autosomal recessive disease Postmenopausal women receiving estrogen therapy because of aging Men with recent heart surgery, ... anemia Chronic myelogenous leukemia Wilson's disease In addition, oral contraceptives have been demonstrated to reduce alkaline ... in patients with Chronic kidney disease and is directly associated with Erythropoiesis stimulating agent resistant anemia. ...
Familial hemophagocytic syndrome Aplastic anemia Gaucher's disease metastatic carcinoma of bone Multiple Myeloma overwhelming ... Rarely, drugs (antibiotics, blood pressure medication, heart medication) can cause pancytopenia. The antibiotics Linezolid and ... anemia: hemoglobin < 13.5 g/dL (male) or 12 g/dL (female). leukopenia: total white cell count < 4.0 x 109/L. Decrease in all ... Alimentary toxic aleukia Copper deficiency Pernicious anemia Medication Hypersplenism Osteopetrosis Organic acidurias ( ...
Examples of other conditions that might be covered include: Alzheimer's disease Aortic surgery Aplastic anaemia Bacterial ... "Heart to Heart" (PDF), CoverTen, Incisive Financial Publishing, pp. 11-12, 10 October 2007 "Critical Illness Insurance: Past, ... bypass surgery Deafness Heart attack Heart valve replacement Kidney failure Loss of independent existence Loss of limbs Loss of ... Around 85% of Trauma Insurance claims paid in Australia are for either Cancer or Heart Disease. It is not uncommon for policies ...
1998 for Outstanding Commitment and Dedication in Promoting Joint Research in US-Thailand Collaboration on Aplastic Anemia ... The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Award ...
... aplastic anemia or myelodysplastic syndrome). Treatment is by phlebotomy, erythrocytapheresis or chelation therapy with iron ... Transfusional hemosiderosis is the accumulation of iron in the liver and heart but also endocrine organs, in patients who ...
... residing among patients with aplastic anemia. This work demonstrated an inherited pattern for apparently acquired aplastic ... He has been Chief of the Hematology Branch of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute since 1994 and he was appointed ... Aplastic Anemia, Acquired and Inherited. Philadelphia: Saunders, 1994. Young, Neal S., ed. Viruses As Agents of Haematological ... He is primarily known for work in the pathophysiology and treatment of aplastic anemia, and is also known for his contributions ...
When Abby is 8 months old, she comes down with aplastic anemia as the result of polluted well water. A bone marrow donation ... Jennifer made the heart-renching decision to turn off his life support. It was a decision that Abby couldn't forgive her for. ...
In April 1979, Demetrio Stratos had been diagnosed with a severe case of aplastic anemia. He was 34 years old. His conditions ... more commonly known as heart attack). The band, Demetrio Stratos, Patrizio Fariselli and Paolo Toffani were included in the ... In April 1979, Demetrio Stratos was diagnosed with a severe case of aplastic anemia. His condition deteriorated rapidly and he ...
"Risk of aplastic anemia in patients using antiepileptic drugs". Epilepsia. 47: 1232-6. doi:10.1111/j.1528-1167.2006.00596.x. ... Heart monitoring should occur during and after IV infusion. Due to these risks, oral phenytoin should be used if possible. At ... Other side effects may include: agranulocytosis, aplastic anemia, decreased white blood cell count, and a low platelet count. ... Abnormal heart rhythms: may be used in the treatment of ventricular tachycardia and sudden episodes of atrial tachycardia after ...
The following year, Abigail is diagnosed with Aplastic Anemia. Jennifer teams up with Austin Reed to find the environmental ... Jack finally pours his heart out to her. Later, Jack becomes insecure about his feelings for Jennifer, so she returns to Emilio ... Jennifer eventually wins Jack's heart, and the two get engaged. When Daniel returns, Jennifer asks him if they can be friends, ... Daniel ends up putting Jennifer's heart back into her chest and saves her life. This begins a flirtatious relationship between ...
Direct physical damage to RBCs Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia Secondary to artificial heart valve(s) Aplastic anemia Fanconi ... Iron deficiency anemia Megaloblastic anemia Vitamin B12 deficiency Pernicious anemia Folate deficiency Hemolytic anemias ( ... Autoimmune hemolytic anemia Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia Idiopathic Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) Evans' ... anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia (inherited pure red cell aplasia) Acquired pure red cell aplasia Decreased numbers of cells ...
... there are major effects of aplastic anemia and agranulocytosis reported and more commonly, there are minor changes such as ... Less common side effects may include increased risk of seizures in people with mixed seizure disorders, abnormal heart rhythms ...
Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) The cells employed are allogeneic peripheral blood stem cells. Matched HLA between donor and ... No bone marrow disorder, high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, cardiopulmonary insufficiency, hematological disorder or ... Mismatched HLA with recipient Age between 18 and 60 years old Good overall state of health No major heart or lung surgical ...
... amputation Congenital aneurysms of the great vessels Congenital antithrombin III deficiency Congenital aplastic anemia ... Congenital l Congenital heart block Congenital heart disease ptosis hypodontia craniostosis Congenital heart disease radio ... ocular Colobomata unilobar lung heart defect Colobomatous microphthalmia heart disease hearing Colobomatous microphthalmia ... heart septum defect Congenital hemidysplasia with ichtyosiform erythroderma and limbs defects Congenital hemolytic anemia ...
Chronic symptoms include: anorexia edema oliguria urticaria hypersensitivity aplastic anemia sore throat fever pharyngeal ... urinary frequency intermittent fever fatty infiltration of the liver heart muscle degeneration death due to circulatory failure ... Other symptoms reported via ingestion include hemolytic anemia, porphyria and severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Bone marrow ...
Mutations in TERT have been implicated in predisposing patients to aplastic anemia, a disorder in which the bone marrow fails ... possibly accelerating heart attacks. In 2009, it was shown that the amount of telomerase activity significantly increased ... in aplastic anemia". N. Engl. J. Med. 352 (14): 1413-24. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa042980. PMID 15814878. Zhang, A; Zheng, C; Hou, M; ... Fanconi anemia and Nijmegen breakage syndrome are associated with short telomeres. However, the genes that have mutated in ...
... complications include anemia, jaundice, predisposition to aplastic crisis, sepsis, cholelithiasis, and delayed growth. ... Over-absorption of iron; accumulation of iron in vital organs (heart, liver, pancreas); organ damage; heart disease; cancer; ... Over-absorption of iron; accumulation of iron in vital organs (heart, liver, pancreas); organ damage; heart disease; cancer; ... Sickle cell anaemia. Variable degrees of hemolysis and intermittent episodes of vascular occlusion resulting in tissue ischemia ...
She died of aplastic anemia as a result of prolonged exposure to ionizing radiation emanating from her research materials. The ... It is unknown whether the crash caused the heart attack or the heart attack caused the crash. William Nelson (c. 1879−1903), a ... 13 BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS Death Due to Aplastic Anemia-- Women Workers Who Were Stricken Sued Company.", The New York Times, ... of aplastic anemia resulting from his exposure to the radioactive material. Marie Curie (1867-1934) invented the process to ...
... and aplastic anemia. Because of this risk, patients who are started on ticlopidine are typically monitored with blood tests to ... When a patient needs to have a stent placed in one of the vessels around their heart, it is important that that stent stay open ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice ... and the prevention of strokes and ischemic heart disease. Ticlopidine was introduced to the United States under the trade name ...
Iron-deficiency anemia (or iron-deficiency anaemia) is a common type of anemia. It is caused by not having enough iron in food, not absorbing the iron in food, and/or losing iron because of bleeding. Iron deficiency causes approximately half of all anemia cases worldwide, and affects women more often than men. This is partly because most women have periods (menstruate). There are probably more than one billion people who have anemia.[1] Anemia is most common in areas like Brazil or Central Africa. Asia, Central America and Eastern Europe are affected too, with North America least affected. Symptoms include pale skin, tiredness, and weakness. Anemia can be diagnosed with a blood test by finding out if there is little enough hemoglobin in the blood. ...
The term macrocytic is from Greek words meaning "large cell". A macrocytic class of anemia is an anemia (defined as blood with an insufficient concentration of hemoglobin) in which the red blood cells (erythrocytes) are larger than their normal volume. The normal erythrocyte volume in humans is about 80 to 100 femtoliters (fL= 10−15 L). In metric terms the size is given in equivalent cubic micrometers (1 μm3 = 1 fL). The condition of having erythrocytes which (on average) are too large, is called macrocytosis. In contrast, in microcytic anemia, the erythrocytes are smaller than normal. In a macrocytic anemia, the larger red cells are always associated with insufficient numbers of cells and often also insufficient hemoglobin content per cell. Both of these factors work to the opposite effect of larger cell size, to finally result in a total blood hemoglobin concentration that ...
Anemia (antzinako grezieraz: ἀναιμία, anaimia, "odol gabezia"; ἀν- an-, "gabe" eta αἷμα haima, "odol" hitzetatik) odolaren egoera berezia da, hematien edota hemoglobinaren urritasuna ezaugarri duena. Bera bakarrik azal daiteke, edo beste prozesu zabalago baten agerpena izan. Anemia dagoenean odolak oxigenoa garraiatzeko duen gaitasuna murrizturik dago eta, ondorioz, gorputzeko ehunek eta organoek ohi baino oxigeno gutxiago jasotzen dute. Izan ere, hematietan dagoen hemoglobina molekula da oxigeno garraiatzaile nagusia. Anemiaren ondorioetako bat ehunen hipoxia da. Mota desberdin asko daude, eta horietako bakoitza kausa desberdinak eragina da. Hainbat ikuspegitatik sailka daitezke, dela kausa sortzailearen arabera, edota ondorioz ateratzen den odolaren morfologiaren arabera, baina ez mota batekoak (anemia aplasikoa, anemia hemolitikoa, ...
... , or anemia of chronic inflammation, is a form of anemia seen in chronic infection, chronic immune activation, and malignancy. These conditions all produce massive elevation of Interleukin-6, which stimulates hepcidin production and release from the liver, which in turn reduces the iron carrier protein ferroportin so that access of iron to the circulation is reduced. Other mechanisms may also play a role, such as reduced erythropoiesis. Anemia of chronic inflammation is the preferred term since not all chronic diseases are associated with this form of anemia. Anemia is considered when RBCs count : < 4.5 million in males < 3.9 million in females Or Hemoglobin ( Hb ) content : < 13.5 gm % in males < 11.5 gm % in females In response to inflammatory cytokines, increasingly IL-6, the liver produces increased amounts of hepcidin. Hepcidin in ...
In a healthy person, a red blood cell survives 90 to 120 days in the circulation, so about 1% of human red blood cells break down each day[citation needed]. The spleen (part of the reticulo-endothelial system) is the main organ that removes old and damaged RBCs from the circulation. In healthy individuals, the breakdown and removal of RBCs from the circulation is matched by the production of new RBCs in the bone marrow. In conditions where the rate of RBC breakdown is increased, the body initially compensates by producing more RBCs; however, breakdown of RBCs can exceed the rate that the body can make RBCs, and so anemia can develop. Bilirubin, a breakdown product of hemoglobin, can accumulate in the blood, causing jaundice. In general, hemolytic anemia occurs as a modification of the RBC life cycle. That is, instead of being collected at the end of its useful life and disposed of normally, the RBC disintegrates in a manner allowing free ...
Anemia aplasikoa hezur muinaren funtzionamendu okerraren ondorioz sortutako anemia da. Hezur muinak ez ditu eritrozitoak behar bezala sortzen, eta horien gabezia odolean anemia eragiten du. Eritrozitoak ez ezik, odoleko beste zelulak ere (leukozitoak eta plaketak) ez dira hezur muinean zuzen sortzen. ...
Dimorphic anemia means two types of anemia at the same time. For example, macrocytic hypochromic, due to hookworm infestation leading to not enough of both iron and vitamin B12 or folic acid or following a blood transfusion. ...
Janz TG, Johnson RL, Rubenstein SD (November 2013). "Anemia in the emergency department: evaluation and treatment". Emergency Medicine Practice. 15 (11): 1-15, quiz 15-6. PMID 24716235. Archived frae the oreeginal on 2016-10-18 ...
Bitamina honen gabeziak anemia kaltegarri izeneko gaitza eragiten du: eritrozitoen kopurua asko jaisten da (eritropoiesiak akats larriak baititu), eta kalte neurologiko eta gastrointestinalak agertzen dira. Behar den baino gutxiago hartzen denean, anemia kaltegarria agertzen ez bada ere, beste gaitz batzuk etor daitezke: nekea, depresioa eta oroimen ahula, besteak beste. Azpimarratu behar da bitamina hau heste meharrean xurgatua izan dadin beharrezkoa dela urdailak ekoizten duen FI faktorea ("faktore intrintsekoa"). Faktorerik ezean hartutako kobalamina ez da xurgatzen eta ez da odolera iristen, anemia kaltegarria agertuz. ...
Yr anhwylder y gwaed mwyaf cyffredin yw Aneamia, sef lleihad yn y nifer arferol o gelloedd gwaed coch neu lai na'r maint arferol o haemoglobin yn y gwaed a achosir gan ddiffyg haearn yn y deiet.[1] ...
অবর্ধক রক্তশূন্যতা (ইংরেজি: Aplastic anemia) একটি রোগ যাতে অস্থিমজ্জার কোষগুলি যথেষ্ট পরিমাণে নতুন রক্তকোষ উৎপাদন করে না, ফলে রক্তে এই কোষগুলির স্বল্পতা দেখা যায়। সাধারণত রক্তশূন্যতা বলতে কেবল লোহিত রক্তকণিকার অভাব বোঝালেও অবর্ধক রক্তশূন্যতায় তিন ধরনের রক্তকোষের (লোহিত কণিকা, শ্বেতকণিকা এবং অণুচক্রিকা) উৎপাদনই হ্রাস পায়। . ...
Vnetje srednjega ušesa je vnetna bolezen srednjega ušesa, ki jo povzročajo mikroorganizmi. Navadno je akutno, gnojno ali serozno, z bolečino, lahko z vročino in vnetjem zgornje dihalne poti.[1]. Srednje uho leži za bobničem in je v normalnih razmerah, ko smo zdravi, napolnjeno z zrakom. Ob okužbi se mikroorganizmi začnejo razmnoževati in votlinica za bobničem se napolni s tekočino ali gnojem, ki prične potiskati na bobnič. Zato se pri vnetju ušes pogosto pojavi bolečina. Mikroorganizmi običajno pridejo v srednje uho iz žrela in nosau skozi ušesno trobljo, ki povezuje žrelo in nos z ušesom. Vnetje srednjega ušesa se pri dojenčkih in otrocih pojavlja pogosteje kot odrasli, saj je njihova ušesna troblja kratka. Nekateri otroci so manj odporni za okužbe in se jim vnetje ponavlja. Bakterijsko vnetje srednjega ušesa se lahko zdravi z ustreznim antibiotikom, ki ga predpiše zdravnik.. ...
દરિયા-સ્તરના દબાણે સ્વસ્થ માનવ શ્વસન હવામાં ધમનીય લોહીના નમૂના પૈકીનો લગભગ 98.5% જેટલો પ્રાણવાયુ Hgb(હિમોગ્લોબિન) સાથે ભળી જાય છે. લગભગ 1.5% જેટલા નમૂના અન્ય રક્ત પ્રવાહીઓમાં ભળી જાય છે અને હિમોગ્લોબિન સાથે સંકળાતો નથી. સસ્તનોમાં અને અન્ય અનેક જાતોમાં હિમોગ્લોબિનના કણો એ પ્રાણવાયુના પ્રાથમિક પરિવાહકો છે(અપવાદ માટે જુઓ નીચે). હિમોગ્લોબિનની પ્રાણવાયુ બંધનકર્તા ક્ષમતા અંદાજે 1.36 અને.37 ...
Anemia: Central venous hemoglobin , 13 g/dL or capillary hemoglobin , 14.5 g/dL in infant , 34 weeks and 0-28 days old Average ... Neonatal Anemia. Kirsten E. Crowley, MD June 2005. Definitions. ... Congestive heart disease common in anemic twin and ... Bone marrow aspiration for congenital hypoplastic or aplastic anemia. *TORCH: bone films, IgM levels, serologies, urine for CMV ... Fanconi Anemia Erica Antell -. what is fanconi anemia?. fanconi anemia is one of the inherited anemias that causes bone marrow ...
See how people just like you are living with aplastic anemia. Learn from their data and experience. ... Talk to people with aplastic anemia. Heart, Blood, and Circulatory Forum. 74112 members 2k+ posts , 603 topics ... What is aplastic anemia?. Aplastic anemia is a condition where bone marrow does not produce sufficient new cells to replenish ... 2 aplastic anemia patients report severe depressed mood (8%). * 5 aplastic anemia patients report moderate depressed mood (20%) ...
Researchers sequenced samples from hundreds of individuals with aplastic anemia to narrow in on somatic mutation and clonal ... Home » Tools & Technology » Sequencing » Sequencing Offers Clues to Clonal Evolution in Aplastic Anemia ... Sequencing Offers Clues to Clonal Evolution in Aplastic Anemia. Jul 02, 2015 ... researchers from the US and Japan described mutation and clonal dynamic patterns in aplastic anemia - a non-cancerous condition ...
Way to Personalize Heart Health in Diabetes Identified. More Than Half of U.S Children Will Have Obesity as Adults. ... Regen BioPharma Responds to FDA Comments on Its Application for Orphan Drug Designation on its Aplastic Anemia Therapy. ... In fact, patients with aplastic anemia typically die within one year of diagnosis. Immunosuppressive therapy has shown some ... The FDA recently cleared Regen to perform phase I clinical trials using HemaXellerate in aplastic anemia patients. ...
Aplastic anemia is a condition in which the bone marrow does not make enough blood cells. Bone marrow is the soft, tissue in ... Low red cell count (anemia) can cause:. *Fatigue. *Pallor (paleness). *Rapid heart rate ... Aplastic anemia is a condition in which the bone marrow does not make enough blood cells. Bone marrow is the soft, tissue in ... Aplastic anemia results from damage to the blood stem cells. Stem cells are immature cells in the bone marrow that give rise to ...
Read more about Jill Mindens Encounter with Aplastic Anemia. Published on Tue, 09/05/2017 - 10:35am. Study suggests heart ... The Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation. (800) 747-2820 , (301) 279-7202. 4330 East West Highway, Suite 230. ... Read more about Study suggests heart drugs may boost chemotherapy in AML ...
Aplastic Anemia - an easy to understand guide covering causes, diagnosis, symptoms, treatment and prevention plus additional in ... http://www.aplastic.org/ National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) 6701 Rockledge Drive. P.O. Box 30105. Bethesda, MD ... Some forms of aplastic anemia cannot be prevented. Treatment. How you are treated for aplastic anemia depends on its cause and ... Fanconis anemia is an inherited condition that causes aplastic anemia and also physical abnormalities. Some women develop a ...
Idiopathic aplastic anemia is a condition in which your bone marrow stops making new blood cells. Learn about the symptoms of ... Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia. The symptoms of aplastic anemia are similar to those of general anemia. When your RBC count is low ... What Is Idiopathic Aplastic Anemia?. Idiopathic aplastic anemia is a type of anemia in which your bone marrow stops making new ... Aplastic Anemia Prevention. There is no known way to prevent idiopathic aplastic anemia. Unlike other forms of anemia, it cant ...
Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesnt make enough new blood cells. ... Iron Chelation (Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation) * What Is a Blood Transfusion? (National Heart, Lung, and Blood ... Article: Novel therapeutic choices in immune aplastic anemia. * Article: Very long-term follow-up of aplastic anemia treated ... Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia (Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation) ...
Aplastic anemia - Reference guide covers symptoms, causes, treatment of this rare blood disorder. ... Aplastic anemia symptoms may include:. *Fatigue. *Shortness of breath with exertion. *Rapid or irregular heart rate ... Aplastic anemia can be very severe and even fatal.. Causes. Aplastic anemia develops when damage occurs to your bone marrow, ... In aplastic anemia, bone marrow contains fewer blood cells than normal.. Once youve received a diagnosis of aplastic anemia, ...
Aplastic anemia occurs when your bone marrow stops producing enough new blood cells. Its a serious problem, but treatments are ... Aplastic anemia. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/aplastic. ... The Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation. Aplastic anemia. http://www.aamds.org/diseases/aplastic-anemia. Accessed ... Aplastic anemia is a condition that occurs when your body stops producing enough new blood cells. Aplastic anemia leaves you ...
Aplastic Anemia. Aplastic anemia is a rare, serious blood disorder in which the bone marrow stops making enough new blood cells ... Platelets can be destroyed when they pass through man-made heart valves, blood vessel grafts, or machines and tubing used for ... It causes blood clots to form in the bodys small blood vessels, including vessels in the brains, kidneys, and heart. ...
Aplastic anemia occurs when your bone marrow stops producing enough new blood cells. Its a serious problem, but treatments are ... Aplastic anemia. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/aplastic. ... The Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation. Aplastic anemia. http://www.aamds.org/diseases/aplastic-anemia. Accessed ... www.merckmanuals.com/professional/hematology-and-oncology/anemias-caused-by-deficient-erythropoiesis/aplastic-anemia. Accessed ...
Luca on is pancytopenia resulting from chemotherapy is same as aplastic anemia: Aplastic anemia means something is wrong with ... trusted information on the use of Chemotherapy for Anemia: Dr. ... No problems noted in heart Dr. Sewa Legha Dr. Legha ... Is anemia a symptom of Sickle Cell Anemia, or is Sickle Cell Anemia a type of anemia and if so do you have the same number of ... Lower WBC count: Aplastic anemia and to some extent fanconi anemia are associated with low WBC counts as well as low counts of ...
Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01623167 .). ... Eltrombopag Added to Standard Immunosuppression for Aplastic Anemia.. Townsley DM1, Scheinberg P1, Winkler T1, Desmond R1, ... Acquired aplastic anemia results from immune-mediated destruction of bone marrow. Immunosuppressive therapies are effective, ... In patients with aplastic anemia that was refractory to immunosuppression, eltrombopag, a synthetic thrombopoietin-receptor ...
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). National Cancer Institute (NCI). Information provided by (Responsible Party ... MedlinePlus related topics: Anemia Aplastic Anemia Bone Marrow Transplantation Drug Information available for: Cyclophosphamide ... Anemia. Anemia, Aplastic. Hematologic Diseases. Bone Marrow Diseases. Cyclophosphamide. Fludarabine phosphate. Thymoglobulin. ... Aplastic Anemia Drug: Antithymocyte Globulin Drug: Cyclophosphamide Drug: Fludarabine Radiation: Total Body Irradiation (TBI) ...
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Information provided by:. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) ... An association of aplastic anaemia in Thailand with low socioeconomic status. Aplastic Anemia Study Group. Br J Haematol. 1995 ... Incidence of aplastic anemia in Bangkok. The Aplastic Anemia Study Group. Blood. 1991 May 15;77(10):2166-8. ... Use of household pesticides and the risk of aplastic anaemia in Thailand. The Aplastic Anemia Study Group. Int J Epidemiol. ...
Acquired Aplastic Anemia. NORD gratefully acknowledges Neal S. Young, MD, NIH/Hemalotogy Branch of the Heart Lung and Blood ... Acquired aplastic anemia. Ann Intern Med. 2002;136:534-46.. Brodsky RA. High-dose cyclophosphamide for aplastic anemia ... Contact for additional information about acquired aplastic anemia:. Neal S Young, MD. Chief, Hematology Branch. National Heart ... Aplastic anemia may also occur as part of an inherited disorder such as Fanconi anemia, the telomere diseases, Schwachman- ...
... congestive heart failure (greater than NY Class II), poorly controlled diabetes, coronary angioplasty within 6 months, or ... No diagnosis of Fanconis anemia, dyskeratosis congenita, or other congenital forms of aplastic anemia. ... Aplastic Anemia Pancytopenia Drug: Recombinant Methionyl Human Stem Cell Factor (r-metHuSCF) Phase 1 ... Aplastic anemia (first of two parts): pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. N Engl J Med. 1982 Mar 18;306(11):645- ...
The study, appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine, could lead to tailor-made treatment plans for aplastic anemia ... Scientists have identified a group of genetic mutations in patients with aplastic anemia, which likely will help doctors ... Heart, Heart Disease, Hematology, Immune System, Leukemia, Lungs, Medicine, Mutation, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Myeloid ... Tags: Anemia, Aplastic Anemia, Bleeding, Blood, Bone, Bone Marrow, Cancer, Cell, Cell Production, Children, DNA, DNA Sequencing ...
1] National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. What is aplastic anemia? Accessed August 26, 2015. Available at: http://www.nhlbi. ... Revolade is the first approved therapy in the EU for patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) who have not responded to other ... Decreased infection-related mortality and improved survival in severe aplastic anemia in the past two decades. Clin Infect Dis ... Epidemiology of aplastic anemia: a prospective multicenter study. Haematologica. 2008; 93(4):518-523.. [5] Valdez JM, ...
Aplastic Anemia. Aplastic anemia (AA) is a term that refers to a condition where the body fails to produce enough blood cells. ... Risk For Heart Disease Increases Among People Infected With Hepatitis C. People chronically infected with hepatitis C were more ... Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Vasculitis Silent Killer Diseases Liver Flu Aplastic Anemia Hepatitis C Hepatitis Needlestick Injuries ... likely to suffer from atherosclerosis, which is a precursor condition for heart disease. ...
Aplastic anemia (AA) is an immune-mediated and life-threatening form of acquired bone marrow failure (BMF), characterized by ... Inhibition of neutrophil adherence improves postischemic ventricular performance of the neonatal heart. Circulation. 1993;88(5 ... Severe Aplastic Anaemia Working Party. Should irradiated blood products be given routinely to all patients with aplastic ... Aplastic anaemia in sublethally irradiated mice given allogeneic lymph node cells. Br J Haematol. 1967;13:482-91.CrossRefPubMed ...
Patients with clinically evident congestive heart failure, serious cardiac arrhythmias; symptoms of coronary artery disease ... Anemia. Anemia, Aplastic. Hematologic Diseases. Bone Marrow Diseases. Cyclosporine. Cyclosporins. Thymoglobulin. Antilymphocyte ... Anti-thymocyte Globulin and Cyclosporine as First-Line Therapy in Treating Patients With Severe Aplastic Anemia. The safety and ... Efficacy of rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin in severe aplastic anemia. Haematologica. 2011 Sep;96(9):1269-75. doi: 10.3324/ ...
Townsley is a staff physician and clinical investigator in the Hematology Branch of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood ... What is eltrombopag and how does it work when applied to aplastic anemia ? This is a drug that is already FDA-approved to treat ... Where can patients go for more information about eltrombopag and its use in treating severe aplastic anemia? Of course www. ... We knew that other growth factor types of drugs were tried in aplastic anemia and they had not been successful. So we werent ...
  • Viruses that have been linked to the development of aplastic anemia include hepatitis, Epstein-Barr, cytomegalovirus, parvovirus B19 and HIV. (drugs.com)
  • Many agents have been mentioned in case reports to be associated with the development of aplastic anemia and include drugs, chemicals, pesticides, radiation, and viral infection. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The degree of association between viral hepatitis and the development of aplastic anemia was estimated. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The Anemia Drugs Market is expected to register a CAGR of 8.4% during the forecast period 2018-2022. (medgadget.com)
  • http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/hematology-and-oncology/anemias-caused-by-deficient-erythropoiesis/aplastic-anemia. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Neal S. Young, chief of the hematology branch at the NIH's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, was the study's co-leader. (news-medical.net)
  • Dr. Townsley is a staff physician and clinical investigator in the Hematology Branch of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) at the Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. (aamds.org)
  • Anemia is a set of conditions characterized by weakness, shortness of breath and a general tiredness due to a decrease in the total amount of red blood cells (RBCs) or hemoglobin in the blood. (medgadget.com)