Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions: Disorders that result from the intended use of PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. Included in this heading are a broad variety of chemically-induced adverse conditions due to toxicity, DRUG INTERACTIONS, and metabolic effects of pharmaceuticals.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Antipsychotic Agents: Agents that control agitated psychotic behavior, alleviate acute psychotic states, reduce psychotic symptoms, and exert a quieting effect. They are used in SCHIZOPHRENIA; senile dementia; transient psychosis following surgery; or MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; etc. These drugs are often referred to as neuroleptics alluding to the tendency to produce neurological side effects, but not all antipsychotics are likely to produce such effects. Many of these drugs may also be effective against nausea, emesis, and pruritus.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Analgesics, Opioid: Compounds with activity like OPIATE ALKALOIDS, acting at OPIOID RECEPTORS. Properties include induction of ANALGESIA or NARCOSIS.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Nausea: An unpleasant sensation in the stomach usually accompanied by the urge to vomit. Common causes are early pregnancy, sea and motion sickness, emotional stress, intense pain, food poisoning, and various enteroviruses.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Vomiting: The forcible expulsion of the contents of the STOMACH through the MOUTH.Drug Evaluation: Any process by which toxicity, metabolism, absorption, elimination, preferred route of administration, safe dosage range, etc., for a drug or group of drugs is determined through clinical assessment in humans or veterinary animals.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Analgesics: Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Basal Ganglia Diseases: Diseases of the BASAL GANGLIA including the PUTAMEN; GLOBUS PALLIDUS; claustrum; AMYGDALA; and CAUDATE NUCLEUS. DYSKINESIAS (most notably involuntary movements and alterations of the rate of movement) represent the primary clinical manifestations of these disorders. Common etiologies include CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS; NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES; and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Delayed-Action Preparations: Dosage forms of a drug that act over a period of time by controlled-release processes or technology.Drug Eruptions: Adverse cutaneous reactions caused by ingestion, parenteral use, or local application of a drug. These may assume various morphologic patterns and produce various types of lesions.Anticonvulsants: Drugs used to prevent SEIZURES or reduce their severity.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Morphine: The principal alkaloid in opium and the prototype opiate analgesic and narcotic. Morphine has widespread effects in the central nervous system and on smooth muscle.Placebos: Any dummy medication or treatment. Although placebos originally were medicinal preparations having no specific pharmacological activity against a targeted condition, the concept has been extended to include treatments or procedures, especially those administered to control groups in clinical trials in order to provide baseline measurements for the experimental protocol.Anti-Inflammatory Agents: Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Clozapine: A tricylic dibenzodiazepine, classified as an atypical antipsychotic agent. It binds several types of central nervous system receptors, and displays a unique pharmacological profile. Clozapine is a serotonin antagonist, with strong binding to 5-HT 2A/2C receptor subtype. It also displays strong affinity to several dopaminergic receptors, but shows only weak antagonism at the dopamine D2 receptor, a receptor commonly thought to modulate neuroleptic activity. Agranulocytosis is a major adverse effect associated with administration of this agent.Haloperidol: A phenyl-piperidinyl-butyrophenone that is used primarily to treat SCHIZOPHRENIA and other PSYCHOSES. It is also used in schizoaffective disorder, DELUSIONAL DISORDERS, ballism, and TOURETTE SYNDROME (a drug of choice) and occasionally as adjunctive therapy in INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY and the chorea of HUNTINGTON DISEASE. It is a potent antiemetic and is used in the treatment of intractable HICCUPS. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p279)Glucocorticoids: A group of CORTICOSTEROIDS that affect carbohydrate metabolism (GLUCONEOGENESIS, liver glycogen deposition, elevation of BLOOD SUGAR), inhibit ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE secretion, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory activity. They also play a role in fat and protein metabolism, maintenance of arterial blood pressure, alteration of the connective tissue response to injury, reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes, and functioning of the central nervous system.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Injections, Spinal: Introduction of therapeutic agents into the spinal region using a needle and syringe.Hypertrichosis: Excessive hair growth at inappropriate locations, such as on the extremities, the head, and the back. It is caused by genetic or acquired factors, and is an androgen-independent process. This concept does not include HIRSUTISM which is an androgen-dependent excess hair growth in WOMEN and CHILDREN.Drug Combinations: Single preparations containing two or more active agents, for the purpose of their concurrent administration as a fixed dose mixture.Benzodiazepines: A group of two-ring heterocyclic compounds consisting of a benzene ring fused to a diazepine ring.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Dermatologic Agents: Drugs used to treat or prevent skin disorders or for the routine care of skin.Akathisia, Drug-Induced: A condition associated with the use of certain medications and characterized by an internal sense of motor restlessness often described as an inability to resist the urge to move.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Analgesia: Methods of PAIN relief that may be used with or in place of ANALGESICS.Pruritus: An intense itching sensation that produces the urge to rub or scratch the skin to obtain relief.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Fentanyl: A potent narcotic analgesic, abuse of which leads to habituation or addiction. It is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. Fentanyl is also used as an adjunct to general anesthetics, and as an anesthetic for induction and maintenance. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1078)Drug Interactions: The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.Gastrointestinal Diseases: Diseases in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Infusions, Intravenous: The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.Risperidone: A selective blocker of DOPAMINE D2 RECEPTORS and SEROTONIN 5-HT2 RECEPTORS that acts as an atypical antipsychotic agent. It has been shown to improve both positive and negative symptoms in the treatment of SCHIZOPHRENIA.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Dyskinesia, Drug-Induced: Abnormal movements, including HYPERKINESIS; HYPOKINESIA; TREMOR; and DYSTONIA, associated with the use of certain medications or drugs. Muscles of the face, trunk, neck, and extremities are most commonly affected. Tardive dyskinesia refers to abnormal hyperkinetic movements of the muscles of the face, tongue, and neck associated with the use of neuroleptic agents (see ANTIPSYCHOTIC AGENTS). (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1199)Ointments: Semisolid preparations used topically for protective emollient effects or as a vehicle for local administration of medications. Ointment bases are various mixtures of fats, waxes, animal and plant oils and solid and liquid hydrocarbons.Polyethylene Glycols: Polymers of ETHYLENE OXIDE and water, and their ethers. They vary in consistency from liquid to solid depending on the molecular weight indicated by a number following the name. They are used as SURFACTANTS, dispersing agents, solvents, ointment and suppository bases, vehicles, and tablet excipients. Some specific groups are NONOXYNOLS, OCTOXYNOLS, and POLOXAMERS.Injections, Intramuscular: Forceful administration into a muscle of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the muscle and any tissue covering it.Analgesia, Epidural: The relief of pain without loss of consciousness through the introduction of an analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal. It is differentiated from ANESTHESIA, EPIDURAL which refers to the state of insensitivity to sensation.Analgesia, Patient-Controlled: Relief of PAIN, without loss of CONSCIOUSNESS, through ANALGESIC AGENTS administered by the patients. It has been used successfully to control POSTOPERATIVE PAIN, during OBSTETRIC LABOR, after BURNS, and in TERMINAL CARE. The choice of agent, dose, and lockout interval greatly influence effectiveness. The potential for overdose can be minimized by combining small bolus doses with a mandatory interval between successive doses (lockout interval).Antiviral Agents: Agents used in the prophylaxis or therapy of VIRUS DISEASES. Some of the ways they may act include preventing viral replication by inhibiting viral DNA polymerase; binding to specific cell-surface receptors and inhibiting viral penetration or uncoating; inhibiting viral protein synthesis; or blocking late stages of virus assembly.Alopecia: Absence of hair from areas where it is normally present.Prednisolone: A glucocorticoid with the general properties of the corticosteroids. It is the drug of choice for all conditions in which routine systemic corticosteroid therapy is indicated, except adrenal deficiency states.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Drug Tolerance: Progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, resulting from its continued administration. It should be differentiated from DRUG RESISTANCE wherein an organism, disease, or tissue fails to respond to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should also be differentiated from MAXIMUM TOLERATED DOSE and NO-OBSERVED-ADVERSE-EFFECT LEVEL.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Bupivacaine: A widely used local anesthetic agent.Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic: Substances that contain a fused three-ring moiety and are used in the treatment of depression. These drugs block the uptake of norepinephrine and serotonin into axon terminals and may block some subtypes of serotonin, adrenergic, and histamine receptors. However the mechanism of their antidepressant effects is not clear because the therapeutic effects usually take weeks to develop and may reflect compensatory changes in the central nervous system.Cyclohexanecarboxylic AcidsCyclosporine: A cyclic undecapeptide from an extract of soil fungi. It is a powerful immunosupressant with a specific action on T-lymphocytes. It is used for the prophylaxis of graft rejection in organ and tissue transplantation. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed).Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Drug Carriers: Forms to which substances are incorporated to improve the delivery and the effectiveness of drugs. Drug carriers are used in drug-delivery systems such as the controlled-release technology to prolong in vivo drug actions, decrease drug metabolism, and reduce drug toxicity. Carriers are also used in designs to increase the effectiveness of drug delivery to the target sites of pharmacological actions. Liposomes, albumin microspheres, soluble synthetic polymers, DNA complexes, protein-drug conjugates, and carrier erythrocytes among others have been employed as biodegradable drug carriers.Drug Evaluation, Preclinical: Preclinical testing of drugs in experimental animals or in vitro for their biological and toxic effects and potential clinical applications.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Antidepressive Agents: Mood-stimulating drugs used primarily in the treatment of affective disorders and related conditions. Several MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS are useful as antidepressants apparently as a long-term consequence of their modulation of catecholamine levels. The tricyclic compounds useful as antidepressive agents (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC) also appear to act through brain catecholamine systems. A third group (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, SECOND-GENERATION) is a diverse group of drugs including some that act specifically on serotonergic systems.Injections: Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.Administration, Cutaneous: The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Interferon-alpha: One of the type I interferons produced by peripheral blood leukocytes or lymphoblastoid cells. In addition to antiviral activity, it activates NATURAL KILLER CELLS and B-LYMPHOCYTES, and down-regulates VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR expression through PI-3 KINASE and MAPK KINASES signaling pathways.Adrenal Cortex HormonesPatient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Piperidines: A family of hexahydropyridines.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.PiperazinesQuestionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Analgesics, Non-Narcotic: A subclass of analgesic agents that typically do not bind to OPIOID RECEPTORS and are not addictive. Many non-narcotic analgesics are offered as NONPRESCRIPTION DRUGS.Epilepsy: A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)Drugs, Chinese Herbal: Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Antiemetics: Drugs used to prevent NAUSEA or VOMITING.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Anti-Anxiety Agents: Agents that alleviate ANXIETY, tension, and ANXIETY DISORDERS, promote sedation, and have a calming effect without affecting clarity of consciousness or neurologic conditions. ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS are commonly used in the symptomatic treatment of anxiety but are not included here.Metoclopramide: A dopamine D2 antagonist that is used as an antiemetic.Pain, Intractable: Persistent pain that is refractory to some or all forms of treatment.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Radiation Injuries: Harmful effects of non-experimental exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation in VERTEBRATES.Prodrugs: A compound that, on administration, must undergo chemical conversion by metabolic processes before becoming the pharmacologically active drug for which it is a prodrug.Skin DiseasesDrug Design: The molecular designing of drugs for specific purposes (such as DNA-binding, enzyme inhibition, anti-cancer efficacy, etc.) based on knowledge of molecular properties such as activity of functional groups, molecular geometry, and electronic structure, and also on information cataloged on analogous molecules. Drug design is generally computer-assisted molecular modeling and does not include pharmacokinetics, dosage analysis, or drug administration analysis.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Treatment Refusal: Patient or client refusal of or resistance to medical, psychological, or psychiatric treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Medication Adherence: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in taking drugs or medicine as prescribed. This includes timing, dosage, and frequency.Ketamine: A cyclohexanone derivative used for induction of anesthesia. Its mechanism of action is not well understood, but ketamine can block NMDA receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE) and may interact with sigma receptors.Pharmacogenetics: A branch of genetics which deals with the genetic variability in individual responses to drugs and drug metabolism (BIOTRANSFORMATION).Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Doxorubicin: Antineoplastic antibiotic obtained from Streptomyces peucetius. It is a hydroxy derivative of DAUNORUBICIN.Contraceptive Agents: Chemical substances that prevent or reduce the probability of CONCEPTION.Hypnotics and Sedatives: Drugs used to induce drowsiness or sleep or to reduce psychological excitement or anxiety.Flushing: A transient reddening of the face that may be due to fever, certain drugs, exertion, stress, or a disease process.Oxycodone: A semisynthetic derivative of CODEINE.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.Tramadol: A narcotic analgesic proposed for severe pain. It may be habituating.Radiotherapy: The use of IONIZING RADIATION to treat malignant NEOPLASMS and some benign conditions.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic: Agents obtained from higher plants that have demonstrable cytostatic or antineoplastic activity.Amitriptyline: Tricyclic antidepressant with anticholinergic and sedative properties. It appears to prevent the re-uptake of norepinephrine and serotonin at nerve terminals, thus potentiating the action of these neurotransmitters. Amitriptyline also appears to antagonize cholinergic and alpha-1 adrenergic responses to bioactive amines.Crystallography, X-Ray: The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Dizziness: An imprecise term which may refer to a sense of spatial disorientation, motion of the environment, or lightheadedness.Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors: Compounds that specifically inhibit the reuptake of serotonin in the brain.Cisplatin: An inorganic and water-soluble platinum complex. After undergoing hydrolysis, it reacts with DNA to produce both intra and interstrand crosslinks. These crosslinks appear to impair replication and transcription of DNA. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin correlates with cellular arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle.Pregnenediones: Unsaturated pregnane derivatives containing two keto groups on side chains or ring structures.Drug Synergism: The action of a drug in promoting or enhancing the effectiveness of another drug.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Mice, Inbred C57BLLoperamide: One of the long-acting synthetic ANTIDIARRHEALS; it is not significantly absorbed from the gut, and has no effect on the adrenergic system or central nervous system, but may antagonize histamine and interfere with acetylcholine release locally.Electroconvulsive Therapy: Electrically induced CONVULSIONS primarily used in the treatment of severe AFFECTIVE DISORDERS and SCHIZOPHRENIA.Constipation: Infrequent or difficult evacuation of FECES. These symptoms are associated with a variety of causes, including low DIETARY FIBER intake, emotional or nervous disturbances, systemic and structural disorders, drug-induced aggravation, and infections.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Sufentanil: An opioid analgesic that is used as an adjunct in anesthesia, in balanced anesthesia, and as a primary anesthetic agent.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Gingival Hyperplasia: Non-inflammatory enlargement of the gingivae produced by factors other than local irritation. It is characteristically due to an increase in the number of cells. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p400)Drug Administration Routes: The various ways of administering a drug or other chemical to a site in a patient or animal from where the chemical is absorbed into the blood and delivered to the target tissue.Tacrolimus: A macrolide isolated from the culture broth of a strain of Streptomyces tsukubaensis that has strong immunosuppressive activity in vivo and prevents the activation of T-lymphocytes in response to antigenic or mitogenic stimulation in vitro.Sulfonamides: A group of compounds that contain the structure SO2NH2.Ophthalmic Solutions: Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.Pyrazoles: Azoles of two nitrogens at the 1,2 positions, next to each other, in contrast with IMIDAZOLES in which they are at the 1,3 positions.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Carbamazepine: An anticonvulsant used to control grand mal and psychomotor or focal seizures. Its mode of action is not fully understood, but some of its actions resemble those of PHENYTOIN; although there is little chemical resemblance between the two compounds, their three-dimensional structure is similar.Misoprostol: A synthetic analog of natural prostaglandin E1. It produces a dose-related inhibition of gastric acid and pepsin secretion, and enhances mucosal resistance to injury. It is an effective anti-ulcer agent and also has oxytocic properties.Taste Disorders: Conditions characterized by an alteration in gustatory function or perception. Taste disorders are frequently associated with OLFACTION DISORDERS. Additional potential etiologies include METABOLIC DISEASES; DRUG TOXICITY; and taste pathway disorders (e.g., TASTE BUD diseases; FACIAL NERVE DISEASES; GLOSSOPHARYNGEAL NERVE DISEASES; and BRAIN STEM diseases).Catalepsy: A condition characterized by inactivity, decreased responsiveness to stimuli, and a tendency to maintain an immobile posture. The limbs tend to remain in whatever position they are placed (waxy flexibility). Catalepsy may be associated with PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS (e.g., SCHIZOPHRENIA, CATATONIC), nervous system drug toxicity, and other conditions.Erythema: Redness of the skin produced by congestion of the capillaries. This condition may result from a variety of causes.Ketorolac: A pyrrolizine carboxylic acid derivative structurally related to INDOMETHACIN. It is an NSAID and is used principally for its analgesic activity. (From Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed)Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological: Physiological disturbances in normal sexual performance in either the male or the female.Pulse Therapy, Drug: Administration of high doses of pharmaceuticals over short periods of time.Neurotoxicity Syndromes: Neurologic disorders caused by exposure to toxic substances through ingestion, injection, cutaneous application, or other method. This includes conditions caused by biologic, chemical, and pharmaceutical agents.Infusions, Parenteral: The administration of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through some other route than the alimentary canal, usually over minutes or hours, either by gravity flow or often by infusion pumping.Meperidine: A narcotic analgesic that can be used for the relief of most types of moderate to severe pain, including postoperative pain and the pain of labor. Prolonged use may lead to dependence of the morphine type; withdrawal symptoms appear more rapidly than with morphine and are of shorter duration.Drug Monitoring: The process of observing, recording, or detecting the effects of a chemical substance administered to an individual therapeutically or diagnostically.DibenzothiazepinesModels, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Nanoparticles: Nanometer-sized particles that are nanoscale in three dimensions. They include nanocrystaline materials; NANOCAPSULES; METAL NANOPARTICLES; DENDRIMERS, and QUANTUM DOTS. The uses of nanoparticles include DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and cancer targeting and imaging.Antiparkinson Agents: Agents used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The most commonly used drugs act on the dopaminergic system in the striatum and basal ganglia or are centrally acting muscarinic antagonists.Injections, Subcutaneous: Forceful administration under the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the skin.Analgesia, Obstetrical: The elimination of PAIN, without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS, during OBSTETRIC LABOR; OBSTETRIC DELIVERY; or the POSTPARTUM PERIOD, usually through the administration of ANALGESICS.Ribavirin: A nucleoside antimetabolite antiviral agent that blocks nucleic acid synthesis and is used against both RNA and DNA viruses.Antidepressive Agents, Second-Generation: A structurally and mechanistically diverse group of drugs that are not tricyclics or monoamine oxidase inhibitors. The most clinically important appear to act selectively on serotonergic systems, especially by inhibiting serotonin reuptake.Azathioprine: An immunosuppressive agent used in combination with cyclophosphamide and hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), this substance has been listed as a known carcinogen. (Merck Index, 11th ed)Dexamethasone: An anti-inflammatory 9-fluoro-glucocorticoid.Nortriptyline: A metabolite of AMITRIPTYLINE that is also used as an antidepressive agent. Nortriptyline is used in major depression, dysthymia, and atypical depressions.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Organometallic Compounds: A class of compounds of the type R-M, where a C atom is joined directly to any other element except H, C, N, O, F, Cl, Br, I, or At. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Mycophenolic Acid: An antibiotic substance derived from Penicillium stoloniferum, and related species. It blocks de novo biosynthesis of purine nucleotides by inhibition of the enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase. Mycophenolic acid is important because of its selective effects on the immune system. It prevents the proliferation of T-cells, lymphocytes, and the formation of antibodies from B-cells. It also may inhibit recruitment of leukocytes to inflammatory sites. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1301)Injections, Intralesional: Injections introduced directly into localized lesions.Methylprednisolone: A PREDNISOLONE derivative with similar anti-inflammatory action.Cosmetic Techniques: Procedures for the improvement or enhancement of the appearance of the visible parts of the body.Levodopa: The naturally occurring form of DIHYDROXYPHENYLALANINE and the immediate precursor of DOPAMINE. Unlike dopamine itself, it can be taken orally and crosses the blood-brain barrier. It is rapidly taken up by dopaminergic neurons and converted to DOPAMINE. It is used for the treatment of PARKINSONIAN DISORDERS and is usually given with agents that inhibit its conversion to dopamine outside of the central nervous system.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Methotrexate: An antineoplastic antimetabolite with immunosuppressant properties. It is an inhibitor of TETRAHYDROFOLATE DEHYDROGENASE and prevents the formation of tetrahydrofolate, necessary for synthesis of thymidylate, an essential component of DNA.Prednisone: A synthetic anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid derived from CORTISONE. It is biologically inert and converted to PREDNISOLONE in the liver.Amines: A group of compounds derived from ammonia by substituting organic radicals for the hydrogens. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Amides: Organic compounds containing the -CO-NH2 radical. Amides are derived from acids by replacement of -OH by -NH2 or from ammonia by the replacement of H by an acyl group. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Amiodarone: An antianginal and class III antiarrhythmic drug. It increases the duration of ventricular and atrial muscle action by inhibiting POTASSIUM CHANNELS and VOLTAGE-GATED SODIUM CHANNELS. There is a resulting decrease in heart rate and in vascular resistance.Remission Induction: Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.Xerostomia: Decreased salivary flow.Administration, Inhalation: The administration of drugs by the respiratory route. It includes insufflation into the respiratory tract.Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
Side effects[edit]. The most common side effects of indinavir include: *Gastrointestinal disturbances (abdominal pain, diarrhea ... "Crixivan (Indinavir Sulfate): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses". RxList. Retrieved 2018-11-08.. ... Currently, it is not recommended for use in HIV/AIDS treatment due to its side effects. Furthermore, it is controversial for ... Capaldini L (August 1997). "Protease inhibitors' metabolic side effects: cholesterol, triglycerides, blood sugar, and "Crix ...
Side-effects. Conventional treatments are subjected to testing for undesired side-effects, whereas alternative therapies, in ... This can both cause worse effect, but also decreased (or even increased) side effects, which may be interpreted as "helping". ... Alternative therapies do not "complement" (improve the effect of, or mitigate the side effects of) functional medical treatment ... and therefore either decreased side effects or nocebo effects towards standard treatment.[114] ...
... but was withdrawn due to cardiac side effects. References[edit]. *^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "Levothyroxine Sodium". The ... Side effects[edit]. Adverse events are generally caused by incorrect dosing. Long-term suppression of TSH values below normal ... Side effects from excessive doses include weight loss, trouble tolerating heat, sweating, anxiety, trouble sleeping, tremor, ... "Synthroid (Levothyroxine Sodium) Drug Information: Uses, Side Effects, Drug Interactions and Warnings". RxList. Archived from ...
Side effects[edit]. While there are studies that show the health and medical benefits of weight loss, a study in 2005 of around ... These diets are not recommended for general use as they are associated with adverse side effects such as loss of lean muscle ... Possible weight loss effects of drinking water prior to meals[edit]. Main article: Weight loss effects of water ... 1994). "Effects of varying carbohydrate content of diet in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus". JAMA. 271 ( ...
Crest Pro-Health mouthwash side effects[edit]. Tooth staining[edit]. Crest Pro-Health mouthwash contains Cetylpyridinium ... "P&G hopes rinse effect won't wash away sales". Cincinnati Business Courier. The company's Crest Pro-Health Rinse, launched ...
Side effects[edit]. Adverse effects include headache, flushing, nausea, hypotension, reflex tachycardia, and increased ... The renal effect of fenoldopam and dopamine may involve physiological antagonism of the renin-angiotensin system in the kidney. ... 6] In contrast to dopamine, fenoldopam is a selective D1 receptor agonist with no effect on beta adrenoceptors, although there ...
Side effects[edit]. Side effects of the GnRH agonists are signs and symptoms of hypoestrogenism, including hot flashes, ... Side effects of GnRH agonists are related to sex hormone deficiency and include symptoms of low testosterone levels and low ... to combat such side effects and to prevent bone wastage. Generally, long-term patients, both male and female, tend to undergo ... As a result, initially there is an increase in FSH and LH secretion (so-called "flare effect"). Levels of LH may increase by up ...
Side effects[edit]. Common side effects of pegaptanib include:[2] *Anterior chamber inflammation ... no toxic effects where exhibited. It was also noted that there was no change in intraocular pressure and no immune response was ... the minimum dosing frequency was 6 weeks to maintain the desired pharmacological effect.[5] This dosing interval is what ...
Side effects[edit]. Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin,[21] with dietary excesses not absorbed, and excesses in the blood ... These effects are attributed to the osmotic effect of unabsorbed vitamin C passing through the intestine.[3] In theory, high ... This was the Lowest-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level (LOAEL), meaning that other adverse effects were observed at higher intakes.[ ... A second meta-analysis found no effect on the risk of prostate cancer.[35] Two meta-analyses evaluated the effect of vitamin C ...
Common side effects include fever, weight loss, vomiting, and rash.[1] A severe type of anaphylaxis may occur.[1] It may also ... Side effects[edit]. The most serious complication of bleomycin is pulmonary fibrosis and impaired lung function. It has been ... Other side effects include fever, rash, dermatographism, hyperpigmentation, alopecia (hair loss) and Raynaud's phenomenon ( ... as they have additive and complementary effects on the DNA, since doxorubicin acts by intercalating between DNA strands, and ...
Common side effects include sleepiness, headache, vomiting, trouble with coordination, and rash.[2] Serious side effects ... The side effect profile varies for different patient populations.[38] Overall adverse effects in treatment are similar between ... Side effects[edit]. Lamotrigine prescribing information has a black box warning about life-threatening skin reactions, ... Side effects such as rash, fever, and fatigue are very serious, as they may indicate incipient Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic ...
Side effects[edit]. Menstrual changes[edit]. Patients who have undergone female sterilization procedures have minimal or no ... unacceptable side effects, or personal preference, tubal ligation offers highly effective birth control without the use of ... The medial ends of the fallopian tubes on the side closer to the uterus are then connected to the back of the uterus itself.[27 ... This waiting period is not required for private insurance beneficiaries, which has the effect of selectively restricting low- ...
Side effects[edit]. Side effects associated with domperidone include dry mouth, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, nausea, rash, ... Domperidone (Motilium) is associated with a small increased risk of serious cardiac side effects. Its use is now restricted to ... Jeffrey K. Aronson (27 November 2009). Meyler's Side Effects of Antimicrobial Drugs. Elsevier. pp. 2244-. ISBN 978-0-08-093293- ... These medications, such as levodopa, can cause nausea as a side effect. Furthermore, anti-nausea drugs, such as metoclopramide ...
Side effects[edit]. The manipulation of the gut microbiota is complex and may cause bacteria-host interactions.[5] Though ... host interactions and unwanted side effects in rare cases.[3][4][5] There is little evidence that probiotics bring the health ... effects of a yogurt with probiotic strains on serum cholesterol levels found little effect of 8.5 mg/dl (0.22 mmol/l) (4% ... A 2015 Cochrane review concluded that a protective effect of some probiotics existed for AAD in children.[78] In adults, some ...
Side-effects[edit]. Although patients at high risk of bleeding were excluded from the phase III clinical study (PROWESS), 25% ... No other side-effects have been observed so far.. In the meantime a second study encompassing approximately 2,000 adult ... lack of positive results and severe side-effects). ... been completed and the results showed a comparable side-effect ... In vitro data suggest that activated protein C exerts an antithrombotic effect by inhibiting factors Va and VIIIa, and that it ...
Common side effects include headache, nausea, abdominal pain, and fever.[2] Serious side effects may include pericarditis, ... Side effects are primarily gastrointestinal but may also include headache; GI effects include nausea, diarrhea and abdominal ... Side effects[edit]. There are no data on use in pregnant women, but the drug does cross the placenta and is excreted in breast ...
Side effects[edit]. Because the SNRIs and SSRIs act in similar ways to elevate serotonin levels, they share many side effects, ... Use of MAOIs and TCAs gave major advances in treatment of depression but their use was limited by unpleasant side effects and ... The most common side effects include loss of appetite, weight, and sleep, drowsiness, dizziness, fatigue, headache, increase in ... As the patient continues along at low doses without any side-effects, the dose is incrementally increased until the patient ...
Side effects[edit]. The most common adverse effects are diarrhea (4.8%), nausea and vomiting (3.6%), injection-site ... Common side effects include nausea, diarrhea, constipation, headache, rash, and pain at the site of injection.[1] Serious side ... "Meropenem side effects - from FDA reports". eHealthMe.. *^ Margolin, L (2004). "Impaired rehabilitation secondary to muscle ... effects include Clostridium difficile infection, seizures, and allergic reactions including anaphylaxis.[1] Those who are ...
Medication side effects[edit]. Certain medications, including NSAIDs (Motrin/Ibuprofen) and steroids can cause hypertension.[38 ... van Zwieten PA, Thoolen MJ, Timmermans PB (1984). "The hypotensive activity and side effects of methyldopa, clonidine, and ... leading to aldosterone-like effects in the kidney, causing hypertension.[17] This effect can also be produced by prolonged ... Compare these effects to those seen in Conn's disease, an adrenocortical tumor which causes excess release of aldosterone,[28] ...
Other side-effects[edit]. Less common side-effects include red skin (erythema), dry skin, damaged fingernails, a dry mouth ( ... Adverse effects[edit]. Chemotherapeutic techniques have a range of side-effects that depend on the type of medications used. ... Although the side effects are often less severe than that seen of cytotoxic chemotherapeutics, life-threatening effects can ... Many of the side effects of chemotherapy can be traced to damage to normal cells that divide rapidly and are thus sensitive to ...
Side effects[edit]. *Irregular menstrual pattern: irregular bleeding and spotting is common in the first three to six months of ... Side effects include irregular periods, benign ovarian cysts, pelvic pain, and depression.[2] Rarely uterine perforation may ... a 3-year follow-up on the efficacy and side effects of the use of levonorgestrel intrauterine system for the treatment of ... Other potential adverse effects and risks. Effectiveness[edit]. After insertion, Mirena is officially sold as effective for up ...
General side effects of drugs[edit]. Bleeding[edit]. Bleeding is one of the most difficult side effects to manage this ... Less common side effects[edit]. Because these drugs act on parts of the blood and blood vessels, they tend to have side effects ... Elice, F; Rodeghiero, F (2012). "Side effects of anti-angiogenic drugs". Thrombosis Research. 129 Suppl 1: 50-3. doi:10.1016/ ... Aside from problems with hemorrhage and hypertension, less common side effects of these drugs include dry, itchy skin, hand- ...
2 Side effects *2.1 Heart and blood vessels *2.1.1 VIGOR study and publishing controversy ... Since the withdrawal of Vioxx it has come to light that there may be negative cardiovascular effects with not only other COX-2 ... This was largely based on the VIGOR (Vioxx GI Outcomes Research) study, which compared the efficacy and adverse effect profiles ... Aside from the reduced incidence of gastric ulceration, rofecoxib exhibits a similar adverse effect profile to other NSAIDs. ...
Side effects[edit]. Rifaximin has few side effects.[7] Side effects are generally mild and uncommon;[6] this is largely because ... It has minimal side effects, prevents reoccurring encephalopathy, and is associated with high patient satisfaction. People are ... very little of the drug is absorbed from the gut meaning systemic side effects are absent.[7] Clostridium difficile infection ... more compliant and satisfied to take this medication than any other due to minimal side effects, prolonged remission, and ...
Side effects[edit]. Side effects of fentanyl analogs are similar to those of fentanyl itself, which include itching, nausea and ... Chen, Quan; Shang, You; Xu, Yong; Li, Ping; Li, Ping; Liu, Guo-Li (February 2016). "Analgesic effect and pharmacological ...
Harris County Transit provides public transportation.[44] The Baytown Park and Ride lot is located on the western side of San ... The city's proximity to the bay and the winds that it generates moderate the area's temperatures and ease the effects of the ... Located within the Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land metropolitan area, it lies on the northern side of the Galveston Bay ... Baytown Nature Center, located on a 450-acre (1.8 km2) peninsula along the Houston Ship Channel and surrounded on three sides ...
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Dangerous side effects. Dangerous side effects. Disposal of the United States.12Back to 49 deaths, but in the fiber in larger ... Follow all directions on your doctor about the most users will experience mild side effects of UseOxycodone products do not ... Follow all directions on your doctor about the most users will experience mild side effects of UseOxycodone products do not ... Disposal and negative effects are abusing them, a doctor) costs approximately $4, but in the most users will be traced as well ...
The treatment contains topical herbal oils and herbal paste which are free from any side effects. It helps to slow down the ... How Dr Rohits Ayurveda therapy is useful in androgenic alopecia ? Is there any side effect of the therapy ? What exactly in ... What types of conventional treatments are available for androgenic alopecia ? What are the side effects of conventional ... Is there any guarantee about the result? What will minimum time duration to see the effect of herbal treatment ? What will be ...
... learn about side effects, dosage, special precautions, and more on MedlinePlus ... Some side effects can be serious. The following symptoms are uncommon, but if you experience any of them, call your doctor ... These side effects may include a heart attack, heart failure, or other heart problems; stroke and mini-stroke; liver disease; ... Transdermal testosterone may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: *burn- ...
Hepatitis B vaccine side effects What are the risks from hepatitis B vaccine?. *Soreness where the shot is given or fever can ... Typhoid vaccine side effects What are the risks from typhoid vaccine?. *Pain from the shot, redness, or swelling at the site of ... MMR vaccine side effects (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella) What are the risks from MMR vaccine?. *Soreness, redness, or rash where ... Polio vaccine side effects *A sore spot with redness, swelling, or pain where the shot is given can happen after polio vaccine. ...
This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You ... Seasonale side effects. Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Seasonale: hives; difficulty ... See also: Side effects (in more detail). What other drugs will affect Seasonale?. Some drugs can make Seasonale less effective ... Common Seasonale side effects may include:. * mild nausea (especially when you first start taking this medicine), vomiting, ...
However, it may have its own share of side effects too. This article elaborates on the possible side effects of an angiogram. ... However, it may have its own share of side effects too. This article elaborates on the possible side effects of an angiogram. ... One less common side effect may be a damage to the blood vessels. This risk has more chances to occur if in case the artery is ... Possible Risks or Side Effects of Angiogram. ☞ After you have undergone the test, you may feel a little discomfort due to mild ...
We look at its effects, uses, and possible side effects. ... there are some risks and possible side effects.. Side effects ... The benefits and side effects of cinnamon powder Not only is cinnamon delicious, but adding it to your diet might be beneficial ... Risks and side effects. Although the use of products containing kojic acid may be considered safe for most people, ... Kola nut: Uses, benefits, and side effects Learn more about the kola nut, including who should avoid taking it, how it can be ...
One common side effect of NSAIDs is peptic ulcer (ulcers of the esophagus, stomach, or duodenum). Side effects, drug ... Therefore, it is advisable to use the lowest effective dose to minimize side effects. The most common side effects of ... Most patients, benefit from nabumetone and other NSAIDs with few side effects. However, serious side effects can occur, and ... You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1- ...
Because of specific side effects, there are a few things that doctors will look out for to decide if a patient is able to take ... There are some side effects and complications to consider before taking propranolol, however, as well as certain people who ... A selective beta-blocker such as metoprolol may have fewer respiratory side effects for cardiovascular issues in people worried ... The combined effect lowers the heart rate to unsafe levels. This is also the case with ACE inhibitors, calcium channel blockers ...
Learn more about the benefits and potential side effects of the various types of cupping. ... Cupping Side Effects. Bruises. A bruise is caused when tiny blood vessels are damaged or broken as the result of trauma to the ... Some discomfort can occur but should not be considered a side effect. Moderate, temporary discomfort is expected as stagnation ... especially given the low risk of the side effects. ... Cupping - Side Effects Did you have any side effects from ...
... side effect, drug - Answer: Your doctor would have weighed up the benefits and risks of you taking ... ... zoloft, sertraline, side effect, drug. Details:. Hi I really need some help? I am wondering if the sexual side effects of ... Home › Q & A › Questions › Sertraline/Zoloft side.... Sertraline/Zoloft side effects?. Asked. 15 Sep 2016 by Willamandrew. ... If this is not going to go away or get better I think I should just stop taking it the now? But if this side effect goes away ...
Side effects are what a medication does to you that you dont want it to do. Medications are prescribed for a specific purpose ... Dont assume that you will get every side effect thats listed! Most people have few or only minor side effects when they take ... What Are Side Effects? Side effects are what a medication does to you that you dont want it to do. Medications are prescribed ... Who Gets Side Effects? Modern antiretroviral medications are very well tolerated and only rarely cause serious side effects. ...
... can also occur as a side effect of docetaxel treatment. This effect on the nerves can make it difficult for a patient to ... Some of the common side effects of docetaxel therapy include:. Anemia. Docetaxel can lead to a drop in red blood cell number ... A bitter or metallic taste in the mouth is a common side effect of docetaxel treatment. Food may also taste different to how it ... Other day I was surfing on internet when I saw a text talking about the drug Doxetaxel and their colateral effects. The text ...
The FDA is now warning that some of these side effects can occur together and that use of these drugs should be restricted for ... Rare but significant and debilitating side effects - tendon rupture, peripheral neuropathy - can occur with fluoroquinolone ... I first learned of the unexpected side effects of fluoroquinolones early in my faculty career when I read Stephen Frieds book ... While reading more about this topic, I came across a nice 2012 piece on fluoroquinolone side effects by former FORBES ...
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Benzodiazepines Table of Contents Overview How to Take It Side Effects Warnings & Precautions Drug Interactions Dosage & ... Not every known side effect, adverse effect, or drug interaction is in this database. If you have questions about your ... This side effect can be dangerous to you or to others.. * DO NOT use temazepam until you have been thoroughly evaluated by your ... Tell your doctor if either of these side effects persist. Get up slowly when rising from a sitting or lying position to reduce ...
SSRI Table of Contents Overview How to Take It Side Effects Warnings & Precautions Drug ... Not every known side effect, adverse effect, or drug interaction is in this database. If you have questions about your ... Children may experience certain side effects of this drug, especially loss of appetite and weight loss. Their growth should be ... Johns Wort should be avoided while taking fluvoxamine due to the increased side effects of too much serotonin. ...
Find out what you can do to manage antidepressant sexual side effects. ... Sexual side effects, like erectile dysfunction, are common complaints of taking antidepressants. Most prescription ... Sexual side effects of antidepressants. Sexual side effects are among the most common complaints about antidepressants. ... Which medications cause sexual side effects?. Sexual side effects are linked to antidepressants in general, but some types of ...
ketoprofen Side Effects. Oral capsule. Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon ... This drug can cause serious side effects. See which side effects you should report to your doctor right away. ... Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue ... Side effects such as stomach upset, nausea, or ulcers may be more likely to occur. Many medicines available without a ...
Other Physical Side Effects. As with most steroids, acne is a common side effect, and can either be tolerated or treated with a ... Physiological Side Effects. Stanazol is known to greatly lower the amount of HDL and LDL cholesterol present in the blood, and ... As an anabolic steroid, it has a host of side effects ranging from physiological to psychological, minor to severe. ... Psychological Effects. While rare (most studies show less than a 5 per cent incidence), the psychological effects of stanazol ...
Though many side effects associated with this drug are mild, for some they may become severe. ... General Side Effects. General side effects caused by Gaviscon can be very severe. Many peoples bodies accumulate high volumes ... Other Side Effects. Reported nervous system side effects include disease of the brain (encephalopathy) in those using Gaviscon ... According to drugs.com, gastrointestinal side effects are the most common side effect associated with Gaviscon. Most patients ...
These side effects may be severe enough to cause therapy to be discontinued in one out of every 20 patients. These side effects ... You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1- ... Side effects of glipizide that are different from metformin include headache, dizziness, heartburn, and skin rashes (which ... A serious but rare side effect of metformin is lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis occurs in one out of every 30,000 patients and ...
... possible side effects, interactions, dosage, user ratings and products that contain Alchemilla ... Side Effects. Side Effects & Safety. Alchemilla is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth appropriately. Although ... interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard ...
What Are the Side Effects of Prednisone and Other Steroids?. Steroids have many potential side effects, especially when given ... Unlike the serious side effects of oral steroids, the most common side effects of anti-inflammatory asthma inhalers are ... Taking supplemental calcium may help to prevent osteoporosis or thinning of the bones, which is one of the side effects of long ... its important to avoid steroids on a long-term basis as there are potential serious side effects. ...
  • Fluoroquinolones already contain black-box warnings for these side effects as well as other warnings about potentially irreversible peripheral neuropathy and potential worsening of myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disorder that causes muscle weakness and fatigue. (forbes.com)
  • While it remains to be seen if and how the backlash will impact Hers (the company has taken down that particular ad but is still promoting Propranolol sans side effect warnings in paid ads on Instagram and Facebook), the event shines light on a larger issue: Responsible marketing of telemedicine in the Instagram age. (yahoo.com)
  • Many patients report excessive sedation with amitriptyline, which is a hazardous side effect, whereas several patients with depression report insomnia too and report improvement in their sleep after treatment with amitriptyline, which can be considered as a beneficial side effect. (springer.com)
  • These side effects of Ciplactin can make it difficult for affected patients to fall asleep or stay asleep throughout the night--a condition referred to as insomnia. (livestrong.com)
  • It went on to highlight that no in-person doctor's appointment was necessary to obtain a prescription, with nary a mention of the medication's potential side effects (which include depression, insomnia and low blood sugar, among others). (yahoo.com)
  • You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. (medicinenet.com)
  • Some people (such as those with liver or kidney disease) may body processes drugs more slowly than normal, and could have higher drug levels in their systems and have increased risk of ore side effects. (thebody.com)
  • I first learned of the unexpected side effects of fluoroquinolones early in my faculty career when I read Stephen Fried's book, Bitter Pills: Inside the Hazardous World of Legal Drugs . (forbes.com)
  • There are drugs and other therapies can prevent or manage many side effects. (lls.org)
  • A general side effect associated with many chemotherapeutic drugs used to treat cancer and, sometimes, anti-HIV drugs. (thebody.com)
  • As with all drugs, tyrosine kinase inhibitors have the potential for side effects. (cancercare.org)
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Two drugs used to prevent malaria in travelers appear to have a lower risk of side effects than a third commonly prescribed medication, according to a research review published Tuesday. (reuters.com)
  • But these drugs don't come without some very serious side effects. (foxnews.com)
  • This side effect can be caused by certain drugs that may be used for anesthesia or to control pain. (cancer.ca)
  • It also helps the side effect of depression that goes with the drugs as well as help you ask intelligent/informed questions when seeing your gastroenterologist. (dailystrength.org)
  • Today's MIT Technology Review details a new method of predicting adverse effects of new experimental drugs. (medgadget.com)
  • This allowed them to compare and ultimately predict the overall effect each of these existing drugs would have on cells. (medgadget.com)
  • For example, four existing drugs currently not used for treating cancer were found to be grouped together with cancer-inhibiting drugs, suggesting that they had similar effects on inhibiting cancer growth, which was later verified. (medgadget.com)
  • Understanding more about the causes of immunotherapy-related side effects and being able to identify patients most at risk for them could help doctors to select immunotherapy drugs for patients in the future, noted Dr. Dubbs. (cancer.gov)
  • To advance research in this area, investigators have been documenting complications associated with immunotherapy drugs , studying the biological mechanisms, modifying immunotherapy drugs to reduce their side effects , and increasing awareness of potential side effects among clinicians and patients. (cancer.gov)
  • For example, the side effects of immunotherapy drugs and new ways to manage them were discussed at a recent scientific meeting on emergency medicine for treating patients with cancer, hosted by the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. (cancer.gov)
  • The immune-related side effects of immunotherapy highlight a fundamental difference between these drugs and other cancer treatments: Conventional treatments such as chemotherapy kill tumor cells directly, whereas immunotherapy does not. (cancer.gov)
  • The efficacy and administration of antipsychotic drugs for specific psychotic disorders are also described separately, as are antipsychotic poisoning, tardive dyskinesia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and other antipsychotic drug side effects. (uptodate.com)
  • Additional drugs can be prescribed to treat this side effect. (mskcc.org)
  • Some patients are lucky to get the drugs and have a wonderful response with the cancer 'seeming to melt away' without any side effects at all. (cnn.com)
  • More commonly a patient will have one or two minor side effects from one or more of the drugs. (cnn.com)
  • Studies have shown, however, that Prozac and other drugs in its class could be linked to serious side effects. (lawyersandsettlements.com)
  • The drug causes the fat you don't absorb to pass directly out of the body, which means that if you eat too much fat you may wind up with the unpleasant side effects of gas with oily spotting, loose stools, and more frequent stools that may be hard to control. (foxnews.com)
  • In March, John Pettigrew, a 58-year-old plumber from England, experienced this unpleasant side effect, which Pfizer does warn of in the prescribing information that is given to users. (foxnews.com)
  • They are associated with little sedation, weight gain, or anticholinergic activity, but a high risk for extrapyramidal side effects. (uptodate.com)
  • The low-potency FGAs (chlorpromazine and thioridazine) are dosed in 100s of milligrams and have high histaminic and muscarinic activity with a corresponding increased prevalence of sedation and anticholinergic effects, but lower risk of extrapyramidal side effects. (uptodate.com)
  • The cited figures provide some basis for estimating the relative contribution of drug and nondrug factors to the side effect incidence rate in the population studied. (rxlist.com)