Alveolitis, Extrinsic Allergic: A common interstitial lung disease caused by hypersensitivity reactions of PULMONARY ALVEOLI after inhalation of and sensitization to environmental antigens of microbial, animal, or chemical sources. The disease is characterized by lymphocytic alveolitis and granulomatous pneumonitis.Respiratory Hypersensitivity: A form of hypersensitivity affecting the respiratory tract. It includes ASTHMA and RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL.Bird Fancier's Lung: A form of alveolitis or pneumonitis due to an acquired hypersensitivity to inhaled avian antigens, usually proteins in the dust of bird feathers and droppings.Saccharopolyspora: A genus of gram-positive bacteria whose spores are round to oval and covered by a sheath.Hypersensitivity, Delayed: An increased reactivity to specific antigens mediated not by antibodies but by cells.Farmer's Lung: A form of alveolitis or pneumonitis due to an acquired hypersensitivity to inhaled antigens associated with farm environment. Antigens in the farm dust are commonly from bacteria actinomycetes (SACCHAROPOLYSPORA and THERMOACTINOMYCES), fungi, and animal proteins in the soil, straw, crops, pelts, serum, and excreta.Radiation Pneumonitis: Inflammation of the lung due to harmful effects of ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.Industrial Oils: Oils which are used in industrial or commercial applications.Precipitins: Antibodies which elicit IMMUNOPRECIPITATION when combined with antigen.Drug Hypersensitivity: Immunologically mediated adverse reactions to medicinal substances used legally or illegally.Lung Diseases, Interstitial: A diverse group of lung diseases that affect the lung parenchyma. They are characterized by an initial inflammation of PULMONARY ALVEOLI that extends to the interstitium and beyond leading to diffuse PULMONARY FIBROSIS. Interstitial lung diseases are classified by their etiology (known or unknown causes), and radiological-pathological features.Isocyanates: Organic compounds that contain the -NCO radical.Trichosporon: A mitosporic fungal genus causing opportunistic infections, endocarditis, fungemia, a hypersensitivity pneumonitis (see TRICHOSPORONOSIS) and white PIEDRA.Agapornis: A genus comprised of nine species of small PARROTS from Africa. They are noted for showing affection for their mates.Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid: Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.Micromonosporaceae: A family of gram-positive, saprophytic bacteria occurring in soil and aquatic environments.Pulmonary Fibrosis: A process in which normal lung tissues are progressively replaced by FIBROBLASTS and COLLAGEN causing an irreversible loss of the ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream via PULMONARY ALVEOLI. Patients show progressive DYSPNEA finally resulting in death.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Granuloma, Respiratory Tract: Granulomatous disorders affecting one or more sites in the respiratory tract.Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary: Sarcoidosis affecting predominantly the lungs, the site most frequently involved and most commonly causing morbidity and mortality in sarcoidosis. Pulmonary sarcoidosis is characterized by sharply circumscribed granulomas in the alveolar, bronchial, and vascular walls, composed of tightly packed cells derived from the mononuclear phagocyte system. The clinical symptoms when present are dyspnea upon exertion, nonproductive cough, and wheezing. (Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p431)Coriolaceae: A family of fungi, order POLYPORALES, found on decaying wood.Hypersensitivity: Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.Amorphophallus: A plant genus of the family ARACEAE. Members contain konjac glucomannan (MANNANS) and SEROTONIN.Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: A common interstitial lung disease of unknown etiology, usually occurring between 50-70 years of age. Clinically, it is characterized by an insidious onset of breathlessness with exertion and a nonproductive cough, leading to progressive DYSPNEA. Pathological features show scant interstitial inflammation, patchy collagen fibrosis, prominent fibroblast proliferation foci, and microscopic honeycomb change.Columbidae: Family in the order COLUMBIFORMES, comprised of pigeons or doves. They are BIRDS with short legs, stout bodies, small heads, and slender bills. Some sources call the smaller species doves and the larger pigeons, but the names are interchangeable.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Aerosols: Colloids with a gaseous dispersing phase and either liquid (fog) or solid (smoke) dispersed phase; used in fumigation or in inhalation therapy; may contain propellant agents.Antigens, Fungal: Substances of fungal origin that have antigenic activity.Dermatitis, Contact: A type of acute or chronic skin reaction in which sensitivity is manifested by reactivity to materials or substances coming in contact with the skin. It may involve allergic or non-allergic mechanisms.Agaricales: An extensive order of basidiomycetous fungi whose fruiting bodies are commonly called mushrooms.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Bronchoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.Antibodies, Fungal: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to FUNGAL ANTIGENS.Antigens: Substances that are recognized by the immune system and induce an immune reaction.Dentin SensitivitySkin Tests: Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Spores, Fungal: Reproductive bodies produced by fungi.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Hypersensitivity, Immediate: Hypersensitivity reactions which occur within minutes of exposure to challenging antigen due to the release of histamine which follows the antigen-antibody reaction and causes smooth muscle contraction and increased vascular permeability.CD4-CD8 Ratio: Ratio of T-LYMPHOCYTES that express the CD4 ANTIGEN to those that express the CD8 ANTIGEN. This value is commonly assessed in the diagnosis and staging of diseases affecting the IMMUNE SYSTEM including HIV INFECTIONS.Inhalation Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.Metallurgy: The science, art, or technology dealing with processes involved in the separation of metals from their ores, the technique of making or compounding the alloys, the techniques of working or heat-treating metals, and the mining of metals. It includes industrial metallurgy as well as metallurgical techniques employed in the preparation and working of metals used in dentistry, with special reference to orthodontic and prosthodontic appliances. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p494)Bronchoalveolar Lavage: Washing out of the lungs with saline or mucolytic agents for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It is very useful in the diagnosis of diffuse pulmonary infiltrates in immunosuppressed patients.Agricultural Workers' Diseases: Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.Bronchial Provocation Tests: Tests involving inhalation of allergens (nebulized or in dust form), nebulized pharmacologically active solutions (e.g., histamine, methacholine), or control solutions, followed by assessment of respiratory function. These tests are used in the diagnosis of asthma.Counterimmunoelectrophoresis: Immunoelectrophoresis in which immunoprecipitation occurs when antigen at the cathode is caused to migrate in an electric field through a suitable medium of diffusion against a stream of antibody migrating from the anode as a result of endosmotic flow.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Mycobacterium: A genus of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria. Most species are free-living in soil and water, but the major habitat for some is the diseased tissue of warm-blooded hosts.Dinitrofluorobenzene: Irritants and reagents for labeling terminal amino acid groups.Prednisolone: A glucocorticoid with the general properties of the corticosteroids. It is the drug of choice for all conditions in which routine systemic corticosteroid therapy is indicated, except adrenal deficiency states.Air Pollution, Indoor: The contamination of indoor air.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Mice, Inbred C57BLBasidiomycota: A phylum of fungi that produce their sexual spores (basidiospores) on the outside of the basidium. It includes forms commonly known as mushrooms, boletes, puffballs, earthstars, stinkhorns, bird's-nest fungi, jelly fungi, bracket or shelf fungi, and rust and smut fungi.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Lymphocytes: White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Hyperalgesia: An increased sensation of pain or discomfort produced by mimimally noxious stimuli due to damage to soft tissue containing NOCICEPTORS or injury to a peripheral nerve.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Fungi: A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.Macrophages, Alveolar: Round, granular, mononuclear phagocytes found in the alveoli of the lungs. They ingest small inhaled particles resulting in degradation and presentation of the antigen to immunocompetent cells.Picryl Chloride: A hapten that generates suppressor cells capable of down-regulating the efferent phase of trinitrophenol-specific contact hypersensitivity. (Arthritis Rheum 1991 Feb;34(2):180).Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Immunity, Cellular: Manifestations of the immune response which are mediated by antigen-sensitized T-lymphocytes via lymphokines or direct cytotoxicity. This takes place in the absence of circulating antibody or where antibody plays a subordinate role.Dermatitis, Allergic Contact: A contact dermatitis due to allergic sensitization to various substances. These substances subsequently produce inflammatory reactions in the skin of those who have acquired hypersensitivity to them as a result of prior exposure.Oxazolone: Immunologic adjuvant and sensitizing agent.Food Hypersensitivity: Gastrointestinal disturbances, skin eruptions, or shock due to allergic reactions to allergens in food.Pneumonia, Viral: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by a viral infection.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Dentin Desensitizing Agents: Substances which reduce or eliminate dentinal sensitivity or the pain associated with a source of stimulus (such as touch, heat, or cold) at the orifice of exposed dentinal tubules causing the movement of tubular fluid that in turn stimulates tooth nerve receptors.Haptens: Small antigenic determinants capable of eliciting an immune response only when coupled to a carrier. Haptens bind to antibodies but by themselves cannot elicit an antibody response.Cell Migration Inhibition: Phenomenon of cell-mediated immunity measured by in vitro inhibition of the migration or phagocytosis of antigen-stimulated LEUKOCYTES or MACROPHAGES. Specific CELL MIGRATION ASSAYS have been developed to estimate levels of migration inhibitory factors, immune reactivity against tumor-associated antigens, and immunosuppressive effects of infectious microorganisms.Pain Threshold: Amount of stimulation required before the sensation of pain is experienced.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Mice, Inbred BALB C
"Hypersensitivity pneumonitis from Pezizia domiciliana. A case of El Niño lung". American Journal of Respiratory and Critical ... The fungus has been implicated in a case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (called El Niño lung in the original report), in which ...
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis J-F. Cordier. European Respiratory Monograph 54: Orphan Lung Diseases. European Respiratory ... Suberosis, also known as corkhandler's disease or corkworker's lung, is a type of hypersensitivity pneumonitis usually caused ... Vinte-e-Um Mendes first reported respiratory disease in Portuguese cork workers in 1947 at the Portuguese Medical Reunion. ...
... hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and allergic fungal sinusitis. Two pediatric cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by E. ... doi:10.1016/S1081-1206(10)61956-4. Kurup, Viswanath P; Shen, Horng-Der; Banerjee, Banani (July 2000). "Respiratory fungal ... doi:10.1016/S1286-4579(00)01264-8. Hogan, Mary Beth (1 September 1996). "Basement Shower Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Secondary ... Epicoccum nigrum is associated with respiratory fungal allergies, including allergic asthma, rhinitis, ...
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to an allergic reaction to inhaled particles. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a ... American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 191, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ... Infant respiratory distress syndrome due to a deficiency of surfactant in the lungs of a baby born prematurely. Tuberculosis ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Obstructive lung disease Johns Hopkins School of Medicine's Interactive Respiratory ...
"CD34 is required for dendritic cell trafficking and pathology in murine hypersensitivity pneumonitis". American Journal of ... Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 184 (6): 687-98. doi:10.1164/rccm.201011-1764OC. PMC 3208601 . PMID 21642249. Sidney LE ...
Sporadic cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) have also been reported in workers exposed to isocyanates. The symptoms may ... Respiratory irritation may progress to a chemical bronchitis. Additional exposures can make the onset easier with less ... Isocyanates are powerful irritants to the eyes and gastrointestinal as well as the respiratory tracts. Direct skin contact with ... Using full face and respiratory protection while applying the product is recommended. ...
IPF was the most common diagnosis (28%) followed by connective tissue disease-related ILD (14%), hypersensitivity pneumonitis ( ... increased respiratory rate, and eventual respiratory distress. Prognosis is generally poor. A number of agents are currently ... Examples of ILD of known cause include hypersensitivity pneumonitis, pulmonary Langerhan's cell histiocytosis, asbestosis, and ... chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis, pulmonary Langerhan's cell histiocytosis and radiation-induced lung injury. Idiopathic ...
... mold on grapes may cause "winegrower's lung", a rare form of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (a respiratory ...
Barrios R. (2008). "Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (extrinsic allergic alveolitis)". Dail and Hammar's Pulmonary Pathology (3rd ... Lycoperdonosis is a respiratory disease caused by the inhalation of large amounts of spores from mature puffballs. It is ... It is one of several types of hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by different agents that have similar clinical features. ... ISBN 978-0-387-72113-2. Peroš-Golubičić T, Sharma OP (2006). "Hypersensitivity pneumonitis". Clinical Atlas of Interstitial ...
Siderosis Silicosis Byssinosis Hypersensitivity pneumonitis Bagassosis Bird fancier's lung Farmer's lung "Respiratory Diseases ... Asthma is a respiratory disease that can begin or worsen due to exposure at work and is characterized by episodic narrowing of ... Often the gas penetrates throughout the lung and if severe can manifest as a form of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, such ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a respiratory disease that can encompass chronic bronchitis and/or emphysema. 15% of ...
The most common considerations include: chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis non-specific interstitial pneumonia sarcoidosis ... An Update of the 2011 Clinical Practice Guideline". American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 192 (2): e3-e19 ... Regardless of cause, UIP is relentlessly progressive, usually leading to respiratory failure and death without a lung ... General principles and recommendations". American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 165 (5): 277-304. doi: ...
... respiratory infections, exacerbation of asthma, and rarely hypersensitivity pneumonitis, allergic alveolitis, chronic ... Another form of hypersensitivity is hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Exposure can occur at home, at work or in other settings. It ... Other problems are respiratory and/or immune system responses including respiratory symptoms, ... "What Is Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis?". National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. October 1, 2010. Retrieved January 15, 2014 ...
... through inhalation of Bacillus anthracis Pneumonia Non-contagious Fibrosing alveolitis Atelectasis Hypersensitivity pneumonitis ... lung disease Lung cancer Pleural effusion Pneumoconiosis Pneumothorax Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema or acute respiratory ...
There are also reports suggest the increase the risk of respiratory symptoms, asthma exasperation, hypersensitivity pneumonitis ... rhinosinusitis, bronchitis and respiratory infections associate the exposure of building and house fungi, including W.sebi. ...
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis, sarcoidosis, silicosis, coal workers pneumoconiosis, respiratory bronchiolitis, alveolar ... hypersensitivity pneumonitis, drug-induced lung disease Small nodules Acute: Hypersensitivity pneumonitis Chronic: ... carbon bblack, ink mist) Organic Hypersensitivity pneumonitis Drug-induced Antibiotics Chemotherapeutic drugs Antiarrhythmic ... hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute inhalational exposures, drug-induced lung diseases, acute interstitial pneumonia Chronic: ...
Inspiratory wheezing also occurs in hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Wheezes heard at the end of both expiratory and inspiratory ... whistling sound produced in the respiratory airways during breathing. For wheezes to occur, some part of the respiratory tree ... Localized processes, such as the occlusion of a portion of the respiratory tree, are more likely to produce wheezing at that ... Stridor - the word is from the Latin, strīdor - is a harsh, high-pitched, vibrating sound that is heard in respiratory tract ...
Tachypnea, respiratory distress, and inspiratory crackles over lower lung fields often are present. On chest radiographs, ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis involves inhalation of an antigen. This leads to an exaggerated immune response (hypersensitivity ... and that asthma generally is classified as a type I hypersensitivity. Unlike asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis targets lung ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is categorized as acute, subacute, and chronic based on the duration of the illness. In the ...
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to other organic dusts (J67.9) Hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to unspecified organic dust ( ... Upper respiratory tract hypersensitivity reaction, site unspecified (J39.8) Other specified diseases of upper respiratory tract ... Postprocedural respiratory disorder, unspecified (J96) Respiratory failure, not elsewhere classified (J98) Other respiratory ... J68) Respiratory conditions due to inhalation of chemicals, gases, fumes and vapours (J69) Pneumonitis due to solids and ...
Woodwind instrumentalists, in rare cases, suffer a condition known as hypersensitivity pneumonitis, also referred to as ... Non-musculoskeletal problems include contact dermatitis, hearing problems such as tinnitus, respiratory disorders or ...
There are ongoing trials with newer drugs such as IFN-γ and mycophenolate mofetil.. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis, a less severe ... Pirfenidone also reduced the decline in distances on the 6-minute walk test, but had no effect on respiratory symptoms. The ... Coal miners, ship workers and sand blasters among others are at higher risk.Hypersensitivity pneumonitis, most often resulting ... Pulmonary fibrosis (literally "scarring of the lungs") is a respiratory disease in which scars are formed in the lung tissues, ...
The differential diagnosis includes idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), hypersensitivity pneumonitis, sarcoidosis, and others ... Clinically advanced cases of asbestosis may lead to respiratory failure. When a physician listens with a stethoscope to the ... Supportive treatment of symptoms includes respiratory physiotherapy to remove secretions from the lungs by postural drainage, ...
Also, unlike asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis targets lung alveoli rather than bronchi. Less than five years of exposure or ... This will enable them to identify the risk factors and put in place preventive measures, including respiratory protection and ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a related condition, with many occupational examples (e.g. flock worker's lung, farmer's lung, ... and involves type III hypersensitivity and type IV hypersensitivity rather than the type I hypersensitivity of asthma. ...
Respiratory system. *Allergic rhinitis (hay fever). *Asthma. *Hypersensitivity pneumonitis. *Eosinophilic pneumonia. * ... Hypersensitivities are categorized according to the parts of the immune system that are attacked and the amount of time it ... According to two reviews, respiratory symptoms are common, but in some cases there has been progression to anaphylaxis.[62][63] ... Sensitization can occur through the gastrointestinal tract, respiratory tract and possibly the skin.[30] Damage to the skin in ...
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis Bagassosis. Bird fancier's lung. Farmer's lung. Lycoperdonosis. Other. *ARDS. *Combined pulmonary ... Respiratory pathology,state=autocollapse}} *shows the template collapsed to the title bar if there is a {{navbar}}, a {{sidebar ... Respiratory pathology,state=collapsed}} to show the template collapsed, i.e., hidden apart from its title bar ... Respiratory pathology,state=expanded}} to show the template expanded, i.e., fully visible ...
Respiratory system. *Allergic rhinitis (hay fever). *Asthma. *Hypersensitivity pneumonitis. *Eosinophilic pneumonia. * ... The most serious and rare form of latex allergy, Type I hypersensitivity can cause an immediate and potentially life- ... Böhm, Ingrid (2010). "Latex allergy in patients suspected for contrast medium hypersensitivity: A neglected differential ...
... is a type of hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by bird droppings. The lungs become inflamed with granuloma formation. Bird fancier's lung (BFL), also called bird-breeder's lung and pigeon-breeder's lung, is a subset of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). This disease is caused by the exposure to avian proteins present in the dry dust of the droppings and sometimes in the feathers of a variety of birds. Birds such as pigeons, parakeets, cockatiels, shell parakeets (budgerigars), parrots, turtle doves, turkeys and chickens have been implicated. People who work with birds or own many birds are at risk. Bird hobbyists and pet store workers may also be at risk. This disease is an inflammation of the alveoli in the lungs. Initial symptoms are breathlessness especially after sudden exertion or when exposed to temperature change and can be very similar to asthma, hyperventilation syndrome or pulmonary ...
... is an occupational lung disease and a type of asthma. Like other types of asthma, it is characterized by airway inflammation, reversible airways obstruction, and bronchospasm, but it is caused by something in the workplace environment. Symptoms include shortness of breath, tightness of the chest, nasal irritation, coughing and wheezing. The first person to use it in reference to a medical condition was Hippocrates, and he believed that tailors, anglers and metalworkers were more likely to be affected by the disease. Although much research has been done since, the inflammatory component of asthma was recognized only in the 1960s. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a related condition, with many occupational examples (e.g. flock worker's lung, farmer's lung, and indium lung). However, although overlapping in many cases, hypersensitivity pneumonitis may be distinguished from occupational asthma in that it ...
The Havana Brown was the result of a planned breeding between Siamese and domestic black cats, by a group of cat fanciers in England, in the 1950s. Early breeders introduced a Siamese type Russian Blue into their breeding. However, using current genetic testing, it is believed that almost none remain in the gene pool. It has been documented that self-brown cats were shown in Europe in the 1890s, one name given to these was the Swiss Mountain Cat. These disappeared until post-World War II, with the most likely explanation that the Siamese Cat Club of Britain discouraged their breeding. The Swiss Mountain Cat was never used in the breeding programs of the modern Havana Brown. However, they likely share genetics inherited from the Siamese. In the early 1950s a group of English cat fanciers began working together with an intent to create a self brown cat of Foreign Type. They called themselves "The Havana Group", later to become "The Chestnut Brown Group". This group of breeders created the ...
In 1994, a group of IRCA breeders decided to leave and form their own group because of the increasing restrictions. Owing to Baker's trademark on the name Ragdoll, the group renamed its stock of IRCA Ragdoll cats Ragamuffins. While the originally proposed name was Liebling, the name Ragamuffin was put forth as an alternative by one of the group's founders and it was chosen. In the spirit of bettering the breed's genetic health, personality, and temperament, the group out-crossed to Persians, Himalayans, and non-pedigreed domestic long-haired cats. The group also allowed some out-crossing to original Ragdolls (which ended in 2010 for ACFA-recognized Ragamuffins). Only cats with at least one Ragamuffin parent and an ACFA-accepted out-cross currently qualify to be called ACFA Ragamuffins. Cat Fanciers' Association Ragamuffins may only have Ragamuffin parents. The first cat association to accept the breed at full show champion status was the United Feline Organization (UFO), and while some major cat ...
The Japanese Akita and American Akita began to diverge in type during the Post World War II era[citation needed]. Helen Keller is credited with bringing the Akita to America after being gifted two Akitas by the Japanese government in 1938. A breed standard by 1939 and dog shows began to be held but then World War 2 began.[34] It was during this time, that US servicemen serving as part of the occupation force in Japan first came into contact with the Akita, the breed so impressed them that many service members chose to bring an Akita back home with them upon completion of their tour.[citation needed] American service members were typically more impressed with the larger more bear-like fighting Akita or German Shepherd type than they were with the smaller framed and fox-like Akita-Inu; the types of dogs they brought back with them to the US reflected this sentiment.[citation needed] Japanese Akita fanciers focused on restoring the breed as a work of Japanese art or to 'Natural Monument' ...
पाठ क्रिएटिभ कमन्स एट्रिब्युसन/सेयर-अलाइक लाइसेन्सअन्तर्गत उपलब्ध छ; अतिरिक्त सर्तहरू लागू हुन सक्छन्। अधिक जानकारीको लागि उपयोगका सर्तहरू हेर्नुहोला ...
... (LAA) is an occupational disease of laboratory animal technicians and scientists. It manifests as an allergic response to animal urine, specifically the major urinary proteins (Mups) of rodents, and can lead to the development of asthma. A study of 5641 workers in Japan who were exposed to laboratory animals found 23.1% had one or more allergic symptoms; globally the prevalence among at risk workers is estimated between 11 and 30% According to the National Institutes of Health, prevention of animal allergy depends on the control of allergens in the work environment. This involves a combination of measures to eliminate or control allergen exposure, including engineering controls, administrative controls, and personal protective equipment. The protein product of the mouse Mup17 gene, known as Mus m 1, Ag1 or MA1, accounts for much of the allergenic properties of mouse urine. Similarly, the product of the rat Mup13 gene, Rat n 1, is also a potent human allergen. One study ...
... (or other combinations with airway or hyperreactivity) is a state characterised by easily triggered bronchospasm (contraction of the bronchioles or small airways). Bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be assessed with a bronchial challenge test. This most often uses products like methacholine or histamine. These chemicals trigger bronchospasm in normal individuals as well, but people with bronchial hyperresponsiveness have a lower threshold. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness is a hallmark of asthma but also occurs frequently in people suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the Lung Health Study, bronchial hyperresponsiveness was present in approximately two-thirds of patients with non-severe COPD, and this predicted lung function decline independently of other factors. In asthma it tends to be reversible with bronchodilator therapy, while this is not the case in COPD. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness has been associated with gas cooking among subjects ...
Allergic Sensitization - There is an acute response (early stages) and a late-phase response (later stages). In the early stages, the Antigen-Presenting Cell causes a response in a TH2 lymphocyte which produce the cytokine interleukin-4 (IL-4). The TH2 lymphocytes interact with B cells and together they produce IgE. IgE circulates around and binds to receptors of cells leading to an acute inflammatory response.[13] In this case, sensitization is commonly referring to commencement of allergic responses.[14] Allergic sensitization development varies with age, with younger children at the greatest risk of developing allergic sensitization.[15] There are a variety of tests to diagnose allergic conditions. Tests that are commonly used place potential allergens on the skin of the patient and looking for a reaction to look for an allergen-specific IgE (Immunoglobulin E). They have shown that IgE levels are at their greatest before 10 years of age and fall vastly until one reaches 30.[15] There is a ...
Allergic Sensitization - There is an acute response (early stages) and a late-phase response (later stages). In the early stages, the Antigen-Presenting Cell causes a response in a TH2 lymphocyte which produce the cytokine interleukin-4 (IL-4). The TH2 lymphocytes interact with B cells and together they produce IgE. IgE circulates around and binds to receptors of cells leading to an acute inflammatory response.[13] In this case, sensitization is commonly referring to commencement of allergic responses.[14] Allergic sensitization development varies with age, with younger children at the greatest risk of developing allergic sensitization.[15] There are a variety of tests to diagnose allergic conditions. Tests that are commonly used place potential allergens on the skin of the patient and looking for a reaction to look for an allergen-specific IgE (Immunoglobulin E). They have shown that IgE levels are at their greatest before 10 years of age and fall vastly until one reaches 30.[15] There is a ...
... is a type of hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by bird droppings. The lungs become inflamed with granuloma formation. Bird fancier's lung (BFL), also called bird-breeder's lung and pigeon-breeder's lung, is a subset of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). This disease is caused by the exposure to avian proteins present in the dry dust of the droppings and sometimes in the feathers of a variety of birds. Birds such as pigeons, parakeets, cockatiels, shell parakeets (budgerigars), parrots, turtle doves, turkeys and chickens have been implicated. People who work with birds or own many birds are at risk. Bird hobbyists and pet store workers may also be at risk. This disease is an inflammation of the alveoli in the lungs. Initial symptoms are breathlessness especially after sudden exertion or when exposed to temperature change and can be very similar to asthma, hyperventilation syndrome or pulmonary ...
The Pomeranian or Pommern duck (in German Pommernente) is a breed of domesticated duck. It is a landrace originating in German baltic sea coast region called Pomerania. Pomeranian ducks share the same ancestors with other northern European duck breeds, such as the Shetland duck and Swedish Blue duck. The Pomeranian duck is a medium-sized bird, male weighs 3 kg; the female usually weighs 2.5 kg. The body is traditionally black or blue with a white breast. They have dark (preferably black) beaks and feet and dark brown eyes. They produce 70-100 eggs per year of 80-90 grams weight. List of duck breeds "Pomeranian Duck". Retrieved 2012-01-29. Australian Poultry Standards (2nd ed.). Victorian Poultry Fanciers Association (trading as Poultry Stud Breeders and Exhibitors Victoria). 2011. pp. 286-287. ISBN 978-1-921488-23-8. "Breeds - Duck - Germany". elbarn.net. European Livestock Breeds Ark and Rescue Net. Retrieved 15 July 2016 ...
In 1994, a group of IRCA breeders decided to leave and form their own group because of the increasing restrictions. Owing to Baker's trademark on the name Ragdoll, the group renamed its stock of IRCA Ragdoll cats Ragamuffins. While the originally proposed name was Liebling, the name Ragamuffin was put forth as an alternative by one of the group's founders and it was chosen. In the spirit of bettering the breed's genetic health, personality, and temperament, the group out-crossed to Persians, Himalayans, and non-pedigreed domestic long-haired cats. The group also allowed some out-crossing to original Ragdolls (which ended in 2010 for ACFA-recognized Ragamuffins). Only cats with at least one Ragamuffin parent and an ACFA-accepted out-cross currently qualify to be called ACFA Ragamuffins. Cat Fanciers' Association Ragamuffins may only have Ragamuffin parents. The first cat association to accept the breed at full show champion status was the United Feline Organization (UFO), and while some major cat ...
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadels Textbook of Respiratory ... Examples of hypersensitivity pneumonitis include:. Bird fanciers lung: This is the most common type of hypersensitivity ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis antibody blood test Antibody. An antibody is a protein produced by the bodys immune system when ... Lung changes due to chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis may be seen on a chest x-ray. Other tests may include:. Chest x-ray. A ...
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis associated with the use of temozolomide. D. Koschel, S. Handzhiev, V. Leucht, O. Holotiuk, A. ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis associated with the use of temozolomide. D. Koschel, S. Handzhiev, V. Leucht, O. Holotiuk, A. ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis associated with the use of temozolomide. D. Koschel, S. Handzhiev, V. Leucht, O. Holotiuk, A. ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis associated with the use of temozolomide Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message from ...
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by occupational exposure to phytase. R. C. van Heemst, I. Sander, J. Rooyackers, L. de Jong ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by occupational exposure to phytase. R. C. van Heemst, I. Sander, J. Rooyackers, L. de Jong ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by occupational exposure to phytase. R. C. van Heemst, I. Sander, J. Rooyackers, L. de Jong ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by occupational exposure to phytase Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message from ...
Farmers are exposed daily to an airborne mixture of respiratory irritants, microbial toxins, nuisance dust and a multitude of ... Farmers are exposed daily to an airborne mixture of respiratory irritants, microbial toxins, nuisance dust and a multitude of ... Production of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) in mice by inhalation of spores of Micropolyspora faeni.. ...
Respiratory Tract Diseases. Respiratory Tract Infections. Lung Diseases, Interstitial. Respiratory Hypersensitivity. ... Small Airway Involvement in Patients With Chronic Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis. The safety and scientific validity of this ... Clinical diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2003 Oct 15;168(8):952-8. Epub 2003 Jul 3. ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is a syndrome with variable clinical presentation in which lung inflammation is caused by ...
Your Name) has sent you a message from European Respiratory Society Message Body (Your Name) thought you would like to see the ... "J67.8 Hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to other organic dusts" and "J67.9 Hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to unspecified ... The effect of pulmonary fibrosis on survival in patients with hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Am J Med 2004; 116: 662-668. ... Incidence, comorbidity and survival rate of hypersensitivity pneumonitis: a national population-based study. Anne Hald Rittig, ...
Read about hypersensitivity pneumonitis (acute and chronic), and inflammation of the lung caused by bacteria, mold, fungi, and ... Murray and Nadels Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa; Saunders Elsevier; 2010; Chap 66. Saltoun, et. ... Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis. *What is hypersensitivity pneumonitis and what are its causes?. *What is acute hypersensitivity ... Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis - Symptoms What were your symptoms associated with hypersensitivity pneumonitis? Post. View 2 ...
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is inflammation of the lungs due to breathing in a foreign substance, usually certain types of ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadels Textbook of Respiratory ... Examples of hypersensitivity pneumonitis include:. Bird fanciers lung: This is the most common type of hypersensitivity ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis usually occurs in people who work in places where there are high levels of organic dusts, fungus, ...
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to other organic dusts answers are found in the ICD-10-CM powered by Unbound Medicine. ... J00-J99 - Diseases of the respiratory system*J60-J70 - Lung diseases due to external agents*J67 - Hypersensitivity pneumonitis ... J67.8 - Hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to other organic dusts. *J67.9 - Hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to unspecified ... J67.8 - Hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to other organic dusts is a sample topic from the ICD-10-CM. To view other topics, ...
... noted the occurrence among automobile production workers of respiratory illness consistent with hypersensitivity pneumonitis ( ... Rose C. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis. In: Rosenstock L, Cullen MR, eds. Textbook of clinical occupational and environmental ... Biopsy-Confirmed Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis in Automobile Production Workers Exposed to Metalworking Fluids -- Michigan, 1994 ... TABLE 1. Clinical findings for six automobile production workers* with hypersensitivity pneumonitis -- production plants A, B ...
Therefore, mycobacteria may be responsible, in part, for many outbreaks of hypersensitivity pneumonitis and other respiratory ... have been implicated in outbreaks of hypersensitivity pneumonitis or respiratory problems in a wide variety of settings. One ... Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis in Workers Exposed to Metalworking Fluid Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis in Swimming Pool Attendants ... Therefore, mycobacteria may be responsible, in part, for many outbreaks of hypersensitivity pneumonitis and other respiratory ...
Department of Radiology, National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, Denver, CO, USA.. ... the CT diagnoses were probable hypersensitivity pneumonitis in two cases and definite hypersensitivity pneumonitis in one case ... Of the 19 patients with chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis, only seven had a definite diagnosis of hypersensitivity ... Can CT distinguish hypersensitivity pneumonitis from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis?. Lynch DA1, Newell JD, Logan PM, King TE Jr ...
Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis in the Workplace article updated by Santiago Quirce, MD, PhD and Joaquin Sastre, MD, PhD for the ... HP usually presents itself as an occupational respiratory disease. ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1984;74:1-9.. *Levy MB, Fink JN. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Ann ... Report of the Subcommittee on Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis. Guidelines for the clinical evaluation of hypersensitivity ...
The second patient developed respiratory symptoms shortly after beginning HAART. Treatment with interleukin-2 was discontinued ... 1998) Hypersensitivity pneumonitis. in Interstitial lung disease. eds Schwarz MI, King TE (B C Decker, Hamilton), pp 393-422, . ... 1992) Hypersensitivity pneumonitis: sensitivity of high-resolution CT scan in a population-based study. AJR 159:469-472, . ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis results from immunologically mediated lung damage provoked by antigen exposure. Common antigens ...
In its acute or subacute form, hypersensitivity pneumonitis may be a cause of recurrent pneumonitis. ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) refers to a group of disorders caused by a nonatopic immunologic response to an inhaled agent ... Acute hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) closely resembles viral or bacterial infections of the lower respiratory tract. ... encoded search term (Pediatric Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis) and Pediatric Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis What to Read Next on ...
Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis. *A group of respiratory diseases that cause inflammation of the lung (specifically granulomatous ... Symptoms of some diseases, including asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and humidifier fever, may also show up soon after ... A number of well-identified illnesses, such as Legionnaires disease, asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and humidifier fever ... Some biological contaminants trigger allergic reactions, including hypersensitivity pneumonitis, allergic rhinitis and some ...
In its acute or subacute form, hypersensitivity pneumonitis may be a cause of recurrent pneumonitis. ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) refers to a group of disorders caused by a nonatopic immunologic response to an inhaled agent ... Respiratory epithelial cells release interleukin-8 in response to a thermophilic bacteria that causes hypersensitivity ... hypersensitivity pneumonitis may be a cause of recurrent pneumonitis. In its chronic form, hypersensitivity pneumonitis may ...
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis J-F. Cordier. European Respiratory Monograph 54: Orphan Lung Diseases. European Respiratory ... Suberosis, also known as corkhandlers disease or corkworkers lung, is a type of hypersensitivity pneumonitis usually caused ... Vinte-e-Um Mendes first reported respiratory disease in Portuguese cork workers in 1947 at the Portuguese Medical Reunion. ...
The quality of the air we breathe has major implications for our respiratory health. , RACGP ... The respiratory tract comes into contact with approximately 14 000 litres of air during a standard working week. ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP, or extrinsic allergic alveolitis) is a complex syndrome caused ... New diagnosis of a respiratory condition with known occupational or environmental causes, eg. hypersensitivity pneumonitis or ...
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish * Interstitial lung disease (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in ... Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) ... Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) * Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias (Merck & Co., Inc ... Pneumonitis (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Also in Spanish * Silicosis: Learn the Facts! (National ...
"Hypersensitivity pneumonitis from Pezizia domiciliana. A case of El Niño lung". American Journal of Respiratory and Critical ... The fungus has been implicated in a case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (called El Niño lung in the original report), in which ...
Asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and other respiratory diseases caused by metalworking fluids. Rosenman, Kenneth D ...
6.1.3 Hypersensitivity pneumonitis.. 6.2 Pleural disease.. 6.3 Therapy of pulmonary thromboembolism: an evidence-based approach ... Evidence-based Respiratory Medicine is the first major evidence-based text in adult respiratory medicine. ... Peter Gibson, Respiratory Medicine Unit, John Hunter Hospital. Permissions. Request permission to reuse content from this site ... Evidence-Based Respiratory Medicine, with CD-ROM. Peter G. Gibson (Editor), Michael Abramson (Section Editor), Richard Wood- ...
Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Asphyxia, respiratory distress. Frequency not reported: Hypersensitivity pneumonitis ... Respiratory. Common (1% to 10%): Decreased lung function, increased cough, Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Respiratory failure, ...
All of them reported onset of respiratory and general... ... Selman M. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis. In: Schwarz MI, King TJ ... employed in a furniture factory located in eastern Poland developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) after the pine wood used ... Acute hypersensitivity pneumonitis in woodworkers caused by inhalation of birch dust contaminated with Pantoea agglomerans and ... Hypersensitivity pneumonitis: insights in diagnosis and pathobiology. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2012; 186(4): 314-324. ...
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