Meningitis, Bacterial: Bacterial infections of the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space, frequently involving the cerebral cortex, cranial nerves, cerebral blood vessels, spinal cord, and nerve roots.Streptococcus suis: A species of STREPTOCOCCUS isolated from pigs. It is a pathogen of swine but rarely occurs in humans.Meningitis, Escherichia coli: A form of gram-negative meningitis that tends to occur in neonates, in association with anatomical abnormalities (which feature communication between the meninges and cutaneous structures) or as OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS in association with IMMUNOLOGIC DEFICIENCY SYNDROMES. In premature neonates the clinical presentation may be limited to ANOREXIA; VOMITING; lethargy; or respiratory distress. Full-term infants may have as additional features FEVER; SEIZURES; and bulging of the anterior fontanelle. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp398-400)Meningitis: Inflammation of the coverings of the brain and/or spinal cord, which consist of the PIA MATER; ARACHNOID; and DURA MATER. Infections (viral, bacterial, and fungal) are the most common causes of this condition, but subarachnoid hemorrhage (HEMORRHAGES, SUBARACHNOID), chemical irritation (chemical MENINGITIS), granulomatous conditions, neoplastic conditions (CARCINOMATOUS MENINGITIS), and other inflammatory conditions may produce this syndrome. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1994, Ch24, p6)Meningitis, Pneumococcal: An acute purulent infection of the meninges and subarachnoid space caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, most prevalent in children and adults over the age of 60. This illness may be associated with OTITIS MEDIA; MASTOIDITIS; SINUSITIS; RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS; sickle cell disease (ANEMIA, SICKLE CELL); skull fractures; and other disorders. Clinical manifestations include FEVER; HEADACHE; neck stiffness; and somnolence followed by SEIZURES; focal neurologic deficits (notably DEAFNESS); and COMA. (From Miller et al., Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p111)Meningitis, Aseptic: A syndrome characterized by headache, neck stiffness, low grade fever, and CSF lymphocytic pleocytosis in the absence of an acute bacterial pathogen. Viral meningitis is the most frequent cause although MYCOPLASMA INFECTIONS; RICKETTSIA INFECTIONS; diagnostic or therapeutic procedures; NEOPLASTIC PROCESSES; septic perimeningeal foci; and other conditions may result in this syndrome. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p745)Meningitis, Viral: Viral infections of the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space. TOGAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; FLAVIVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; RUBELLA; BUNYAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ORBIVIRUS infections; PICORNAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; RHABDOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ARENAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; HERPESVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ADENOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; JC VIRUS infections; and RETROVIRIDAE INFECTIONS may cause this form of meningitis. Clinical manifestations include fever, headache, neck pain, vomiting, PHOTOPHOBIA, and signs of meningeal irritation. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp1-3)Meningitis, Fungal: Meningitis caused by fungal agents which may occur as OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS or arise in immunocompetent hosts.Meningitis, Haemophilus: Infections of the nervous system caused by bacteria of the genus HAEMOPHILUS, and marked by prominent inflammation of the MENINGES. HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE TYPE B is the most common causative organism. The condition primarily affects children under 6 years of age but may occur in adults.Meningitis, Meningococcal: A fulminant infection of the meninges and subarachnoid fluid by the bacterium NEISSERIA MENINGITIDIS, producing diffuse inflammation and peri-meningeal venous thromboses. Clinical manifestations include FEVER, nuchal rigidity, SEIZURES, severe HEADACHE, petechial rash, stupor, focal neurologic deficits, HYDROCEPHALUS, and COMA. The organism is usually transmitted via nasopharyngeal secretions and is a leading cause of meningitis in children and young adults. Organisms from Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, B, C, Y, and W-135 have been reported to cause meningitis. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp689-701; Curr Opin Pediatr 1998 Feb;10(1):13-8)Meningitis, Cryptococcal: Meningeal inflammation produced by CRYPTOCOCCUS NEOFORMANS, an encapsulated yeast that tends to infect individuals with ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME and other immunocompromised states. The organism enters the body through the respiratory tract, but symptomatic infections are usually limited to the lungs and nervous system. The organism may also produce parenchymal brain lesions (torulomas). Clinically, the course is subacute and may feature HEADACHE; NAUSEA; PHOTOPHOBIA; focal neurologic deficits; SEIZURES; cranial neuropathies; and HYDROCEPHALUS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp721-2)Tuberculosis, Meningeal: A form of bacterial meningitis caused by MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS or rarely MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS. The organism seeds the meninges and forms microtuberculomas which subsequently rupture. The clinical course tends to be subacute, with progressions occurring over a period of several days or longer. Headache and meningeal irritation may be followed by SEIZURES, cranial neuropathies, focal neurologic deficits, somnolence, and eventually COMA. The illness may occur in immunocompetent individuals or as an OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTION in the ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME and other immunodeficiency syndromes. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp717-9)Cerebrospinal Fluid: A watery fluid that is continuously produced in the CHOROID PLEXUS and circulates around the surface of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and in the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Meningitis, Listeria: Inflammation of the meninges caused by LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES infection, usually occurring in individuals under the age of 3 years or over the age of 50 years. It may occur at any age in individuals with IMMUNOLOGIC DEFICIENCY SYNDROMES. Clinical manifestations include FEVER, altered mentation, HEADACHE, meningeal signs, focal neurologic signs, and SEIZURES. (From Medicine 1998 Sep;77(5):313-36)Spinal Puncture: Tapping fluid from the subarachnoid space in the lumbar region, usually between the third and fourth lumbar vertebrae.Echovirus Infections: Infectious disease processes, including meningitis, diarrhea, and respiratory disorders, caused by echoviruses.Streptococcus pneumoniae: A gram-positive organism found in the upper respiratory tract, inflammatory exudates, and various body fluids of normal and/or diseased humans and, rarely, domestic animals.Neisseria meningitidis: A species of gram-negative, aerobic BACTERIA. It is a commensal and pathogen only of humans, and can be carried asymptomatically in the NASOPHARYNX. When found in cerebrospinal fluid it is the causative agent of cerebrospinal meningitis (MENINGITIS, MENINGOCOCCAL). It is also found in venereal discharges and blood. There are at least 13 serogroups based on antigenic differences in the capsular polysaccharides; the ones causing most meningitis infections being A, B, C, Y, and W-135. Each serogroup can be further classified by serotype, serosubtype, and immunotype.Angiostrongylus cantonensis: A species of parasitic nematodes distributed throughout the Pacific islands that infests the lungs of domestic rats. Human infection, caused by consumption of raw slugs and land snails, results in eosinophilic meningitis.Ceftriaxone: A broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic with a very long half-life and high penetrability to meninges, eyes and inner ears.Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteins: Proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid, normally albumin and globulin present in the ratio of 8 to 1. Increases in protein levels are of diagnostic value in neurological diseases. (Brain and Bannister's Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p221)Niger: A republic in western Africa, north of NIGERIA and west of CHAD. Its capital is Niamey.Streptococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS.Meninges: The three membranes that cover the BRAIN and the SPINAL CORD. They are the dura mater, the arachnoid, and the pia mater.Neisseria meningitidis, Serogroup A: Strains of Neisseria meningitidis responsible for most outbreaks of meningococcal disease in Western Europe and the United States in the first half of the 20th century. They continue to be a major cause of disease in Asia and Africa, and especially localized epidemics in Sub-Sahara Africa.Haemophilus influenzae: A species of HAEMOPHILUS found on the mucous membranes of humans and a variety of animals. The species is further divided into biotypes I through VIII.Meningoencephalitis: An inflammatory process involving the brain (ENCEPHALITIS) and meninges (MENINGITIS), most often produced by pathogenic organisms which invade the central nervous system, and occasionally by toxins, autoimmune disorders, and other conditions.Streptococcus agalactiae: A bacterium which causes mastitis in cattle and occasionally in man.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Enterovirus InfectionsEncyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Sick Building Syndrome: A group of symptoms that are two- to three-fold more common in those who work in large, energy-efficient buildings, associated with an increased frequency of headaches, lethargy, and dry skin. Clinical manifestations include hypersensitivity pneumonitis (ALVEOLITIS, EXTRINSIC ALLERGIC); allergic rhinitis (RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, PERENNIAL); ASTHMA; infections, skin eruptions, and mucous membrane irritation syndromes. Current usage tends to be less restrictive with regard to the type of building and delineation of complaints. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Neck Muscles: The neck muscles consist of the platysma, splenius cervicis, sternocleidomastoid(eus), longus colli, the anterior, medius, and posterior scalenes, digastric(us), stylohyoid(eus), mylohyoid(eus), geniohyoid(eus), sternohyoid(eus), omohyoid(eus), sternothyroid(eus), and thyrohyoid(eus).Echovirus 9: A species of ENTEROVIRUS associated with outbreaks of aseptic meningitis (MENINGITIS, ASEPTIC).Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Food Dispensers, Automatic: Mechanical food dispensing machines.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Postal Service: The functions and activities carried out by the U.S. Postal Service, foreign postal services, and private postal services such as Federal Express.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Foundations: Organizations established by endowments with provision for future maintenance.Nuclear Warfare: Warfare involving the use of NUCLEAR WEAPONS.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)JapanPharmaceutical Services: Total pharmaceutical services provided by qualified PHARMACISTS. In addition to the preparation and distribution of medical products, they may include consultative services provided to agencies and institutions which do not have a qualified pharmacist.MassachusettsVirus Diseases: A general term for diseases produced by viruses.
Meningitis and encephalitis[edit]. High levels of lactate dehydrogenase in cerebrospinal fluid are often associated with ... bacterial meningitis.[34] In the case of viral meningitis, high LDH, in general, indicates the presence of encephalitis and ... Noncancerous conditions that can raise LDH levels include heart failure, hypothyroidism, anemia, pre-eclampsia, meningitis, ...
Meningitis[edit]. Meningococcal meningitis is a form of bacterial meningitis. Meningitis is a disease caused by inflammation ... See also: African meningitis belt, 2009-10 West African meningitis outbreak, and Meningitis Vaccine Project ... FASO: Meningitis kills more than 400 *^ Enserink M (December 2008). "Meningitis. Less vaccine can be more". Science. 322 (5907 ... Meningitis[edit]. The patient with meningococcal meningitis typically presents with high fever, nuchal rigidity (stiff neck), ...
... and even meningitis or carotico-cavernous fistula is important. ...
... is an inflammation of the bronchi (large and medium-sized airways) in the lungs.[1] Symptoms include coughing up mucus, wheezing, shortness of breath, and chest discomfort.[1] Bronchitis is divided into two types: acute and chronic.[1] Acute bronchitis is also known as a chest cold.[1] Acute bronchitis usually has a cough that lasts around three weeks.[4] In more than 90% of cases the cause is a viral infection.[4] These viruses may be spread through the air when people cough or by direct contact.[1] Risk factors include exposure to tobacco smoke, dust, and other air pollution.[1] A small number of cases are due to high levels of air pollution or bacteria such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae or Bordetella pertussis.[4][5] Treatment of acute bronchitis typically involves rest, paracetamol (acetaminophen), and NSAIDs to help with the fever.[6][7] Chronic bronchitis is defined as a productive cough that lasts for three months or more per year for at least two years.[8] Most people with chronic ...
In addition, locations of inflammation where infection is the most common cause include pneumonia, meningitis and salpingitis. ...
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"Meningitis and Encephalitis Fact Sheet". National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Archived from the original on ... "Meningitis and Encephalitis Information Page". NINDS. Archived from the original on 29 October 2017. Retrieved 29 October 2017. ... It can be caused by a bacterial infection, such as bacterial meningitis,[12] or may be a complication of a current infectious ... Encephalitis with meningitis is known as meningoencephalitis. While encephalitis with involvement of the spinal cord is known ...
Sagittal magnetic resonance images of ankle region: psoriatic arthritis. (a) Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) image, showing high signal intensity at the Achilles tendon insertion (enthesitis, thick arrow) and in the synovium of the ankle joint (synovitis, long thin arrow). Bone marrow oedema is seen at the tendon insertion (short thin arrow). (b, c) T1 weighted images of a different section of the same patient, before (panel b) and after (panel c) intravenous contrast injection, confirm inflammation (large arrow) at the enthesis and reveal bone erosion at tendon insertion (short thin arrows ...
Meningitis 2009-04-02 Menstrual cycle 2005-08-30 Metabolism 2011-09-05 ...
In 1976, SEM images showed that there were homing receptors on microvilli-like tips on leukocytes that would allow white blood cells to get out of the blood vessel and get into tissue.[5] Since the 1990s the identity of ligands involved in leukocyte extravasation have been studied heavily. This topic was finally able to be studied thoroughly under physiological shear stress conditions using a typical flow chamber.[6] Since the first experiments, a strange phenomenon was observed. Binding interactions between the white blood cells and the vessel walls were observed to become stronger under higher force. Selectins (E-selection, L-selection, and P-selectin) were found to be involved in this phenomenon. The shear threshold requirement seems counterintuitive because increasing shear elevates the force applied to adhesive bonds and it would seem that this should increase the dislodging ability. Nevertheless, cells roll more slowly and more regularly until an optimal shear is reached where rolling ...
The focus of treatment is to remove plaque. Therapy is aimed at the reduction of oral bacteria and may take the form of regular periodic visits to a dental professional together with adequate oral hygiene home care. Thus, several of the methods used in the prevention of gingivitis can also be used for the treatment of manifest gingivitis, such as scaling, root planing, curettage, mouth washes containing chlorhexidine or hydrogen peroxide, and flossing. Interdental brushes also help remove any causative agents. Powered toothbrushes work better than manual toothbrushes in reducing the disease.[15] The active ingredients that "reduce plaque and demonstrate effective reduction of gingival inflammation over a period of time" are triclosan, chlorhexidine digluconate, and a combination of thymol, menthol, eucalyptol, and methyl salicylate. These ingredients are found in toothpaste and mouthwash. Hydrogen peroxide was long considered a suitable over-the-counter agent to treat gingivitis. There has been ...
meningitis. DNA virus. JCV Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. RNA virus. MeV Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. LCV ...
Breast cancer may coincide with or mimic symptoms of mastitis. Only full resolution of symptoms and careful examination are sufficient to exclude the diagnosis of breast cancer. Lifetime risk for breast cancer is significantly reduced for women who were pregnant and breastfeeding. Mastitis episodes do not appear to influence lifetime risk of breast cancer. Mastitis does however cause great difficulties in diagnosis of breast cancer and delayed diagnosis and treatment can result in worse outcome. Breast cancer may coincide with mastitis or develop shortly afterwards. All suspicious symptoms that do not completely disappear within 5 weeks must be investigated. Breast cancer incidence during pregnancy and lactation is assumed to be the same as in controls. Course and prognosis are also very similar to age matched controls.[26][27] However diagnosis during lactation is particularly problematic, often leading to delayed diagnosis and treatment. Some data suggest that noninflammatory breast cancer ...
In both the acute and chronic forms, antibiotics are used if an infection is suspected. The treatment of choice is often azithromycin and cefixime to cover both gonorrhoeae and chlamydia. Fluoroquinolones are no longer recommended due to widespread resistance of gonorrhoeae to this class.[7] Doxycycline may be used as an alternative to azithromycin. In chronic epididymitis, a four- to six-week course of antibiotics may be prescribed to ensure the complete eradication of any possible bacterial cause, especially the various chlamydiae. For cases caused by enteric organisms (such as E. coli), ofloxacin or levofloxacin are recommended.[7] In children, fluoroquinolones and doxycycline are best avoided. Since bacteria that cause urinary tract infections are often the cause of epididymitis in children, co-trimoxazole or suited penicillins (for example, cephalexin) can be used. Household remedies such as elevation of the scrotum and cold compresses applied regularly to the scrotum may relieve the pain ...
Nonallergic rhinitis refers to rhinitis that is not due to an allergy. The category was formerly referred to as vasomotor rhinitis, as the first cause discovered was vasodilation due to an overactive parasympathetic nerve response. As additional causes were identified, additional types of nonallergic rhinitis were recognized. Vasomotor rhinitis is now included among these under the more general classification of nonallergic rhinitis.[14] The diagnosis is made upon excluding allergic causes.[15] It is an umbrella term of rhinitis of multiple causes, such as occupational (chemical), smoking, gustatory, hormonal, senile (rhinitis of the elderly), atrophic, medication-induced (including rhinitis medicamentosa), local allergic rhinitis, non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophilia syndrome (NARES) and idiopathic (vasomotor or non-allergic, non-infectious perennial allergic rhinitis (NANIPER), or non-infectious non-allergic rhinitis (NINAR).[16]. In vasomotor rhinitis,[17][18] certain nonspecific stimuli, ...
... refers to an underlying process that causes inflammation and injury of the heart. It does not refer to inflammation of the heart as a consequence of some other insult. Many secondary causes, such as a heart attack, can lead to inflammation of the myocardium and therefore the diagnosis of myocarditis cannot be made by evidence of inflammation of the myocardium alone.[20][21] Myocardial inflammation can be suspected on the basis of electrocardiographic (ECG) results, elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and/or erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and increased IgM (serology) against viruses known to affect the myocardium. Markers of myocardial damage (troponin or creatine kinase cardiac isoenzymes) are elevated.[11] The ECG findings most commonly seen in myocarditis are diffuse T wave inversions; saddle-shaped ST-segment elevations may be present (these are also seen in pericarditis).[11] The gold standard is the biopsy of the myocardium, in general done in the setting of angiography. A ...
Meningitis: *for meningitis by E. coli, as an adjunct to imipenem. *for meningitis caused by Pseudomonas, as an adjunct to ... for neonatal meningitis caused by Streptococcus agalactiae or Listeria monocytogenes, as an adjunct to ampicillin ... for neonatal meningitis caused by Gram negative bacteria such as E. coli, as adjunct to a 3rd-generation cephalosporin ... for meningitis caused by Acetobacter, as an adjunct to imipenem or colistin ...
meningitis. DNA virus. JCV Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. RNA virus. MeV Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. LCV ...
... is a bacterial infection involving the inner layers of the skin.[1] It specifically affects the dermis and subcutaneous fat.[1] Signs and symptoms include an area of redness which increases in size over a few days.[1] The borders of the area of redness are generally not sharp and the skin may be swollen.[1] While the redness often turns white when pressure is applied, this is not always the case.[1] The area of infection is usually painful.[1] Lymphatic vessels may occasionally be involved,[1][3] and the person may have a fever and feel tired.[2] The legs and face are the most common sites involved, though cellulitis can occur on any part of the body.[1] The leg is typically affected following a break in the skin.[1] Other risk factors include obesity, leg swelling, and old age.[1] For facial infections, a break in the skin beforehand is not usually the case.[1] The bacteria most commonly involved are streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus.[1] In contrast to cellulitis, erysipelas is ...
The value of allergen labeling other than for intentional ingredients is controversial. This concerns labeling for ingredients present unintentionally as a consequence of cross-contact or cross-contamination at any point along the food chain (during raw material transportation, storage or handling, due to shared equipment for processing and packaging, etc.).[10][11] Experts in this field propose that if allergen labeling is to be useful to consumers, and healthcare professionals who advise and treat those consumers, ideally there should be agreement on which foods require labeling, threshold quantities below which labeling may be of no purpose, and validation of allergen detection methods to test and potentially recall foods that were deliberately or inadvertently contaminated.[106][107] Labeling regulations have been modified to provide for mandatory labeling of ingredients plus voluntary labeling, termed precautionary allergen labeling (PAL), also known as "may contain" statements, for ...
Health care providers. Given the ubiquitous use of latex products in health care settings, management of latex allergy presents significant health organizational problems. Those healthcare workers-such as physicians, nurses, aides, dentists, dental hygienists, operating room employees, occupational therapists, laboratory technicians, and hospital housekeeping personnel-who frequently use latex gloves and other latex-containing medical supplies are at risk for developing latex allergy.[25] Between about 4% to 17% of healthcare workers have a reaction, which usually presents as Irritant Contact Dermatitis. This contact dermatitis can develop further through allergic sensitivity to a status of full anaphylactic shock. Apart from the uncomfortable and in some cases life-threatening health implications, this will effectively hinder the person from working with any amount of latex and could impede their chance of maintaining their vocation.[26] In the surgical setting, the risk of a potentially ...
Quincke HI (1893). "Meningitis serosa". Sammlung Klinischer Vorträge. 67: 655.. *^ Nonne M (1904). "Ueber Falle vom ... The first report of IIH was by the German physician Heinrich Quincke, who described it in 1893 under the name serous meningitis ...
Epiglottitis, meningitis, pneumonia. Hib vaccine. Hiberix, Pentacel, ActHIB, Pedvax HIB, Tetramune, Quinvaxem, Pentavac PFS, ... Meningococcal meningitis. Meningococcal vaccine. Serotype C: Neisvac C and Meningitec. Serotypes A/C/W-135/Y: Mencevax, ...
Meningitis [3]. Diagnosis[edit]. A patient with cortical blindness has no vision but the response of his/her pupil to light is ... and meningitis.[3] Rarely, a patient with acquired cortical blindness may have little or no insight that they have lost vision ...
Quincke HI (1893). "Meningitis serosa". Sammlung Klinischer Vorträge. 67: 655. Nonne M (1904). "Ueber Falle vom Symptomkomplex ... who described it in 1893 under the name serous meningitis The term "pseudotumor cerebri" was introduced in 1904 by his ...
... is a very rare form of parasitic meningitis that causes a fatal brain infection. The parasite enters the body through the nose ... Various parasites can cause meningitis or can affect the brain or nervous system in other ways. Overall, parasitic meningitis ... Some parasites can cause a rare form of meningitis called eosinophilic meningitis, eosinophilic meningoencephalitis, or EM. ... As with meningitis caused by other infections, people who develop symptomatic EM from these parasites can have ...
Viral meningitis causes, risk factors, transmission, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention ... Initial symptoms of viral meningitis are similar to those for bacterial meningitis. However, bacterial meningitis is usually ... Viral meningitis is the most common type of meningitis, an inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord. It is often ... Doctors diagnose meningitis by ordering specific lab tests on specimens from a person suspected of having meningitis. If a ...
... but only a few cause meningitis. Most cases of pneumococcal meningitis occur in babies and young children under 18 months; the ... Pneumococcal meningitis is a type of bacterial meningitis with over 90 strains, ... Can pneumococcal meningitis be prevented?. There are vaccines available to help protect against pneumococcal meningitis, find ... Is meningitis contagious?. Pneumococcal meningitis is not considered to be contagious. Therefore, close contact with someone ...
Fungal meningitis[edit]. Fungal meningitis, such as cryptococcal meningitis, is treated with long courses of high dose ... Meningitis may be encountered in cerebral malaria (malaria infecting the brain) or amoebic meningitis, meningitis due to ... Although meningitis is a notifiable disease in many countries, the exact incidence rate is unknown.[20] In 2013 meningitis ... Tuberculous meningitis, which is meningitis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is more common in people from countries in ...
You may be wondering what the deal is with meningitis because youve heard frightening stuff about meningitis outbreaks in the ... Most cases of meningitis are caused by viruses (viral meningitis) or bacteria (bacterial meningitis). Fungi and other organisms ... What Is Meningitis?. Meningitis is inflammation of membranes around the brain and spinal cord called the meninges (pronounced: ... Meningitis. Meningitis can be a serious infection, and it can be contagious - which is why outbreaks make the news. However, ...
... is a serious illness that affects the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Find out more in this article ... Viral meningitis can also be serious, but usually is not as bad as meningitis caused by bacteria. Someone with viral meningitis ... Meningitis is a word you might hear on the news. Thats because there are sometimes outbreaks of meningitis at schools or ... Can Meningitis Be Prevented?. If someone gets bacterial meningitis in your neighborhood or school, doctors will want to know ...
Meningitis. * Childhood vaccinations fall across every major illness amid rise of anti-vaxx movement By Laura Donnelly 26 Sep ... What is meningitis, is it contagious and what are the symptoms? By Katie Russell 4 Jun 2019, 10:08am. ... Sepsis is bigger risk than meningitis, parents warned, as cases among youngsters rocket By Sarah Knapton 22 Jul 2019, 12:01am. ... Will your university student son or daughter bring meningitis home for Christmas? By Matthew Barbour 11 Dec 2017, 7:00am. ...
... a 19-month-old Canadian toddler living in Alberta who in 2012 developed bacterial meningitis. Unfortunately for Ezekiel, his ...
... who suffered twice from Meningitis, is relieved that the lead pharmacist for NECC is finally going to trial for the Meningitis ... Meningitis Peay. Joan Peay, who suffered twice from Meningitis, is relieved that the lead pharmacist for NECC is finally going ...
... and learn when to seek medical care for meningitis. Meningitis is inflammation of the meninges. Symptoms typically include ... Meningitis Quiz. What is meningitis and what causes it? Take our Meningitis Quiz to learn the causes, symptoms, treatments, and ... Fungal meningitis: Fungal meningitis (for example, Cryptococcus meningitis) is not considered to be contagious. ... home / infectious disease health center / infectious disease a-z list / is meningitis contagious center / is meningitis ...
Meningitis Definition Meningitis is a potentially fatal inflammation of the meninges, the thin, membranous covering of the ... Meningitis Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine, 3rd ed. COPYRIGHT 2006 Thomson Gale. Meningitis. Definition. Meningitis is a serious ... Meningitis UXL Complete Health Resource COPYRIGHT 2001 The Gale Group, Inc.. MENINGITIS. DEFINITION. Meningitis (pronounced meh ... Viral meningitis -Meningitis caused by a virus. Also called aseptic meningitis.. Vaccines are available for both meningococcal ...
... including the meningitis rash, and find out when and where to get medical advice if you have any concerns. ... Symptoms of meningitis can appear in any order. Some may not appear at all. In the early stages, there may not be a rash, or ... Meningitis rash. The rash usually starts as small, red pinpricks before spreading quickly and turning into red or purple ... Someone with meningitis, septicaemia or meningococcal disease can get a lot worse very quickly. ...
... Outbreak Is Affecting Men Positive For HIV In NYC In case you need any more reason to protect yourself, heres a ... BEWARE: Meningitis Outbreak Death Toll Rises To Seven In updated figured posted to the Centers for Disease Control and ... Meningitis Outbreak Claims The Lives Of Nearly 300 People In Nigeria The Center for Disease Control recently announced the ... discovery of a new strain of cerebrospinal meningitis that has killed 282 people in Nigeria. ...
University officials on two coasts are struggling to get control of a dangerous meningitis outbreak, and arranging to provide a ... About 10% to 15% of meningitis patients die from the illness. *The current meningitis vaccine doesnt protect students against ... Two universities battle meningitis outbreaks. Liz Szabo, USA TODAY Published 5:25 p.m. ET Dec. 4, 2013 , Updated 9:41 a.m. ET ... The first meningitis case in Princeton occurred in March; the eighth was diagnosed Nov. 20. All four of the Santa Barbara cases ...
Meningitis, inflammation of the meninges, the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. Meningitis can be caused by various ... Meningococcal meningitis. The term meningitis is often applied to meningococcal meningitis, which is caused by Neisseria ... Meningitis, inflammation of the meninges, the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. Meningitis can be caused by various ... Other forms of meningitis. Various other forms of meningitis are caused by viruses and ordinarily have a short, uncomplicated, ...
Meningitis, Aseptic / Viral Meningitis , 1990 Case Definition (https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/meningitis-aseptic/case- ... Meningitis, other bacterial (https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/meningitis-other-bacterial/) ...
Health Information on Meningitis: MedlinePlus Multiple Languages Collection ... Meningitis: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Meningitis: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) ... URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/meningitis.html Other topics A-Z. ...
Meningitis is an infection of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. This covering is called the meninges. ... Enteroviral meningitis occurs more often than bacterial meningitis and is milder. It usually occurs in the late summer and ... Antibiotics are used to treat bacterial meningitis. Antibiotics do not treat viral meningitis. But antiviral medicine may be ... Early diagnosis and treatment of bacterial meningitis is essential to prevent permanent neurological damage. Viral meningitis ...
Meningitis, especially caused by certain bacteria and viruses, is preventable with vaccinations and prophylactic or preventable ... Meningitis, especially caused by certain bacteria and viruses, is preventable with vaccinations and prophylactic or preventable ... Those who are travelling to regions with high incidences of infections leading to meningitis need to be vaccinated before they ... Notable vaccines for children among preventable causes of meningitis include:. *The mengingococcal vaccine against type C ...
... meningitis is either bacterial or viral, but can sometimes be caused by fungi. Meningitis can affect both immunocompromised and ... Bacterial meningitis. When bacterial organisms cause meningitis, the condition is called bacterial meningitis (BM). The disease ... Another deadly and contagious type of meningitis is meningococcal meningitis, caused by Neisseria meningitides. It strikes ... Fungal meningitis. This type of meningitis occurs mostly due to Cryptococcus neoformans, a fungus that thrives in mud and in ...
... and meningitis can be a life-threatening condition. Know the warning signs. ... A high fever rarely means that your baby has meningitis, but it can be an indicator, ... Sometimes meningitis is called spinal meningitis.) Meningitis is usually caused either by a virus (aseptic meningitis) or by ... Meningitis that affects babies up to 2 or 3 months old is called neonatal meningitis. Whether viral or bacterial, it can be ...
Meningitis, an inflammation of the membranes around the brain and spinal cord, begins with a high fever and irritability common ... "But the child is gravely ill soon after the onset of the symptoms, and this distinguishes meningitis from a harmless upper ... To some 10 percent of those infected, meningitis is fatal. Others develop infections that cause a form of arthritis or other ... Of the approximately 20,000 cases reported annually of either meningitis or the other related bacterial diseases, 90 percent ...
... a Salem mother watched her 7-week-old baby goes from happy and alert to gravely sick with meningitis to dying in her arms. ... More: Separate vaccine can protect against meningitis B strain. An average of 4,100 cases of bacterial meningitis resulting in ... Here are the facts about the different types of meningitis, the symptoms for each, and how meningitis is treated. Time ... She died of meningitis on Sunday after being discharged from the Salem Hospital emergency room with a fever.. ANNA REED / ...
Meningitis is inflammation of the membranes that surround and protect the brain and spinal cord. Anyone can be affected but at- ... WHAT IS MENINGITIS?. Meningitis is inflammation of the membranes that surround and protect the brain and spinal cord. ... Star Wars fan, 11, who lost his legs and one of his hands to meningitis gets a £10,000 R2-D2-themed bionic arm Kye Vincent, of ... More than a MILLION people may have missed out on a life-saving meningitis vaccine on the NHS due to an IT blunder Tim Mason ( ...
... "meningitis"[MeSH Terms] OR "meningitis"[All Fields]). Search. ... Cryptococcal meningitis mimicking primary mania in a young ... Rheumatoid meningitis: a rare complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Lu L et al. BMJ Case Rep. (2015) ... A case of mania due to cryptococcal meningitis, successfully treated with adjunctive olanzapine, in a patient with acquired ... Secondary mania due to AIDS and cryptococcal meningitis in a 78-year-old patient. ...
  • Joan Peay, who suffered twice from Meningitis, is relieved that the lead pharmacist for NECC is finally going to trial for the Meningitis outbreak of 2012. (tennessean.com)
  • University officials on two coasts are struggling to get control of a dangerous meningitis outbreak, and arranging to provide a vaccine not licensed in the USA. (usatoday.com)
  • About 98% of meningococcal meningitis cases are "sporadic," rather than part of a large outbreak. (usatoday.com)
  • some communities hold vaccination campaigns after an outbreak of meningococcal meningitis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • BOSTON (AP) - Dirk Thompson III doesn't hold out much hope that he and the 750 other victims in a nationwide meningitis outbreak will ever see much, if any, compensation for the deaths and illnesses caused by tainted steroids. (yahoo.com)
  • He hopes to find justice another way if criminal charges are brought against the principals of a Massachusetts compounding pharmacy that made the steroid injections blamed for the fungal meningitis outbreak. (yahoo.com)
  • An outbreak of fungal meningitis has been linked to steroid shots for back pain. (yahoo.com)
  • The compounding pharmacy at the center of the fungal meningitis outbreak was not following the requirements of its state license, according to a spokeswoman for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. (go.com)
  • Princeton University began its vaccinations of nearly 6,000 students Monday to try to stop an outbreak of type B meningitis, in an unusual, federal government-endorsed administration of a drug not generally approved for use in the United States. (nypost.com)
  • WASHINGTON -- Medicare is coming under scrutiny in the meningitis outbreak that has rekindled doubts about the safety of the nation's drug supply. (cnbc.com)
  • The meningitis outbreak has called attention to the role of compounding pharmacies in supplying medications routinely used by hospitals and doctors to treat patients. (cnbc.com)
  • A Meningitis outbreak occurred after a steroid drug commonly injected into people's spines to relieve back pain was apparently contaminated by an ordinary fungus. (npr.org)
  • Is that possibly the reason there was a meningitis outbreak at this one pharmacy? (npr.org)
  • An outbreak of a rare and deadly form of fungal meningitis that has killed 4 people and sickened another 26 in five states is believed to have been traced back to a steroid manufactured by the New England Compounding Center. (yahoo.com)
  • NEW YORK (AP) - The potential scope of the meningitis outbreak that has killed at least five people widened dramatically Thursday as health officials warned that hundreds, perhaps thousands, of patients who got steroid back injections in 23 states could be at risk. (yahoo.com)
  • Creditors are seeking to claw back more than $21 million from insiders and affiliates of the Massachusetts pharmacy that made the tainted steroid injections tied to a fatal meningitis outbreak, following a recent filing by the company showing that insiders received millions of dollars in salary and other payments in the year before it sought bankruptcy protection. (wsj.com)
  • The toll in the nationwide fungal meningitis outbreak has risen to 14 dead, linked to a tainted back pain treatment from a Massachusetts compounding facility. (deseretnews.com)
  • The steroid linked to a fungal meningitis outbreak was produced and distributed by the New England Compounding Center. (cnn.com)
  • The ever-expanding outbreak of life-threatening fungal meningitis in back pain patients linked to steroid injections prepared by a compounding pharmacy, which so far has sickened at least 214 people and killed 15 in 15 states, is a public health catastrophe. (cnn.com)
  • The steroid medication linked to the current fungal meningitis outbreak was produced and widely distributed by the New England Compounding Center in Framingham, Massachusetts, one of many compounding pharmacies across the country that has crossed the line between traditional compounding and large-scale drug production. (cnn.com)
  • ATLANTA, Oct. 6 (UPI) -- An outbreak of a deadly and rare form of fungal meningitis has widened to nine U.S. states and killed seven people, health officials said Saturday. (upi.com)
  • BOSTON (Reuters) - Michigan prosecutors on Friday filed second-degree murder charges against the co-founder and supervisory pharmacist of a Massachusetts compounding pharmacy linked to a deadly 2012 fungal meningitis outbreak, according to court records. (reuters.com)
  • FILE PHOTO: Pharmacist Barry Cadden, co-founder of the now-defunct New England Compounding Center, arrives to be sentenced after being convicted for racketeering and fraud for his role in a 2012 meningitis outbreak that killed 64 people across the United States, in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., June 26, 2017. (reuters.com)
  • Cadden, 52, and Chin, 50, were among 14 people indicted in federal court in Boston in 2014 following a fungal meningitis outbreak that authorities say was caused by mold-tainted steroids produced by Framingham, Massachusetts-based NECC. (reuters.com)
  • Two more people have died from fungal meningitis linked to tainted steroid injections, raising the death toll for the outbreak to 14. (go.com)
  • These drugs are very strong and can be very difficult for patients to tolerate over time," said Dr. J. Todd Weber, incident manager of the Multistate Meningitis Outbreak at the CDC, adding that the agency is working with experts on the dose and duration of the treatments. (go.com)
  • A vaccine developed during a meningitis outbreak showed promise in treating patients with gonorrhea. (medicaldaily.com)
  • 2012-11-14T20:00:20-05:00 https://images.c-span.org/Files/ed2/309397-m.jpg Joy Lovelace testified on the meningitis outbreak earlier in 2012 that killed her husband, Eddie Lovelace, who contracted the disease from a tainted injection. (c-span.org)
  • The fungus Aspergillus, pictured, has been found in some of the patients affected by the meningitis outbreak. (livescience.com)
  • Thank you for signing the Guest Book for Meningitis Outbreak Victims. (legacy.com)
  • This vaccine can also be used for people who have not been vaccinated before if there's an outbreak of bacterial meningitis. (healthline.com)
  • More doctors, clinics and other health care providers are likely to be sued in the deadly meningitis outbreak linked to fungus-contaminated steroids as plaintiffs attorneys search for deep pockets, legal experts say. (businessinsurance.com)
  • Please take a moment to sign the Guest Book for Meningitis Outbreak Victims. (legacy.com)
  • Send me a daily email when updates are made to the obituary or Condolence page for Meningitis Outbreak Victims. (legacy.com)
  • If there's been a meningitis outbreak in your community, you should talk to your children about it, especially if they're pre-teens or teens. (healthline.com)
  • It's like being reborn': Law student, 23, left PARALYSED after contracting deadly meningitis is filmed walking for the first time in nearly. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • Patients contracted the deadly meningitis after being injected in their spines with a preservative-free steroid called methylprednisolone acetate that was contaminated by a fungus. (cnn.com)
  • The highest incidence of meningitis occurs in babies under a month old, with an increased risk of meningitis continuing through about two years of age. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The truth is that health care professionals have always been concerned about the heightened risk of meningitis among college students living in close quarters together and sharing drinks and utensils," he explained. (webmd.com)
  • Mother's instinct saves her baby's life: Five-week-old boy, who showed no signs of meningitis, only survived killer disease after he was. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • ︉ Research has found that key early warning signs of meningitis and septicaemia in children under 17 years old often include cold hands and feet, abnormal skin colour (pale, bluish or mottled), and leg pains. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • So it's important to get routine vaccinations, know the signs of meningitis, and get medical care right away if you think that your child has the illness. (teenshealth.org)
  • Other signs of meningitis include protein levels that are higher than normal, and glucose levels that are lower than normal. (healthline.com)
  • In newborns, the most common agents of meningitis are those that are contracted from the newborn's mother, including Group B streptococci (becoming an increasingly common infecting organism in the newborn period), Escherichia coli , and Listeria monocytogenes . (encyclopedia.com)
  • Bacteria from the birth canal can be associated with life-threatening meningitis in newborns. (asbmb.org)