Dyspnea: Difficult or labored breathing.Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive: A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Exercise Tolerance: The exercise capacity of an individual as measured by endurance (maximal exercise duration and/or maximal attained work load) during an EXERCISE TEST.Dyspnea, Paroxysmal: A disorder characterized by sudden attacks of respiratory distress in at rest patients with HEART FAILURE and PULMONARY EDEMA. It usually occurs at night after several hours of sleep in a reclining position. Patients awaken with a feeling of suffocation, coughing, a cold sweat, and TACHYCARDIA. When there is significant WHEEZING, it is called cardiac asthma.Forced Expiratory Volume: Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.Spirometry: Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.Vital Capacity: The volume of air that is exhaled by a maximal expiration following a maximal inspiration.Lung Diseases, Obstructive: Any disorder marked by obstruction of conducting airways of the lung. AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION may be acute, chronic, intermittent, or persistent.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Respiratory Muscles: These include the muscles of the DIAPHRAGM and the INTERCOSTAL MUSCLES.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Cough: A sudden, audible expulsion of air from the lungs through a partially closed glottis, preceded by inhalation. It is a protective response that serves to clear the trachea, bronchi, and/or lungs of irritants and secretions, or to prevent aspiration of foreign materials into the lungs.Airway Obstruction: Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.Inspiratory Capacity: The maximum volume of air that can be inspired after reaching the end of a normal, quiet expiration. It is the sum of the TIDAL VOLUME and the INSPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME. Common abbreviation is IC.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Breathing Exercises: Therapeutic exercises aimed to deepen inspiration or expiration or even to alter the rate and rhythm of respiration.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Bronchodilator Agents: Agents that cause an increase in the expansion of a bronchus or bronchial tubes.Scopolamine Derivatives: Analogs or derivatives of scopolamine.Oxygen Inhalation Therapy: Inhalation of oxygen aimed at restoring toward normal any pathophysiologic alterations of gas exchange in the cardiopulmonary system, as by the use of a respirator, nasal catheter, tent, chamber, or mask. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Lung Diseases, Interstitial: A diverse group of lung diseases that affect the lung parenchyma. They are characterized by an initial inflammation of PULMONARY ALVEOLI that extends to the interstitium and beyond leading to diffuse PULMONARY FIBROSIS. Interstitial lung diseases are classified by their etiology (known or unknown causes), and radiological-pathological features.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Lung Volume Measurements: Measurement of the amount of air that the lungs may contain at various points in the respiratory cycle.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Bronchial DiseasesHemoptysis: Expectoration or spitting of blood originating from any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT, usually from hemorrhage in the lung parenchyma (PULMONARY ALVEOLI) and the BRONCHIAL ARTERIES.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Heart Neoplasms: Tumors in any part of the heart. They include primary cardiac tumors and metastatic tumors to the heart. Their interference with normal cardiac functions can cause a wide variety of symptoms including HEART FAILURE; CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS; or EMBOLISM.Tracheal NeoplasmsAsthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Tracheal DiseasesAcute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Inhalation: The act of BREATHING in.Work of Breathing: RESPIRATORY MUSCLE contraction during INHALATION. The work is accomplished in three phases: LUNG COMPLIANCE work, that required to expand the LUNGS against its elastic forces; tissue resistance work, that required to overcome the viscosity of the lung and chest wall structures; and AIRWAY RESISTANCE work, that required to overcome airway resistance during the movement of air into the lungs. Work of breathing does not refer to expiration, which is entirely a passive process caused by elastic recoil of the lung and chest cage. (Guyton, Textbook of Medical Physiology, 8th ed, p406)Bronchoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.Natriuretic Peptide, Brain: A PEPTIDE that is secreted by the BRAIN and the HEART ATRIA, stored mainly in cardiac ventricular MYOCARDIUM. It can cause NATRIURESIS; DIURESIS; VASODILATION; and inhibits secretion of RENIN and ALDOSTERONE. It improves heart function. It contains 32 AMINO ACIDS.Maximal Voluntary Ventilation: Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be breathed in and blown out over a sustained interval such as 15 or 20 seconds. Common abbreviations are MVV and MBC.Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity: The amount of a gas taken up, by the pulmonary capillary blood from the alveolar gas, per minute per unit of average pressure of the gradient of the gas across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.Residual Volume: The volume of air remaining in the LUNGS at the end of a maximal expiration. Common abbreviation is RV.Pulmonary Emphysema: Enlargement of air spaces distal to the TERMINAL BRONCHIOLES where gas-exchange normally takes place. This is usually due to destruction of the alveolar wall. Pulmonary emphysema can be classified by the location and distribution of the lesions.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Albuterol: A short-acting beta-2 adrenergic agonist that is primarily used as a bronchodilator agent to treat ASTHMA. Albuterol is prepared as a racemic mixture of R(-) and S(+) stereoisomers. The stereospecific preparation of R(-) isomer of albuterol is referred to as levalbuterol.Pericardial Effusion: Fluid accumulation within the PERICARDIUM. Serous effusions are associated with pericardial diseases. Hemopericardium is associated with trauma. Lipid-containing effusion (chylopericardium) results from leakage of THORACIC DUCT. Severe cases can lead to CARDIAC TAMPONADE.Pulmonary Embolism: Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Total Lung Capacity: The volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration. It is the equivalent to each of the following sums: VITAL CAPACITY plus RESIDUAL VOLUME; INSPIRATORY CAPACITY plus FUNCTIONAL RESIDUAL CAPACITY; TIDAL VOLUME plus INSPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus functional residual capacity; or tidal volume plus inspiratory reserve volume plus EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus residual volume.Bronchial Provocation Tests: Tests involving inhalation of allergens (nebulized or in dust form), nebulized pharmacologically active solutions (e.g., histamine, methacholine), or control solutions, followed by assessment of respiratory function. These tests are used in the diagnosis of asthma.Natriuretic Agents: Endogenous or exogenous chemicals that regulate the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE in the body. They consist of peptides and non-peptide compounds.Expiratory Reserve Volume: The extra volume of air that can be expired with maximum effort beyond the level reached at the end of a normal, quiet expiration. Common abbreviation is ERV.Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia: An interstitial lung disease of unknown etiology, occurring between 21-80 years of age. It is characterized by a dramatic onset of a "pneumonia-like" illness with cough, fever, malaise, fatigue, and weight loss. Pathological features include prominent interstitial inflammation without collagen fibrosis, diffuse fibroblastic foci, and no microscopic honeycomb change. There is excessive proliferation of granulation tissue within small airways and alveolar ducts.Tracheal StenosisChest Pain: Pressure, burning, or numbness in the chest.
Dyspnea. *Fainting or the sensation of the world spinning around them. *Severe anxiety ...
... (trade name Maxalt) is a 5-HT1 receptor agonist of the triptan class of drugs developed by Merck & Co. for the treatment of migraine headaches.[1] It is available in strengths of 5 and 10 mg as tablets and orally disintegrating tablets (Maxalt-MLT). Maxalt obtained approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on June 29, 1998. It is a second-generation triptan. Rizatriptan is available only by prescription in Australia, Finland, the United States, Canada and New Zealand. Similarly, it is classed as a POM (Prescription Only Medicine) in the United Kingdom, Italy (as Rizaliv), France, Israel (as Rizalt), The Netherlands, Croatia and Spain (as Maxalt). It is classified as OTC (over-the-counter) in Brazil (also as Maxalt). ...
The condition is difficult to detect and may go unnoticed, because many patients have no specific symptoms. Diagnosis is further complicated by the fact that many patients with the injury experienced multiple other serious injuries as well,[10] so the attention of hospital staff may be distracted from the possibility of aortic rupture. In fact most cases occur along with other injuries.[4] A common symptom is unusually high blood pressure in the upper body and very low blood pressure in lower limbs. Another symptom is renal failure where the creatinine level shoots very high and urine output becomes negligible. In most cases, however, the doctors would misinterpret renal failure as due to issues with the kidney itself and may recommend dialysis. Though not completely reliable, chest X-rays are the first-line treatment,[4] initially used to diagnose this condition when the patient is unstable and cannot be sent to the CT bay. The preferred method of diagnosis used to be CT angiogram until it was ...
In the acute form, the baby develops dyspnea and cyanosis and soon dies of heart failure. These symptoms may be described in ... dyspnoea: 42%, thoracic pain: 35%), and edemas of the lower limbs (51%). With treatment the rate of healing was about 97%.[47] ...
acute onset, persistent dyspnea. *bilateral infiltrates on chest radiograph consistent with pulmonary edema ...
Dyspnoea. *Visual disturbances. *Increased hepatic enzymes without associated clinical sequelae.. Contraindications[edit]. ...
Dyspnea, shortness of breath, or breathlessness. Disambiguation page providing links to articles with similar titles ...
Shiber J. R., Santana J. (May 2006). "Dyspnea". Med. Clin. North Am. 90 (3): 453-79. doi:10.1016/j.mcna.2005.11.006. PMID ...
Shiber JR, Santana J (May 2006). "Dyspnea". Med. Clin. North Am. 90 (3): 453-79. doi:10.1016/j.mcna.2005.11.006. PMID 16473100 ... Many different conditions can lead to the feeling of dyspnea (shortness of breath). DiagnosisPro, an online medical expert ...
"Dyspnea". www.clevelandclinicmeded.com. Cleveland Clinic. Archived from the original on 11 July 2017. Retrieved 24 May 2017. ...
... dyspnea; and cough. "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0080". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health ( ...
Emilia suffered from recurrent coughs and dyspnea; at 11 she began having hemorrhages from the upper gastrointestinal tract, ...
a b Shiber JR, Santana J (May 2006). "Dyspnea". Med. Clin. North Am. 90 (3): 453-79. PMID 16473100. doi:10.1016/j.mcna.2005.11. ...
Baldwin, Jennifer; Cox, Jaclyn (September 2016). "Treating Dyspnea". Medical Clinics of North America. 100 (5): 1123-1130. doi: ...
Shiber JR, Santana J. Dyspnea. Med. Clin. North Am. May 2006, 90 (3): 453-79. PMID 16473100. doi:10.1016/j.mcna.2005.11.006.. ...
Nicrosini, F.; Carpinella, G. (1978). "Eprozinol treatment of chronic bronchitis with dyspnea and cough". Broncho-pneumologie. ...
In some cases, dyspnea persists for an indefinite period. Contusion can also permanently reduce the compliance of the lungs. ... Dyspnea (painful breathing or difficulty breathing) is commonly seen, and tolerance for exercise may be lowered. Rapid ... Fibrosis of the lungs can occur, resulting in dyspnea (shortness of breath), low blood oxygenation, and reduced functional ...
Additionally, BNP can be used to differentiate between causes of dyspnea due to heart failure from other causes of dyspnea. If ... The patient will have dyspnea (shortness of breath) on exertion and in severe cases, dyspnea at rest. Increasing breathlessness ... The consequences of this are dyspnea (shortness of breath), orthopnea and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. ... Another symptom of heart failure is paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea: a sudden nighttime attack of severe breathlessness, usually ...
Definition of Dyspnea MedicineNet. Last Editorial Review: 11/1/1998] Levene, Malcolm I.; David Ian Tudehope; Michael John ... Still, many simply define dyspnea as difficulty in breathing without further specification, which may confuse it with e.g. ... The other way around, labored breathing or tachypnea can voluntarily be performed even when there is no dyspnea. Presentations ... Labored breathing is distinguished from shortness of breath or dyspnea, which is the sensation of respiratory distress rather ...
Dyspnea or difficulty breathing. The frequency of Rh factor blood types and the RhD neg allele gene differs in various ...
Respiration: Depression, dyspnea, asthma. Dermatological: Itching, burning, urticaria. Obstetric: Pseudo-sinusoidal fetal heart ...
... dyspnea). "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0075". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). "Butyl ...
... dyspnoea; chest pain; palpitations and mild pyrexia. Rare: Uterine rupture, severe hypotension, coronary spasms with subsequent ...
Dyspnea". Med. Clin. North Am. 90 (3): 453-79. doi:10.1016/j.mcna.2005.11.006. PMID 16473100.. ...
An 82-year-old man with dyspnea and pulmonary abnormalities. N Engl J Med. 2003 Apr 17;348(16):1574-85. Meadors M, Floyd J, ...
Mahler DA (2006). "Mechanisms and measurement of dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease". Proceedings of the American ... O'Donnell DE (2006). "Hyperinflation, Dyspnea, and Exercise Intolerance in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease". The ... and the modified MRC dyspnea scale. Significant weight loss is a bad sign. Results of spirometry are also a good predictor of ...
... who awaken suddenly at night feeling short of breath and gasping for air could be suffering from paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, ... Chapter 11 Dyspnea, Orthopnea, and Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea. Clinical Methods: The History, Physical, and Laboratory ... What Is Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea?. By Michele Blacksberg RN HERWriter Average Select rating. Poor. Fair. Average. Good. ... Having had episodes of orthopnea or dyspnea with exertion. There are also non-cardiac reasons for PND. PND is a term that may ...
Found Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea 1 time.. Displaying results 1 to 10.. 1. Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. This is the shortness ...
Dyspnea= Shortness of breath (SOB). Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea ni bermaksud severe SOB & coughing occur at night & awekening ... Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea ialah sign of heart failure(biasanya left side heart failure).. Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea ni ... Cara nk reduce Paroxysmal nocturnal Dyspnea ni ialah dgn tinggikan kepala,letakla bantal ke kt bahagian kepala. ...
Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea or PND : Classical attack. Editor October 5, 2010 No Comments cardiac asthmaorthopneaparoxysmal ... nocturnal dyspneaPND Describing the attack of PND. Normally after 30 minutes to 2 hours of lying in bed for sleep, the patient ...
... yet the relationship between laboratory-induced dyspnea in healthy volunteers and spontaneous dyspnea in patients with chronic ... Dyspnea: COPD or heart failure? Pinkowish, Mary Desmond; Amsterdam, Ezra A.; Morrissey, Brian // Patient Care;Jun2002, Vol. 36 ... Dyspnea affective response: comparing COPD patients with healthy volunteers and laboratory model with activities of daily ... Background: Laboratory-induced dyspnea (breathing discomfort) in healthy subjects is widely used to study perceptual mechanisms ...
The most common clinical presentation was dyspnea. The etiology was idiopathic. All patients were diagnosed by ... including dyspnea (n = 6), a lack of symptoms (n = 2), and atrial fibrillation (n = 1). No cardiac tamponade occurred. The time ... dyspnea, and fatigue according to Mask et al. [11]. ...
In turn, they present with nonspecific complaints, the most common ones cited being cough and dyspnea with exertion [7].. The ... The patient had no complaints of dyspnea, cough or inspiratory stridor. With persistent disease and desire to re-establish ... Dyspnea, Dysphonia, and Cough: Varied Presentations of Tracheobronchopathia Osteochondroplastica. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. ... The presentation is often asymptomatic or may instead include nonspecific respiratory complaints, with cough and dyspnea the ...
52-year-old female referred for dyspnea over the past 1-5 years. The symptoms are getting worse over the past several months. ...
... thus leaving thickened responsible for the sudden cardiac dyspnea occurring one month before death, and the simultaneous ...
Phlegm-resolving&Cough&Dyspnea-relieving---化痰止咳平喘药 *Phlegm-resolving Medicinal---化痰药 *Phlegm-Cold-Resolving---温化寒痰药 ...
Dyspnea (asthma) * Cancer * Lymphoma (Non-Hodgkins-lymphoma) * Circulation, Vessels * Circulatory disorders (arteries) ...
Dyspnea and Respiratory Distress: Hospital-Acquired. *Dystocia. *E *Esophageal Motility Disorder: Treatment ...
Over next 5 days, developed inability to walk, spiking fevers, and severe dyspnea. No PMH. Lives at home with older brother. ... Previously healthy 14-yo M presents with fever, dyspnea, inability to bear weight, and draining abscess on left abdomen. ...
Because angina pectoris and dyspnea may be described similarly by patients and because ischemic episodes may be entirely silent ...
Always be mixed with dyspnoea and should internalize. Read more Posts navigation. 1 2 3 … 11 Next Posts» ...
Monitor for signs/symptoms of interstitial lung disease/pneumonitis (eg, dyspnea, cough, fever), diarrhea, and dermatologic ... Respiratory: Cough (21%), nasal signs and symptoms (19%), dyspnea (13%), upper respiratory tract infection (12%) ... such as dyspnea, cough, and fever). Permanently discontinue dacomitinib if ILD is confirmed. ...
Carlsons for TEENs or to salvage imgages that fitness it can be of progressively worsening dyspnea story. The substance is ...
Respiratory: Dyspneathrombocytopenia. Musculoskeletal: CPK increasedthrombosis. Gastrointestinal: Abdominal painvision ...
Cardiac tamponade (compression) in case of massive effusion or constrictive pericarditis: dyspnoea, restlessness, rising ...
Most common adverse events include musculoskeletal pain, upper respiratory tract infection, pyrexia, fatigue, cough, dyspnea, ...
Symptoms have included hypotension, dyspnea, throat tightness, facial and upper airway edema, pruritus, and urticaria. If an ...
For her dyspnea, a contrast enhanced chest computerized tomography scan and lower extremity venous Doppler were done, which ... According to the patients husband, she became debilitated from her dyspnea and generalized weakness which resulted in an ... She also endorsed body aches, alopecia, dyspnea, fatigue, headaches, Raynauds phenomenon, and cold intolerance. She had no ... and dyspnea. As a result, she consumed an increasingly restrictive diet. Initially, she was diagnosed with a latex allergy; ...
... dyspnea, hyperventilation, fast heart rate, low blood pressure, fainting, marked uneasiness, weakness, vertigo, blurred vision ...
... dyspnea, pharyngeal or laryngeal edema, flushing, hypotension, pyrexia, fatigue, headache, dizziness, nausea, tachycardia, and ... dyspnea, pharyngeal or laryngeal edema, flushing, hypotension, pyrexia, fatigue, headache, dizziness, nausea, tachycardia, and ...
On admission, the patient presented with respiratory symptoms (dyspnea) due to a massive both side pleural effusions. Pleural ...
  • The most common clinical presentation was dyspnea. (beds.ac.uk)
  • In our cases, the clinical manifestations were variable, including dyspnea (n = 6), a lack of symptoms (n = 2), and atrial fibrillation (n = 1). (beds.ac.uk)
  • This according to a study that included consecutive patients with unexplained dyspnea referred for invasive hemodynamic exercise testing. (mdedge.com)
  • In addition to obvious difficulty in breathing in and out, cats exhibiting dyspnea frequently show a variety of associated clinical signs. (cornell.edu)
  • Fatigue with dyspnea is a condition in which there is excessive tiredness or weariness coupled with difficulty breathing. (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • Demonstrates at least moderate positive correlation with other dyspnea scores, including the baseline dyspnea index (BDI) and oxygen cost diagram (OCD) ( Chhabra 2009 ). (mdcalc.com)
  • Notably, insular activation during dyspnea perception was positively correlated with midbrain activation during anticipation. (hindawi.com)
  • The results demonstrate that dyspnea anticipation activates brain areas involved in dyspnea perception. (hindawi.com)
  • In chronic respiratory conditions the adequate perception of dyspnea plays a key role as it has a strong influence on health behavior and course of disease. (hindawi.com)
  • Notably, the perception of dyspnea is not tightly related to objective lung function [ 2 ] but is modulated by cognitive and affective factors [ 3 - 6 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Notably, recent studies have demonstrated that negative emotions are related not only to increased perception but also to changes in the neural processing of dyspnea [ 18 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that single-dose inhalation of nebulized ondansetron (a serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonist) will improve the perception of dyspnea during strenuous exercise in health, young men. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Dyspnoea and perception of airway obstruction]. (nih.gov)
  • Unlike those for other types of noxious stimuli, there are no specialized dyspnea receptors (although recent MRI studies have identified a few specific areas in the midbrain that may mediate perception of dyspnea). (merckmanuals.com)
  • The experience of dyspnea likely results from a complex interaction between chemoreceptor stimulation, mechanical abnormalities in breathing, and the perception of those abnormalities by the CNS. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Oxygen therapy ( O 2 th ) improves the 6MWT walk distance (6MWD), but it is not know its effect on the different component of dyspnea perception in ILD patients. (ersjournals.com)
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of O 2 th on the different components of dyspnea perception in ILD patients with exercise induced hypoxia (EIH). (ersjournals.com)
  • Our hypothesis is that O 2 th would provide a reduction in the affective component of dyspnea and so in the dyspnea perception overall. (ersjournals.com)
  • Cardiopulmonary exercise testing should be considered when there is no apparent cause for dyspnea after a thorough diagnostic evaluation. (aafp.org)
  • Studies have shown that the type and severity of an underlying lung or heart disease correlates well with the way the patient describes the dyspnea. (aafp.org)
  • Prevalence of dyspnea has been reported to be highest in patients with lung, breast, and esophageal cancer. (ons.org)
  • Dyspnoea will worsen due to restriction of lung and chest expansion. (bmj.com)
  • A high-resolution computed tomography scan could be considered if the dyspnea were progressive, but he has normal diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide, suggesting that interstitial lung disease is highly unlikely. (acc.org)
  • Several types of dyspnea happen only when your body is in a certain position. (webmd.com)
  • Hence, an assessment method that measures the impact of dyspnea on activities monitored by a rehabilitation program is of utmost importance for rehabilitators. (dovepress.com)
  • Decreased oxygen in the blood or an interruption in blood supply to the heart or lungs may also cause dyspnea. (diseaseinfosearch.org)
  • Severe anemia (low blood count) can decrease the body's ability to carry oxygen and lead to dyspnea. (cancersupportivecare.com)
  • Other simple tests helpful in the work up of dyspnea are a chest xray or CT scan, a blood count, pulmonary function testing, and an arterial blood gas analysis (to examine the level of oxygen in the blood). (cancersupportivecare.com)
  • It has not been shown to improve dyspnea for people with normal oxygen saturations. (cancersupportivecare.com)
  • Oxygen for relief of dyspnea: what is the evidence? (ovid.com)
  • Oxygen is often prescribed for relief of dyspnea and several consensus guidelines support this practice. (ovid.com)
  • Opioids are the most effective and widely studied agents available for palliation of dyspnea in this population, while adjuvant therapies such as oxygen, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and hand-held fans may also be used. (ebmedicine.net)
  • Once the patient is in the office, the initial goal of assessment is to determine the severity of the dyspnea with respect to the need for oxygenation and intubation. (aafp.org)
  • At one minute intervals, the patient will be asked to place a mark on a vertical visual analog scale (VAS) in order to rate separately the intensity and the unpleasantness of dyspnea. (bioportfolio.com)
  • When the patient is no longer able to breathe through the resistance system, the patient will be asked to make final ratings of the intensity and the unpleasantness of dyspnea. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Does not capture patient effort, such that dyspnea from pulmonary disease (and not behavioral responses to disability) are reflected in mMRC Dyspnea Scale scores. (mdcalc.com)
  • Furthermore, while the mMRC is correlated with morbidity and mortality for patients with respiratory disease, currently-available data do not confirm attributable cause and effect between mMRC Dyspnea Scale scores and patient-centered outcomes. (mdcalc.com)
  • Following PR, the MRC grade 2 dyspnoea group showed similar improvements in ISW, CRQ-D, HAD-Anxiety and HAD-Depression to the MRC grades 3/4 dyspnoea group ( table 1 ). (bmj.com)
  • At rest and at peak of exercise, subjects were asked to rate 5 different dyspnea components (1:overall, 2:effort, 3:difficult inspiration, 4:difficult expiration, 5:anxiety) and leg discomfort. (ersjournals.com)
  • When your physician has been unable to diagnose the reason for your dyspnea during exercise, it may be appropriate for you to be seen at the Dyspnea Clinic. (massgeneral.org)
  • Dyspnea' refers to the awareness of breathing discomfort that is typically experienced during exercise in health and disease. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • It follows that alleviating dyspnea and improving exercise tolerance are among the principal goals of disease management. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Pdi, time in inspiration (Ti), time per breath (TTOT), respiratory gases, ratings of perceived dyspnea and fatigue, and 760-800 nm near-infrared spectroscopy absorbency changes of the serratus anterior muscle were measured throughout exercise. (ahajournals.org)
  • The objectives of this study were to examine the relationships between exercise parameters and dyspnea in obesity and assess the effects of weight loss. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The investigators compared pulmonary function, exercise performance and dyspnea in 34 patients with abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS) against 34 age and sex-matched controls. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Pulmonary function, exercise performance and dyspnea results for normal weight controls were compared against the results for obese subjects. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Exercise test and chest X-ray are normal, and his dyspnea is not progressive. (acc.org)
  • Regardless of whether his dyspnea is due to a combination of deconditioning and a pathological process, increasing his exercise level is beneficial. (acc.org)
  • Severe dyspnoea on light exercise at high altitude: unusual presentation of Ebstein's anomaly. (biomedsearch.com)
  • In addition, certain breeds are predisposed to some of the conditions that cause dyspnea. (petplace.com)
  • The freeMD virtual doctor has found 325 conditions that can cause Dyspnea . (freemd.com)
  • Case Image: Successful endovascular treatment of a giant left subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm causing severe dyspnea. (diseaseinfosearch.org)
  • Case 4 - A 59-Year-Old Woman with Rheumatic Mitral Valve Disease (Severe Stenosis and Regurgitation), Severe Dyspnea, Shock and Pulmonary Condensation. (diseaseinfosearch.org)
  • Severe dyspnea activated a network of sensorimotor, cerebellar, and limbic areas. (hindawi.com)
  • Left insular and parietal opercular cortex showed increased connectivity with right insular and anterior cingulate cortex when severe dyspnea was anticipated, while the cerebellum showed increased connectivity with the amygdala. (hindawi.com)
  • When we determine a patient's dyspnea is caused by a pulmonary disorder, we develop the patient's personalized treatment plan and manage his or her follow-up care. (massgeneral.org)
  • The patient's dyspnea has worsened to the point that he can hardly walk from his couch to the bathroom without becoming extremely short of breath. (medscape.com)
  • However, she had to be admitted to the hospital in November 2009 due to progressive dyspnoea. (escardio.org)
  • Using laboratory models to test treatment: morphine reduces dyspnea and hypercapnic ventilatory response.Banzett RB, Adams L, O'Donnell CR, Gilman SA, Lansing RW, Schwartzstein RM. (google.com)
  • In the dyspnoea of advanced valvular disease of the heart morphine relieves the distress and restlessness, and induces sleep. (yourdictionary.com)
  • Bruera E, MacEachern T, Ripamonti C, Hanson J. Subcutaneous Morphine for Dyspnea in Cancer Patients. (annals.org)
  • Participants reported significantly different dyspnoea scores when treated with morphine: an improvement of 6.6 mm (95% confidence interval 1.6 mm to 11.6 mm) in the morning and of 9.5 mm (3.0 mm to 16.1 mm) in the evening (P = 0.011 and P = 0.006, respectively). (bmj.com)
  • Conclusions Sustained release, oral morphine at low dosage provides significant symptomatic improvement in refractory dyspnoea in the community setting. (bmj.com)
  • Dyspnea is often associated with accumulation of fluid (edema) in the lungs or the chest cavity (pleural effusion). (petplace.com)
  • Two treatment approaches to dyspnea associated with malignant pleural effusions appeared to be similar in a randomized trial. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Point out that both approaches -- indwelling pleural catheters and chest tubes with talc slurry pleurodesis - yielded significant improvements in dyspnea after 6 weeks of treatment. (medpagetoday.com)
  • But both approaches -- indwelling pleural catheters and chest tubes with talc slurry pleurodesis - yielded significant improvements in dyspnea after 6 weeks of treatment, according to Najib Rahman, DPhil, of the University of Oxford, in England, and colleagues. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The first symptoms are those associated with worsening dyspnoea, pleural effusions, chest pain, and weight loss. (bmj.com)