Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.CREST Syndrome: A mild form of LIMITED SCLERODERMA, a multi-system disorder. Its features include symptoms of CALCINOSIS; RAYNAUD DISEASE; ESOPHAGEAL MOTILITY DISORDERS; sclerodactyly, and TELANGIECTASIS. When the defect in esophageal function is not prominent, it is known as CRST syndrome.Skin Diseases, Metabolic: Diseases of the skin associated with underlying metabolic disorders.Dermatomyositis: A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)Hyperphosphatemia: A condition of abnormally high level of PHOSPHATES in the blood, usually significantly above the normal range of 0.84-1.58 mmol per liter of serum.N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferases: Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of N-acetylgalactosamine from a nucleoside diphosphate N-acetylgalactosamine to an acceptor molecule which is frequently another carbohydrate. EC 2.4.1.-.Skin DiseasesScleroderma, Systemic: A chronic multi-system disorder of CONNECTIVE TISSUE. It is characterized by SCLEROSIS in the SKIN, the LUNGS, the HEART, the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, the KIDNEYS, and the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM. Other important features include diseased small BLOOD VESSELS and AUTOANTIBODIES. The disorder is named for its most prominent feature (hard skin), and classified into subsets by the extent of skin thickening: LIMITED SCLERODERMA and DIFFUSE SCLERODERMA.Calciphylaxis: Condition of induced systemic hypersensitivity in which tissues respond to appropriate challenging agents with a sudden local calcification.Foot Diseases: Anatomical and functional disorders affecting the foot.Joint DiseasesTelangiectasis: Permanent dilation of preexisting blood vessels (CAPILLARIES; ARTERIOLES; VENULES) creating small focal red lesions, most commonly in the skin or mucous membranes. It is characterized by the prominence of skin blood vessels, such as vascular spiders.Hyperostosis, Cortical, Congenital: A disease of young infants characterized by soft tissue swellings over the affected bones, fever, and irritability, and marked by periods of remission and exacerbation. (Dorland, 27th ed)Skin UlcerCalcium Gluconate: The calcium salt of gluconic acid. The compound has a variety of uses, including its use as a calcium replenisher in hypocalcemic states.Nadroparin: A heparin fraction with a mean molecular weight of 4500 daltons. It is isolated from porcine mucosal heparin and used as an antithrombotic agent. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Eyelid DiseasesCalcium Pyrophosphate: An inorganic pyrophosphate which affects calcium metabolism in mammals. Abnormalities in its metabolism occur in some human diseases, notably HYPOPHOSPHATASIA and pseudogout (CHONDROCALCINOSIS).Nephrocalcinosis: A condition characterized by calcification of the renal tissue itself. It is usually seen in distal RENAL TUBULAR ACIDOSIS with calcium deposition in the DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULES and the surrounding interstitium. Nephrocalcinosis causes RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Durapatite: The mineral component of bones and teeth; it has been used therapeutically as a prosthetic aid and in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.alpha-2-HS-Glycoprotein: A fetuin subtype that is synthesized by HEPATOCYTES and secreted into the circulation. It plays a major role in preventing CALCIUM precipitation in the BLOOD.Basal Ganglia Diseases: Diseases of the BASAL GANGLIA including the PUTAMEN; GLOBUS PALLIDUS; claustrum; AMYGDALA; and CAUDATE NUCLEUS. DYSKINESIAS (most notably involuntary movements and alterations of the rate of movement) represent the primary clinical manifestations of these disorders. Common etiologies include CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS; NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES; and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Phosphates: Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid.Dermatologic Agents: Drugs used to treat or prevent skin disorders or for the routine care of skin.Raynaud Disease: An idiopathic vascular disorder characterized by bilateral Raynaud phenomenon, the abrupt onset of digital paleness or CYANOSIS in response to cold exposure or stress.Fibroblast Growth Factors: A family of small polypeptide growth factors that share several common features including a strong affinity for HEPARIN, and a central barrel-shaped core region of 140 amino acids that is highly homologous between family members. Although originally studied as proteins that stimulate the growth of fibroblasts this distinction is no longer a requirement for membership in the fibroblast growth factor family.Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Antibodies, Antinuclear: Autoantibodies directed against various nuclear antigens including DNA, RNA, histones, acidic nuclear proteins, or complexes of these molecular elements. Antinuclear antibodies are found in systemic autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease.GlucuronidasePhosphorus: A non-metal element that has the atomic symbol P, atomic number 15, and atomic weight 31. It is an essential element that takes part in a broad variety of biochemical reactions.Centromere: The clear constricted portion of the chromosome at which the chromatids are joined and by which the chromosome is attached to the spindle during cell division.Osteopontin: A negatively-charged extracellular matrix protein that plays a role in the regulation of BONE metabolism and a variety of other biological functions. Cell signaling by osteopontin may occur through a cell adhesion sequence that recognizes INTEGRIN ALPHA-V BETA-3.Fingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.Autoantibodies: Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Cutis Laxa: A group of connective tissue diseases in which skin hangs in loose pendulous folds. It is believed to be associated with decreased elastic tissue formation as well as an abnormality in elastin formation. Cutis laxa is usually a genetic disease, but acquired cases have been reported. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Glycodeoxycholic Acid: A bile salt formed in the liver by conjugation of deoxycholate with glycine, usually as the sodium salt. It acts as a detergent to solubilize fats for absorption and is itself absorbed. It is used as a cholagogue and choleretic.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Lung Compliance: The capability of the LUNGS to distend under pressure as measured by pulmonary volume change per unit pressure change. While not a complete description of the pressure-volume properties of the lung, it is nevertheless useful in practice as a measure of the comparative stiffness of the lung. (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p562)Scleroderma, Localized: A term used to describe a variety of localized asymmetrical SKIN thickening that is similar to those of SYSTEMIC SCLERODERMA but without the disease features in the multiple internal organs and BLOOD VESSELS. Lesions may be characterized as patches or plaques (morphea), bands (linear), or nodules.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Vital Capacity: The volume of air that is exhaled by a maximal expiration following a maximal inspiration.Hyperostosis: Increase in the mass of bone per unit volume.Luciferases, Renilla: Luciferases from RENILLA that oxidizes certain LUMINESCENT AGENTS to cause emission of PHOTONS.Immunoprecipitation: The aggregation of soluble ANTIGENS with ANTIBODIES, alone or with antibody binding factors such as ANTI-ANTIBODIES or STAPHYLOCOCCAL PROTEIN A, into complexes large enough to fall out of solution.Photography: Method of making images on a sensitized surface by exposure to light or other radiant energy.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.
Enzootic Calcinosis Archived 2014-07-28 at the Wayback Machine. Gruenberg MS, PhD, DECAR DECBHM. W.G., April 2014. Enzootic ... Calcinosis. The Merck Veternary Manual. Merck Sharp & Dohme, Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA. Topical Agents (Toxicity) Archived ...
TSC2 Tumoral calcinosis, familial, normophosphatemic; 610455; SAMD9 Tumoral calcinosis, hyperphosphatemic; 211900; KL Tumoral ... calcinosis, hyperphosphatemic, familial; 211900; FGF23 Tumoral calcinosis, hyperphosphatemic, familial; 211900; GALNT3 Tyrosine ...
"calcinosis_cutis_2_060122". Derm Atlas. Retrieved 13 March 2012. "Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Deposition Disease: Synovial ...
Calcinosis cutis is condition in which there are irregular nodular deposits of calcium salts in skin and subcutaneous tissue. ... Calcinosis Monckeberg's arteriosclerosis "Cell Injury". Bertazzo, Sergio; Gentleman, Eileen; Cloyd, Kristy L.; Chester, Adrian ...
"Gastric mucosal calcinosis: clinicopathologic considerations". Advances in Anatomic Pathology. 14 (3): 224-8. doi:10.1097/PAP. ... Drowsiness Headache Gastric mucosal calcinosis Heart valve calcification Hypercalcemia Increased intracranial pressure ...
Dystrophic calcinosis cutis has also been reported. Other serious sequelae include sialolithiasis of the submandibular gland ... Oga, A.; Kadowaki, T.; Hamanaka, S.; Sasaki, K. (1998). "Dystrophic calcinosis cutis in the skin below the mandible of a ...
Dereure O (May 2007). "[SAMD9 mutation in normophosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis]". Annales De Dermatologie Et De ... "A deleterious mutation in SAMD9 causes normophosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis". American Journal of Human Genetics. 79 ( ...
2007). "Tumoral calcinosis presenting with eyelid calcifications due to novel missense mutations in the glycosyl transferase ... 2006). "Polypeptide GalNAc-transferase T3 and familial tumoral calcinosis. Secretion of fibroblast growth factor 23 requires O- ... cause familial tumoral calcinosis". Nat Genet. 36 (6): 579-81. doi:10.1038/ng1358. PMID 15133511. "Entrez Gene: GALNT3 UDP-N- ... "Two novel nonsense mutations in GALNT3 gene are responsible for familial tumoral calcinosis". J. Hum. Genet. 52 (5): 464-8. doi ...
Calcinosis Fahr's syndrome Muscular atrophy "OMIM Entry - # 259050 - PRIMROSE SYNDROME; PRIMS". omim.org. Retrieved 6 August ...
Kalani, MY; Martirosyan, NL; Little, AS; Kakarla, UK; Theodore, N (Dec 2011). "Tumoral calcinosis presenting as a deformity of ...
Bonazza S, La Morgia C, Martinelli P, Capellari S (August 2011). "Strio-pallido-dentate calcinosis: a diagnostic approach in ... Loeb JA (March 1998). "Functional improvement in a patient with cerebral calcinosis using a bisphosphonate". Mov. Disord. 13 (2 ...
The compound 13-cis retinoic acid was first studied in the 1960s at Roche Laboratories in Switzerland by Werner Bollag as a treatment for skin cancer. Experiments completed in 1971 showed that the compound was likely to be ineffective for cancer and, surprisingly, that it could be useful to treat acne. However, they also showed that the compound was likely to cause birth defects, so in light of the events around thalidomide, Roche abandoned the product. In 1975, Gary Peck and Frank Yoder independently rediscovered the drug's use as a treatment of cystic acne while studying it as a treatment for lamellar ichthyosis, and published that work. Roche resumed work on the drug. In clinical trials, subjects were carefully screened to avoid including women who were or might become pregnant. Roche's New Drug Application for isotretinoin for the treatment of acne included data showing that the drug caused birth defects in rabbits. The FDA approved the application in 1982. Scientists involved in the ...
"calcinosis_cutis_2_060122". Derm Atlas. Archived from the original on 5 February 2007. Retrieved 13 March 2012.. ...
Some children develop calcinosis, which are calcium deposits under the skin. The rash is the source of the "dermato-" part of ... calcinosis and neopterin. Once a diagnosis of JDMS is made, the treatment is often a 3-day course of Intravenous ("pulse") ... calcinosis, dysphonia and nailfold capillaroscopy. Other useful criteria include myositis-specific or -related antibodies, ...
Calcinosis cutis Skin lesion List of cutaneous conditions James, William D.; Berger, Timothy G.; et al. (2006). Andrews' ...
2000). Enzootic calcinosis in 16 cows from 6 dairy farms in Unterengadin. Schweiz Arch Tierheilkd. 142:6 333-8. Braun, U., et ... 2000). Enzootic calcinosis in goats caused by golden oat grass (Trisetum flavescens). Veterinary Record 146 161-2. Grabner, A ... 1985). Enzootic calcinosis in the horse. Tierarztl Prax Suppl. 1 84-93. Ess. Agrostogr. 88, 153. 1812 GrassBase entry: Trisetum ... This grass is noted for being toxic to livestock, causing calcinosis, the deposition of calcium in soft tissues including ...
... calcinosis (calcium deposits in blood vessels); atherosclerosis (blockage of blood vessels); type 2 diabetes; loss of bone mass ...
Lesions may also appear on the ear and eyelid.[citation needed] Calcinosis cutis Skin lesion List of cutaneous conditions ... Subepidermal calcified nodule (also known as a "solitary congenital nodular calcification", and "Winer's nodular calcinosis") ...
It is a part of CREST syndrome, referring to the five main features: calcinosis, Raynaud syndrome, esophageal dysmotility, ... and subcutaneous calcinosis: a syndrome mimicking hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia". Bulletin of the Johns Hopkins ...
CREST causes thickening and tightening of the skin with deposition of calcific nodules ("calcinosis"). Raynaud's phenomenon is ... The acronym "CREST" refers to the five main features: calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, ... Scleroderma Winterbauer RH (1964). "Multiple telangiectasia, Raynaud's phenomenon, sclerodactyly, and subcutanious calcinosis: ...
Typical clinical features include jaundice, elevated blood levels of alkaline phosphatase, calcinosis cutis, telangiectasias, ...
Other: facial pain due to trigeminal neuralgia, hand paresthesias, headache, stroke, fatigue, calcinosis and weight loss. ...
... renal insufficiency and calcinosis. Calcium forms complexes with a number of pharmaceutical drugs, reducing their ...
Excretory calcinosis in American lobsters in Long Island Sound was described in 2002. The disease causes mineralized calculi to ... A. D. M. Dove (2005). "Ultrastructural features of excretory calcinosis in the lobster, Homarus americanus Milne-Edwards". ... "Excretory calcinosis: a new fatal disease of wild American lobsters Homarus americanus". Diseases of Aquatic Organisms. 58 (2- ...
Gorospe M, Fadare O (May 2007). "Gastric mucosal calcinosis: clinicopathologic considerations". Advances in Anatomic Pathology ...
Calcinosis is the formation of calcium deposits in any soft tissue. The most common type of calcinosis is dystrophic ... The cause of the rare condition of tumoral calcinosis is not entirely understood. It is generally characterized by large, ... Calcinosis cutis Dermatomyositis Fahrs syndrome Hypercalcemia Hyperphosphatemia Primrose syndrome Scleroderma Univ. Washington ...
Tumoral calcinosis is a rare condition in which there is calcium deposition in the soft tissue in periarticular location i.e. ... The name indicates calcinosis (calcium deposition) which resembles tumor (like a new growth). They are not true neoplasms - ... Genetests/NCBI/NIH/UW entries on Hyperphosphatemic Familial Tumoral Calcinosis. ...
... calcinosis) in the bodys tissues. Explore symptoms, inheritance, genetics of this condition. ... Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC) is a condition characterized by an increase in the levels of phosphate in ... Calcinosis may also develop in the soft tissue of the feet, legs, and hands. Rarely, calcinosis occurs in blood vessels or in ... Genetic Testing Registry: Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis 3 *Genetic Testing Registry: TUMORAL CALCINOSIS, ...
Based upon the etiology of calcium deposition, there are five subtypes of calcinosis cutis: dystrophic, metastatic, idiopat ... Calcinosis cutis is a descriptive term for the deposition of insoluble calcium salts in the cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue. ... Idiopathic calcinosis cutis: Idiopathic calcinosis cutis is the occurrence of calcinosis cutis without any underlying tissue ... Iatrogenic calcinosis cutis: Iatrogenic calcinosis cutis is the deposition of calcium salts in the skin as a side effect of ...
... By Stephanie Eschenbach, MD and Thomas L. Pope, Jr., MD, FACR ... 2 Subcutaneous calcinosis, as part of the CREST variant or diffuse variant, is often seen on the extensor surfaces and in areas ... subcutaneous calcinosis on the left thumb volar pad; 5) moderate-to-severe resorption of the right first-, second-, and third- ... "7 The combination of calcinosis and acro-osteolysis, as seen in Figure 2, is considered to be pathognomic for scleroderma.6 ...
We present what we believe is the first identified case of autoimmune hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis in an 8-year-old boy ... Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC)/hyperostosis-hyperphosphatemia syndrome (HHS) is an autosomal recessive ... In addition to the classical clinical and biochemical features of hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis, the patient exhibited ... Thus, this report describes the first case, to our knowledge, of autoimmune hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis with ...
Evaluation of Calcinosis Prevalence in Systemic Sclerosis : a Cross Sectional Study Evaluating Calcinosis Cutis Prevalence by ... Evaluation of Calcinosis in Systemic Sclerosis (CALCIDERMIS). The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... Calcinosis cutis prevalence by radiographic assessment [ Time Frame: at inclusion ( baseline) ]. Secondary Outcome Measures : * ... Calcinosis. Pathologic Processes. Connective Tissue Diseases. Skin Diseases. Calcium Metabolism Disorders. Metabolic Diseases. ...
Bilateral striopallidodentate calcinosis. Disease definition Bilateral striopallidodentate calcinosis (BSPDC, also erroneously ...
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... primary hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis; tumoral calcinosis with hyperphosphatemia ... Synonyms: cortical hyperostosis with hyperphosphatemia; familial hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis/hyperphosphatemic ... hyperostosis syndrome; familial Teutschlaender disease; HFTC; HHS; hypercalcemic tumoral calcinosis; hyperostosis with ... tumoral calcinosis with hyperphosphatemia Alt IDs: OMIM:211900, ICD10CM:M11.2, ORDO:306661 Definition: A calcinosis ...
V. Mehta and C. Balachandran, "Idiopathic vulvar calcinosis: the counterpart of idiopathic scrotal calcinosis," Indian Journal ... Scrotal Calcinosis: A Case Report and Review of Pathogenesis and Surgical Management. Usman M. Tela1 and M. Bashir Ibrahim2 ... S. G. Browne, "Calcinosis circumscripta of the scrotal wall, the aetiologic role of onchocerca vulvulus," British Journal of ... C. H. Chang, C. H. Yang, and H. S. Hong, "Surgical pearl: pinch-punch excisions for scrotal calcinosis," Journal of the ...
... calcinosis) on a dime. The calcinosis was removed from a patient who has had systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) for a year. ISN ... Also see Photo of Calcinosis on Fingertip). A year and a half ago, her doctor stopped her Raynauds medication for emotional ... Photo of Calcinosis on Dime. Author: Shelley Ensz. Scleroderma is highly variable. See Types of Scleroderma. Read Disclaimer ... The calcium nodule (calcinosis) is an ugly thing, with lots of irregularities to hang onto flesh. My wife has had scleroderma ...
The Mammalian Phenotype (MP) Ontology is a community effort to provide standard terms for annotating phenotypic data. You can use this browser to view terms, definitions, and term relationships in a hierarchical display. Links to summary annotated phenotype data at MGI are provided in Term Detail reports.
Calcinosis circumscripta is deposition of calcium at bony prominences or, in the footpads and mouth. It is usually a disease of ... Calcinosis cutis is induced by local skin damage in susceptible animals and takes two forms: dystrophic or metastatic. The ... How does calcinosis cutis and calcinosis circumscripta typically progress?. In the case of calcinosis circumscripta, single ... Calcinosis cutis occurs in susceptible pets in areas where local skin damage has occurred. Calcinosis cutis has two forms:. * ...
CALCINOSIS TREATED BY PARATHYROIDECTOMY1 ELMER C. BARTELS, M.D., F.A.C.P.; RICHARD B. CATTELL, M.D. ... CALCINOSIS AND SCLERODERMA WITH PARATHYROIDECTOMY1 Annals of Internal Medicine; 18 (2): 225-232 ... Subcutaneous calcinosis, a disease tending to serious bodily disability, presents a most difficult therapeutic problem. It is ... Dystrophic calcinosis in a patient with overlap syndrome (scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis) treated by leflunomide: A case ...
... Subscriber Sign In VisualDx Mobile Feedback Select Language Share Get VisualDx Mobile. There are VisualDx ... L94.2 - Calcinosis cutis. SNOMEDCT:. 21323007 - Calcinosis cutis. Look For. Subscription Required. Diagnostic Pearls. ... Calcinosis cutis in Infant/Neonate. Print Images (7) Contributors: Noah Craft MD, PhD, Belinda Tan MD, PhD, Lowell A. Goldsmith ... Note, however, that calcinosis cutis can occur anywhere on the body. Local trauma, infections (particularly parasitic, eg, ...
... index finger on knuckle which has lead to a calcinosis, (same finger), which has become abscessed on pad, its becoming bigger. ... Not sure what hurts more the ulcer or the calcinosis! :wacko: Well..... even if I slightly bump the calcinosis, or touch it, it ... Ulcer and Calcinosis By Annie20, June 8, 2011. in Sclero Forums (MAIN) ... If I bump or press on the calcinosis, it hurts tremendously. (It has become bigger.) I do not want to subject myself to anymore ...
Pronounced Linear Calcinosis in a Boy with Mild Dermatomyositis del Carmen Boente, María; Nadra, Graciela; Asial, Raúl et al. ... Calcinosis in Ruminants due to Plant Poisoning: Contributions on the Pathogenesis Acamovic, T.; Stewart, C. S.; Pennycott, T. ... Tumoral Calcinosis and Calciphylaxis After Renal Transplantation Fernandez, E.; Torregrosa, J. V.; Zarraga, S. et al. 1998-01- ... Tumoral Calcinosis Associated With End-Stage Renal Disease: A Case Study Capes, M.; Fox, R. B.; Association of Chiropractic ...
... defined as calcinosis involving the torso or 2 extremities) and moderate to severe calcinosis (indicated by a calcinosis ... Calcinosis can be painful and cause disabilities and other problems. Researchers want to learn more about calcinosis to find ... Has moderate to severe calcinosis, defined as having a calcinosis activity visual analogue scale score of greater than or equal ... Improvement of calcinosis lesions, assessed by Calcinosis Assessment Tool, durometry measurements, photography, and imaging ...
Calcium and Phosphate Metabolism in Tumoral Calcinosis PAUL D. MITNICK, M.D.; STANLEY GOLDFARB, M.D.; EDUARDO SLATOPOLSKY, M.D ... Calcium and Phosphate Metabolism in Tumoral Calcinosis. Ann Intern Med. 1980;92:482-487. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-92-4-482 ... We have recently seen a patient with tumoral calcinosis, a syndrome comprising hyperphosphatemia, normocalcemia, normal ...
Treating calcinosis cutis via a topical wash with DMSO every other day was effective for the symptoms of calcinosis cutis. ... A dog with calcinosis cutis was treated by topical dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) administration, reaching a complete involution of ... For this reason, DMSO is proposed as a topical treatment for the management of calcinosis cutis in dogs. The authors present ... Resolution of iatrogenic calcinosis cutis in a dog through topical application of DMSO. 26 Sep 2018 ...
Find out information about Calcinosis. Deposition of calcium salts in the skin, subcutaneous tissue, or other part of the body ... Related to Calcinosis: calcinosis circumscripta, Calcinosis cutis, tumoral calcinosis. calcinosis. [‚kal·sə′nō·səs] (medicine) ... Cutaneous calcinosis or Calcinosis cutis is a skin disease of dogs characterized by dystrophic calcium deposition in dermis and ... La radiografia confirmo la sospecha de extensas areas de calcinosis (Figura 1).. Calcinosis asimetrica en un adulto con ...
What is tumoral calcinosis? Meaning of tumoral calcinosis medical term. What does tumoral calcinosis mean? ... Looking for online definition of tumoral calcinosis in the Medical Dictionary? tumoral calcinosis explanation free. ... 2. calcinosis that develops in association with neoplastic conditions. tumoral calcinosis. Oncology A condition characterized ... Spontaneous regression of multiple tumoral calcinosis in a child.. Selim kalsinozis kutis/Benign calcinosis cutis ...
As expected given the plain film appearances, there are multiple low-T2 lesions anterior to the patella consistent with multifocal calcification or ossification. ...
"Calcinosis" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Calcinosis" by people in this website by year, and whether " ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Calcinosis" by people in Profiles. ...
  • McGregor DH et al: Nonfamilial tumoral calcinosis associated with chronic renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism: report of two cases with clinicopathological, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic findings. (statdx.com)
  • ABSTRACT: Background: Calcinosis is an important sequela of JDM which may cause significant morbidity and mortality. (scirp.org)
  • Tumoral calcinosis is a phosphocalcic metabolism anomaly, particularly among younger age groups and characterized by the presence of calcified masses in the juxta-articular regions (hip, elbow, ankle and scapula) without joint involvement. (cdc.gov)