Ischemia: A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.Cold Ischemia: The chilling of a tissue or organ during decreased BLOOD perfusion or in the absence of blood supply. Cold ischemia time during ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION begins when the organ is cooled with a cold perfusion solution after ORGAN PROCUREMENT surgery, and ends after the tissue reaches physiological temperature during implantation procedures.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Brain Ischemia: Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.Organ Preservation: The process by which organs are kept viable outside of the organism from which they were removed (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Cold Temperature: An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.Organ Preservation Solutions: Solutions used to store organs and minimize tissue damage, particularly while awaiting implantation.Reperfusion Injury: Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Raffinose: A trisaccharide occurring in Australian manna (from Eucalyptus spp, Myrtaceae) and in cottonseed meal.Warm Ischemia: A tissue or organ remaining at physiological temperature during decreased BLOOD perfusion or in the absence of blood supply. During ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION it begins when the organ reaches physiological temperature before the completion of SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS and ends with reestablishment of the BLOOD CIRCULATION through the tissue.Delayed Graft Function: General dysfunction of an organ occurring immediately following its transplantation. The term most frequently refers to renal dysfunction following KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Allopurinol: A XANTHINE OXIDASE inhibitor that decreases URIC ACID production. It also acts as an antimetabolite on some simpler organisms.Myocardial Reperfusion Injury: Damage to the MYOCARDIUM resulting from MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION (restoration of blood flow to ischemic areas of the HEART.) Reperfusion takes place when there is spontaneous thrombolysis, THROMBOLYTIC THERAPY, collateral flow from other coronary vascular beds, or reversal of vasospasm.Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Ischemic Attack, Transient: Brief reversible episodes of focal, nonconvulsive ischemic dysfunction of the brain having a duration of less than 24 hours, and usually less than one hour, caused by transient thrombotic or embolic blood vessel occlusion or stenosis. Events may be classified by arterial distribution, temporal pattern, or etiology (e.g., embolic vs. thrombotic). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp814-6)Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Reperfusion: Restoration of blood supply to tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. It is primarily a procedure for treating infarction or other ischemia, by enabling viable ischemic tissue to recover, thus limiting further necrosis. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing REPERFUSION INJURY.Common Cold: A catarrhal disorder of the upper respiratory tract, which may be viral or a mixed infection. It generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and sneezing.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Transplantation, Isogeneic: Transplantation between genetically identical individuals, i.e., members of the same species with identical histocompatibility antigens, such as monozygotic twins, members of the same inbred strain, or members of a hybrid population produced by crossing certain inbred strains.Cryopreservation: Preservation of cells, tissues, organs, or embryos by freezing. In histological preparations, cryopreservation or cryofixation is used to maintain the existing form, structure, and chemical composition of all the constituent elements of the specimens.Rats, Inbred LewLiver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Procaine: A local anesthetic of the ester type that has a slow onset and a short duration of action. It is mainly used for infiltration anesthesia, peripheral nerve block, and spinal block. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1016).Tissue and Organ Harvesting: The procedure of removing TISSUES, organs, or specimens from DONORS for reuse, such as TRANSPLANTATION.Ischemic Preconditioning: A technique in which tissue is rendered resistant to the deleterious effects of prolonged ISCHEMIA and REPERFUSION by prior exposure to brief, repeated periods of vascular occlusion. (Am J Physiol 1995 May;268(5 Pt 2):H2063-7, Abstract)Transplants: Organs, tissues, or cells taken from the body for grafting into another area of the same body or into another individual.Trimetazidine: A vasodilator used in angina of effort or ischemic heart disease.Mice, Inbred C57BLGerbillinae: A subfamily of the Muridae consisting of several genera including Gerbillus, Rhombomys, Tatera, Meriones, and Psammomys.Spinal Cord Ischemia: Reduced blood flow to the spinal cord which is supplied by the anterior spinal artery and the paired posterior spinal arteries. This condition may be associated with ARTERIOSCLEROSIS, trauma, emboli, diseases of the aorta, and other disorders. Prolonged ischemia may lead to INFARCTION of spinal cord tissue.Adenosine: A nucleoside that is composed of ADENINE and D-RIBOSE. Adenosine or adenosine derivatives play many important biological roles in addition to being components of DNA and RNA. Adenosine itself is a neurotransmitter.Hypothermia, Induced: Abnormally low BODY TEMPERATURE that is intentionally induced in warm-blooded animals by artificial means. In humans, mild or moderate hypothermia has been used to reduce tissue damages, particularly after cardiac or spinal cord injuries and during subsequent surgeries.Brain Death: A state of prolonged irreversible cessation of all brain activity, including lower brain stem function with the complete absence of voluntary movements, responses to stimuli, brain stem reflexes, and spontaneous respirations. Reversible conditions which mimic this clinical state (e.g., sedative overdose, hypothermia, etc.) are excluded prior to making the determination of brain death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp348-9)Death: Irreversible cessation of all bodily functions, manifested by absence of spontaneous breathing and total loss of cardiovascular and cerebral functions.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Perfusion: Treatment process involving the injection of fluid into an organ or tissue.Mannitol: A diuretic and renal diagnostic aid related to sorbitol. It has little significant energy value as it is largely eliminated from the body before any metabolism can take place. It can be used to treat oliguria associated with kidney failure or other manifestations of inadequate renal function and has been used for determination of glomerular filtration rate. Mannitol is also commonly used as a research tool in cell biological studies, usually to control osmolarity.Ischemic Preconditioning, Myocardial: Exposure of myocardial tissue to brief, repeated periods of vascular occlusion in order to render the myocardium resistant to the deleterious effects of ISCHEMIA or REPERFUSION. The period of pre-exposure and the number of times the tissue is exposed to ischemia and reperfusion vary, the average being 3 to 5 minutes.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Pancreas Transplantation: The transference of a pancreas from one human or animal to another.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Neuroprotective Agents: Drugs intended to prevent damage to the brain or spinal cord from ischemia, stroke, convulsions, or trauma. Some must be administered before the event, but others may be effective for some time after. They act by a variety of mechanisms, but often directly or indirectly minimize the damage produced by endogenous excitatory amino acids.Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery: NECROSIS occurring in the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY distribution system which brings blood to the entire lateral aspects of each CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE. Clinical signs include impaired cognition; APHASIA; AGRAPHIA; weak and numbness in the face and arms, contralaterally or bilaterally depending on the infarction.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Myocardial Reperfusion: Generally, restoration of blood supply to heart tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. Reperfusion can be induced to treat ischemia. Methods include chemical dissolution of an occluding thrombus, administration of vasodilator drugs, angioplasty, catheterization, and artery bypass graft surgery. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Cerebrovascular Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Living Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Acute Kidney Injury: Abrupt reduction in kidney function. Acute kidney injury encompasses the entire spectrum of the syndrome including acute kidney failure; ACUTE KIDNEY TUBULAR NECROSIS; and other less severe conditions.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Hindlimb: Either of two extremities of four-footed non-primate land animals. It usually consists of a FEMUR; TIBIA; and FIBULA; tarsals; METATARSALS; and TOES. (From Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p73)Cerebral Infarction: The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Liver Failure: Severe inability of the LIVER to perform its normal metabolic functions, as evidenced by severe JAUNDICE and abnormal serum levels of AMMONIA; BILIRUBIN; ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE; ASPARTATE AMINOTRANSFERASE; LACTATE DEHYDROGENASES; and albumin/globulin ratio. (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed)Glutathione: A tripeptide with many roles in cells. It conjugates to drugs to make them more soluble for excretion, is a cofactor for some enzymes, is involved in protein disulfide bond rearrangement and reduces peroxides.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Tissue Fixation: The technique of using FIXATIVES in the preparation of cytologic, histologic, or pathologic specimens for the purpose of maintaining the existing form and structure of all the constituent elements.Pancreatitis: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS. Pancreatitis is classified as acute unless there are computed tomographic or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic findings of CHRONIC PANCREATITIS (International Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis, Atlanta, 1992). The two most common forms of acute pancreatitis are ALCOHOLIC PANCREATITIS and gallstone pancreatitis.Nephrectomy: Excision of kidney.Adenosine Triphosphate: An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Metapneumovirus: A genus of the subfamily PNEUMOVIRINAE, containing two members: Turkey rhinotracheitis virus and a human Metapneumovirus. Virions lack HEMAGGLUTININ and NEURAMINIDASE.Cold Climate: A climate characterized by COLD TEMPERATURE for a majority of the time during the year.Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Coronavirus Infections: Virus diseases caused by the CORONAVIRUS genus. Some specifics include transmissible enteritis of turkeys (ENTERITIS, TRANSMISSIBLE, OF TURKEYS); FELINE INFECTIOUS PERITONITIS; and transmissible gastroenteritis of swine (GASTROENTERITIS, TRANSMISSIBLE, OF SWINE).Constriction: The act of constricting.Cardiotonic Agents: Agents that have a strengthening effect on the heart or that can increase cardiac output. They may be CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES; SYMPATHOMIMETICS; or other drugs. They are used after MYOCARDIAL INFARCT; CARDIAC SURGICAL PROCEDURES; in SHOCK; or in congestive heart failure (HEART FAILURE).Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.P-Selectin: Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that mediates the adhesion of neutrophils and monocytes to activated platelets and endothelial cells.Mesenteric Vascular Occlusion: Obstruction of the flow in the SPLANCHNIC CIRCULATION by ATHEROSCLEROSIS; EMBOLISM; THROMBOSIS; STENOSIS; TRAUMA; and compression or intrinsic pressure from adjacent tumors. Rare causes are drugs, intestinal parasites, and vascular immunoinflammatory diseases such as PERIARTERITIS NODOSA and THROMBOANGIITIS OBLITERANS. (From Juergens et al., Peripheral Vascular Diseases, 5th ed, pp295-6)Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Liver Diseases: Pathological processes of the LIVER.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.
... as well as their predilection towards ischemia and acute coronary syndromes in the absence of obstructive coronary artery ... It is exacerbated by having a full stomach and by cold temperatures. Pain may be accompanied by breathlessness, sweating, and ... Since microvascular angina is not characterized by major arterial blockages, it is harder to recognize and diagnose. ... which undergoes thrombosis and results in acute myocardial ischemia, which, if not reversed, results in cell necrosis ( ...
Paralysis is a very late sign of acute arterial ischemia and signals the death of nerves supplying the extremity. Foot drop may ... as in acrobatics and military flying Localized extreme cold, such as by frostbite or improper cold compression therapy ... Venous problems like venous outflow obstruction and low-flow states can cause acute arterial ischemia. An aneurysm is one of ... Acute arterial occlusion may develop as a result of arterial dissection in the carotid artery or aorta or as a result of ...
Symptoms of acute limb ischaemia include: Pain Pallor Paresthesias Perishingly cold Pulselessness Paralysis These symptoms are ... doi:10.1016/S0950-821X(05)80702-9. ABC of Arterial and Venous Disease: Acute Limb Ischaemia Ken Callum and Andrew Bradbury BMJ ... Renal ischemia (nephric ischemia) Mesenteric ischemia Cerebral ischemia Cardiac ischemia In order to treat acute limb ischaemia ... Acute limb ischaemia (ALI) occurs when there is a sudden lack of blood flow to a limb. Acute limb ischaemia is caused by ...
Echocardiography can also help determine if acute myocardial ischemia is the precipitating cause, and may manifest as regional ... Arterial blood pressure falls. This destimulates baroreceptors in the carotid sinus and aortic arch which link to the nucleus ... and patients will manifest with cold and clammy extremities, cyanosis, claudication, generalized weakness, dizziness, and ... Acute decompensation[edit]. Main article: Acute decompensated heart failure. In acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), the ...
Ischemia[edit]. Main article: Ischemia. Ischemia, meaning insufficient blood flow to a tissue, can also result in hypoxia. This ... Acute[edit]. If oxygen delivery to cells is insufficient for the demand (hypoxia), electrons will be shifted to pyruvic acid in ... Martin, Lawrence (1999). All you really need to know to interpret arterial blood gases (2nd ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott ... If tissue is not being perfused properly, it may feel cold and appear pale; if severe, hypoxia can result in cyanosis, a blue ...
... spinal cord ischemia leading to paralysis, buttock claudication, ischemic collitis, embolization leading to acute limb ischemia ... potentially increasing the risk of ischemia to the organs which derive their arterial supply from the clamped segment. Critics ... selective spinal drainage and cold crystalloid renal perfusion. There is limited evidence supporting these techniques. The ... OAS is used to treat aneurysms of the abdominal and thoracic aorta, aortic dissection, acute aortic syndrome, and aortic ...
Underlying ischemia may also be treated surgically by arterial revascularization, for example in diabetic ulcers, and patients ... Acute and chronic wounds are at opposite ends of a spectrum of wound-healing types that progress toward being healed at ... Blood vessels constrict in tissue that becomes cold and dilate in warm tissue, altering blood flow to the area. Thus keeping ... among which are ischemia, reperfusion injury, and bacterial colonization. Ischemia is an important factor in the formation and ...
If there is underlying fear or anxiety (e.g., social circumstances), or acute fear (e.g., acute threat, needle phobia), the ... If the ischaemia is intense or prolonged, limb weakness progresses to collapse. An individual with very little skin ... Arterial disease in the upper spinal cord, or lower brain, causes syncope if there is a reduction in blood supply, which may ... but also with carbonated and ice-cold beverages, and even belching." The most common cause of cardiac syncope is cardiac ...
Perform a detailed cardiovascular assessment Identify patients experiencing an acute cardiac event (e.g., acute myocardial ... cold water submersion) Identify the patient experiencing a heat related emergency (e.g., heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat ... Conduct differential diagnosis of coma patients Manage patients with seizures Manage patients with cerebral ischemia Initiate ... Swan-Ganz catheter interpretation Arterial lines Cardiac pacing, synchronized cardioversion, defibrillation, and drugs Flight ...
In patients who have high ICP due to an acute injury, it is particularly important to ensure adequate airway, breathing, and ... Kellie G (1824). "Appearances observed in the dissection of two individuals; death from cold and congestion of the brain". ... This results in widespread reduction in cerebral flow and perfusion, eventually leading to ischemia and brain infarction. ... venous and arterial systems). Intracranial hypertension, commonly abbreviated IH, IICP or raised ICP, is elevation of the ...
Furthermore, irreversible intestinal damage is seen after approximately only 5 hours of cold ischemia in the form of mucosal ... extensive venous thrombosis or arterial ischemia of the mesentery, and motility syndromes. Donated intestines, like all organs ... or small bowel transplantation is the surgical replacement of the small intestine for chronic and acute cases of intestinal ... Arterial vessels are connected to the abdominal aorta, below the kidneys. However, venous drainage, or the reattachment of the ...
Nanotechnology may lead to the cure for illnesses such as the common cold, diseases, and cancer. It is already starting to be ... It should hopefully be able to treat heart valves that are defective; and detect and treat arterial plaque in the heart (" ... Polyketal nanoparticles have also been used in the infarcted mouse heart to prevent ischemia-reperfusion injury caused by ... Increased Nox2 expression in human cardiomyocytes after acute myocardial infarction. Journal of Clinical Pathology. 56: 194-199 ...
The most common mechanism of damage is ischemia causing infarction and scar formation. After myocardial infarction, dead ... Binding to alpha-1 receptors results in systemic arterial vasoconstriction. This helps restore blood pressure but also ... and patients will manifest with cold and clammy extremities, cyanosis, claudication, generalized weakness, dizziness, and ... of key importance to preventing acute decompensation. Left ventricular diastolic function can be determined through ...
In acute cases, drugs and procedures which cause vasodilation are effective in reducing pain experienced by patient. For ... Presence of distal extremity ischemia (indicated by claudication, pain at rest, ischemic ulcers or gangrene) documented by ... Hussein EA, el Dorri A (1993). "Intra-arterial streptokinase as adjuvant therapy for complicated Buerger's disease: early ... The impaired circulation increases sensitivity to cold. Peripheral pulses are diminished or absent. There are color changes in ...
Most victims of cold-water drowning do not develop hypothermia quickly enough to decrease cerebral metabolism before ischemia ... The mechanism in acute drowning is hypoxemia and irreversible cerebral anoxia due to submersion in liquid. Drowning would be ... This typically occurs at an arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide of 55 mm Hg, but may differ significantly from ... The actual cause of death in cold or very cold water is usually lethal bodily reactions to increased heat loss and to freezing ...
Ischemia, meaning insufficient blood flow to a tissue, can also result in hypoxia. This is called 'ischemic hypoxia'. This can ... If tissue is not being perfused properly, it may feel cold and appear pale; if severe, hypoxia can result in cyanosis, a blue ... p. Chapter 7. Hobler, K.E.; L.C. Carey (1973). "Effect of acute progressive hypoxemia on cardiac output and plasma excess ... Oxygen diffuses from the breathed air, mixed with water vapour, to arterial blood, where its partial pressure is around 100 ...
Arterial blood carries oxygen from inhaled air to all of the cells of the body, and venous blood carries carbon dioxide, a ... The term ischemia refers to tissue that is inadequately perfused with blood, and infarction refers to tissue death (necrosis), ... After severe acute blood loss, liquid preparations, generically known as plasma expanders, can be given intravenously, either ... The blood in the circulation of these creatures, which generally live in cold environments with low oxygen tensions, is grey- ...
Cold reduces the metabolic rate of cells, which conserves energy stores (ATP) and oxygen needed to produce energy. Cold ... "Cerebral ischemia: deep hypothermia". Open Anesthesia. Retrieved 14 April 2016. 45 to 60 minutes is upper limit of safe time ... "EMERGENCY PRESERVATION AND RESUSCITATION FOR CARDIAC ARREST FROM TRAUMA (EPR-CAT)". Acute Care Research. Retrieved 20 April ... Rapid central arterial access is obtained and profound (. ... Cooling continues until the brain is also inactivated by cold, ...
... which leads to the loss of arterial elasticity and reduced arterial compliance and may subsequently lead to coronary artery ... Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia is associated with an increased risk of heart problems in those with previous heart ... Kvan E.; Pettersen K.I.; Sandvik L.; Reikvam A. (2007). "High mortality in diabetic patient with acute myocardial infarction: ... extreme heat and cold, exposure to tobacco smoke, and mental health concerns such as stress and depression. A 2015 SBU-report ...
Acute and chronic hepatic porphyrias (acute intermittent porphyria, porphyria cutanea tarda, hereditary coproporphyria, ... Cryoablation: Cryoablation is a technique used to destroy tissue using cold temperature. The tumor is not removed and the ... Loco-regional therapy may refer to either percutaneous therapies (e.g. cryoablation), or arterial catheter-based therapies ( ... incorporated into embolic microspheres that lodge in the tumor vasculature causing ischemia and delivering their radiation dose ...
Acute and prolonged intake of high quantities of alcoholic drinks (3-4 or more) increases the risk of a heart attack. Family ... Ischemia first affects this region, the subendocardial region, and tissue begins to die within 15-30 minutes of loss of blood ... Other symptoms may include shortness of breath, nausea, feeling faint, a cold sweat, or feeling tired. About 30% of people have ... Inflammatory cells, particularly macrophages, move into affected arterial walls. Over time, they become laden with cholesterol ...
Arterial surgery is only indicated once there is positive confirmation that the arteries are indeed the source of pain. Some ... Most side effects are mild, such as flushing; however, rare cases of myocardial ischemia have occurred. They are thus not ... Kirthi, Varo; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R. Andrew (2013-04-30). "Aspirin with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches ... Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with the use of beta blockers include: nausea, diarrhea, bronchospasm, dyspnea, cold ...
Variable degrees of hemolysis and intermittent episodes of vascular occlusion resulting in tissue ischemia and acute and ... "New Orleans filmmaker cleared in cold-case murder; false positive highlights limitations of familial DNA searching". The New ... Venous thrombosis; certain arterial thrombotic conditions; patients with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, cerebral ... Cutaneous photosensitivity; acute neurovisceral crises Medical procedure[edit]. Genetic testing is often done as part of a ...
... pulmonary arterial hypertension, stenocardia. It was shown that in children with pulmonary arterial hypertension due to ... These properties have potential to be used to prevent the development of a series of pathological conditions including ischemia ... Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) deficiency can be detrimental to the vascular function after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). AMIs ... they had become cold-blooded). The mice survived this procedure for 6 hours and afterwards showed no negative health ...
Variable degrees of hemolysis and intermittent episodes of vascular occlusion resulting in tissue ischemia and acute and ... "New Orleans filmmaker cleared in cold-case murder; false positive highlights limitations of familial DNA searching". The New ... Venous thrombosis; certain arterial thrombotic conditions; patients with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, cerebral ... Predisposition of acute myeloid leukemia; skeletal abnormalities; radial hypoplasia and vertebral defect and other physical ...
... (ALI) occurs when there is a sudden lack of blood flow to a limb. Acute limb ischaemia is caused by embolism or thrombosis, or rarely by dissection or trauma. Thrombosis is usually caused by peripheral vascular disease (atherosclerotic disease that leads to blood vessel blockage), while an embolism is usually of cardiac origin. In the United States, ALI is estimated to occur in 14 out of every 100,000 people per year. With proper surgical care, acute limb ischaemia is a highly treatable condition; however, delayed treatment (beyond 6 to 12 hours) can result in permanent disability, amputation, and/or death. The New Latin term ischaemia as written, is a British version of the word ischemia, and stems from the Greek terms ischein 'to hold'; and haima 'blood'. In this sense, ischaemia refers to the inhibition of blood flow to/through the limb. Acute limb ischaemia can occur in patients through all age groups. Patients that ...
... (a.k.a. cerebral ischemia, cerebrovascular ischemia) is a condition in which there is insufficient blood flow to the brain to meet metabolic demand. This leads to poor oxygen supply or cerebral hypoxia and thus to the death of brain tissue or cerebral infarction / ischemic stroke. It is a sub-type of stroke along with subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracerebral hemorrhage. Ischemia leads to alterations in brain metabolism, reduction in metabolic rates, and energy crisis. There are two types of ischemia: focal ischemia, which is confined to a specific region of the brain; and global ischemia, which encompasses wide areas of brain tissue. The main symptoms involve impairments in vision, body movement, and speaking. The causes of brain ischemia vary from sickle cell anemia ...
... (PIER) is a percutaneous technique used in interventional radiology for limb salvage in patients with lower limb ischemia due to long superficial femoral artery occlusions. This method is intended for those patients who make poor candidates for infrainguinal arterial bypass surgery. A guide wire is intentionally introduced in the subintimal space, after which balloon dilatation is performed to create a new lumen for the blood to flow through. The technique is not without complications but may serve as a "temporary bypass" to provide wound healing and limb salvage. Spinosa DJ, Leung DA, Matsumoto AH, Bissonette EA, Cage D, Harthun NL, Kern JA, Angle JF, Hagspiel KD, Crosby IK, Wellons HA, Tribble CG, Hartwell GD (2004). "Percutaneous intentional extraluminal recanalization in patients with chronic critical limb ischemia". Radiology. 232 (2): 499-507. doi:10.1148/radiol.2322030729. PMID 15286320. Prakash Krishnan ...
... is the constellation of ocular signs and symptoms secondary to severe, chronic arterial hypoperfusion to the eye. Amaurosis fugax is a form of acute vision loss caused by reduced blood flow to the eye; it may be a warning sign of an impending stroke, as both stroke and retinal artery occlusion can be caused by thromboembolism due to atherosclerosis elsewhere in the body (such as coronary artery disease and especially carotid atherosclerosis). Consequently, those with transient blurring of vision are advised to urgently seek medical attention for a thorough evaluation of the carotid artery. Anterior segment ischemic syndrome is a similar ischemic condition of anterior segment usually seen in post-surgical cases. Retinal artery occlusion (such as central retinal artery occlusion or branch retinal artery occlusion) leads to rapid death of retinal cells, thereby resulting in severe loss of vision. Those with ocular ischemic syndrome are typically between the ages of 50 and ...
... is a medical condition in which injury to the small intestine occurs due to not enough blood supply.[2] It can come on suddenly, known as acute mesenteric ischemia, or gradually, known as chronic mesenteric ischemia.[1] The acute form of the disease often presents with sudden severe abdominal pain and is associated with a high risk of death.[1] The chronic form typically presents more gradually with abdominal pain after eating, unintentional weight loss, vomiting, and fear of eating.[1][2] Risk factors for acute mesenteric ischemia include atrial fibrillation, heart failure, chronic kidney failure, being prone to forming blood clots, and previous myocardial infarction.[2] There are four mechanisms by which poor blood flow occurs: a blood clot from elsewhere getting lodged in an artery, a new blood clot forming in an artery, a blood clot forming in the ...
Ischemia or ischaemia is a restriction in blood supply to tissues, causing a shortage of oxygen that is needed for cellular metabolism (to keep tissue alive).[3] Ischemia is generally caused by problems with blood vessels, with resultant damage to or dysfunction of tissue. It also means local anemia in a given part of a body sometimes resulting from congestion (such as vasoconstriction, thrombosis or embolism). Ischemia comprises not only insufficiency of oxygen, but also reduced availability of nutrients and inadequate removal of metabolic wastes. Ischemia can be partial (poor perfusion) or total. Contents [show] Signs and symptoms[edit] Since oxygen is carried to tissues in the blood, insufficient blood supply causes tissue to become starved of oxygen. In the highly metabolically active tissues of the heart and brain, irreversible damage to tissues can occur in as little ...
... or ischaemia is a restriction in blood supply to tissues, causing a shortage of oxygen and needed for cellular metabolism (to keep tissue alive). Ischemia is generally caused by problems with blood vessels, with resultant damage to or dysfunction of tissue. It also means local anemia in a given part of a body sometimes resulting from congestion (such as vasoconstriction, thrombosis or embolism). Ischemia comprises not only insufficiency of oxygen, but also reduced availability of nutrients and inadequate removal of metabolic wastes. Ischemia can be partial (poor perfusion) or total. Play media Since oxygen is carried to tissues in the blood, insufficient blood supply causes tissue to become starved of oxygen. In the highly metabolically active tissues of the heart and brain, irreversible damage to tissues can occur in as little as 3-4 minutes at body temperature. The kidneys are also quickly damaged by ...
The exact pathologic mechanism for RCN is unclear, however the onset of small vessel pathology is likely an important aspect in the cause of this condition. In general the renal cortex is under greater oxygen tension and more prone to ischemic injury, especially at the level of the proximal collecting tubule, leading to its preferential damage in a sudden drop in perfusion. Rapidly corrected acute renal ischemia leads to acute tubular necrosis, from which complete recovery is possible, while more prolonged ischemia may lead to RCN. Pathologically, the cortex of the kidney is grossly atrophied with relative preservation of the gross structure of the medulla. The damage is usually bilateral owing to its underlying systemic causes, and is most frequently associated with pregnancy (,50% of cases).[1] It accounts for 2% of all cases of acute kidney failure in adults and more than 20% of cases of ...
In medicine, aortoiliac occlusive disease, also known as Leriche's syndrome and Leriche syndrome, is a form of central artery disease involving the blockage of the abdominal aorta as it transitions into the common iliac arteries. Classically, it is described in male patients as a triad of the following signs and symptoms: claudication of the buttocks and thighs absent or decreased femoral pulses erectile dysfunction This combination is known as Leriche syndrome. However, any number of symptoms may present, depending on the distribution and severity of the disease, such as muscle atrophy, slow wound healing in the legs, and critical limb ischemia. Treatment involves revascularization typically using either angioplasty or a type of vascular bypass Kissing balloon angioplasty +/- stent, so named because the two common iliac stents touch each other in the distal aorta. Aorto-iliac bypass graft Axillary-bi-femoral and femoral-femoral bypass (sometimes abbreviated "ax-fem ...
... or reperfusion insult, sometimes called ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) or reoxygenation injury, is the tissue damage caused when blood supply returns to tissue (re- + perfusion) after a period of ischemia or lack of oxygen (anoxia or hypoxia). The absence of oxygen and nutrients from blood during the ischemic period creates a condition in which the restoration of circulation results in inflammation and oxidative damage through the induction of oxidative stress rather than (or along with) restoration of normal function. Reperfusion of ischemic tissues is often associated with microvascular injury, particularly due to increased permeability of capillaries and arterioles that lead to an increase of diffusion and fluid filtration across the tissues. Activated endothelial cells produce more reactive oxygen species but less nitric oxide following reperfusion, and the imbalance results in a subsequent inflammatory response. The inflammatory ...
... refers to an increase in the diameter of existing arterial vessels. Mechanically, arteriogenesis is linked to elevated pressure, which increases radial wall stress, and elevated flow, which increases endothelial surface stress. The vessel increases in diameter until the stress is normalized (Prior et al., 2004). Arteriogenesis does not occur every time there is an increase in flow, however. Most vessel networks can handle increased flow without increasing diameter because flow is related to vessel diameter by a power of four. Initial experiments demonstrated this phenomenon in that mature vessels are unlikely to respond to increased flow by increasing diameter, but will respond to decreased flow by decreasing diameter (Brownlee & Langille, 1991). Another experiment showed that increasing shear stress caused an immediate increase in vessel expansion followed by a rapid decrease, as well as demonstrating that the mature vessels do indeed respond more favorably to decreased stress ...
... (blood spurt, blood spray, blood gush, or blood jet) is the effect when an artery, a blood vessel in the human body (or other organism's body) is cut. Blood pressure causes the blood to bleed out at a rapid, intermittent rate, in a spray or jet, coinciding with the beating of the heart, rather than the slower, but steady flow of venous bleeding. Also known as arterial bleeding, arterial spurting, or arterial gushing, the amount of blood loss can be copious, occur very rapidly, and can lead to death. In cut carotid arteries with 100 mL of blood through the heart at each beat (at 65 beats a minute), a completely severed artery will spurt blood for about 30 seconds and the blood will not spurt much higher than the human head. If the artery is just nicked, on the other hand, the blood will spurt longer but will be coming out under pressure and spraying much further. To prevent hand ischemia, there is a "squirt test" that ...
Is-suffiss -voru ġej mil-Latin, preċiżament mil-kelma "vorare", li tfisser taħtaf u tibla l-ikel u użat biex jiffurmaw nomi jew aġġettivi li jinndikaw annimali b' tipi ta' dieti differenti. Il-lista ta' hawn taħt fiha l-kliem li jispiċċaw bis-suffiss -voru u hemm indikat ukoll, x' tip ta' dieta u minn liema sura ta' ikel tikkonsisti. ...
In this paper a rare case of severe acute limb ischemia following incorrect deployment of a clip-based closure device ( ... The foot was cold and pale with absence of capillary refilling. Both superficial and deep sensations were abolished. Her height ... Acute limb ischemia caused by incorrect deployment of a clip-based arterial closure device. Łukasz Dzieciuchowicz, Maciej ... "Acute limb ischemia caused by incorrect deployment of a clip-based arterial closure device". Videosurgery and Other ...
However, several trials have compared cold intravenous fluids to ... more ... Endovascular hypothermia in acute ischemic stroke: pilot study of selective intra-arterial cold saline infusion. Stroke. 2016 ... Endovascular reperfusion and cooling in cerebral acute ischemia (ReCCLAIM I). J Neurointerv Surg. 2014 Mar. 6 (2):91-5. [ ... 1, 36, 72, 73, 74, 75] One study suggested increased pulmonary edema and repeat cardiac arrest with 2 L of cold intravenous ...
Smoking near the time of surgery causes a further acute narrowing of the blood vessels, which may cause ischemia of the tissue ... Please be aware that long-term effects of smoking cause a narrowing of the small arterial blood vessels that traverse the skin ... Finally, report any signs of a cold, fever, cough, infection or skin lesion to your provider prior to surgery. ...
Femoral Arterial Stenosis, Intermittent Claudication, Acute Limb Ischemia, Critical Limb Ischemia, Limb Threatening Ischemia. ... Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Peripheral Vascular Disease, Arterial Insufficiency, ... Acute Limb Ischemia (see management below). *Cold, painful, pale limb with diminished or absent pulses ... critical ischemia limb, critical limb ischemia, critical limb ischaemia, Critical limb ischaemia, Critical limb ischemia. ...
Methods: This was a single center study of consecutive patients with acute and non-acute limb ischemia between September 1, ... Occluded cold stored venous allograft can be successfully re-opened in most cases with a favorable effect on limb salvage. ... underwent percutaneous intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy. The median duration of thrombolysis was 20 h (IQR 18-24) with no ... Duration of ischemia and treatment effects of pre- versus in-hospital ticagrelor in patients with ST-segment elevation ...
Forty patients treated for proven mesenteric arterial occlusion were evaluated retrospectively in ... Acute mesenteric arterial occlusion is a curable disease, provided it is diagnosed and treated before irreversible changes ... The appearance of acute abdominal pain accompanied by profuse cold sweating in a cardiac patient with apparently normal abdomen ... hyperactive bowel sounds, and a history of embolic events should always raise the suspicion of acute mesenteric ischemia and ...
This article, the second in a three-part series on the vascular system, reviews arterial pathophysiology ... Acute limb ischaemia. *Pain. *Pale limb. *Pulselessness. *Extremely cold limb (this feature can be unreliable as limb takes ... Peripheral arterial disease. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) refers to arterial syndromes caused mainly by atherosclerotic ... The thrombus causes acute ischaemia, which, if left untreated, can lead to myocardial cell necrosis and MI involving either the ...
Acute superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion leads to acute intestinal ischemia and is associated with high mortality. ... Occluded cold stored venous allograft can be successfully re-opened in most cases with a favorable effect on limb salvage. ... Early and late outcomes of hybrid endovascular and open repair procedures in patients with peripheral arterial disease2013 ... Methods: This was a single center study of consecutive patients with acute and non-acute limb ischemia between September 1, ...
6 Arterial TOS is associated with hand ischemia caused by either external compression of the subclavian artery or from emboli ... Venous TOS commonly presents with acute effort thrombosis of the subclavian vein, also known as Paget-Schroetter syndrome.2,6 ... discoloration and cold intolerance of fingers in cases involving sympathetic fibers; and, less commonly, weakness of the upper ... 6 The symptoms of arterial TOS include digital ischemia, claudication, pallor, coldness, paresthesia, and pain in the hand but ...
... acute abdominal pain due to gastrointestinal ischemia (5), back pain and hematuria as a result of renal infarction (6), or cold ... 1995) Chiaris network: normal anatomic variant or risk factor for arterial embolic events? J Am Coll Cardiol 26:203-210. ... Paradoxical embolism causing acute MI in the presence of right-to-left shunt is a potentially fatal and likely under-reported ... Acute MI might be the consequence of paradoxical embolism, which should be entertained in the differential diagnosis (see Fig. ...
... of its blood supply leading to ischemia and necrosis.1 Other causes include arterial thrombosis, vasospasm and occlusion of ... Finally, vomiting is more commonly seen in acute Sheehans syndrome, a l t h o u g h c a s e s p r e s e n t i n g w i t h ... cold intolerance etc.1,2 The presentation as intractable v o m i t i n g i s q u i t e u n u s u a l , w i t h s p o r a d i c ... The clinical presentation is myriad and encompasses a broad spectrum, from an acute presentation such as failure to lactate ...
Time of arterial and venous anastomosis, warm ischemia and cold was 32.28 15.52 (15-79) min, 31 9.7 (20 - 60) min, 1.72 1.02 ( ... and arterial thrombosis (1). Medical: urinary tract infection (12), acute tubular necrosis (5), acute rejection (6), ... El tiempo de anastomosis arterial, venosa, isquemia caliente y fr a fue: 32,28 15,52 (15 - 79) min, 31 9,7 (20 - 60) min, 1,72 ... y trombosis arterial (1). Las m dicas: infecci n del tracto urinario (12), necrosis tubular aguda (5), rechazo agudo (6), ...
The incidence of acute myocardial infarction in patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate is controversial. ... Subsequently, further studies are necessary to clarify the incidence of acute myocardial infarction in old people. ... In particular, it has been reported that body temperature lowering due to cold irrigating fluid may result in "cardiac stress" ... as demonstrated by increased peripheral resistance and arterial pressure, as well as reduced stroke volume and cardiac output ...
However, deceased donor allografts are subject to longer cold ischemia and DGF, both of which have also been shown to cause ... Five weeks later, the patient was treated for an episode of acute cellular rejection (ACR) (Banff grade IA) that responded to ... Renal arterial stenosis in renal allografts: retrospective study of predisposing factors and outcome after percutaneous ... Surprisingly, ischemia and hypoperfusion of TRAS that is significant enough to cause graft dysfunction and even graft loss has ...
Intra-arterial mild hypothermia reduced infarct volume after ischemia-reperfusion injury in the arterial thrombolysis of an ... A total of 26 patients with acute middle cerebral artery occlusion were divided into a normothermia group (n = 15) and a mild ... Additionally, it improved the prognosis of patients with an acute middle cerebral artery occlusion, suggesting that this ... Herein, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of intra-arterial mild hypothermia in combination with arterial thrombolysis to ...
Acute limb ischemia. Any individual who presents with symptoms and signs of acute limb ischemia should be evaluated promptly ... f) Systemic vasculitides (e.g., Raynauds phenomenon) - commonly in young woman and manifested with exposure to cold or ... Arterial embolus is a common etiology of acute limb ischemia, and optimizing rate control for a patient with atrial ... Critical limb ischemia (CLI). CLI is chronic and is to be distinguished from acute limb ischemia. The diagnosis and management ...
Prolonged warm and cold ischemia time and reduced hepatic arterial perfusion are risk factors leading to ITBL. There are only a ... For this purpose, acute lymphedema was induced in the mouse hindlimb by a modified popliteal lymphadenectomy. The 4-week course ... Therefore, we examined the effects of 3 h of hepatic artery ischemia-reperfusion (3 h I/R) and hepatic arterial ligation (HAL ... Erythropoietin As Additive of HTK Preservation Solution in Cold Ischemia/reperfusion Injury of Steatotic Livers The Journal of ...
Functional cholestasisrelated to donor liver preservation injury (cold or rewarming ischemia or reperfusion injury) peaks ... Subacute or incomplete hepatic arterial thrombosis can result in chronic ductal ischemia, bacteremiafrom cholangitisand ... In acute hyperbilirubinemia, jaundice can lag behind bilirubinuria. *The renal threshold for conjugated bilirubin is 1 mg/dL, ... It is the test of choice if acute cholecystitis with cystic duct obstruction and biliary leakage is suspected, but it has ...
The left shunt was complicated with acute upper limb ischemia and treated with endovascular means. A 77-year-old male was ... while having the old brachio-cephalic arterial venous shunt in the left arm abandoned. ... referred to our hospital due to severe pain of abrupt onset, accompanied with cyanosis and cold temperature in the left arm and ... Endovascular Treatment of Acute Limb Ischemia Due to Thrombosis of Abandoned Brachio-Cephalic AV Fistula ...
... while the European guidelines specify utility of cold renal perfusion when the ischemia time is greater than 30 min [5]. ... Acute kidney injury after open repair of intact abdominal aortic aneurysms. Ann Vasc Surg. 2017;39:294-300.CrossRefPubMedGoogle ... Guidelines recommend a proximal mean arterial pressure of 90-100 mmHg and distal arterial pressure of 60 mmHg to ensure ... Randomized data supports the use of cold (4 °C) crystalloid (Ringers lactate) as superior to normothermic or cold blood [174, ...
Study Acute ischaemia: Lower limb flashcards from Tom Sun ... What occurs if arterial circulation is not restored within 6 ... Acute ischaemia: Lower limb Flashcards Preview Phase II: Periop Pt1 , Acute ischaemia: Lower limb , Flashcards ... What clinical features are suggestive of acute thrombosis as the cause of acute limb ischaemia? ... What clinical features are suggestive of acute embolism as the cause of acute limb ischaemia? ...
Acute rejection was induced by allogenic ktx of C57BL/6 (B6)-kidney grafts to BALB/c-recipients with prolonged cold ischemia ( ... Longitudinal evaluation of perfusion changes in acute and chronic renal allograft rejection using arterial spin labeling in ... BACKGROUND: CIE is an acute, reversible neurological disturbance directly attributable to the intra-arterial administration of ... To examine the longitudinal changes of renal perfusion due to acute and chronic renal allograft rejection by using arterial ...
However, cerebral ischemia may result from either an intra- or extracranial interruption of arterial blood flow. If ... Renal impairment and acute renal failure-are clinical conditions of diverse etiology, which are associated with an increasing ... These vasospasms can be caused by cold or stress. A pallor or cyanosis is usually present due to severe constriction of the ... Mean arterial pressures are derived electronically from the blood pressure wave. Mean pretreatment values of mean arterial ...
The diagnosis of acute right leg ischemia due to the acute occlusion of the 3-infrapopliteal arteries was considered. A dose of ... On physical examination, the right leg of the patient was found to be pale and cold with the sign of developing mottling and ... She had no detectable arterial pulses below her right knee by palpation, which was confirmed by an emergency Doppler ... A 72-year-old woman was admitted to our department due to acute ischemia of the right leg. She was diagnosed with persistent ...
Acute occlusion of artery by embolus is the cause of the acute ischemia in more then 80% of cases. Most often arterial emboli ... Signs and symptoms are known as „6 Ps" (pulselessness, pain, pallor, persishingly cold, paresthesia, paralysis). Because of ... Acute organ or tissue ischemia is the most common emergency in vascular surgery. ... In conclusion, because of prolonged tissue ischemia in belatedly recognized arterial embolism of lower extremities, amputation ...
  • Materials and methods: Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive inhaled isoflurane (1.5% for 2 h), NAC (1 g/kg, intra-arterial injection) or placebo before the induction of brief warm ischemia (10 min) followed by cold ischemia (45 min) periods. (ncku.edu.tw)
  • Cold ischemia was used in 40% of the time (20.7 min), warm ischemia in 17% (7.2 min) and no arterial clamping in 43% of the time. (peertechz.com)
  • LPN and RPN should be performed only by surgeons with experience in laparoscopic and robotic surgery as the procedure is technically challenging and should be completed within 30 minutes of warm ischemia time. (blogs.com)
  • Ideally, surgeons should practice minimally invasive partial npehrectomy in an animal lab before attempting their first procedure to ensure that all necessary steps can be performed within 30 minutes of warm ischemia time. (blogs.com)
  • An 84 year old woman presented with acute, diffuse, colicky abdominal pain associated with intermittent vomiting, and had a six week background of general malaise and weight loss. (bmj.com)
  • These include chronic limb ischaemia, atrial fibrillation, recent MI (resulting in a mural thrombus), or a symptomatic AAA (ask about back/abdominal pain) and peripheral aneurysms. (teachmesurgery.com)
  • We recently developed an intra-abdominal cooling device that efficiently prevents kidney rewarming during robotic transplantation, and prevents ischaemia-reperfusion injuries. (smw.ch)
  • intestinal angina generalized cramping abdominal pain occurring shortly after a meal and persisting for one to three hours, due to ischemia of the smooth muscle of the bowel. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Factors involved in cast formation include biliary infection, bile duct damage and ischaemia, fasting, haemolysis and abdominal surgery. (lww.com)
  • Bile duct damage and ischaemia, biliary infection, fasting, parenteral nutrition, abdominal surgery and possibly other factors, are all thought to be implicated in cast pathogenesis via sludge development. (lww.com)
  • 2 , 3 , 5 , 6 Arterial TOS is associated with hand ischemia caused by either external compression of the subclavian artery or from emboli arising from a subclavian artery aneurysm. (ajnr.org)
  • Induction of hypothermia in patients with various types of neurologic injury with use of large volumes of ice-cold intravenous fluid. (medscape.com)
  • Therapies are directed to 1) manage concomitant CHF or serious arrhythmias (especially associated with hyperkalemia), 2) patient support (nutritional supplementation, correct hypothermia, prevent self mutilation), 3) acute pain amelioration, 4) measures to limit thrombus growth/ formation, 5) critical monitoring, and 6) prevention of repeated events. (vin.com)
  • Furthermore, in our previous study, the association between hypothermia and myocardial ischemia did not appear to be related to shivering. (asahq.org)
  • She had no detectable arterial pulses below her right knee by palpation, which was confirmed by an emergency Doppler examination revealing the complete lack of blood flow in both dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial arteries. (hindawi.com)
  • The foot felt cold and there were no detectable pulses in her foot. (robertkreisman.com)
  • On examination, the limbs may be pale and cold , with weak or absent pulses . (teachmesurgery.com)
  • Damage to the tubules as a result of this cell swelling resulted in varying degrees of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) that slowed the recovery of the donor kidneys during the first 2 weeks after their transplantation. (nih.gov)
  • Male SD rats were engaged in a 70% partial hepatic ischemia model. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Rats were assigned to four groups, Sham, Ischemia (Isch), Isch + exercise and Isch + ES groups. (springer.com)
  • Supplementary material 1 Muscle weight of tibialis anterior (TA) following IAO + 2FAO ischemia (Isch) and effects of exercise training (EX) and electrical stimulation (ES) in rats. (springer.com)
  • Peter JV, John P, Graham PL, Moran JL, George IA, Bersten A. Corticosteroids in the prevention and treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in adults: meta-analysis. (springermedizin.de)
  • While some investiga-tors have found that the behavior of these QRS wave forms is consistent and a valuable aid in assessing presence of myocardial ischemia and dysfunction,others have reported that these changes are variable and not reliable. (cheapmedicinechest.com)
  • In addition to local damage to the bowel, II/R leads to remote organ dysfunction ( 5 , 6 ), particularly in the lung, resulting in acute lung injury (ALI) ( 3 , 7 ), characterized by an excess elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and activated neutrophils ( 8 - 10 ). (spandidos-publications.com)