Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Psychopharmacology: The study of the effects of drugs on mental and behavioral activity.Diet, Vegetarian: Dietary practice of completely avoiding meat products in the DIET, consuming VEGETABLES, CEREALS, and NUTS. Some vegetarian diets called lacto-ovo also include milk and egg products.Animal Welfare: The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.Social Welfare: Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Mycoplasma bovis: A species of gram-negative bacteria causing MASTITIS; ARTHRITIS; and RESPIRATORY TRACT DISEASES in CATTLE.New Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)Palaeognathae: A superorder of large, mostly flightless birds, named for their distinctive PALATE morphology. It includes the orders Apterygiformes, Casuriiformes, Dinornithiformes, RHEIFORMES; STRUTHIONIFORMES and Tinamiformes.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Mycoplasma: A genus of gram-negative, mostly facultatively anaerobic bacteria in the family MYCOPLASMATACEAE. The cells are bounded by a PLASMA MEMBRANE and lack a true CELL WALL. Its organisms are pathogens found on the MUCOUS MEMBRANES of humans, ANIMALS, and BIRDS.Rinderpest: A viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by MORBILLIVIRUS. It may be acute, subacute, or chronic with the major lesions characterized by inflammation and ulceration of the entire digestive tract. The disease was declared successfully eradicated worldwide in 2010.Rinderpest virus: A species of MORBILLIVIRUS causing cattle plague, a disease with high mortality. Sheep, goats, pigs, and other animals of the order Artiodactyla can also be infected.Anniversaries and Special Events: Occasions to commemorate an event or occasions designated for a specific purpose.Wilderness: Environment un-modified by human activity. Areas in which natural processes operate without human interference.Animal DiseasesTheileria parva: A protozoan parasite that is the etiologic agent of East Coast fever (THEILERIASIS). Transmission is by ticks of the Physicephalus and Hyalomma genera.Theileriasis: Infection of cattle, sheep, or goats with protozoa of the genus THEILERIA. This infection results in an acute or chronic febrile condition.Lyme Disease Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent LYME DISEASE.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Marek Disease Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent MAREK DISEASE, an avian disease caused by a herpesvirus.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.DenmarkFactor XI Deficiency: A hereditary deficiency of blood coagulation factor XI (also known as plasma thromboplastin antecedent or PTA or antihemophilic factor C) resulting in a systemic blood-clotting defect called hemophilia C or Rosenthal's syndrome, that may resemble classical hemophilia.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Malignant Catarrh: A herpesvirus infection of cattle characterized by catarrhal inflammation of the upper respiratory and alimentary epithelia, keratoconjunctivitis, encephalitis and lymph node enlargement. Syn: bovine epitheliosis, snotsiekte.ArtiodactylaGammaherpesvirinae: A subfamily of HERPESVIRIDAE characterized by variable reproductive cycles. The genera include: LYMPHOCRYPTOVIRUS and RHADINOVIRUS.Antelopes: Any of various ruminant mammals of the order Bovidae. They include numerous species in Africa and the American pronghorn.Herpesviridae: A family of enveloped, linear, double-stranded DNA viruses infecting a wide variety of animals. Subfamilies, based on biological characteristics, include: ALPHAHERPESVIRINAE; BETAHERPESVIRINAE; and GAMMAHERPESVIRINAE.Bison: A genus of the family Bovidae having two species: B. bison and B. bonasus. This concept is differentiated from BUFFALOES, which refers to Bubalus arnee and Syncerus caffer.MississippiChromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Genome: The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.Sequence Tagged Sites: Short tracts of DNA sequence that are used as landmarks in GENOME mapping. In most instances, 200 to 500 base pairs of sequence define a Sequence Tagged Site (STS) that is operationally unique in the human genome (i.e., can be specifically detected by the polymerase chain reaction in the presence of all other genomic sequences). The overwhelming advantage of STSs over mapping landmarks defined in other ways is that the means of testing for the presence of a particular STS can be completely described as information in a database.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus: The type species of APHTHOVIRUS, causing FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE in cloven-hoofed animals. Several different serotypes exist.Foot-and-Mouth DiseaseAphthovirus: A genus of the family PICORNAVIRIDAE infecting mainly cloven-hoofed animals. They cause vesicular lesions and upper respiratory tract infections. FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE VIRUS is the type species.Capsid Proteins: Proteins that form the CAPSID of VIRUSES.Viral Vaccines: Suspensions of attenuated or killed viruses administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious viral disease.Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Epizootic: A species of ORBIVIRUS causing a fatal disease in deer. It is transmitted by flies of the genus Culicoides.South DakotaReoviridae Infections: Infections produced by reoviruses, general or unspecified.Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Rabbit: A species in the genus LAGOVIRUS which causes hemorrhagic disease, including hemorrhagic septicemia, in rabbits.Deer: The family Cervidae of 17 genera and 45 species occurring nearly throughout North America, South America, and Eurasia, on most associated continental islands, and in northern Africa. Wild populations of deer have been established through introduction by people in Cuba, New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, and other places where the family does not naturally occur. They are slim, long-legged and best characterized by the presence of antlers. Their habitat is forests, swamps, brush country, deserts, and arctic tundra. They are usually good swimmers; some migrate seasonally. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1362)Bluetongue virus: The type species of ORBIVIRUS causing a serious disease in sheep, especially lambs. It may also infect wild ruminants and other domestic animals.Bluetongue: A reovirus infection, chiefly of sheep, characterized by a swollen blue tongue, catarrhal inflammation of upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, and often by inflammation of sensitive laminae of the feet and coronet.Babesiosis: A group of tick-borne diseases of mammals including ZOONOSES in humans. They are caused by protozoa of the genus BABESIA, which parasitize erythrocytes, producing hemolysis. In the U.S., the organism's natural host is mice and transmission is by the deer tick IXODES SCAPULARIS.Babesia: A genus of tick-borne protozoan parasites that infests the red blood cells of mammals, including humans. There are many recognized species, and the distribution is world-wide.Zambia: A republic in southern Africa, south of DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO and TANZANIA, and north of ZIMBABWE. Its capital is Lusaka. It was formerly called Northern Rhodesia.Tick-Borne Diseases: Bacterial, viral, or parasitic diseases transmitted to humans and animals by the bite of infected ticks. The families Ixodidae and Argasidae contain many bloodsucking species that are important pests of man and domestic birds and mammals and probably exceed all other arthropods in the number and variety of disease agents they transmit. Many of the tick-borne diseases are zoonotic.Babesia microti: A species of protozoa infecting humans via the intermediate tick vector IXODES scapularis. The other hosts are the mouse PEROMYSCUS leucopus and meadow vole MICROTUS pennsylvanicus, which are fed on by the tick. Other primates can be experimentally infected with Babesia microti.

Induction of bovine polioencephalomalacia with a feeding system based on molasses and urea. (1/4595)

Polioencephalomalacia (PEM), a disease first described in the United States and related to intensive beef production, appeared in Cuba coincident with the use of a new, molasses-urea-based diet to fatten bulls. Because the only experimental means so far of reproducing PEM has been with amprolium, a structural analog of thiamin, the present study attempted to induce the disease using the molasses-urea-based diet. Six Holstein bulls (200-300 kg) were studied during consumption of three successive diets: 1) commercial molasses-urea-restricted forage diet of Cuban feedlots, 2) a period in which forage was gradually withdrawn and 3) a forage-free diet composed only of molasses, urea and fish meal. PEM was reproduced in this way. At ten-day intervals, blood concentrations of glucose, lactate, pyruvate and urea were measured, as well as when clinical signs of PEM appeared. The signs, clinical course and lesions of the experimentally induced disease were comparable to those of field cases. The biochemical results suggested a block in pyruvate oxidation as in PEM elsewhere in the world. No evidence existed of urea intoxication. In addition, brain and liver concentration of total thiamin from field cases and normal animals were found to be similar.  (+info)

The indirect hemagglutination test for the detection of antibodies in cattle naturally infected mycoplasmas. (2/4595)

Stable mycoplasma antigens for the indirect hemagglutination test (IHA) were prepared employing glutaraldehyde treated sheep erythrocytes sensitized with Mycoplasma agalactiae subsp. bovis and Mycoplasma bovigenitalium antigens. Employing these antigens mycoplasma antibodies were detected in sera from cattle which had mastitic symptoms due to natural infection with either M. agalactiae subsp. bovis or M. bovigenitalium. A total of 200 cows from four herds were examined at varying intervals for the presence of M. agalactiae subsp. bovis and for the detection of antibody using growth inhibition and IHA tests. Mycoplasmas were isolated from 37 animals. Growth inhibiting antibody was detected from 56 of the 200 animals. In the IHA tests, antibody titer greater than or equal to 1:80 were detected in 148 animals, 76 of these having antibody titers greater than or equal to 1:160, while sera of 116 normal control animals had no growth inhibiting antibody and none had IHA antibody titers greater than 1:40. M. bovigenitalium was isolated from the milk of three of 26 animals in a fifth herd during an outbreak of mastitis. Growth inhibiting antibodies were demonstrated in the sera of ten of the 26 animals. However, the IHA test detected antibody titers of greater than or equal to 1:160 in 13 animals and of 1:80 in one of the 26 animals. To determine the specificity of the IHA tests, M. agalactiae subsp. bovis and M. bovigenitalium antigens were reacted with rabbit hyperimmune typing sera produced against 12 species of bovine mycoplasmatales. Homologous antisera showed IHA antibody titers of 1:1280 and 1:2560 against M. agalactiae subsp. bovis and M. bovigenitalium respectively, whereas heterologous antisera showed IHA antibody titers of less than or equal to 1:20. Also eight type-specific bovine antisera were reacted with M agalactiae subsp. bovis and M. bovigenitalium antigens in homologous and heterologous tests. Homoogous reactions showed IHA antibody titers greater than or equal to 1:320, whereas heterologous reactions showed IHA titers of less than or equal to 1:20. This IHA test promises to be useful for the detection of bovine mycoplasma antibodies in sera from cattle infected with M. agalactiae subsp. bovis or M. bovigenitalium. Thes test is sensitive, reproducible and specific and the technique is relatively simple and rapid. The antigens were stable for at least seven months.  (+info)

Experimental production of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis: comparison of serological and immunological responses using pili fractions of Moraxella bovis. (3/4595)

The effect of vaccinating cattle and mice on the development of keratoconjunctivitis was studied. Cattle were vaccinated with whole cells, disrupted cells and pili fractions of three strains of Moraxella bovis. Mice were vaccinated with pili fractions of three strains. The resistance of all vaccinated animals was challenged with virulent cultures of M. bovis. In an attempt to correlate the response seen after vaccination and challenge with a pili fraction of M. bovis, vaccinated cattle and mice were grouped on the basis of signs of disease manifested and compared on the basis of serological responses. Serum samples were tested for antibodies by a gel diffusion precipitin test. A greater number of the sera of resistant cattle had antibodies to the homologous pili antigen than those of vaccinated nonresistant cattle. Cattle vaccinated with disrupted cells were not resistant to infectious bovine kerato-conjuctivitis and their sera lacked antibodies against the pili antigens. Vaccinated mice were more resistant to infectious bovine kerato-conjuctivitis and their sera lacked antibodies against the pili antigens. Vaccinated mice were more resistant to challenge exposure by homologous than heterologous cultures. A greater number of the sera of resistant mice had antibodies to pili antigens than nonresistant mice.  (+info)

Hypersensitivity pneumonitis: experimental production in calves with antigens of Micropolyspora faeni. (4/4595)

Pneumonitis was induced in calves by exposure to aerosols of Micropolyspora faeni with or without prior sensitization of the animals by subcutaneous injection of antigen. The pneumonitis primarily involved centrolobular areas and was characterized by alveolar septal thickening and loss of air space by cellular infiltration. Vasculitis and focal haemorrhage occurred in certain individuals and haemoproteinaceous exudate appeared within septa and alveolar lumina. The pneumonitis was compared with human farmer's lung, pneumonitis of housed cattle and other experimental hypersensitivity pneumonitides.  (+info)

Values of three coagulation screening tests of precolostral calves. (5/4595)

Prothrombin times, partial thromboplastin times and platelet counts were performed to determine normal values and to screen for coagulation defects of precolostral calves. The precolostral calves were in two groups: one group of a few calves was tested two years before the second larger group. The results for both groups were similar. The tests were performed on postcolostral calves and on mature cows to compare their values with those of precolostral calves. The mean values of prothrombin times and partial thromboplastin times of precolostral calves in the first group were 18.8 seconds and 54.8 seconds respectively. The mean values of prothrombin times and partial thromboplastin times of precolostral calves in the second group were 18.8 seconds and 50.8 seconds respectively. The mean platelet count was 422,400/cmm for the first group and 482,800/cmm for the second group.  (+info)

Treponema brennaborense sp. nov., a novel spirochaete isolated from a dairy cow suffering from digital dermatitis. (6/4595)

A novel Treponema species was isolated from an ulcerative lesion of a cow suffering from digital dermatitis (DD), a disease which causes painful ulcerations along the coronary band. Among other anaerobic bacteria, high numbers of spirochaetes have been regularly found in DD lesions. Here data are presented of a spirochaete isolated from a DD ulcer. By chemotaxonomy, protein analysis and comparative 16S rDNA sequence analysis this isolate was classified as a treponeme that differed from all Treponema species described previously. The only isolate, DD5/3T, for which the name Treponema brennaborense is proposed, is designated the type strain of the novel species. The strain is a small, highly motile spirochaete that has two periplasmic flagella, one flagellum being attached at each cell pole. Strain DD5/3T exhibits alpha-glucosidase and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase activity and growth is inhibited by rabbit serum. T. brennaborense was phylogenetically most closely related (89.5% 16S rRNA similarity) to Treponema maltophilum, an oral spirochaete isolated from a periodontitis patient.  (+info)

In vitro activities of cephalosporins and quinolones against Escherichia coli strains isolated from diarrheic dairy calves. (7/4595)

The in vitro activities of several cephalosporins and quinolones against 195 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from diary calves affected by neonatal diarrhea were determined. One hundred thirty-seven of these strains produced one or more potential virulence factors (F5, F41, F17, cytotoxic necrotizing factor, verotoxin, and the eae gene), but the remaining 58 strains did not produce any of these factors. From 11 to 18% of the E. coli strains were resistant to cephalothin, nalidixic acid, enoxacin, and enrofloxacin. However, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, and cefquinome were highly effective against the E. coli isolates tested. Some significant differences (P < 0.05) in resistance to quinolones between the strains producing potential virulence factors and nonfimbriated, nontoxigenic, eae-negative strains were found. Thus, eae-positive, necrotoxigenic, and verotoxigenic (except for nalidixic acid) E. coli strains were significantly more sensitive to nalidixic acid, enoxacin, and enrofloxacin than nonfimbriated, nontoxigenic, eae-negative strains. Moreover, eae-positive strains were significantly more sensitive to enoxacin and enrofloxacin than F5-positive strains. Thus, the result of this study suggest that the bovine E. coli strains that produce some potential virulence factors are more sensitive to quinolones than those that do not express these factors.  (+info)

The effect of streptomycin, oxytetracycline, tilmicosin and phenylbutazone on spermatogenesis in bulls. (8/4595)

To determine whether declining semen quality associated with health problems may be due to certain antibiotic or anti-inflammatory treatments, semen was collected 3 times per week for up to 42 d from 6 normal bulls after treatment with oxytetracycline, tilmicosin, dihydrostreptomycin, or phenylbutazone. No adverse effects on semen quality were observed.  (+info)

No data available that match "cattle diseases"


  • In a study among Holstein calves published in the scientific journal BMC Genetics they have discovered a hitherto undescribed disease among animals - a facial deformation they have chosen to call Facial Dysplasia Syndrome. (eurekalert.org)
  • The researchers have discovered the genetic mutation that is the cause of the disease among calves and traced it back to one particular breeding bull. (eurekalert.org)
  • The bull has now been put down to prevent further cases of the disease among new-born calves. (eurekalert.org)
  • After having received information from veterinarians of calves with facial deformations, Jørgen Agerholm went looking for more cases in his network of cattle veterinarians, including on Facebook. (eurekalert.org)
  • This gene was sequenced in the calves' genome, and the researchers were then able to determine that a mutation in this gene had caused the disease among the calves. (eurekalert.org)
  • This means that the calves developed the deformation when the mutation was passed on from either the mother or father and not from both the mother and the father, which is the case with many hereditary diseases. (eurekalert.org)
  • Our aim was always to lower the number of sick and dead calves, as some hereditary diseases are very painful and invalidating. (eurekalert.org)
  • Scours is the main cause of disease and death in calves 2-30 days of age. (iastate.edu)
  • Two other nearby farms suspected of being affected by the disease were being tested and restrictions have been placed on the movement of animals to prevent any spread, the Ministry of Primary Industries said in a statement. (reuters.com)
  • Babesiosis is a rare, severe and sometimes fatal tick-borne disease caused by various types of Babesia, a microscopic parasite that infects red blood cells. (co.zm)
  • The initial outbreak in July led to concerns that the disease that could affect market access for New Zealand's diary products, but led only to a brief dip in the New Zealand dollar. (reuters.com)
  • News in July of the country's first confirmed cases briefly knocked the New Zealand dollar given the importance of the cattle industry for the economy. (bovinevetonline.com)
  • And of course it also improves the financial situation of the cattle owners, who are able to minimise losses', explains Jørgen Agerholm, who is also Head of the Section for Veterinary Reproduction and Obstetrics. (eurekalert.org)
  • When the disease entered Africa in 1889, the ensuing pandemic saw the deaths of millions of cattle and buffalo, and the starvation of many thousands of people who had depended on those animals for food, or for pulling a plough or a cart. (vaccinenewsdaily.com)
  • Announced publicly in June, the Kansas-based CattleTrace pilot project is on track to begin testing a purpose-built infrastructure for cattle disease traceability by fall 2018. (thefencepost.com)
  • Meanwhile, in another sign of the gradual spread of the deadly disease around the world, officials in the Czech Republic announced plans to slaughter a herd of cattle after tests confirmed the first case of mad-cow disease in the country. (wsj.com)
  • Study: Shift to Grass-fed Requires Larger Cattle Herd. (agweb.com)
  • One of them had some post-movement tests to undertake, to make sure cattle that had just been moved onto the premises did not have the disease, before introducing them to the rest of the herd. (yorkshirepost.co.uk)
  • These higher-risk cattle are allowed to commingle with the U.S. herd, enter the U.S. food supply and enter the non-ruminant U.S. animal feed system. (opednews.com)
  • USDA has an absolute duty to protect the U.S. cattle herd as well as U.S. consumers from the introduction of BSE that is known to be occurring under the OTM Rule, and R-CALF is again calling on USDA to immediately rescind the OTM Rule. (opednews.com)
  • We are counting on Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to take appropriate action to protect our cattle herd and our consumers by immediately overturning the OTM Rule that is allowing the continuous introduction of BSE into the United States," Thornsberry said. (opednews.com)
  • The quarantine of a Texas cattle herd that may have eaten feed banned in the U.S. to prevent mad cow disease shows how well government protections on the food supply work, an industry official said. (mad-cow.org)
  • With expanded coverage of herd diseases, this new edition meets the growing need for management of both diseases of individual cows and medical problems affecting whole herds. (elsevier.com)
  • The Pennsylvania Johne's Disease Herd Certification Program, sponsored by the state Department of Agriculture in cooperation with Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences, is one of the nation's longest-running voluntary Johne's disease monitoring and control programs. (psu.edu)
  • Today's decision to eradicate is driven by the government's desire to protect the national herd from the disease and protect the base of our economy - the farming sector," Ardern said in a statement. (producer.com)
  • Thousands of cattle have been lost in parts of Mashonaland East Province especially among the communal farmers, at a time when the government is working towards rebuilding the national herd and restocking. (co.zw)
  • The vaccine protects cattle against the deadly East Coast Fever (ECF), which kills two cows every minute - one million a year - causing economic losses of US$189 million in the 11 countries in eastern and southern Africa where the disease is endemic. (scidev.net)
  • Scientists at the university`s College of Veterinary Medicine have completed initial testing of a new vaccine they say promises to protect cattle from brucellosis without most of the drawbacks of the vaccine currently in use. (chicagotribune.com)
  • The new vaccine appears to provide protection for cattle ``not statistically different`` from that provided by the current vaccine, known as strain 19, without the complications that accompany it, Adams explained. (chicagotribune.com)
  • The disease has been conquered using a vaccine and a programme of education implemented by the FAO. (fwi.co.uk)
  • In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , Benjamin Dewals of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Liège in Belgium and his team report that they have discovered the gene that enables AlHV-1 infection to progress to MCF, and they have developed a vaccine against the disease. (phys.org)
  • When the researchers infected these rabbits with normal AlHV-1, the rabbits did not develop the disease, indicating that the knockout virus could be act as a vaccine. (phys.org)
  • Q. Is there any vaccine for EHD in cattle? (feedstuffs.com)
  • This is a most unusual bug, a 'Ripley's Believe It or Not' bacterium, and the tick that carries it is equally bizarre," said veterinary immunologist Jeffrey Stott, who has led the effort to develop a preventive vaccine for the malady that western ranchers know all too well as "foothill abortion disease. (redbluffdailynews.com)
  • Vaccine trials to prevent the disease are now in the second year, thanks to a longtime partnership between UC Davis, the University of Nevada, Reno, and the California Cattlemen's Association. (redbluffdailynews.com)
  • Eventually, the ELISA became one of the key elements to the global elimination of the virus, together with the vaccine that brought the disease under control. (iaea.org)
  • A recombinant live vector vaccine was produced by insertion of cDNA encoding the structural proteins (P1) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) into a replication-competent human adenovirus type 5 vaccine strain (Ad5 wt). (nih.gov)
  • Groups of cattle (n = 3) were immunized twice, by the subcutaneous and/or intranasal routes, with either the Ad5 wt vaccine or with the recombinant FMDV Ad5-P1 vaccine. (nih.gov)
  • GENERAL - Fort Dodge Animal Health has provided its Zulvac® 1 vaccine against Serotype 1 Bluetongue (BTV-1) in cattle and sheep to vets in Jersey under the terms of a Special Export Licence from the French Government. (thecattlesite.com)
  • The pathogenesis of persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection was investigated in 46 cattle that were either naive or had been vaccinated using a recombinant, adenovirus-vectored vaccine 2 weeks before challenge. (asm.org)
  • Our collaborative work has led to improvements in diagnostic tests, a better understanding of mechanisms of disease transmission and pathogenesis, and the identification of new vaccine candidates," he explained. (psu.edu)
  • The investigation revealed 10 confirmed cases of EHD (Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease). (agweb.com)
  • Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) is a disease of great concern for deer in North America. (agweb.com)
  • The epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses are widespread in white-tailed deer and periodically cause serious epidemics in wild populations. (agweb.com)
  • Confirmed cases of epizootic hemorrhagic disease have occurred in North American cattle, in conjunction with epidemics in deer for several decades. (agweb.com)
  • The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship announced Thursday that Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease has been found in more than fifteen herds of cattle, mostly in the western part of the state. (whotv.com)
  • Cases of epizootic hemorrhagic disease, or EHD, were reported this summer in South Dakota cattle herds and in white-tailed deer. (feedstuffs.com)
  • State agriculture officials have confirmed two cases of Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease, or EHD. (wrn.com)
  • All classical endemic and emerging viruses, such as pestiviruses, bovine herpesvirus type 1, foot-and-mouth disease virus, bluetongue virus, epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus, Rift Valley fever virus, and bovine ephemeral fever virus, could be excluded as the causative agent. (cdc.gov)
  • Federated Farmers says there's no cause for concern, despite another Canterbury farm testing positive for a bacterial cattle disease. (newstalkzb.co.nz)
  • The Iowa Department of Agriculture is advising cattle farmers to use insect control to protect their animals. (whotv.com)
  • McGraw says farmers who notice signs of illness in cattle should contact their veterinarian to rule out other disease. (wrn.com)
  • OVER 2 000 cattle have succumbed to tick-borne disease with farmers raising concern that if new supplies of dip stocks were not procured in time, current dip stocks will run out over the next few weeks and trigger more deaths. (co.zw)
  • Tick-borne disease is caused by people who are not dipping their animals and would like to encourage our farmers to dip their animals," he said. (co.zw)
  • The disease, is very common during the rainy season due to high tick prevalence that has thrived due to irregular cattle dipping by most farmers. (co.zw)
  • Last year, the disease claimed hundreds of cattle in Mashonaland East and Mashonaland Central provinces, leaving farmers distraught. (co.zw)
  • In Mhondoro-Mubaira area, about 100 cattle have died from the disease in Kwaramba Village in ward six, according to the Farmers Voice. (co.zw)
  • Farmers are advised not to panic and sell their cattle for peanuts," he said. (co.zw)
  • Most of the farmers in this part of Sinazongwe do not have dip tanks and rarely treat their cattle. (co.zm)
  • The findings showed that iatrogenic diseases were more often caused by farmers (92.6per cent) than by bovine practitioners (7.4 per cent). (bva.co.uk)
  • Cattle farmers are being urged to find out more about how new funding could help to eradicate a disease which costs the farming industry more than £60m a year. (edp24.co.uk)
  • The problem with this disease is that very often farmers don't realise their cattle have it: they just think that their yield is five or 10% lower than what it could be. (edp24.co.uk)
  • British farmers know that trading cattle can bring risks of disease transmission. (producer.com)
  • If farmers pay the annual fee, the money raised will be used to procure dipping chemicals and that will see the cattle being dipped regularly," she said. (co.zw)
  • One of the more common diseases to be found in the developed countries is brucellosis , which has been controlled quite successfully through vaccination and testing. (britannica.com)
  • In addition, cattle vaccinated with strain 19 sometimes react to brucellosis test almost exactly as if they were actually infected with the disease. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Head of cattle, nearly 90 of them which tested positive for deadly brucellosis disease two years ago will be put to death in two weeks' time, decided the experts of the Kerala Veterinary and Animal Sciences University (KVASU). (medindia.net)
  • Brucellosis disease function as facultative intracellular parasites, causing chronic disease, which usually persists for life in cattle. (medindia.net)
  • There is a Cooperative State Federal Brucellosis program in the United States to eradicate the disease from this country. (vt.edu)
  • States are designated "Brucellosis Class Free" when there are no cattle or bison infected with brucellosis for 12 consecutive months. (vt.edu)
  • The U.S. Geological Survey and its partners have shown how brucellosis has impacted cattle, bison and elk in the greater Yellowstone area. (usgs.gov)
  • Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey and its partners have shown how brucellosis, a disease which has significant economic implications for the cattle industry and wildlife health, has been transmitted back and forth between cattle, bison and elk in the greater Yellowstone area. (usgs.gov)
  • Federal scientists developed and analyzed a genomic dataset of Brucella abortus, the bacteria that causes brucellosis, which spanned 30 years and included samples from cattle, bison and elk. (usgs.gov)
  • This study shows that elk, in some areas distant from the feeding grounds, have strains that are unrelated to bison, suggesting that management of bison and feeding grounds may not affect brucellosis dynamics in these other elk populations, where the disease has been spreading. (usgs.gov)
  • Dr Fofana was speaking to Daily Observer and said his department was working towards addressing the outbreak, with hopes to eradicate the diseases outbreak within the next 5 to 10 years. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • The Johne's Disease Integrated Program (JDIP) -- a consortium of 170 scientists from more than 50 leading academic institutions, government agencies and industry organizations around the world -- is led by Vivek Kapur, head of Penn State's Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences. (psu.edu)
  • Annual economic losses to producers as a result of Johne's disease are estimated at more than $14 million in Pennsylvania, up to $500 million in the United States and as much as $1.5 billion worldwide. (psu.edu)
  • Our consortium also has enabled the development of online training programs on Johne's disease for veterinarians and producers. (psu.edu)
  • Improved sampling and testing strategies developed by JDIP are currently being incorporated into USDA's Voluntary Bovine Johne's Disease Control Program. (psu.edu)
  • Coordinating this Johne's disease program dovetails with the college's growing capacity in infectious-disease research," he said. (psu.edu)
  • What is Johne's Disease? (farms.com)
  • Johne's (pronounced Yo-knees) Disease is a chronic disease of profuse, watery diarrhea and weight loss or "wasting" in adult cattle (Figure 1) caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subsp. (farms.com)
  • How did Johne's Disease get on my farm? (farms.com)
  • Diagnosing a clinical case: Does this animal exhibiting weight loss and diarrhea have Johne's disease? (farms.com)
  • Best test in a live animal: PCR on a manure (fecal) sample can be used as a primary diagnostic test to confirm the clinical signs of diarrhea and wasting suggestive of Johne's disease. (farms.com)
  • To investigate the additional genetic effect of this program, a genetic-epidemiological model was developed to assess the effect of selection of cows that test negative for Johne's disease (dam selection). (wur.nl)
  • Genetic selection for Johne's disease resistance by certification and surveillance is too slow for practical purpose, but that selection on the sire level is able to contribute to the control of Johne's disease in the long run. (wur.nl)
  • The new, national approach to Johne's disease (JD) officially commenced on 1 July and all Australian cattle producers are encouraged to become familiar with the changes. (farmbiosecurity.com.au)
  • AHA has released a useful fact sheet, New approach to Johne's disease in cattle , which clearly outlines what the approach means for the individual producer and also addresses some frequently asked questions," said Mr Rowland. (farmbiosecurity.com.au)
  • This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and characteristics of Johne's disease (JD) lesions in Ugandan cattle slaughtered at two of the main abattoirs in Kampala. (springer.com)
  • Characteristic Johne's disease granulomas were found in 4.7% of the samples examined, derived from Zebu, Ankole longhorn, Friesian breeds of cattle and their crosses. (springer.com)
  • There were also some unique and atypical lesions found in association with Johne's disease granulomas. (springer.com)
  • The prevalence of Johne's disease lesions among slaughtered cattle in Kampala's two abattoirs indicates that the disease is well established in the cattle population in the country. (springer.com)
  • Longitudinal study of clinicopathological features of Johne's disease in sheep naturally exposed to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis , Veterinary Pathology, 48(3), 565-575. (springer.com)
  • For this retrospective study, 4262 clinical records of cattle admitted to the veterinary teaching hospital of the University of Milan between 2005 and 2017 were analysed, and 121 cases (2.8 per cent), referred for an iatrogenic-related disease, were selected. (bva.co.uk)
  • Foot-and-mouth disease has been eliminated from most of North America , some Central American countries, Australia, and New Zealand . (britannica.com)
  • Because the lesions look very similar to Vesicular Stomatitis and/or Foot and Mouth Disease, foreign animal disease investigations were performed with submissions to the Foreign Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Plum Island, NY. (agweb.com)
  • Presence of Foot and Mouth Disease in That State Is Denied. (nytimes.com)
  • Hi, we are two middle schoolers that are trying to make the world a better place by donating to pay back Australia's debt from the foot and mouth disease outbreak this year. (change.org)
  • We observed that Australia had a rather severe outbreak of foot and mouth disease, and it had costed them up to 16 billion dollars. (change.org)
  • The effects of foot and mouth disease are gruesome, not to mention it is easily spread and can also be passed to humans. (change.org)
  • By donating, you are opening a pathway for the animals that have foot and mouth disease to be cured, and also opening a pathway for the animals that don't have the disease to be protected. (change.org)
  • Evidence of partial protection against foot-and-mouth disease in cattle immunized with a recombinant adenovirus vector expressing the precursor pol. (nih.gov)
  • IMPORTANCE The existence of a prolonged, asymptomatic carrier state is a political impediment for control and potential eradication of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). (asm.org)
  • Natural and induced factors inhibiting foot and mouth disease virus were investigated in bovine secretions, especially in those from the upper respiratory and oro pharyngeal areas. (bl.uk)
  • On 27 June, chief veterinary officers and other experts from around the world will meet at FAO Headquarters to discuss measures to safeguard remaining samples of virus and vaccines in laboratories, and to assess risks and response requirements in the fight against other high impact diseases. (fao.org)
  • And of course it also improves the financial situation of the cattle owners, who are able to minimise losses', explains Jørgen Agerholm, who is also Head of the Section for Veterinary Reproduction and Obstetrics. (eurekalert.org)
  • Ithaca, NY -- A test for the cattle disease salmonella dublin that is cheaper, quicker, safer and more sensitive than traditional bacteriological tests is now available for the first time in the United States at the state Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine. (syracuse.com)
  • The government, through the Veterinary Services Department, has since suspended cattle movement into Harare. (co.zw)
  • The veterinary department informed me that approximately 50 cattle have died because of babesiosis, a tick-borne disease," he said. (co.zm)
  • To determine whether influenza D virus was present in cattle in Ireland and to investigate epidemiologic factors that might be related to this virus, we conducted a cross-sectional study by using 320 nasal swab specimens from cattle with respiratory disease that were submitted to the Central Veterinary Research Laboratory (Celbridge, Ireland) for routine bovine viral pathogen testing during 2014-2016. (cdc.gov)
  • Retrospective analysis of iatrogenic diseases in cattle requiring admission to a veterinary hospital. (bva.co.uk)
  • Iatrogenic diseases in veterinary medicine are often related to malpractice or lack of skill. (bva.co.uk)
  • In my veterinary practice of more than twenty years, which has been devoted in large part to cattle, with special reference to the disease of abortion, I have found that in nearly every case of abortion, except such as were caused by a fall, a kick or other absolute violence, the germs of the disease were in both the cow and the foetus. (oldandsold.com)
  • Gary Zimmerman, veterinary researcher in Livingston, MT, says there are several different genera and many species of pathogenic coccidia, but only a few affect cattle. (beefmagazine.com)
  • The Director of Veterinary Services, Dr Obatoulo Ushewekunze says the high rate of cattle deaths in Hwedza and other parts of Mashonaland East Province is due to tick borne diseases as a result of prolonged periods of non-dipping. (co.zw)
  • In: McGavin M.D. and Zachary J.F. (eds), Pathologic basis of veterinary disease, 2nd edn, (Mosby-Elsevier, St Louis, Missouri) 732-374. (springer.com)
  • It is the only member of the monotypic genus Bubulcus, although some authorities regard two of its subspecies as full species, the western cattle egret and the eastern cattle egret. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cattle egret has two geographical races which are sometimes classified as full species, the western cattle egret, B. ibis, and eastern cattle egret, B. coromandus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most taxonomic authorites lump this species and the eastern cattle egret together (called the cattle egret), but some (including the International Ornithologists' Union separate them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most infections with the North American strains of EHD appear to be subclinical and seropositive cattle may be common in some regions. (agweb.com)
  • The problem is difficult to detect early in subclinical cattle (subclinical=before diarrhea and weight loss develop) but these infected animals can and often do shed high numbers of the MAP organism, contaminating the farm long before there is evidence of a problem. (farms.com)
  • All cattle have subclinical infections, which are held in check by host immunity. (beefmagazine.com)
  • 25 June 2011, Rome - Flanked by Presidents, Vice-Presidents, Ministers and other international dignitaries, FAO Director-General Jacques Diouf today unveiled a commemorative plaque to celebrate global freedom from rinderpest, or cattle plague, one of history's deadliest animal diseases and a long-time threat to human livelihoods and food security. (fao.org)
  • A remarkable breakthrough in the fight against infectious animal diseases has taken place with the announcement of the eradication of rinderpest, a highly contagious viral disease of cattle, buffalo, yak and other wildlife species. (iaea.org)
  • Projections of live cattle trade in the EU-25 assist to reduce the uncertainty on the risk of importing animal diseases in the Netherlands. (umn.edu)
  • This work was funded by the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA) under the Transboundary Animal Diseases in East Africa project, DFC no. 10-006KU (HS). (nih.gov)
  • This benefits both species, but it has been implicated in the spread of tick-borne animal diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinical disease is seen in cattle and wildlife animals such as the Arabian oryx and water buffalo, but LSDV does not naturally infect sheep and goats [ 4 - 6 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Cattle, sheep, and goats are at the highest risk of developing anthrax, but other farm animals, as well as wildlife and humans, can contract the disease. (vt.edu)
  • The Hong Kong patient marks the 106th reported case of the disease world-wide, with 98 deaths. (wsj.com)
  • Tuberculosis is a global burden with oneâ third of the worldâ s population infected with the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and an annual 1.4 million deaths from the disease. (omicsonline.org)
  • Deaths in cattle due to EHD have been confirmed by the SDSU Animal Disease Research and Diagnostic Laboratory, but these death losses are considered very uncommon overall. (feedstuffs.com)
  • January disease is another serious problem in cattle, with over 2 000 cattle deaths already recorded from tick-borne disease this season. (co.zw)
  • INDONESIA - An unknown disease has caused dozens of cattle deaths in Siguntur Nagari, or the traditional village in Dharmasraya District, West Sumatra Province. (thedairysite.com)
  • Chief of Siguntur Nagari recalled that a cow, which was suspected to carry an unknown disease, from a neighboring hamlet was wandering inside Siguntur Nagari territory prior to the deaths of dozens of cattle in the region. (thedairysite.com)
  • The disease usually manifests itself in humans as depression, memory loss and dementia, and death usually occurs within 14 months of the first observed symptoms. (wsj.com)
  • Symptoms in cattle include fever, swollen eyes, ulcers on the mouth, lameness and labored breathing. (agweb.com)
  • Symptoms in cattle include sores in the mouth. (feedstuffs.com)
  • Symptoms of the disease include, decrease in milk production, depression, weakness and difficulty in breathing for the animal, followed by rapid and shallow breaths. (co.zw)
  • If there is deep damage to the intestinal mucosa, there will be symptoms and it becomes disease - which we call coccidiosis. (beefmagazine.com)
  • This acute and lethal lymphoproliferative disease occurs after a prolonged asymptomatic incubation period after transmission. (phys.org)
  • The total eradication of rinderpest - a disease that decimated cattle, buffalo and many other animal species, both domestic and wild - is proof of this today. (fao.org)
  • Wildebeests carry asymptomatically alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), a γ-herpesvirus inducing malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) to several ruminant species (including cattle). (phys.org)
  • Cattle can become affected uncommonly, but clinical illness is very rare in other species. (feedstuffs.com)
  • however, cattle are now believed to be the main reservoir species ( 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • The book is well indexed for finding out the relevant part or disease for the species in which you are interested. (thepigsite.com)
  • The cattle egret (Bubulcus ibis) is a cosmopolitan species of heron (family Ardeidae) found in the tropics, subtropics and warm temperate zones. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cattle egrets exploit drier and open habitats more than other heron species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its genus name Bubulcus is Latin for herdsman, referring, like the English name, to this species' association with cattle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite superficial similarities in appearance, the cattle egret is more closely related to the genus Ardea, which comprises the great or typical herons and the great egret (A. alba), than to the majority of species termed egrets in the genus Egretta. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cattle egret has undergone one of the most rapid and wide reaching natural expansions of any bird species. (wikipedia.org)
  • The initial outbreak in July led to concerns that the disease that could affect market access for New Zealand's diary products, but led only to a brief dip in the New Zealand dollar. (reuters.com)
  • Although the United States has not had an FMD outbreak since 1929, the disease is still considered a serious threat. (eurekalert.org)
  • Because there are seven different types of FMD viruses and more than 60 subtypes, vaccines must be highly specific, matched to the type and subtype present in the area of an outbreak, to protect animals against developing clinical signs of disease. (eurekalert.org)
  • In the current outbreak, the most common sign noted in cattle is that of excessive drooling. (feedstuffs.com)
  • A. The most common problem associated with EHD in cattle in this South Dakota outbreak has been that of sores in the mouth. (feedstuffs.com)
  • The first outbreak of the disease occurred in Mashonaland Central in January. (co.zw)
  • OVER FOURTY cattle have died in Sinazongwe district in the last seven days due to the outbreak of babesiosis disease, district commissioner Protacio Mulenga has confirmed. (co.zm)
  • And the district administration in Sinazongwe has banned the crossing and selling of cattle following reports of the outbreak of the disease. (co.zm)
  • The suspected outbreak has greatly affected the livelihoods of most of our people as you know that the wealth and agricultural productivity of people is cattle. (co.zm)
  • I would also like to take this opportunity to appeal to Zambeef here in Sinazongwe to stop buying cattle from Mweemba chiefdom so that we contain the outbreak, "he said. (co.zm)
  • Little is known about the disease in Asia, but China claims that its last outbreak was in 1995 according to reports," he said. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Scientists advising the British Government decided that the most likely explanation for this unusual outbreak was the consumption of beef from diseased cattle before 1989, when regulations were adopted for the disposal of potentially infectious cattle offal, including brains, and the use of sheep entrails as feed ceased. (ourstrangeplanet.com)
  • The global eradication of rinderpest, achieved under an FAO coordinated programme, makes the virus the first animal disease to be eliminated from its natural setting thanks to human efforts and international cooperation, and only the second disease of any kind to be eradicated, after smallpox in humans. (fao.org)
  • This page provides a summary list of both recent and past news articles related to Bluetongue Disease. (thecattlesite.com)
  • UK - Store cattle breeders selling at North of England auction markets can widen the range of competition for their stock, and hopefully earn more money, if they inject them, pre-sale, against bluetongue virus eight (BTV8). (thecattlesite.com)
  • When USDA implemented its OTM Rule, the agency stated that Canada's BSE prevalence was continuously decreasing and that Canadian cattle born after the export eligibility date of March 1, 1999, would "have an extremely low likelihood of exposure to BSE. (opednews.com)
  • Canada's BSE testing is voluntary, and based on the significant numbers of BSE-positive cattle detected under very limited testing, Canada's BSE prevalence rate is likely well above USDA's estimate," he pointed out. (opednews.com)
  • FMDV structural and nonstructural proteins were localized to follicle-associated epithelium of the dorsal soft palate and dorsal nasopharynx in persistently infected cattle. (asm.org)
  • Overall, 61/79 (77%) of the cattle sera were positive for antibodies against FMDV by PrioCHECK FMDV NS ELISA and solid phase blocking ELISA detected titres ≥ 80 for serotypes O, SAT 1, SAT 2 and SAT 3 in 41, 45, 30 and 45 of these 61 seropositive samples, respectively. (nih.gov)
  • In the last few weeks, the Nebraska Department of Agriculture has investigated multiple cases of cattle with severe oral, nasal and ocular lesions. (agweb.com)
  • AntaraNews.com reports that the cases of cattle death have been reported in five out of six jorongs, which are the smaller units of traditional village of Siguntur Nagari. (thedairysite.com)
  • Hello, I'm Ted Oliphant, as a police officer in Fyffe, Alabama I investigated over 35 cases of cattle mutilations over a six month period from October 1992 through May 1993. (ourstrangeplanet.com)
  • The AWBI pointed out that transporting and killing the infected cattle without preceding anaesthesia, would be in apparent violation of the Prevention and Control of Infectious and Contagious Diseases in Animals (PCICDA) Act, 2009, and the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (PCA) Act, 1960. (medindia.net)
  • New legislation states that cattle born before 1 August 1996 cannot be slaughtered for human consumption and consignment of these animals to a fresh meat slaughterhouse will be an offence. (vegsoc.org)
  • Mark Bryan also says the cattle disease could be a major setback for efforts to reduce antibiotic use in farm animals. (radionz.co.nz)
  • The rest of the world is still plagued by the disease, which attacks all cloven-footed animals. (britannica.com)
  • The disease is spread by close contact between animals and does not pose a food safety risk or any risk to humans. (reuters.com)
  • As a general rule, 60 to 75 percent of affected animals can be returned to useful function if the disease is detected and treated early in its course. (missouri.edu)
  • KVASU Registrar Joseph Mathew said all the department heads concerned attended the meeting which decided on the mercy killing of the animals at their Thiruvazhamkunnu cattle farm in Palakkad. (medindia.net)
  • Traditional bacteriological tests identified only the bacteria in sick or deceased animals, missing up to 85 percent of infections in carrier cattle. (syracuse.com)
  • Jacob Petrich and colleagues note that the human form of Mad Cow Disease is linked to eating beef from animals infected with abnormal proteins called prions implicated in a range of brain diseases. (medindia.net)
  • The disease has never been found in U.S. cattle, and in its news release, Purina stressed that it only uses meat and bone meal from U.S.-grown animals and only in those products in which it is allowed. (mad-cow.org)
  • Some scientists have speculated that the level of immunity in the cattle population may currently be on a down cycle, allowing more animals to show clinical signs, although this has not been definitively proven. (feedstuffs.com)
  • Zoonotic diseases are diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans and from humans to animals. (vt.edu)
  • Instead, the Pajaroello lives in the decomposing plant litter at the base of trees, shrubs and rocks, and is attracted to cattle by the carbon dioxide the animals give off. (redbluffdailynews.com)
  • It has killed millions of cattle and wild animals, and seriously damaged food security in Africa and Asia where the disease has been most prevalent. (iaea.org)
  • The disease is not transmitted directly from sick animals to healthy animals by mere contact. (cattletoday.info)
  • In nonvaccinated cattle, systemically disseminated virus was cleared from peripheral sites by 10 dpi, while virus selectively persisted within the nasopharynx of a subset of animals. (asm.org)
  • The disease can mean economic losses due to temporary declines in milk production, lower market weights, sterility in bulls, and secondary infections that can even lead to the animals' death. (thedairysite.com)
  • They often accompany cattle or other large mammals, catching insect and small vertebrate prey disturbed by these animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Meanwhile, adult cattle rarely develop the disease, though it can occur in thin, malnourished or severely stressed cows, or those compromised by another cattle disease. (beefmagazine.com)
  • The adult cattle egret has few predators, but birds or mammals may raid its nests, and chicks may be lost to starvation, calcium deficiency or disturbance from other large birds. (wikipedia.org)
  • R-CALFUSA (Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund, United Stockgrowers of America) is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to ensuring the continued profitability and viability of the U.S. cattle industry. (opednews.com)
  • But while industry and government officials stress that the risk is small, cattle ranchers fear the mix-up might be enough to taint public perception, just as beef was rebounding after a decade of flat sales. (mad-cow.org)
  • Ranchers in California and neighboring states have struggled with foothill abortion disease at least as far back as the 1940s. (redbluffdailynews.com)
  • LAS CRUCES, N.M. - Cattle experts from New Mexico State University's Cooperative Extension Service will make presentations to ranchers and others April 26 on the cattle disease trichomoniasis. (demingheadlight.com)
  • Cattle experts share vital information for ranchers on April 26. (demingheadlight.com)

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