A hindrance to the passage of fluids through a CATHETER.
Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.
Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.
A flexible, tubular device that is used to carry fluids into or from a blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity.
Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.
Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.
Blockage in any part of the URETER causing obstruction of urine flow from the kidney to the URINARY BLADDER. The obstruction may be congenital, acquired, unilateral, bilateral, complete, partial, acute, or chronic. Depending on the degree and duration of the obstruction, clinical features vary greatly such as HYDRONEPHROSIS and obstructive nephropathy.
Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.
Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.
Hindrance of the passage of luminal contents in the DUODENUM. Duodenal obstruction can be partial or complete, and caused by intrinsic or extrinsic factors. Simple obstruction is associated with diminished or stopped flow of luminal contents. Strangulating obstruction is associated with impaired blood flow to the duodenum in addition to obstructed flow of luminal contents.
Partial or complete blockage in any part of the URETHRA that can lead to difficulty or inability to empty the URINARY BLADDER. It is characterized by an enlarged, often damaged, bladder with frequent urges to void.
Blocked urine flow through the bladder neck, the narrow internal urethral opening at the base of the URINARY BLADDER. Narrowing or strictures of the URETHRA can be congenital or acquired. It is often observed in males with enlarged PROSTATE glands.
Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the nose. The obstruction may be unilateral or bilateral, and may involve any part of the NASAL CAVITY.
The hindering of output from the STOMACH into the SMALL INTESTINE. This obstruction may be of mechanical or functional origin such as EDEMA from PEPTIC ULCER; NEOPLASMS; FOREIGN BODIES; or AGING.
Occlusion of the outflow tract in either the LEFT VENTRICLE or the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart. This may result from CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS, predisposing heart diseases, complications of surgery, or HEART NEOPLASMS.
Catheters that are inserted into a large central vein such as a SUBCLAVIAN VEIN or FEMORAL VEIN.
Passage of a CATHETER into the URINARY BLADDER or kidney.
Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.
Catheters inserted into various locations within the heart for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.
Interference with the secretion of tears by the lacrimal glands. Obstruction of the LACRIMAL SAC or NASOLACRIMAL DUCT causing acute or chronic inflammation of the lacrimal sac (DACRYOCYSTITIS). It is caused also in infants by failure of the nasolacrimal duct to open into the inferior meatus and occurs about the third week of life. In adults occlusion may occur spontaneously or after injury or nasal disease. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p250)
Catheters inserted into the URINARY BLADDER or kidney for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes.
Infections resulting from the use of catheters. Proper aseptic technique, site of catheter placement, material composition, and virulence of the organism are all factors that can influence possible infection.
Methods of creating machines and devices.
Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.
Chronic ESOPHAGITIS characterized by esophageal mucosal EOSINOPHILIA. It is diagnosed when an increase in EOSINOPHILS are present over the entire esophagus. The reflux symptoms fail to respond to PROTON PUMP INHIBITORS treatment, unlike in GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE. The symptoms are associated with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to food or inhalant allergens.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
A stricture of the ESOPHAGUS. Most are acquired but can be congenital.
Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.
INFLAMMATION, acute or chronic, of the ESOPHAGUS caused by BACTERIA, chemicals, or TRAUMA.

Risk factors for peripherally inserted central venous catheter complications in children. (1/4)

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Interventional nephrology: Catheter dysfunction--prevention and troubleshooting. (2/4)

 (+info)

Disconnection of the rubber tip of arrow-trerotola percutaneous thrombolytic device. (3/4)

 (+info)

Evaluation of correlations between underlying disease and port complications. (4/4)

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Catheter obstruction is a medical condition that occurs when a catheter, a flexible tube used for draining or injecting fluids into body cavities or passages, becomes blocked and cannot function properly. The blockage can be caused by various factors such as the accumulation of debris, blood clots, or crystals, depending on the type of catheter and its location in the body.

For instance, an indwelling urinary catheter may become obstructed due to the formation of encrustations, which are mineral deposits that build up on the catheter surface over time. Similarly, a central venous catheter can get obstructed by a blood clot or a fibrin sheath, a layer of tissue that forms around the catheter and can eventually block the flow of fluids.

Catheter obstruction can lead to various complications, including infection, pain, and damage to surrounding tissues. Therefore, it is essential to identify and address the issue promptly by flushing the catheter, changing its position, or replacing it entirely, depending on the severity and cause of the obstruction.

Indwelling catheters, also known as Foley catheters, are medical devices that are inserted into the bladder to drain urine. They have a small balloon at the tip that is inflated with water once the catheter is in the correct position in the bladder, allowing it to remain in place and continuously drain urine. Indwelling catheters are typically used for patients who are unable to empty their bladders on their own, such as those who are bedridden or have nerve damage that affects bladder function. They are also used during and after certain surgical procedures. Prolonged use of indwelling catheters can increase the risk of urinary tract infections and other complications.

Equipment failure is a term used in the medical field to describe the malfunction or breakdown of medical equipment, devices, or systems that are essential for patient care. This can include simple devices like syringes and thermometers, as well as complex machines such as ventilators, infusion pumps, and imaging equipment.

Equipment failure can have serious consequences for patients, including delayed or inappropriate treatment, injury, or even death. It is therefore essential that medical equipment is properly maintained, tested, and repaired to ensure its safe and effective operation.

There are many potential causes of equipment failure, including:

* Wear and tear from frequent use
* Inadequate cleaning or disinfection
* Improper handling or storage
* Power supply issues
* Software glitches or bugs
* Mechanical failures or defects
* Human error or misuse

To prevent equipment failure, healthcare facilities should have established policies and procedures for the acquisition, maintenance, and disposal of medical equipment. Staff should be trained in the proper use and handling of equipment, and regular inspections and testing should be performed to identify and address any potential issues before they lead to failure.

A catheter is a flexible tube that can be inserted into the body to treat various medical conditions or to perform certain medical procedures. Catheters are used to drain fluids, deliver medications, or provide access to different parts of the body for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. They come in various sizes and materials, depending on their intended use.

In a general sense, catheters can be classified into two main categories:

1. **External catheters:** These are applied to the outside of the body and are commonly used for urinary drainage. For example, a condom catheter is an external collection device that fits over the penis to drain urine into a bag. Similarly, a Texas or Foley catheter can be used in females, where a small tube is inserted into the urethra and inflated with a balloon to keep it in place.
2. **Internal catheters:** These are inserted into the body through various openings or surgical incisions. They have different applications based on their placement:
* **Urinary catheters:** Used for bladder drainage, similar to external catheters but inserted through the urethra.
* **Vascular catheters:** Inserted into veins or arteries to administer medication, fluids, or to perform diagnostic tests like angiography.
* **Cardiovascular catheters:** Used in procedures such as cardiac catheterization to diagnose and treat heart conditions.
* **Neurological catheters:** Placed in the cerebrospinal fluid spaces of the brain or spinal cord for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes, like draining excess fluid or delivering medication.
* **Gastrointestinal catheters:** Used to provide enteral nutrition, drain fluids, or perform procedures within the gastrointestinal tract.

Proper care and maintenance of catheters are crucial to prevent infection and other complications. Patients with indwelling catheters should follow their healthcare provider's instructions for cleaning, handling, and monitoring the catheter site.

Intestinal obstruction, also known as bowel obstruction, is a medical condition characterized by a blockage that prevents the normal flow of contents through the small intestine or large intestine (colon). This blockage can be caused by various factors such as tumors, adhesions (scar tissue), hernias, inflammation, or impacted feces.

The obstruction can be mechanical, where something physically blocks the intestinal lumen, or functional, where the normal muscular contractions of the bowel are impaired. Mechanical obstructions are more common than functional ones.

Symptoms of intestinal obstruction may include abdominal pain and cramping, nausea and vomiting, bloating, inability to pass gas or have a bowel movement, and abdominal distention. If left untreated, intestinal obstruction can lead to serious complications such as tissue death (necrosis), perforation of the intestine, and sepsis. Treatment typically involves hospitalization, intravenous fluids, nasogastric decompression, and possibly surgery to remove the obstruction.

Airway obstruction is a medical condition that occurs when the normal flow of air into and out of the lungs is partially or completely blocked. This blockage can be caused by a variety of factors, including swelling of the tissues in the airway, the presence of foreign objects or substances, or abnormal growths such as tumors.

When the airway becomes obstructed, it can make it difficult for a person to breathe normally. They may experience symptoms such as shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing, and chest tightness. In severe cases, airway obstruction can lead to respiratory failure and other life-threatening complications.

There are several types of airway obstruction, including:

1. Upper airway obstruction: This occurs when the blockage is located in the upper part of the airway, such as the nose, throat, or voice box.
2. Lower airway obstruction: This occurs when the blockage is located in the lower part of the airway, such as the trachea or bronchi.
3. Partial airway obstruction: This occurs when the airway is partially blocked, allowing some air to flow in and out of the lungs.
4. Complete airway obstruction: This occurs when the airway is completely blocked, preventing any air from flowing into or out of the lungs.

Treatment for airway obstruction depends on the underlying cause of the condition. In some cases, removing the obstruction may be as simple as clearing the airway of foreign objects or mucus. In other cases, more invasive treatments such as surgery may be necessary.

Ureteral obstruction is a medical condition characterized by the partial or complete blockage of the ureter, which is the tube that carries urine from the kidney to the bladder. This blockage can be caused by various factors such as kidney stones, tumors, blood clots, or scar tissue, leading to a backup of urine in the kidney (hydronephrosis). Ureteral obstruction can cause pain, infection, and potential kidney damage if not treated promptly.

Catheterization is a medical procedure in which a catheter (a flexible tube) is inserted into the body to treat various medical conditions or for diagnostic purposes. The specific definition can vary depending on the area of medicine and the particular procedure being discussed. Here are some common types of catheterization:

1. Urinary catheterization: This involves inserting a catheter through the urethra into the bladder to drain urine. It is often performed to manage urinary retention, monitor urine output in critically ill patients, or assist with surgical procedures.
2. Cardiac catheterization: A procedure where a catheter is inserted into a blood vessel, usually in the groin or arm, and guided to the heart. This allows for various diagnostic tests and treatments, such as measuring pressures within the heart chambers, assessing blood flow, or performing angioplasty and stenting of narrowed coronary arteries.
3. Central venous catheterization: A catheter is inserted into a large vein, typically in the neck, chest, or groin, to administer medications, fluids, or nutrition, or to monitor central venous pressure.
4. Peritoneal dialysis catheterization: A catheter is placed into the abdominal cavity for individuals undergoing peritoneal dialysis, a type of kidney replacement therapy.
5. Neurological catheterization: In some cases, a catheter may be inserted into the cerebrospinal fluid space (lumbar puncture) or the brain's ventricular system (ventriculostomy) to diagnose or treat various neurological conditions.

These are just a few examples of catheterization procedures in medicine. The specific definition and purpose will depend on the medical context and the particular organ or body system involved.

Central venous catheterization is a medical procedure in which a flexible tube called a catheter is inserted into a large vein in the body, usually in the neck (internal jugular vein), chest (subclavian vein), or groin (femoral vein). The catheter is threaded through the vein until it reaches a central location, such as the superior vena cava or the right atrium of the heart.

Central venous catheterization may be performed for several reasons, including:

1. To administer medications, fluids, or nutritional support directly into the bloodstream.
2. To monitor central venous pressure (CVP), which can help assess a patient's volume status and cardiac function.
3. To draw blood samples for laboratory tests.
4. To deliver chemotherapy drugs or other medications that may be harmful to peripheral veins.
5. To provide access for hemodialysis or other long-term therapies.

The procedure requires careful attention to sterile technique to minimize the risk of infection, and it is usually performed under local anesthesia with sedation or general anesthesia. Complications of central venous catheterization may include bleeding, infection, pneumothorax (collapsed lung), arterial puncture, and catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI).

Duodenal obstruction is a medical condition characterized by the blockage or impediment of the normal flow of contents through the duodenum, which is the first part of the small intestine. This blockage can be partial or complete and can be caused by various factors such as:

1. Congenital abnormalities: Duodenal atresia or stenosis, where there is a congenital absence or narrowing of a portion of the duodenum.
2. Inflammatory conditions: Duodenitis, Crohn's disease, or tumors that cause swelling and inflammation in the duodenum.
3. Mechanical obstructions: Gallstones, tumors, strictures, or adhesions (scar tissue) from previous surgeries can physically block the duodenum.
4. Neuromuscular disorders: Conditions like progressive systemic sclerosis or amyloidosis that affect the neuromuscular function of the intestines can lead to duodenal obstruction.

Symptoms of duodenal obstruction may include nausea, vomiting (often with bilious or fecal matter), abdominal pain, distention, and decreased bowel movements. Diagnosis typically involves imaging studies such as X-rays, CT scans, or upper gastrointestinal series to visualize the blockage. Treatment depends on the underlying cause but may involve surgery, endoscopic procedures, or medications to manage symptoms and address the obstruction.

Urethral obstruction is a medical condition that refers to a blockage in the urethra, which is the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body. This blockage can be partial or complete and can be caused by various factors such as scar tissue, stones, tumors, or enlarged prostate gland in men. Symptoms may include difficulty in urinating, painful urination, frequent urination, and urinary retention. If left untreated, urethral obstruction can lead to serious complications such as kidney damage or infection.

Urinary bladder neck obstruction is a medical condition that refers to a partial or complete blockage at the bladder neck, which is the area where the bladder connects to the urethra. This obstruction can be caused by various factors such as prostate enlargement, bladder tumors, scar tissue, or nerve damage.

The bladder neck obstruction can lead to difficulty in urinating, a weak urine stream, and the need to strain while urinating. In severe cases, it can cause urinary retention, kidney failure, and other complications. Treatment for this condition depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, surgery, or minimally invasive procedures.

Nasal obstruction is a medical condition that refers to any blockage or restriction in the normal flow of air through the nasal passages. This can be caused by various factors such as inflammation, swelling, or physical abnormalities in the nasal cavity. Common causes of nasal obstruction include allergies, sinusitis, deviated septum, enlarged turbinates, and nasal polyps. Symptoms may include difficulty breathing through the nose, nasal congestion, and nasal discharge. Treatment options depend on the underlying cause and may include medications, surgery, or lifestyle changes.

Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is a medical condition that refers to the blockage of the passage from the stomach to the small intestine, also known as the pylorus. This blockage can be caused by various factors, including tumors, scar tissue, or gallstones. As a result, food and digestive enzymes cannot pass through the pylorus into the small intestine, leading to symptoms such as vomiting, abdominal pain, bloating, and weight loss. In severe cases, GOO can lead to malnutrition, dehydration, and other complications if left untreated. Treatment options for GOO depend on the underlying cause of the obstruction and may include medication, endoscopic procedures, or surgery.

Ventricular outflow obstruction is a term used in cardiology to describe a condition where there is an obstruction or narrowing in the flow of blood as it exits the heart's ventricles (the lower chambers of the heart). This obstruction can occur due to various reasons such as congenital heart defects, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or calcification of the aortic valve.

In a normal heart, the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the aorta through the aortic valve, and the right ventricle pumps deoxygenated blood into the pulmonary artery through the pulmonic valve. Any obstruction in these outflow tracts can lead to increased pressure within the ventricles, which can result in various symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, dizziness, or fatigue.

The severity of the obstruction and the resulting symptoms can vary depending on the location and extent of the narrowing. Treatment options may include medications, surgical procedures, or catheter-based interventions to alleviate the obstruction and improve blood flow.

Central venous catheters (CVCs) are medical devices used to access the central venous system, typically placed in one of the large great veins such as the internal jugular, subclavian, or femoral vein. They can be used for a variety of purposes including administration of medications and fluids, monitoring central venous pressure, and obtaining blood samples. CVCs come in different types, such as non-tunneled, tunneled, and implantable ports, each with its own specific indications and uses. Proper placement and maintenance of CVCs are crucial to prevent complications such as infection, thrombosis, and catheter-related bloodstream infections.

Urinary catheterization is a medical procedure in which a flexible tube (catheter) is inserted into the bladder through the urethra to drain urine. This may be done to manage urinary retention, monitor urine output, or obtain a urine sample for laboratory testing. It can be performed as a clean, intermittent catheterization, or with an indwelling catheter (also known as Foley catheter) that remains in place for a longer period of time. The procedure should be performed using sterile technique to reduce the risk of urinary tract infection.

Peripheral catheterization is a medical procedure that involves the insertion of a thin, flexible tube (catheter) into a peripheral vein, which is a blood vessel located outside of the chest and abdomen. This type of catheterization is typically performed to administer medications, fluids, or nutritional support, or to monitor various physiological parameters such as central venous pressure.

Peripheral catheters are usually inserted into veins in the hands or arms, although they can also be placed in other peripheral veins. The procedure is typically performed using aseptic technique to minimize the risk of infection. Once the catheter is in place, it may be secured with a dressing or suture to prevent movement and dislodgement.

Peripheral catheterization is a relatively safe and common procedure that is routinely performed in hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare settings. However, like any medical procedure, it carries a small risk of complications such as infection, bleeding, or damage to the vein or surrounding tissues.

A cardiac catheter is a thin, flexible tube that is inserted into the heart or adjacent blood vessels during a cardiac catheterization procedure. This procedure is typically performed to diagnose and treat various cardiovascular conditions such as heart disease, heart defects, or abnormal heart rhythms.

Cardiac catheters can be used for several purposes:

1. To measure the pressure and oxygen levels in different chambers of the heart and blood vessels.
2. To inject dye into the coronary arteries to visualize blockages or narrowing through angiography.
3. To perform interventions such as balloon angioplasty, stent placement, or valvuloplasty to open up blocked or narrowed blood vessels or repair damaged heart valves.
4. To collect samples of heart muscle tissue for biopsy, which can help diagnose conditions like cardiomyopathy or myocarditis.

There are various types of cardiac catheters, including:

1. Diagnostic catheters - used to measure pressure and oxygen levels in the heart and blood vessels.
2. Guiding catheters - used to guide other interventional devices like balloons or stents into place.
3. Angioplasty balloon catheters - used to inflate a balloon at the tip of the catheter, which helps open up blocked or narrowed blood vessels.
4. Thermodilution catheters - used to measure cardiac output and other hemodynamic parameters.
5. Microcatheters - smaller, more flexible catheters used for complex interventions or accessing difficult-to-reach areas of the heart and blood vessels.

Cardiac catheterization is a minimally invasive procedure that usually requires only local anesthesia and mild sedation. The recovery time is typically short, with most patients returning home within 24 hours after the procedure.

Lacrimal duct obstruction is a blockage in the lacrimal duct, which is the passageway that drains tears from the eye into the nose. This condition can cause excessive tearing, pain, and swelling in the affected eye. In some cases, it may also lead to recurrent eye infections or inflammation. The obstruction can be caused by various factors such as age-related changes, injury, infection, inflammation, or congenital abnormalities. Treatment options for lacrimal duct obstruction depend on the underlying cause and severity of the condition and may include medications, minor surgical procedures, or more invasive surgeries.

A urinary catheter is a flexible tube that is inserted into the bladder to drain urine. It can be made of rubber, plastic, or latex and comes in various sizes and lengths. The catheter can be inserted through the urethra (the tube that carries urine out of the body from the bladder) and is called a Foley catheter or an indwelling catheter. A straight catheter, on the other hand, is inserted through the urethra and removed after it has drained the urine.

Urinary catheters are used in various medical situations, such as when a person is unable to empty their bladder due to surgery, anesthesia, medication, or conditions that affect bladder function. They may also be used for long-term management of urinary incontinence or to drain the bladder during certain medical procedures.

It's important to note that the use of urinary catheters carries a risk of complications, such as urinary tract infections, bladder spasms, and injury to the urethra or bladder. Therefore, they should only be used when necessary and under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Catheter-related infections are infections that occur due to the presence of a catheter, a flexible tube that is inserted into the body to perform various medical functions such as draining urine or administering medication. These infections can affect any part of the body where a catheter is inserted, including the bladder, bloodstream, heart, and lungs.

The most common type of catheter-related infection is a catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), which occurs when bacteria enter the urinary tract through the catheter and cause an infection. Symptoms of CAUTI may include fever, chills, pain or burning during urination, and cloudy or foul-smelling urine.

Other types of catheter-related infections include catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI), which can occur when bacteria enter the bloodstream through the catheter, and catheter-related pulmonary infections, which can occur when secretions from the respiratory tract enter the lungs through a catheter.

Catheter-related infections are a significant concern in healthcare settings, as they can lead to serious complications such as sepsis, organ failure, and even death. Proper catheter insertion and maintenance techniques, as well as regular monitoring for signs of infection, can help prevent these types of infections.

Equipment design, in the medical context, refers to the process of creating and developing medical equipment and devices, such as surgical instruments, diagnostic machines, or assistive technologies. This process involves several stages, including:

1. Identifying user needs and requirements
2. Concept development and brainstorming
3. Prototyping and testing
4. Design for manufacturing and assembly
5. Safety and regulatory compliance
6. Verification and validation
7. Training and support

The goal of equipment design is to create safe, effective, and efficient medical devices that meet the needs of healthcare providers and patients while complying with relevant regulations and standards. The design process typically involves a multidisciplinary team of engineers, clinicians, designers, and researchers who work together to develop innovative solutions that improve patient care and outcomes.

"Foreign bodies" refer to any object or substance that is not normally present in a particular location within the body. These can range from relatively harmless items such as splinters or pieces of food in the skin or gastrointestinal tract, to more serious objects like bullets or sharp instruments that can cause significant damage and infection.

Foreign bodies can enter the body through various routes, including ingestion, inhalation, injection, or penetrating trauma. The location of the foreign body will determine the potential for harm and the necessary treatment. Some foreign bodies may pass through the body without causing harm, while others may require medical intervention such as removal or surgical extraction.

It is important to seek medical attention if a foreign body is suspected, as untreated foreign bodies can lead to complications such as infection, inflammation, and tissue damage.

Eosinophilic esophagagitis (EE) is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder characterized by symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction and eosinophil-predominant inflammation. It's typically diagnosed through endoscopic biopsy that reveals more than 15 eosinophils per high power field in the esophagus, despite treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell that play an important role in the body's immune response. In EE, these cells accumulate in the esophagus and cause inflammation, leading to symptoms such as difficulty swallowing (dysphagia), food impaction, chest pain, heartburn, and regurgitation.

The disorder is often associated with other atopic conditions, such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema. Treatment typically involves a combination of dietary modifications, medications (such as proton pump inhibitors or corticosteroids), and esophageal dilation in cases where there is stricture formation.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

The esophagus is the muscular tube that connects the throat (pharynx) to the stomach. It is located in the midline of the neck and chest, passing through the diaphragm to enter the abdomen and join the stomach. The main function of the esophagus is to transport food and liquids from the mouth to the stomach for digestion.

The esophagus has a few distinct parts: the upper esophageal sphincter (a ring of muscle that separates the esophagus from the throat), the middle esophagus, and the lower esophageal sphincter (another ring of muscle that separates the esophagus from the stomach). The lower esophageal sphincter relaxes to allow food and liquids to enter the stomach and then contracts to prevent stomach contents from flowing back into the esophagus.

The walls of the esophagus are made up of several layers, including mucosa (a moist tissue that lines the inside of the tube), submucosa (a layer of connective tissue), muscle (both voluntary and involuntary types), and adventitia (an outer layer of connective tissue).

Common conditions affecting the esophagus include gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett's esophagus, esophageal cancer, esophageal strictures, and eosinophilic esophagitis.

Esophageal stenosis is a medical condition characterized by the narrowing or constriction of the esophagus, which is the muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach. This narrowing can make it difficult to swallow food and liquids, leading to symptoms such as dysphagia (difficulty swallowing), pain or discomfort while swallowing, regurgitation, and weight loss.

Esophageal stenosis can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

1. Scarring or fibrosis due to prolonged acid reflux or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
2. Radiation therapy for cancer treatment
3. Ingestion of corrosive substances
4. Eosinophilic esophagitis, an allergic condition that affects the esophagus
5. Esophageal tumors or cancers
6. Surgical complications

Depending on the underlying cause and severity of the stenosis, treatment options may include medications to manage symptoms, dilation procedures to widen the narrowed area, or surgery to remove the affected portion of the esophagus. It is important to seek medical attention if you experience any difficulty swallowing or other symptoms related to esophageal stenosis.

A medical definition of 'food' would be:

"Substances consumed by living organisms, usually in the form of meals, which contain necessary nutrients such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water. These substances are broken down during digestion to provide energy, build and repair tissues, and regulate bodily functions."

It's important to note that while this is a medical definition, it also aligns with common understanding of what food is.

Esophagitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation and irritation of the esophageal lining, which is the muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach. This inflammation can cause symptoms such as difficulty swallowing, chest pain, heartburn, and acid reflux.

Esophagitis can be caused by various factors, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), infection, allergies, medications, and chronic vomiting. Prolonged exposure to stomach acid can also cause esophagitis, leading to a condition called reflux esophagitis.

If left untreated, esophagitis can lead to complications such as strictures, ulcers, and Barrett's esophagus, which is a precancerous condition that increases the risk of developing esophageal cancer. Treatment for esophagitis typically involves addressing the underlying cause, managing symptoms, and protecting the esophageal lining to promote healing.

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This is done to drain accumulated cerebrospinal fluid either through a temporary catheter or a permanent shunt. Other diseases ... This allows the cerebrospinal fluid to flow directly to the basal cisterns, thereby bypassing any obstruction. A surgical ...
... experimental approach is the recanalization of the ejaculatory ducts by transrectal or transurethral inserted balloon catheter ... Ejaculatory duct obstruction must not be confused with an obstruction of the vas deferens. If both ejaculatory ducts are ... Ejaculatory duct obstruction (EDO) is a pathological condition which is characterized by the obstruction of one or both ... Ejaculatory duct obstruction is the underlying cause for 1-5% of male infertility. Since ejaculatory duct obstruction is a ...
Catheter obstruction is commonly observed with a central venous catheter. Currently, the standard treatment for catheter ... To treat blocked catheters, alteplase is administered directly into the catheter. In adults diagnosed with acute ischemic ... Alteplase can be used in small doses to clear blood clots that obstruct a catheter, reopening the catheter so it can continue ... Alteplase has been approved by the FDA, and treatment can be done via systemic thrombolysis or catheter-directed thrombolysis. ...
... dilatation with cutting balloon catheter followed by introduction of the pyeloplasty balloon catheter. This balloon is inflated ... Symptoms, less likely in chronic obstruction, are pain radiating to the T11 to T12 dermatomes, anuria, nocturia, or polyuria.[ ... Urine can drain through the central channel of this catheter. Definition: obstructive uropathy from Online Medical Dictionary. ... 71 (9): 491-3. doi:10.1016/S1726-4901(08)70155-2. PMID 18818145.[dead link] Treatment of ureteropelvic junction obstruction ...
"Catheter interventional treatment of Sano shunt obstruction in patients following modified Norwood palliation for hypoplastic ...
It is clinically important because it is often an obstruction to catheters in 20% of patients. "valve of Vieussens". ...
A functional obstruction at the lower end of the ureter leads to progressive dilatation and a tendency to infection. The ... ureteric orifice appears normal and a ureteric catheter passes easily.[citation needed] Definitive surgical treatment involves ...
... of the eustachian tube using balloon catheter has gained attention as a method of treating eustachian tube obstruction. There ... Tarabichi M, Najmi M (November 2015). "Site of eustachian tube obstruction in chronic ear disease". The Laryngoscope. 125 (11 ... Four subtypes have been described: Anatomic obstruction within the proximal cartilaginous eustachian tube. Dilatory Eustachian ... are two methods of performing this procedure depending on the route of the catheter introduction and the area of the Eustachian ...
... catheter obstruction, and device malfunction. In one study, the most likely cause for device removals was due to infectious ... A catheter connected to a subcutaneous reservoir is implanted for permanent access in humans. The reservoir used is most ... Of the noninfectious complications, the most frequently reported were CSF leaks, hemorrhage, catheter malposition, ... a catheter-based device can be implanted. These devices are connected to a subcutaneous reservoir, the most common being the ...
Renal failure and uremia will follow within 36-48 hours of complete urethral obstruction. The time from complete obstruction ... Gentle mechanical manipulation of a penis may dislodge the blockage, or a catheter might be used to drain the bladder. ... However, they can pose the risk of urethral obstruction if they accumulate in the bladder and are allowed to clump together to ... Even if there is no crystal formation, a thick protein matrix may cause urethral obstruction by itself though this is seen more ...
TPN dependent patients require frequent checkups to monitor catheter function, check liver enzyme levels, and evaluate for ... Bowel obstruction: mechanical or functional obstruction of the bowel, most commonly due to adhesions, hernias or neoplasms. ... Mechanical causes of intestinal obstruction must be excluded to reach a diagnosis of pseudo-obstruction. Attempts must also be ... Intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO) is a clinical syndrome caused by severe impairment in the ability of the intestines to push ...
Bowel obstruction For medication management, hydration, and symptom control when the oral route is not viable due to total ... The Macy Catheter is intended to provide rectal access to administer liquids and medications. The Macy Catheter can be used in ... Many oral forms of medications can be crushed and suspended in water to be given via the Macy Catheter. The Macy Catheter is ... The Macy Catheter is a specialized catheter designed to provide comfortable and discreet administration of ongoing medications ...
... dilation of the eustachian tube using balloon catheter has gained attention as a method of treating eustachian tube obstruction ... There are two methods of performing this procedure depending on the route of the catheter introduction and the area of the ... Muaaz Tarabichi pioneered the transtympanic (ear) introduction of the balloon catheter and the dilatation of the proximal part ... Tarabichi, Muaaz; Najmi, Murtaza (November 2015). "Site of eustachian tube obstruction in chronic ear disease: Site of ...
Ureteropelvic junction obstruction (also called UPJ obstruction or Pelvic-ureteric junction obstruction PUJO) caused by ... To remove the catheter after several weeks the balloon is deflated by snipping the distal end of the catheter. The catheter can ... A ureteric balloon catheter is a balloon catheter intended for treating strictures of the ureter. In fact it is a double J ... The catheter has a relatively large-diameter central lumen and a shaft of 2 mm (6 Fr.). The balloon is in two sections: a long ...
If there is catheter obstruction, thrombolytic drugs can be used if the obstruction is caused by clots or fibrin deposition. ... An implanted central venous catheter, also called a port a "cath" or "port-a-cath", is similar to a tunneled catheter, but is ... Venous catheters may occasionally become occluded by kinks in the catheter, backwash of blood into the catheter leading to ... Commonly used catheters include Quinton catheters. A peripherally inserted central catheter, or PICC line (pronounced "pick"), ...
... or for obstruction of urine flow within the catheter tube. Urine flow is blocked. The Foley catheter must be discarded and ... Councill tip catheters have a small hole at the tip so they can be passed over a wire. Three-way, or triple lumen catheters ... Foley catheters are also used in abdominal surgery. Indwelling urinary catheters should not be used to monitor stable people ... In urology, a Foley catheter is a brand name for one of many brands of urinary catheters (UC). Foleys and their namesakes are ...
The end with the catheter is placed in the third ventricle to drain the excess CSF and the other end is placed in the ... In utero infection or infection during infancy could both result in glial cell build-up to make an obstruction. It is generally ... An extracranial shunt is essentially a sturdy tube with a catheter on one end to drain the third ventricle. The shunt also has ... The following treatment methods are not used for aqueductal stenosis caused by tumor compression; if the obstruction is a ...
The guide wire guides the balloon catheter to the obstruction where the catheter is inflated to press the plaque against the ... Teflon is commonly used to reduce friction in biomaterial applications such as in arterial grafts, catheters, and guide wire ... The guide wire is threaded up through the femoral artery to the obstruction. ...
An MR venogram is also performed in most cases to exclude the possibility of venous sinus stenosis/obstruction or cerebral ... These stenoses can be more adequately identified and assessed with catheter cerebral venography and manometry. Buckling of the ... or obstruction of the veins that drain blood from the brain. The first theory, that of increased production of cerebrospinal ... it may be necessary to perform more long-term monitoring of the ICP by a pressure catheter. The original criteria for IIH were ...
The most easily treatable cause is obstruction of urine flow, which is often solved by insertion of a urinary catheter into the ... It may also occur because of some severe obstruction like kidney stones or tumours. It may occur with end stage kidney disease ... Stones or tumours in the urinary tract can also cause it by creating an obstruction to urinary flow. High blood calcium, ... Acute anuria, where the decline in urine production occurs quickly, is usually a sign of obstruction or acute kidney failure. ...
They can be placed in less than 15 minutes in a manner similar to Foley catheter placement. They can be easily removed, also in ... Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common cause, but obstruction may also occur acutely after treatment for BPH ... The prostatic stent is a completely internal device and can be inserted and removed as easily as a Foley catheter. It permits ... Some patients prefer a temporary stent to Foley catheter use. A temporary stent will not provide voiding function if the ...
A deflated balloon catheter is advanced into the obstructed artery and inflated to relieve the narrowing; certain devices such ... After a heart attack, it can be restricted to the culprit vessel (the one whose obstruction or thrombosis is suspected of ... Downsides to this approach include spasm of the artery and pain, inability to use larger catheters needed in some procedures, ... Interventional cardiology is a branch of cardiology that deals specifically with the catheter based treatment of structural ...
We report the case of a patient with SVC syndrome caused by tumoral obstruction due to central small-cell lung cancer who had ... Preserving previously placed central venous catheters (CVCs) is a major issue in this population. ... syndrome is a group of clinical signs caused by the obstruction or compression of SVC and characterized by edema of the head, ...
Acute small-bowel obstruction following mesenteric perforation by CAPD catheter. Lookup NU author(s): Dr Suren Kanagasundaram ...
... ... using a simple and inexpensive tubal insemination catheter was evaluated in 23 infertile patients with cornual obstruction ... encouraging its use in patients with cornual Fallopian tube obstruction either as the sole therapeutic approach or in ...
Other modalities rarely used now include removal of boluses using catheters,[unreliable medical source?] and the use of large- ... Endoscopes can be used to diagnose the cause of the food bolus obstruction, as well as to remove the obstruction. Traditional ... An esophageal food bolus obstruction is a medical emergency caused by the obstruction of the esophagus by an ingested foreign ... Food bolus obstruction is most commonly caused by Schatzki rings, which are mucosal rings of unknown cause in the lower ...
Achieving an adequate minute volume through a 2 mm transtracheal catheter in simulated upper airway obstruction using a ... The ineffectiveness and danger of using transtracheal jet ventilation in cases of complete upper airway obstruction motivated ... transtracheal catheter in a simulated obstructed airway. ...
Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) is a blockage at the base of the bladder. It reduces or stops the flow of urine into the ... Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) is a blockage at the base of the bladder. It reduces or stops the flow of urine into the ... Sometimes, a catheter is placed through the belly area into the bladder to drain the bladder. This is called a suprapubic tube. ... Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) is a blockage at the base of the bladder. It reduces or stops the flow of urine into the ...
Emergency surgery may be needed to treat a bowel obstruction if you have a complete blockage or if more conservative treatments ... a catheter to drain urine from your bladder. Takeaway. Bowel obstruction is a potentially life threatening condition. Its ... of small bowel obstructions are successfully treated with conservative methods. You may need bowel obstruction surgery if:. * ... Suspected bowel obstructions always need prompt medical attention. Surgery isnt always needed, but a bowel obstruction always ...
bladder outlet obstruction. *long-term use of a foley catheter, which drains urine from the bladder ...
... scan of the chest of a 53-year-old man showed obstruction of the superior vena cava secondary to the indwelling catheter (arrow ... larger diameter catheters with multiple lumens, peripherally inserted central catheters, catheter tip malposition, a history of ... 1,9 Central venous catheters should be used only when necessary, and the smallest catheters should be used, with removal when ... Incidence of catheter-related complications in patients with central venous or hemodialysis catheters: a health care claims ...
Complications of balloon catheter replacement include obstruction, ulcers, or intussusception. These are due to the tube ... CT scan showed a Foley catheter in the proximal jejunum without obstruction. The patient was admitted, kept NPO, given IV ... Despite having an inflated balloon, this patient did not have obstruction. Retrieval of the migrated catheter was achieved ... Morbidity of Foley catheter replacement of dislodged PEG tubes is sparse. They are a cheap and effective way to maintain a ...
... and/or stenting of venous obstructions. In some cases, patients may also be given pulmonary embolism (PE) prophylaxis by means ... consists of thrombus removal with catheter-directed thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy, angioplasty, ... Stenting of iliac vein obstruction following catheter-directed thrombolysis in lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. Chin Med J ... Success Rates of Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis. Success rates with catheter-directed thrombolytics vary depending on the age ...
Percutaneous nephrostomy catheters - used to drain the kidneys, often to relieve an obstruction Fluid drainage system - enables ... an X-ray that uses a catheter and a contrast agent or X-ray dye to visualize arteries and veins Angioplasty - widens narrowed ... prevents renal hypertension by using a small balloon catheter to open arteries in the kidneys Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters ... uses a small balloon catheter to open blocked grafts so that hemodialysis or kidney failure treatment can be performed High ...
... Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections ... the catheter should be changed if it is likely that the catheter itself is contributing to the obstruction (e.g., formation of ... Condom catheter drainage may be useful for incontinent male patients without outlet obstruction and with an intact voiding ... Use smallest suitable bore catheter.. Avoid irrigation unless needed to prevent or relieve obstruction. Refrain from daily ...
persistent outlet obstruction can eventually decrease renal function and predispose to urinary infection;. - consequently these ... intermittent sterile catheterization, small caliber (12-14 Fr) catheter is used every 4-6 hours to maintain a bladder volume , ... if increased outlet resistance is secondary to physical obstruction or fails to respond to pharmacologic methods, surgery may ... increased outlet resistance due to bladder neck hypertrophy, prostatic obstruction or increased resistance of external ...
... , Superior Caval Vein Obstruction, Superior Vena Cava Occlusion, Superior Vena Cava Syndrome, SVC ... Consult for catheter directed Thrombolysis or thrombectomy in hemodynamically Unstable Patients ... Superior Vena Cava Obstruction. Superior Vena Cava Obstruction Aka: Superior Vena Cava Obstruction, Superior Caval Vein ... Superior Vena Cava Obstruction Compensation. *SVC is a thin walled, low pressure large vein 2 cm in width and 4-6 cm in ...
ButHowever, obstruction, retention of urine flow, and use of catheters increase the complexity. There are several bacteria (e.g ...
UTIs associated with microbial biofilms developed on catheters account for a high percentage of all nosocomial infections and ... Mobley, H.L.; Warren, J.W. Urease-positive bacteriuria and obstruction of long-term urinary catheters. J. Clin. Microbiol. 1987 ... E. faecalis attaches to fibrinogen-coated catheters and uses it for growth, enhancing biofilm development on the catheter [32]. ... Another antimicrobial approach for the prevention of biofilm-associated catheter development is bacteriophages. Catheters ...
Boston Scientific issued a class one recalled for its Fetch 2 Aspiration Catheters because they can break during surgery and ... This removes the obstruction and allows blood to flow more freely.. Boston Scientific issued the recall because of reports of ... Doctors use aspiration catheters such as the Fetch 2 to clear blood clots from coronary arteries in a procedure known as ... Home News FDA News & Recalls Boston Scientific Recalls Blood Clot Removal Catheters ...
Guideline for Prevention of Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (2009): recommendations and updates. ... If obstruction occurs and it is likely that the catheter material is contributing to obstruction, change the catheter.. IB. ... Management of Obstruction. Recommendations for Management of catheter obstruction by ID number and category.. #. Recommendation ... Number of bloodstream infections secondary to CAUTI per 1000 catheter-days. *Catheter utilization ratio: (urinary catheter days ...
uric acid , umbilical artery catheter. UAO. upper airway obstruction. UBD. universal blood donor. ...
Read about a urinary catheter, which is a flexible tube used to empty the bladder and collect urine in a drainage bag. ... Specific reasons a urinary catheter may be used include:. *to allow urine to drain if you have an obstruction in the tube that ... Read more about the types of urinary catheter.. Looking after your catheter. If you need a long-term urinary catheter, youll ... Types of urinary catheter. There are 2 main types of urinary catheter:. *intermittent catheters - these are temporarily ...
It is then removed - and the obstruction is gone.. Over the three years its been available, it has proved to provide continued ... But the best news may be the availability of a new 15-minute, catheter-free, outpatient procedure called iTind. A temporary ... Ignoring the symptoms can cause serious problems, including bladder and kidney failure, needing a catheter, or even dialysis, ...
Diagnosis of obstruction is usually based on an inability to advance a urethral catheter into the bladder. Your primary care ... Dogs with total urethral obstruction will die within days if the obstruction is not relieved. Your pet should be seen by a ... If the obstruction is caused by urinary tract calculi, your veterinarian will try to flush the stones back into the bladder, ... Recurrence of urethral obstruction by calculi is prevented by reducing the factors that cause stone formation. If your dog is a ...
Ventricular wall collapse, in small patients, resulting in obstruction of the catheter and predisposing to tentorial herniation ... Whenever irrigation of the catheter or the performance of the VPR is decided upon, great care must be used so that pressure ... The use of a lumbar catheter under these conditions for external drainage and monitoring is at the discretion of the physician. ... A double suture tie with silk suture should be used to secure the ventricular or lumbar catheter to the connection fitting. ...
... catheter position, inflammatory processes, and CSF overdrainage. Most respondents considered chronic CSF overdrainage to be a ... understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of shunt obstruction was highly variable and included growth, migration, or ... also believed that choroid plexus is the tissue most often found in obstructed proximal catheters. However, free-text responses ... RESULTS Respondents agreed that shunt malfunction occurs most often as the result of ventricular catheter obstruction. Despite ...
... regardless of underlying etiology but may result in premature removal of indwelling catheters in cats with urethral obstruction ... The catheter is sutured to the prepuce, sutures are placed around the catheter, and waterproof tape is placed over the ... Catheter type and placement may also affect incidence of and risk for trauma. The rigidity of polypropylene catheters can make ... 1. Inflammation/Stricture Caused by Indwelling Urinary Catheters Urinary catheters are made from a variety of materials, ...
Guideline for Prevention of Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (2009): recommendations and updates. ... If obstruction occurs and it is likely that the catheter material is contributing to obstruction, change the catheter.. IB. ... Management of Obstruction. Recommendations for Management of catheter obstruction by ID number and category.. #. Recommendation ... Number of bloodstream infections secondary to CAUTI per 1000 catheter-days. *Catheter utilization ratio: (urinary catheter days ...
A urinary catheter would then be utilized to alleviate the urethral obstruction and remove urine from the bladder. It is ... If your pet is diagnosed with a urethral obstruction, immediate urethral catheterization to relieve the obstruction is required ... Urethral obstructions are life-threatening if they are not treated immediately.. For pets that have not defecated, contact your ... Urinary blockage (urethral obstruction) is particularly common in male cats, but can be experienced by any animal. ...
Obstruction of sinus drainage. Obstruction of the natural sinus ostia prevents normal mucus drainage. The ostia can be blocked ... Finally, sinusitis in intensive care settings is associated with nasal catheter placement. ... Mechanical obstruction because of nasal polyps, foreign bodies, deviated septa, or tumors can also lead to ostial blockage. In ... Cases in which the cause is obstruction are usually evident and can include the presence of prolonged nasogastric or ...
  • Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) is a blockage at the base of the bladder. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Consider using external catheters as an alternative to indwelling urethral catheters in cooperative male patients without urinary retention or bladder outlet obstruction. (cdc.gov)
  • Further research is needed on the benefit of using a urethral stent as an alternative to an indwelling catheter in selected patients with bladder outlet obstruction. (cdc.gov)
  • In communicative patients, a marked urge to void suggests outlet obstruction, whereas thirst and no urge to void suggest volume depletion. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Palpable bladder distention indicates an outlet obstruction. (msdmanuals.com)
  • ERCP cannot be performed if a gastric outlet obstruction or a previous surgical anastomosis (eg, gastrojejunostomy) cannot be crossed. (medscape.com)
  • The use of a ventricular or lumbar drainage catheter, or a Duet™ EDMS, is contraindicated where trained personnel are not available to supervise monitoring and drainage on a 24-hour-a-day basis. (medtronic.com)
  • The global cerebrospinal fluid drainage catheter market size was valued at USD 257.34 million in 2020 and is expected to expand at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 4.5% from 2021 to 2028. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • In this Daily Rounds, Dr. Alyssa recounts a time she had trouble placing a urinary catheter in a blocked cat. (cliniciansbrief.com)
  • No complications were reported, The results of this study emphasize the ease, cost effectiveness and safety of this method, encouraging its use in patients with cornual Fallopian tube obstruction either as the sole therapeutic approach or in association with other assisted conception treatment alternatives. (unifesp.br)
  • When considering esophageal dilation to treat a patient with food bolus obstruction, care must be made to look for features of eosinophilic esophagitis, as these patients are at a higher risk of dilation-associated complications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Keep reading to learn more about the survival rates of bowel obstruction surgery and factors that increase the risk of severe complications. (healthline.com)
  • People who require emergency bowel obstruction surgery tend to have a relatively high chance of death or complications either during surgery or shortly after. (healthline.com)
  • Complications of balloon catheter replacement include obstruction, ulcers, or intussusception. (sages.org)
  • The lower circulating drug levels are the suggested mechanism for the lower incidence of systemic and, in particular, intracranial hemorrhagic complications reported with catheter-directed thrombolysis. (medscape.com)
  • All reports of shaft breakage happened during the procedure, and the broken section was either removed while still partially attached to the catheter shaft or retrieved with a snare, without further patient complications," Boston Scientific said in a statement. (drugwatch.com)
  • This will include advice about getting new catheter supplies, reducing the risk of complications such as infections, spotting signs of potential problems, and when you should get medical advice. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Further research is needed on the risks and benefits of suprapubic catheters as an alternative to indwelling urethral catheters in selected patients requiring short- or long-term catheterization, particularly with respect to complications related to catheter insertion or the catheter site. (cdc.gov)
  • 1,2 Indwelling catheters are commonly used but are associated with complications (incidence, up to 50%) that should be prevented and monitored. (cliniciansbrief.com)
  • Following are the top 5 complications associated with indwelling urinary catheters, according to the author. (cliniciansbrief.com)
  • 3 The ideal catheter material is unknown, but minimization of inflammation, trauma, and complications should be considered during catheter selection. (cliniciansbrief.com)
  • Complications occurred in 26 infants (36%), including intravenous catheter sepsis (n = 15), pneumatosis (n = 2), pneumonia (n = 1), bowel obstruction (n = 7), wound infection (n = 5), and SVC thrombosis (n = 1). (nih.gov)
  • A total of 47 complications occurred in the complex group including catheter sepsis (n = 15), short bowel syndrome (n = 7), pneumatosis (n = 3), bowel obstruction (n = 4), pneumonia (n = 2), superior vena cava thrombosis (n = 1), enterocutaneous fistula (n = 1), and 9 deaths (28% mortality rate). (nih.gov)
  • They can either be inserted through the tube that carries urine out of the bladder (urethral catheter) or through a small opening made in your lower tummy (suprapubic catheter). (www.nhs.uk)
  • Intermittent catheterization is preferable to indwelling urethral or suprapubic catheters in patients with bladder emptying dysfunction. (cdc.gov)
  • The suprapubic tray is used for outflow obstruction, chronic retention, urethral trauma, urethral obstruction or fistula and pre/post operative bladder drainage as prescribed by a physician. (bd.com)
  • The suprapubic tray includes introducer, stylet, collection bag and pre-filled catheter inflation syringe. (bd.com)
  • The Benefits of Suprapubic Malecot Catheters Over Foley Catheters - Medical innovation has continuously evolved to enhance patient care and comfort, particularly in urology. (powershow.com)
  • One such innovation that has gained recognition in recent years is the suprapubic malecot catheters. (powershow.com)
  • In this blog, we will explore the benefits of suprapubic malecot catheters and why they are gaining popularity in urological care. (powershow.com)
  • The use of a ventricular catheter is contraindicated if scalp infection is present. (medtronic.com)
  • Respondents agreed that shunt malfunction occurs most often as the result of ventricular catheter obstruction. (thejns.org)
  • Patients who require chronic indwelling catheters or individuals who can be managed with intermittent catheterization may have different needs. (cdc.gov)
  • The risk of acquiring a urinary tract infection depends on the method and duration of catheterization, the quality of catheter care, and host susceptibility. (cdc.gov)
  • Reported infection rates vary widely, ranging from 1%-5%, after a single brief catheterization (3) to virtually 100% for patients with indwelling urethral catheters draining into an open system for longer than 4 days (4). (cdc.gov)
  • Minimize urinary catheter use and duration of use in all patients, particularly those at higher risk for CAUTI or mortality from catheterization such as women, the elderly, and patients with impaired immunity. (cdc.gov)
  • Consider alternatives to chronic indwelling catheters, such as intermittent catheterization, in spinal cord injury patients. (cdc.gov)
  • 9 The catheter should be removed if there is acute onset or clinical worsening of hematuria during indwelling catheterization. (cliniciansbrief.com)
  • When patients present with urethral obstruction, there is tendency to want to immediately attempt urethral catheterization and try to relieve the obstruction, and then perform diagnostic tests, rather than the other way around . (vin.com)
  • The effectiveness of selective tubal cannulation using a simple and inexpensive tubal insemination catheter was evaluated in 23 infertile patients with cornual obstruction demonstrated by hysterosalpingography. (unifesp.br)
  • Percutaneous transcatheter treatment of patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) consists of thrombus removal with catheter-directed thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy, angioplasty, and/or stenting of venous obstructions. (medscape.com)
  • The following recommendations were developed for the care of patients with temporary indwelling urethral catheters. (cdc.gov)
  • Determination of the optimal catheter care for these and other patients with different drainage systems requires separate evaluation. (cdc.gov)
  • Such infection in otherwise healthy patients is often asymptomatic and is likely to resolve spontaneously with the removal of the catheter. (cdc.gov)
  • Intracranial pressure monitoring with a ventricular or lumbar catheter is contraindicated in patients receiving anticoagulants or who are known to have a bleeding diathesis. (medtronic.com)
  • Avoid use of urinary catheters in patients and nursing home residents for management of incontinence. (cdc.gov)
  • Further research is needed on periodic (e.g., nighttime) use of external catheters (e.g., condom catheters) in incontinent patients or residents and the use of catheters to prevent skin breakdown. (cdc.gov)
  • Use urinary catheters in operative patients only as necessary, rather than routinely. (cdc.gov)
  • For operative patients who have an indication for an indwelling catheter, remove the catheter as soon as possible postoperatively, preferably within 24 hours, unless there are appropriate indications for continued use. (cdc.gov)
  • Ensure that only properly trained persons (e.g., hospital personnel, family members, or patients themselves) who know the correct technique of aseptic catheter insertion and maintenance are given this responsibility. (cdc.gov)
  • 1 Indwelling urinary catheters allow for continuous urine collection and output assessment, as well as management of patients with urinary obstruction or bladder dysfunction, patients that are immobilized, and patients undergoing genitourinary surgery. (cliniciansbrief.com)
  • Hematuria is common in catheterized patients regardless of underlying etiology but may result in premature removal of indwelling catheters in cats with urethral obstruction. (cliniciansbrief.com)
  • Purpose To evaluate the factors that predict symptomatic dislodgement of a percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) catheter in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. (koreamed.org)
  • Thrombolex, Inc., announced never-before-reported major reductions in obstruction in all of the segmental pulmonary arteries (PA), based on independent core lab data analysis of 107 patients from 18 sites in the USA, with acute intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism (PE), using the BASHIR™ Endovascular Catheter and small doses of tPA. (pr.com)
  • Of those with pulmonary function abnormalities, one third of patients present with an obstructive pattern, one fourth with a restrictive pattern of decreased lung volumes, one third with an isolated decreased DLCO, and the remainder have a mixed pattern of obstruction and restriction with varying amounts of gas exchange abnormality (Newman and Maier 2001). (cdc.gov)
  • Achieving an adequate minute volume through a 2 mm transtracheal catheter in simulated upper airway obstruction using a modified industrial ejector. (ventinovamedical.com)
  • The ineffectiveness and danger of using transtracheal jet ventilation in cases of complete upper airway obstruction motivated Prof. Enk to search for a better solution. (ventinovamedical.com)
  • The many reasons for false-positive scintigraphic results are well known, and if biliary obstruction from a complicating factor is present, nuclear scans may be nondiagnostic. (medscape.com)
  • Your veterinarian may inject contrast material into a urethral catheter during x-rays to see if there is any narrowing of the urethra which may indicate a tumor or scar tissue. (acvs.org)
  • Flexible bevel tip needle has an ability to navigate around obstructions like tumor, organ and nerve, and perform surgeries at a targeted location. (auckland.ac.nz)
  • Contrast that tries to enter the internal carotid will give a waterpaint appearance due to this outflow obstruction. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • Complication of dislodged gastrostomy Foley catheter. (sages.org)
  • Soon after dislodgement, Foley catheters are often placed through the mature gastrocutaneous fistula to prevent tract closure until more definitive replacement occurs. (sages.org)
  • This report describes a patient in whom the replacement Foley catheter migrated distally and required colonoscopic retrieval. (sages.org)
  • It became dislodged several weeks after placement and was replaced with a Foley catheter. (sages.org)
  • Physical examination showed a soft, non-distended, and non-tender abdomen with a gastrocutaneous fistula and no Foley catheter. (sages.org)
  • CT scan showed a Foley catheter in the proximal jejunum without obstruction. (sages.org)
  • Colonoscopy revealed a Foley catheter with inflated balloon in the ileocecal region. (sages.org)
  • If no gastrostomy tube is accessible, a Foley catheter is a good alternative to prevent tract closure. (sages.org)
  • Morbidity of Foley catheter replacement of dislodged PEG tubes is sparse. (sages.org)
  • This remarkable device offers several advantages over the traditional Foley catheter, making it a promising option for individuals requiring long-term or short-term urinary drainage. (powershow.com)
  • Foley catheter: Invasive urinary tract management tool - Nulife - Nulife's Foley catheter is an essential tool for invasive urinary tract management. (powershow.com)
  • Nulife's Foley catheter is ideal for use in hospitals, medical facilities, and nursing homes. (powershow.com)
  • When cancer blocks the outlet of the stomach, one option is to place a stent across the obstruction. (dukehealth.org)
  • A urinary catheter is a flexible tube used to empty the bladder and collect urine in a drainage bag. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The catheter usually remains in the bladder, allowing urine to flow through it and into a drainage bag. (www.nhs.uk)
  • to allow urine to drain if you have an obstruction in the tube that carries urine out of your bladder (urethra). (www.nhs.uk)
  • The urinary bladder may rupture and spill urine into the dog's abdomen with complete obstruction. (acvs.org)
  • 1,2 Catheter-associated UTIs include positive urine cultures with additional signs of UTI, including fever or additional systemic and lower urinary tract signs. (cliniciansbrief.com)
  • In the acute care hospital setting, insert urinary catheters using aseptic technique and sterile equipment. (cdc.gov)
  • 8 Hematuria can be secondary to UTI or sterile cystitis or be associated with catheter-related bladder and urethral irritation. (cliniciansbrief.com)
  • Adoption of the closed method of urinary drainage has markedly reduced the risk of acquiring a catheter-associated infection, but the risk is still substantial. (cdc.gov)
  • However, the longer a catheter is used, the greater the risk of infection. (www.nhs.uk)
  • On the other hand, the complete obstruction is associated with swallowing, fever, pain, gland infection and drainage of purulent exudate via the duct orifice, characterizing the sialodenitis. (bvsalud.org)
  • this will diagnose and treat obstruction and provide continuous monitoring of output. (msdmanuals.com)
  • if necessary, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is performed to treat obstruction or impaction. (medscape.com)
  • Despite contrary evidence in the literature, most respondents (66%) also believed that choroid plexus is the tissue most often found in obstructed proximal catheters. (thejns.org)
  • Urinary tract calculi are the most common cause of urethral obstruction in dogs, and anything that causes stone formation will increase the risk of urethral blockage (see urinary stones). (acvs.org)
  • Catheter-associated thrombosis is the most common noninfectious complication of implantable venous access devices and can cause superior vena cava syndrome. (cmaj.ca)
  • Prophylactic approaches to catheter-associated thrombosis are not recommended, and the use of superior vena cava filters in deep vein thrombosis of the upper extremities should be avoided. (cmaj.ca)
  • Despite being potentially lifesaving, bowel obstruction surgery is associated with a high rate of death during surgery or shortly after the procedure. (healthline.com)
  • If left untreated, bowel obstruction can be life threatening. (healthline.com)
  • Bowel obstruction surgeries can range from minimally invasive to extensive. (healthline.com)
  • What is the success rate of bowel obstruction surgery? (healthline.com)
  • The rate is between 10% and 20% for large bowel obstruction. (healthline.com)
  • In a 2016 study , researchers found that the 30-day and 90-day mortality rates for 323 people undergoing emergency laparotomy for small bowel obstruction were 13% and 17%, respectively. (healthline.com)
  • The chances of dying after receiving bowel obstruction surgery seem to be lower among younger people. (healthline.com)
  • In a 2022 study , researchers examined the survival rate of people 40 to 74 years old and people over the age of 75 who were treated for bowel obstruction between 2009 and 2019. (healthline.com)
  • Older adults tend to have poorer outlooks after bowel obstruction surgery than younger adults. (healthline.com)
  • In a 2021 study , researchers found that the death rate of bowel obstruction surgery was significantly higher in women than men over the age of 65. (healthline.com)
  • Besides age, one of the most important factors for determining the chances of surviving bowel obstruction surgery is how quickly treatment is begun. (healthline.com)
  • In a 2018 study , researchers examined the outcomes of 9,991 people who underwent an emergency laparotomy between December 2013 and November 2015 to treat small bowel obstruction. (healthline.com)
  • How long is a hospital stay after bowel obstruction surgery? (healthline.com)
  • The recovery period after bowel obstruction surgery can be long and difficult. (healthline.com)
  • Who needs bowel obstruction surgery? (healthline.com)
  • On 27 Month1, Mr A underwent surgery for a closed loop small bowel obstruction. (hdc.org.nz)
  • The demand for Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) drainage catheters is anticipated to upsurge owing to the rising incidence of neurological disorders and increasing road accidents, which result in traumatic brain and spinal injuries. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • A tube, called a catheter, is inserted into the bladder through the urethra. (medlineplus.gov)
  • On 12 Month2, Mr A returned to the hospital's Emergency Department and was admitted to the Urology Ward with leakage around his urinary catheter, haematuria, [5] and lower abdominal discomfort. (hdc.org.nz)
  • Budd-Chiari syndrome is an uncommon condition induced by thrombotic or nonthrombotic obstruction of the hepatic venous outflow and is characterized by hepatomegaly, ascites, and abdominal pain. (medscape.com)
  • Recommendations for Proper urinary catheter insertion techniques by ID number and category. (cdc.gov)
  • Perform hand hygiene immediately before and after insertion or any manipulation of the catheter device or site. (cdc.gov)
  • Made with high-quality materials, this catheter features a soft, rounded tip for comfortable insertion and a large balloon capacity for secure placement. (powershow.com)
  • Catheter-directed thrombolysis involves the acceleration of the body's natural thrombolytic pathway. (medscape.com)
  • Catheter type and placement may also affect incidence of and risk for trauma. (cliniciansbrief.com)
  • During catheter placement, contrast material previously injected outlines the irregular, dilated saccular ductal branches. (medscape.com)
  • Rarely is a patient's condition so critical that you cannot safely perform a few diagnostic tests before attempting to relieve the obstruction. (vin.com)
  • Obstruction of large- or small-caliber veins leads to hepatic congestion as blood flows into, but not out of, the liver. (medscape.com)
  • Success rates with catheter-directed thrombolytics vary depending on the age of the thrombus and its proximity to the inferior vena cava. (medscape.com)
  • An increasingly commonly recognized cause for esophageal food bolus obstruction is eosinophilic esophagitis, which is an inflammatory disorder of the mucosa of the esophagus, of unknown cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, free-text responses revealed that the respondents' understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of shunt obstruction was highly variable and included growth, migration, or adherence of choroid plexus, CSF debris, catheter position, inflammatory processes, and CSF overdrainage. (thejns.org)
  • 4,5 The rigidity of polypropylene catheters can cause significant inflammatory lesions in the urethra and bladder. (cliniciansbrief.com)
  • Moreover, an increase in the FDA approvals for CSF drainage catheters in clinical applications, such as head injury, spinal injury, subarachnoid hemorrhages, hydrocephalus, and inflammatory diseases of the cerebrospinal space, is responsible for facilitating the market growth in the region. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • Doctors use aspiration catheters such as the Fetch 2 to clear blood clots from coronary arteries in a procedure known as thrombectomy. (drugwatch.com)
  • Photographs of the head and upper chest of a 53-year-old man with catheter-associated superior vena cava syndrome, showing (A) facial and neck plethora, and (B) a prominent superficial venous pattern on the chest. (cmaj.ca)
  • Other conditions that predispose to food bolus obstructions are esophageal webs, tracheoesophageal fistula/esophageal atresia (TOF/OA) and peptic strictures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Endoscopes can be used to diagnose the cause of the food bolus obstruction, as well as to remove the obstruction. (wikipedia.org)
  • While glucagon has been used in those with esophageal food bolus obstruction, evidence as of 2019 does not support its effectiveness, and its use may result in more side effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Retrieval of the migrated catheter was achieved without operative exploration. (sages.org)
  • Ignoring the symptoms can cause serious problems, including bladder and kidney failure, needing a catheter, or even dialysis, according to Penn State Health Specialty Services. (newsmax.com)
  • Your primary care veterinarian may feel the catheter pass over the calculi in dogs that are partially obstructed. (acvs.org)
  • According to one explanation, the contrast may dislodge mucous plugs that have caused temporary obstruction. (medscape.com)
  • Diagnosis of obstruction is usually based on an inability to advance a urethral catheter into the bladder. (acvs.org)
  • For many of us who were in the cath lab in the 1970s and 1980s, the diagnosis of coronary artery spasm was not rare. (acc.org)
  • But the best news may be the availability of a new 15-minute, catheter-free, outpatient procedure called iTind. (newsmax.com)
  • It is possible that if too much CSF is removed from the ventricles, either during a drainage procedure or when the ventricle is first punctured, the ventricle may collapse and occlude the catheter. (medtronic.com)
  • Sometimes, sialolith are asymptomatic generally when the obstruction is incomplete, so that the saliva surpasses the stone and is eliminated 2 . (bvsalud.org)