An acute or prolonged illness usually considered to be life-threatening or with the threat of serious residual disability. Treatment may be radical and is frequently costly.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Taiwan" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. It is a country located in East Asia. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terms, I would be happy to help with those!
Treatments which are undergoing clinical trials or for which there is insufficient evidence to determine their effects on health outcomes; coverage for such treatments is often denied by health insurers.
Cost-sharing mechanisms that provide for payment by the insured of some portion of covered expenses. Deductibles are the amounts paid by the insured under a health insurance contract before benefits become payable; coinsurance is the provision under which the insured pays part of the medical bill, usually according to a fixed percentage, when benefits become payable.
A person who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Economic aspects of the fields of pharmacy and pharmacology as they apply to the development and study of medical economics in rational drug therapy and the impact of pharmaceuticals on the cost of medical care. Pharmaceutical economics also includes the economic considerations of the pharmaceutical care delivery system and in drug prescribing, particularly of cost-benefit values. (From J Res Pharm Econ 1989;1(1); PharmacoEcon 1992;1(1))

Stop-loss insurance: are you tempting fate? (1/59)

Capitation is a gamble, but stop-loss insurance can keep physician groups from losing their shirts. Who needs it? That depends on the type of contract and many other factors.  (+info)

"Carving out" conditions from global capitation rates: protecting high-cost patients, physicians, and health plans in a managed care environment. (2/59)

The purposes of this study were (1) to develop a method for identifying individuals with high-cost medical conditions, (2) to determine the percentage of healthcare spending they represent, and (3) to explore policy implications of "carving out" their care from managed care capitation. Annual payments over a 2-year period to enrollees of three health plans--a traditional managed care organization, and a state Medicaid program--were determined by using a cross-sectional analysis of insurance claims data. The main outcome measures were the number of enrollees with total annual payments in excess of $25,000 and the contribution of these high-cost enrollees to each health plan's total costs. Forty-one groups of diagnosis and procedure codes representing a combination of acute and chronic conditions were included on the list of carve-out conditions. Pulmonary insufficiency and respiratory failure together accounted for the largest number of high-cost individuals in each health plan. Solid organ and bone marrow transplants, AIDS, and most malignancies that required high-dose chemotherapy were also important. The carve-out list identified more than one third of high-cost individuals enrolled in the Medicaid program, approximately 20% of high-cost managed care enrollees, and 10% of high-cost fee-for-service enrollees. These data confirm that it is possible to identify high-cost individuals in health plans by using a carve-out list. Carving out high-cost patients from capitation risk arrangements may protect patients, physicians, and managed care organizations.  (+info)

Catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in systemic lupus erythematosus: an autopsy case report of a young woman. (3/59)

Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) is a severe variant of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) characterized by disseminated microangiopathy that results in multiorgan failure. CAPS mainly occurs in association with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Clinically, CAPS mimics disseminated SLE vasculitis, intravascular coagulation (DIC), and particularly thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). We describe an autopsy case of young woman with CAPS in SLE, which is difficult to differentiate from TTP secondary to SLE.  (+info)

A flexible benefits tax credit for health insurance and more. (4/59)

This essay outlines a concept for a "flexible benefits" tax credit for expanding health insurance coverage and other purposes such as retirement savings plans (with potential withdrawals for higher education, first-home ownership, and catastrophic medical expenses). Two examples are presented. The advantages of a flexible benefits tax credit are considered in terms of efficient use of the budget surplus to help meet the varied (and changing) needs of American families, to eliminate major national gaps in health insurance and pension coverage, and to advance other objectives. If the budget surplus is used wisely, political decisionmakers could achieve health insurance coverage for most uninsured workers and children and assure a future with real economic security for American families.  (+info)

Reduction of catastrophic health care expenditures by a community-based health insurance scheme in Gujarat, India: current experiences and challenges. (5/59)

OBJECTIVE: To assess the Self Employed Women's Association's Medical Insurance Fund in Gujarat in terms of insurance coverage according to income groups, protection of claimants from costs of hospitalization, time between discharge and reimbursement, and frequency of use. METHODS: One thousand nine hundred and thirty claims submitted over six years were analysed. FINDINGS: Two hundred and fifteen (11%) of 1927 claims were rejected. The mean household income of claimants was significantly lower than that of the general population. The percentage of households below the poverty line was similar for claimants and the general population. One thousand seven hundred and twelve (1712) claims were reimbursed: 805 (47%) fully and 907 (53%) at a mean reimbursement rate of 55.6%. Reimbursement more than halved the percentage of catastrophic hospitalizations (>10% of annual household income) and hospitalizations resulting in impoverishment. The average time between discharge and reimbursement was four months. The frequency of submission of claims was low (18.0/1000 members per year: 22-37% of the estimated frequency of hospitalization). CONCLUSIONS: The findings have implications for community-based health insurance schemes in India and elsewhere. Such schemes can protect poor households against the uncertain risk of medical expenses. They can be implemented in areas where institutional capacity is too weak to organize nationwide risk-pooling. Such schemes can cover poor people, including people and households below the poverty line. A trade off exists between maintaining the scheme's financial viability and protecting members against catastrophic expenditures. To facilitate reimbursement, administration, particularly processing of claims, should happen near claimants. Fine-tuning the design of a scheme is an ongoing process - a system of monitoring and evaluation is vital.  (+info)

Abdominal catastrophe revisited: the risk and outcome of enteric peritoneal contamination. (6/59)

OBJECTIVE: Peritonitis from a visceral source is associated with striking morbidity and mortality in patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD). Surgical intervention for both diagnosis and repair is definitive. However, because the antecedents of enteric injury leading to peritonitis are unpredictable, no preventive strategy has been proposed or adopted. The goal of this study was to examine risk factors influencing the occurrence and outcome of anatomically documented peritonitis of enteric origin. DESIGN: Retrospective chart and database review. SETTING: Peritoneal dialysis unit in tertiary-care referral hospital. PATIENTS: 330 patients treated with PD for end-stage renal disease between 1988 and 2000. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of peritonitis of anatomically documented enteric origin over two consecutive time periods within the study interval: period 1, from 1 January 1988 through 30 June 1996; period 2, from 1 July 1996 through 30 June 2000. RESULTS: At least 1 episode of peritonitis occurred in 202 of 330 patients during the entire study period of 12.5 years (600.74 patient-years of care). There were 543 episodes of peritonitis. Anatomically documented visceral Injury caused bacterial peritonitis in 41 patients with a total of 63 discrete episodes, an incidence rate of 0.1048 per patient-year. Peritonitis-free survival was compared between the two periods using Kaplan-Meier analysis. The curve representing risk distribution for anatomically documented visceral peritonitis remained constant over the two periods, in contrast to improvements found in all other types of peritonitis, taken as a group (p= 0.044). Logistic regression modeling showed that the only risk factor associated with development of anatomically documented visceral peritonitis was older age. There was no influence of race, sex, time on PD, and underlying disease etiology. 31 deaths were attributed to peritonitis during the study period. The mortality rate from enteric peritonitis due to visceral injury was 46.3% (19/41 cases), compared to 7.5% for all other peritonitis taken as a group (12/161 cases, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The experience at University Hospitals of Cleveland suggests that abdominal catastrophe occurs in approximately 10% of all patients treated with PD, and is associated with high mortality, which has not changed over time. Therefore, peritonitis due to spontaneous visceral injury presents a great diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is important to develop a research strategy to understand this devastating complication.  (+info)

How and why the health insurance system will collapse. (7/59)

The advocates of defined-contribution health plans extol the virtues of consumer-driven health care, consumer choice, and empowered consumers as solutions to the problems--particularly the rapidly growing costs--of employer-sponsored health benefits. This paper argues that the widespread use of defined-contribution plans, with more consumer choice and more knowledgeable consumers, will lead to the erosion of the social contract on which health insurance must be based, with healthier employees subsidizing the care of older and sicker ones, and a death spiral of adverse selection. If unchecked by government intervention, these trends will lead to the collapse of employer-sponsored health insurance.  (+info)

Wealth patterns among elderly Americans: implications for health care affordability. (8/59)

This paper estimates the ability of the elderly to pay for necessary health care services and emerging technologies. Projections from the Long Term Care Financing Model paint a promising picture of the income and assets that elders in the future will have available to support discretionary, uncovered health care and service costs. Nevertheless, policymakers should pay close attention to the finances of the "Tweeners"--people who are middle class with low levels of discretionary assets available for health and long-term care.  (+info)

A catastrophic illness is a severe and acute or chronic illness or condition that requires complex or long-term care, often involving extensive medical resources and significant financial costs. These illnesses often cause major disruptions to the lives of patients and their families, both in terms of their daily activities and their emotional well-being.

Examples of catastrophic illnesses include advanced stages of cancer, end-stage renal disease, stroke, heart failure, and certain neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These conditions often require ongoing medical treatment, hospitalization, surgery, and/or the use of specialized medical equipment, which can result in substantial financial burdens for patients and their families.

In some cases, insurance policies may provide coverage for catastrophic illnesses, but the specific benefits and limitations of such coverage can vary widely depending on the policy and the insurer. Some government programs, such as Medicaid and Medicare, may also offer financial assistance for patients with catastrophic illnesses, although eligibility criteria and benefit levels may also vary.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Taiwan" is not a medical term or concept. It is the name of an island nation located in East Asia. The official name of the country is the Republic of China (ROC). If you have any medical questions or inquiries, I would be happy to help answer those for you!

Investigational therapies, also known as experimental or investigational new drugs (INDs), refer to treatments or interventions that are currently being studied and have not yet been approved for general use by regulatory authorities such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). These therapies may include new drugs, biologics, medical devices, procedures, or behavioral interventions.

Investigational therapies are typically tested in clinical trials to assess their safety, efficacy, and optimal dosage. The process of testing an investigational therapy can take several years and involves multiple phases of research, including preclinical studies (testing in the lab), phase I trials (safety testing in a small group of people), phase II trials (testing for effectiveness and side effects in a larger group of people), and phase III trials (large-scale testing to confirm effectiveness, monitor side effects, and collect information that will allow the therapy to be used safely).

Participation in clinical trials of investigational therapies is voluntary and usually requires informed consent from the participant. Investigational therapies may offer hope for people with serious or life-threatening conditions who have exhausted all other treatment options, but they also carry risks, as their safety and efficacy have not yet been fully established.

A deductible is a specific amount of money that a patient must pay out of pocket before their health insurance starts covering the costs of medical services. For example, if a patient has a $1000 deductible, they must pay the first $1000 of their medical bills themselves before the insurance begins to cover the remaining costs. Deductibles are annual, meaning they reset every year.

Coinsurance is the percentage of costs for a covered medical service that a patient is responsible for paying after they have met their deductible. For example, if a patient has a 20% coinsurance rate, they will be responsible for paying 20% of the cost of each medical service, while their insurance covers the remaining 80%. Coinsurance rates vary depending on the health insurance plan and the specific medical service being provided.

In medical and legal contexts, a minor is a person who has not yet reached the age of majority. The age of majority varies depending on the jurisdiction but is generally 18 or 21 years old. Minors are considered to be legally incompetent to make certain decisions for themselves, such as consenting to medical treatment or signing a contract. Therefore, in healthcare settings, minors typically require the consent of a parent or guardian before receiving medical care, except in specific circumstances where the minor is deemed mature enough to make their own decisions (e.g., emancipated minors).

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Pharmaceutical economics is a branch of economics that focuses on the production and distribution of pharmaceutical products and services. It involves the analysis of various factors that influence the development, pricing, and accessibility of medications, including issues related to healthcare policy, regulation, reimbursement, and market competition.

Pharmaceutical economists study topics such as:

1. The research and development (R&D) process for new drugs, including the costs, risks, and uncertainties associated with bringing a new drug to market.
2. The pricing of pharmaceuticals, taking into account factors such as production costs, R&D expenses, market competition, and the value that medications provide to patients and society.
3. The impact of government regulations and policies on the pharmaceutical industry, including issues related to intellectual property protection, drug safety, and efficacy testing.
4. The role of health insurance and other third-party payers in shaping the demand for and access to pharmaceuticals.
5. The evaluation of pharmaceutical interventions' cost-effectiveness and their impact on healthcare outcomes and patient well-being.
6. The analysis of market structures, competitive dynamics, and strategic decision-making within the pharmaceutical industry.
7. The assessment of globalization, international trade, and cross-border collaboration in the pharmaceutical sector.

Pharmaceutical economics plays a crucial role in informing healthcare policy decisions, improving patient access to essential medications, and promoting sustainable and innovative practices within the pharmaceutical industry.

A catastrophic illness is a severe illness requiring prolonged hospitalization or recovery. Examples would include cancer, ... Research indicates that the unusual economic environment of the delivery of catastrophic illness care encourages the use of ... Medicare contains a benefit for catastrophic illness. MR Gillick; NA Serrell; LS Gillick (1982), "Adverse consequences of ... "Treatment Decision Making in Catastrophic Illness", Medical Care, XV (1): 19-33, JSTOR 3763281 John K. Iglehart (March 2001), ...
Pear, Robert (February 1, 1987). "Health care debate: How to pay for extended coverage; Congress takes on catastrophic illness ... "Agency asking U.S. care in 'catastrophic' ills". The New York Times. November 2, 1986. Retrieved July 15, 2011. Pear, Robert ( ... Berry, William J.; Davis, Lisa E. (April 11, 1978). "Psychiatrist Szasz Contends Mental Illness Does not Exist". The Harvard ...
Fowlie, Johnathan (Nov 4, 2009). "Margaret MacDiarmid recovers from catastrophic illness". Vancouver Sun. Retrieved July 12, ...
Her appointment lasted until 2017 Fowlie, Johnathan (Nov 4, 2009). "Margaret MacDiarmid recovers from catastrophic illness". ...
Coyne, J. C., & Fiske, V. (1992). Couples coping with chronic and catastrophic illness. Fukuyama, F. (1995). Trust: The social ... Helgeson, V. S., Jakubiak, B., Van Vleet, M., & Zajdel, M. (2018). Communal coping and adjustment to chronic illness: Theory ... illness). A core tenet within the model is that communication enhances coping outcomes. In this vein, Helgeson et al's model ... Scholars who have attempted to apply the communal coping framework to context outside of illness and natural disaster have ...
"Governor OKs Insurance Aid to Catastrophic Illness Victims". Los Angeles Times. October 2, 1989. Madrigal, Alexis (2011). Book ... authorizing the purchasing of health insurance by uninsured Californians suffering from catastrophic serious illnesses, such as ...
... the Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Fund in 2001; proposing Smart Growth affordable housing in 2004; Chapter 70 ...
Gold, S. J. "Mental Health and Illness in Vietnamese Refugees." West J Med 157.3 (1992): 290-94. Print. Wikimedia Commons has ... "Population Displacement and Housing Dilemmas Due to Catastrophic Disasters." Journal of Planning Literature 22.1 (2007): 3-15. ...
Injury or illness. Scuba equipment failure leading to non-catastrophic but rapid loss of breathing gas. Sudden loss of thermal ...
Iatrogenic illness or death caused purposefully or by avoidable error or negligence on the healer's part became a punishable ... Impoverishment is described for households exposed to catastrophic health expenditure or to hardship financing. Every year, ... With the development of scientific medicine in the 20th century, it could be expected that iatrogenic illness or death might be ... A study reported that in the United States in 2001, illness and medical debt caused half of all personal bankruptcies. ...
He designed a health insurance scheme - Arogyasri - to provide financial risk protection against catastrophic illnesses. In ...
PSPCA veterinarians uniformly reported catastrophic illnesses in the cats seized at the Tiger Ranch compound. "Most deaths have ...
By virtue of the National Assistance Law, victims of catastrophic illnesses and disasters are entitled benefits. Social ...
... s are a form of catastrophic coverage, intended to cover for catastrophic illnesses. Adoption rates ... Acronyms in healthcare Catastrophic illness Health care Health care reform Health economics Health insurance in the United ...
Catastrophic incidents that result in mass fatalities usually also result in mass injuries and/or illnesses. While it is more ... A catastrophic plane crash with no survivors is an example of a mass fatality incident. Part of the distinction is because ...
Some types of illnesses may not fall neatly into "episodes." It is possible that one patient may have multiple bundles that ... Providers risk large losses, for example if a patient experiences a catastrophic event. A complex "reinsurance mechanism" may ... by overstating the severity of an illness, by giving the lowest level of service possible, by not diagnosing complications of a ... which incorporate payment for keeping people as healthy as possible in addition to payment for episodes of illness. The St. ...
The ICD also has a category for enduring personality change after a catastrophic experience or psychiatric illness. If an ... They have nerves or a nervous illness. It is an illness not just of mind or brain, but a disorder of the entire body. ... We ... For example, people with optimal mental health can also have a mental illness, and people who have no mental illness can also ... 50 Signs of Mental Illness List of mental disorders Mental illness portrayed in media Mental disorders in film Mental illness ...
For example, a fever is "prodromal" to measles, which means that a fever may be a risk factor for developing this illness. The ... Epidemics seldom occur after a disaster, and dead bodies do not lead to catastrophic outbreaks of infectious diseases. ... Intuitively, epidemic diseases, illnesses, and injuries might be expected following major disasters. However, as noted by de ... Within 3-4 weeks there is a period of extreme illness. severe bloody diarrhea, indicating intestinal disorders causing fluid ...
During the 1950s, HMSA introduced a Major Medical Plan to help protect against the cost of catastrophic illness. In the 1960s, ...
She signed an agreement with Bambino Gesù Hospital in Italy for the care of children with catastrophic illnesses. In addition, ...
Jude has an International Outreach Program to improve the survival rates of children with catastrophic illnesses worldwide. St ... designated nonprofit medical corporation which focuses on children's catastrophic diseases, particularly leukemia and other ...
... insurance premiums to protect individuals against illnesses of a catastrophic nature would be financed by a payroll tax. The ... January 22, 1976). "Medicare: limiting the cost of major illness would benefit 3 million patients". The New York Times. p. 25. ... In October 1973, Long and Senator Abraham Ribicoff (D-CT) introduced a bipartisan bill for catastrophic health insurance ... In June 1979, Carter proposed more limited health insurance reform-an employer mandate to provide catastrophic private health ...
A horrifyingly great number of prisoners did not survive the camp, dying of hunger or falling victim to illness. The exact ... They had to do their work, commanded by an SS building brigade, under catastrophic living and dietary conditions. Many died of ... hunger or illnesses, or were murdered. The people who had been buried at the Bretzenheim Jewish graveyard were exhumed and ...
Intuitively, epidemic diseases, illnesses, and injuries might be expected following major disasters. However, as noted by de ... Epidemics seldom occur after a disaster, and dead bodies do not lead to catastrophic outbreaks of infectious diseases. ... Bellesrad Marshall Islands Cold War II Democide Global catastrophic risk Nuclear holocaust Nuclear terrorism World War III ... Still catastrophic consequences". Journal of Geophysical Research. 112 (D13): D13107. Bibcode:2007JGRD..11213107R. doi:10.1029/ ...
... and disabling accidents or illnesses, permanent unemployment, and the technological redundancy of skills. These catastrophic ... Catastrophic vs. non-catastrophic shocks: Some events occur with low frequency, but have severe income effects like old-age, ... On the other end of the scale are high frequency events with non-severe income effects like transient illness, crop loss, and ... Protection against these non-catastrophic events need not require long-term net transfers to the afflicted household. If ...
Dampier's service was cut short by a catastrophic illness, and he returned to England for several months of recuperation. For ...
"Ventilator-Dependent Survivors of Catastrophic Illness Transferred to 23 Long- Term Care Hospitals for Weaning from Prolonged ... "Ventilator-dependent survivors of catastrophic illness transferred to 23 long-term care hospitals for weaning from prolonged ... A Los Angeles Illness Narrative. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2006, ISBN 978-0813539010 Wikimedia Commons has media ...
Injuries include heat illness and dehydration, concussions, and trauma-related deaths. Heat illnesses are a rising concern in ... In American football, for instance, five times as many catastrophic injuries happen in high school as in college-level ... Heat illness and dehydration are typically brought on by high temperatures and high humidity. These conditions carry increased ... Heat illnesses are among the primary causes of sports-related death or disability. They require immediate medical attention. ...
She revealed that she had battled constant suicidal urges at the height of her mental illness. During her appearance on the ... I was always melancholic and prone to sadness and hopelessness but this was catastrophic and unimaginable." In March 2017, ... "It was an illness and it ran its course." In 2019 the National Library of Ireland announced that the Keyes digital archive for ... mental illness, divorce and alcoholism. Keyes considers herself a feminist, and has chosen to reflect feminist issues in many ...
... injuries or illnesses to airplane crashes and catastrophic natural disasters. Women especially were singled out for brutal ...
A catastrophic illness is a severe illness requiring prolonged hospitalization or recovery. Examples would include cancer, ... Research indicates that the unusual economic environment of the delivery of catastrophic illness care encourages the use of ... Medicare contains a benefit for catastrophic illness. MR Gillick; NA Serrell; LS Gillick (1982), "Adverse consequences of ... "Treatment Decision Making in Catastrophic Illness", Medical Care, XV (1): 19-33, JSTOR 3763281 John K. Iglehart (March 2001), ...
All heat illnesses in high school athletes are preventable. Since 1995, according to an annual survey of catastrophic football ... Heat Illness Among High School Athletes --- United States, 2005--2009. Heat illness during practice or competition is a leading ... If left untreated, heat illness can progress to heat stroke and result in permanent illness or death; thus, prevention is ... TABLE 1. Number (N = 118) and rate* of time-loss heat illnesses† among high school athletes, by sport and practice or ...
"We still dont know enough about the long-term effects of COVID not to consider it a catastrophic illness," Velardi said. ... Right now the district only opens the sick leave bank for "catastrophic illnesses." Velardi still isnt sure whether COVID ... take up to a week of unpaid leave last year because they had previously drained their sick days on a surgery or another illness ...
Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Fund (CICRF) > How Does a Family Apply for the Fund? ... DHS Home > Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Fund Commission Home > How Does a Family Apply for the Fund? ... Financial assistance from the Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Fund reduced that burden immeasurably. Like a lot of ... Financial assistance from the Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Fund was there when we needed it." ...
The best reason for having insurance of course is the unexpected accident or catastrophic illness. Oh how I miss my AAA ... Theres still the risk of an expensive medical illness. What then?. I have actually bought quite a lot of medical care and paid ... catastrophic policy that I had for years. It cost about $250/year and had a $25,000 deductible but promised to pay about $ ...
They basically protect you from worst-case scenarios, like serious accidents or illnesses. Catastrophic plans cover prevention ... Catastrophic plans. People under 30 and people with hardship exemptions may buy a "catastrophic" health plan. This type of plan ... Do you qualify for a catastrophic plan in the Marketplace?. When you fill out a Marketplace application youll see catastrophic ... A catastrophic plan generally requires you to pay all of your medical costs up to a certain amount, usually several thousand ...
Step By Step Guide to Optimum Health and Relief From Catastrophic Illness.. (407 Page Expanded Edition). Just $17.95 ...
A study of patients aged 60 and older who presented with influenza-like illness (ILI) in acute care hospital emergency ... 4. Influenza can lead to catastrophic disability. Influenza is often considered to be associated with short-term morbidity, but ... Catastrophic disability can be measured using the Barthel Index, which measures 10 activities of daily living. ... "Persistent loss of function, or catastrophic disability, should be considered when looking at the overall burden of flu," said ...
Product contamination: Product contamination can lead to foodborne illnesses and have catastrophic outcomes, including loss of ...
The things that you do to get ready for a blizzard will also be fundamental to preparing for wider or more catastrophic events. ... This includes such emergencies as a job loss, illness, and other short-term conditions. Remember, short-term prepping is the ...
Pedagogues may only donate sick days to a colleague suffering from a catastrophic illness. Sick leave transfer rules are on ... Are there any illnesses for which time off will not be deducted from my sick bank? Yes. Measles, mumps and chicken pox are ... If you are a teacher or other appointed pedagogue and are absent from school because of illness, you will be paid for up to 10 ... Aside from these three personal business days, your self-treated days may only be taken for your own illness or disability. If ...
Why should plagues of mental illness surprise us, in a world being ripped apart? ... What greater indictment of a system could there be than an epidemic of mental illness? Yet plagues of anxiety, stress, ... The latest, catastrophic figures for childrens mental health in England reflect a global crisis. ... Its more surprising to discover the range of physical illnesses it causes or exacerbates. Dementia, high blood pressure, heart ...
HUS is a catastrophic illness that predominantly affects children aged 4-12 months, sometimes affects older children, and ... Patients with TTP often report an episode of flulike illness 2-3 weeks before presentation. Most patients with TTP do not have ...
Examples may involve an unexpected acute physical illness or psychological condition, or unanticipated catastrophic event ...
... for unmet healthcare needs while reducing often catastrophic out-of-pocket expenditures associated with complex illnesses.7 ... This measure was based on a question that asked respondents if any household member forwent care for a serious illness, and, if ... The first concern was the possibility that there was measurement error in illnesses reported as reasons for mortality, which ... The multivariate models for out-of-pocket expenditures controlled for differences in illness or health condition composition by ...
Nonetheless, van Gogh faced not only the apathy of his modern audience but also catastrophic spells of mental illness during ... Despite his immense output, Van Gogh suffered from mental illness, which most likely included seizures, psychotic symptoms, ... and his battles with mental illness. Above all, they are a passionate personal tale of artistic evolution and a one-of-a-kind ... hallucinations, and bipolar illness. Gauguin moved for Tahiti, partly to get away from Van Goghs increasingly unstable conduct ...
... generations of Western North Carolinians have trusted Thoms Rehabilitation Hospital for the treatment of catastrophic illness ...
Have you recovered from your illness or injuries? Would you say fully recovered, partially recovered, or not recovered? ... Catastrophic Events Question Sub Topic: Disaster Survey Title:. Not Applicable Share This Question Times viewed. 190 ...
Millions of U.S. workers are exposed each day to heat related illness in their workplaces. Although heat illness is 100% ... and the economy could become catastrophic. ... Heat illness is a problem indoors as well, as many ... Heat illness is 100% preventable, yet 11 workers suffer serious heat-related injury or death every day in the United States. ... Without federal standards for preventing heat illness on the job, the problem persists and stands to increase dramatically as ...
... general physical and mental wellbeing and explore whether extended periods of joblessness correlate to catastrophic illness and ...
Living with mental illness is hard, but its especially difficult when dealing with more than one condition at the same time. ... Jamison found herself succumbing to the same exhilarating highs and catastrophic depressions that afflicted many of her ... With its three-phase approach, Owning Bipolar can help you and your loved ones become experts at an illness that has called the ... With its three-phase approach, Owning Bipolar can help you and your loved ones become experts at an illness that has called the ...
... illness or other catastrophic loss.. DRI SOLACE does not seek cash contributions. The program is an opportunity to offer ...
Diagnosis of sudden catastrophic illness depends a good deal on eyewitness accounts. But, as criminologists know, eyewitnesses ...
... catastrophic illness, natural disasters, unemployment, or working low-wage jobs. They are individuals of all ages, colors, and ... People become homeless for many reasons such as a lack of affordable housing, mental illness, substance abuse disorders, ...
Catastrophic fixed airway disease developed in two workers who had no known personal risk factors prior to employment at the ... No specific etiology of the illnesses was identified. The authors conclude that a short term exposure to a specific mix may ...
... anybody that has any type of chronic illness or anybody that is going to have a catastrophic illness," Taylor said. "They ...
  • Family and friends of L'Tonya Bowe are raising money for the nonprofit Help Hope Live to fund uninsured medical expenses associated with Catastrophic Illness. (helphopelive.org)
  • The past year has been filled with anxiety about my child's illness, compounded by the endless medical expenses. (nj.gov)
  • Less than 2% of the population is enrolled in a health insurance scheme leading to a propensity for catastrophic health expenses when accessing care. (bvsalud.org)
  • Have you recovered from your illness or injuries? (cdc.gov)
  • While it is unknown how many drug and opioid overdose deaths are associated with workplace injuries and illnesses, it is clear that this national epidemic is impacting workers and employers. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition to work injuries and illnesses being the reason opioids are prescribed in the first place, there are others ways in which this epidemic is undoubtedly impacting workers and employers. (cdc.gov)
  • NIOSH remains committed to primary prevention of occupational injuries and illnesses as our primary focus. (cdc.gov)
  • During 1992-2000, an average of 40 fatal occupational injuries and 12,400 nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses related to animals were recorded each year in the United States, most involving domestic farm animals. (cdc.gov)
  • Electrical Safety of preventing work-related injuries, illnesses, and deaths. (cdc.gov)
  • A study of patients aged 60 and older who presented with influenza-like illness (ILI) in acute care hospital emergency departments found that only 31% of the patients with confirmed influenza met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for ILI (temperature ≥37.8 °C and cough and/or sore throat). (medscape.com)
  • Heat illness during practice or competition is a leading cause of death and disability among U.S. high school athletes ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • 4. Influenza can lead to catastrophic disability. (medscape.com)
  • Short-term disability insurance covers a percentage of a participant's lost salary resulting from injury or illness. (flexiblebenefit.com)
  • Long-term disability insurance protects participants from catastrophic illness or injury. (flexiblebenefit.com)
  • There are lots of concerns around a second wave of coronavirus, and the country is rightly preparing for that but my concern is a tsunami of cancer, cardiac and other patients with serious illnesses who have been neglected the last few months. (itv.com)
  • My concern is a tsunami of cancer, cardiac and other patients with serious illnesses who have been neglected the last few months. (itv.com)
  • Aux États-Unis, lorsque le séjour en unité des soins intensifs est prolongé, les patients peuvent être transférés vers un CHSLD. (who.int)
  • Dans la pratique, les patients qui ont besoin de soins de longue durée en Turquie sont hospitalisés en unités de soins intensifs. (who.int)
  • Une proportion importante des lits réservés aux unités de soins intensifs en Turquie sont utilisés pour les soins de longue durée aux patients atteints de problèmes complexes. (who.int)
  • To examine the incidence and characteristics of heat illness among high school athletes, CDC analyzed data from the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance Study for the period 2005--2009, which includes the 2005--06, 2006--07, 2007--08 and 2008--09 school years. (cdc.gov)
  • NATA-affiliated certified athletic trainers, who are trained in illness and injury prevention, assessment, and care, provide services to approximately 42% of the 18,753 public and private high schools in the United States (NATA, unpublished data, 2010). (cdc.gov)
  • Care for illness or injury that develops rapidly, has pronounced symptoms and is finite in length. (discount-life-insurance-quotes.com)
  • COB attempts to ensure that subscribers receive all benefits they are entitled to without profiting from illness or injury. (excellusbcbs.com)
  • The disorder can be triggered by infection or illness that would not otherwise cause chronic pain, injury, and other physical stress. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The case definition included events in which the source of the injury was an animal or animal product (Occupational Injury and Illness Classification Manual source code 51). (cdc.gov)
  • This results in significant out-of-pocket payment for health services by Cameroonians with catastrophic consequences to households. (bvsalud.org)
  • A catastrophic illness is a severe illness requiring prolonged hospitalization or recovery. (wikipedia.org)
  • The things that you do to get ready for a blizzard will also be fundamental to preparing for wider or more catastrophic events. (wnd.com)
  • Psychological and social factors such as a history of childhood abuse or neglect, exposure to war or other catastrophic events, and low job or life satisfaction have also been associated with an increased risk of fibromyalgia. (medlineplus.gov)
  • For workers in safety sensitive jobs, such as transportation and operators of heavy equipment, there will be increased risks for catastrophic events that impact many besides the worker. (cdc.gov)
  • What greater indictment of a system could there be than an epidemic of mental illness? (filmsforaction.org)
  • Financial assistance from the Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Fund reduced that burden immeasurably. (nj.gov)
  • Financial assistance from the Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Fund was there when we needed it. (nj.gov)
  • Hemolytic uremic syndrome is a diarrheal illness complication arising from an infection with Escherichia coli O157:H7. (medscape.com)
  • Research indicates that the unusual economic environment of the delivery of catastrophic illness care encourages the use of innovative therapies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medical care that is required for a short period of time to cure a certain illness and/or condition. (discount-life-insurance-quotes.com)
  • Care for an illness continuing over a protracted period of time or recurring frequently. (discount-life-insurance-quotes.com)
  • from that health savings account, they can purchase catastrophic coverage. (eppc.org)
  • About 15.5 million men would avoid catastrophic health expenditures in a subset of seven countries without universal health coverage. (who.int)
  • Motivational factors included the knowledge of having access to quality health services even without money in the event of an unforeseen illness and having a large family/household size. (bvsalud.org)
  • There's still the risk of an expensive medical illness. (heartland.org)
  • a serious accident or illness that racks up huge medical bills in a short time. (qvc.com)
  • All athletes, coaches, athletic trainers, and parents/guardians should be aware of the risk factors for heat illness, follow recommended strategies, and be prepared to respond quickly to symptoms of illness. (cdc.gov)
  • The number of days for which a subscriber may receive benefits during a period of illness. (excellusbcbs.com)
  • The best reason for having insurance of course is the unexpected accident or catastrophic illness. (heartland.org)
  • Product contamination can lead to foodborne illnesses and have catastrophic outcomes, including loss of life. (marsh.com)
  • Treatment of catastrophic illnesses should be looked after, we should be looked after equally, equally right across Canada," he said. (globalnews.ca)
  • Main outcome measures Life years gained, averted treatment costs, number of men avoiding catastrophic healthcare expenditures and poverty, and additional tax revenue by income group. (who.int)
  • The role demic is the occurrence of more cases of disease than played by outbreaks of infectious diseases in causing illness expected in a given area or among a specific group of per- after geophysical disasters must be identified so that prior- sons over a particular period of time. (cdc.gov)
  • Catastrophic fixed airway disease developed in two workers who had no known personal risk factors prior to employment at the factory. (cdc.gov)
  • Overall, the bottom income group would get 31% of the life years saved and 29% each of the averted disease costs and averted catastrophic health expenditures, while paying only 10% of the additional taxes. (who.int)
  • The elderly get a voucher for their choice of private insurance plans for age-related illnesses. (eppc.org)
  • During 2005--2009, the 100 schools sampled reported a total of 118 heat illnesses among high school athletes resulting in ≥1 days of time lost from athletic activity (i.e., time-loss heat illness), a rate of 1.6 per 100,000 athlete-exposures and an average of 29.5 time-loss heat illnesses per school year. (cdc.gov)
  • The highest rate of time-loss heat illness was among football players, 4.5 per 100,000 athlete-exposures, a rate 10 times higher than the average rate (0.4) for the eight other sports. (cdc.gov)
  • This includes such emergencies as a job loss, illness, and other short-term conditions. (wnd.com)
  • These illnesses usually involve high costs for hospitals, doctors and medicines and may incapacitate the person from working, creating a financial hardship. (wikipedia.org)
  • The average corresponds to a weighted average annual estimate of 9,237 illnesses nationwide. (cdc.gov)
  • Consistent with guidelines from the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) ( 3 ), to reduce the risk for heat illness, high school athletic programs should implement heat-acclimatization guidelines (e.g., set limits on summer practice duration and intensity). (cdc.gov)
  • Detailed exposure data, such as ambient temperature, relative humidity, or specific type of heat illness (e.g., heat cramps or heat exhaustion) are not collected. (cdc.gov)
  • No specific etiology of the illnesses was identified. (cdc.gov)
  • Higher excise taxes support the targets of the sustainable development goals on non-communicable diseases and poverty, and provides financial protection against illness. (who.int)
  • Resultados: Un total de 41 internos fueron incluidos en el estudio, con una edad media de 44 años. (bvsalud.org)
  • Oh how I miss my AAA catastrophic policy that I had for years. (heartland.org)
  • More than 250 district employees had to take up to a week of unpaid leave last year because they had previously drained their sick days on a surgery or another illness, Velardi said. (edweek.org)