Catabolite Repression: Process by which micro-organisms adapt quickly to a preferred rapidly-metabolizable intermediate through the inhibition or repression of genes related to CATABOLISM of less preferred source(s).Enzyme Repression: The interference in synthesis of an enzyme due to the elevated level of an effector substance, usually a metabolite, whose presence would cause depression of the gene responsible for enzyme synthesis.Galactosidases: A family of galactoside hydrolases that hydrolyze compounds with an O-galactosyl linkage. EC 3.2.1.-.Repressor Proteins: Proteins which maintain the transcriptional quiescence of specific GENES or OPERONS. Classical repressor proteins are DNA-binding proteins that are normally bound to the OPERATOR REGION of an operon, or the ENHANCER SEQUENCES of a gene until a signal occurs that causes their release.Phosphoenolpyruvate Sugar Phosphotransferase System: The bacterial sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) that catalyzes the transfer of the phosphoryl group from phosphoenolpyruvate to its sugar substrates (the PTS sugars) concomitant with the translocation of these sugars across the bacterial membrane. The phosphorylation of a given sugar requires four proteins, two general proteins, Enzyme I and HPr and a pair of sugar-specific proteins designated as the Enzyme II complex. The PTS has also been implicated in the induction of synthesis of some catabolic enzyme systems required for the utilization of sugars that are not substrates of the PTS as well as the regulation of the activity of ADENYLYL CYCLASES. EC 2.7.1.-.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Operon: In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.GluconatesGlucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Carbon: A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Bacillus subtilis: A species of gram-positive bacteria that is a common soil and water saprophyte.Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein: A transcriptional regulator in prokaryotes which, when activated by binding cyclic AMP, acts at several promoters. Cyclic AMP receptor protein was originally identified as a catabolite gene activator protein. It was subsequently shown to regulate several functions unrelated to catabolism, and to be both a negative and a positive regulator of transcription. Cell surface cyclic AMP receptors are not included (CYCLIC AMP RECEPTORS), nor are the eukaryotic cytoplasmic cyclic AMP receptor proteins, which are the regulatory subunits of CYCLIC AMP-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASES.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Succinates: Derivatives of SUCCINIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain a 1,4-carboxy terminated aliphatic structure.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Tryptophanase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-tryptophan and water to indole, pyruvate, and ammonia. It is a pyridoxal-phosphate protein, requiring K+. It also catalyzes 2,3-elimination and beta-replacement reactions of some indole-substituted tryptophan analogs of L-cysteine, L-serine, and other 3-substituted amino acids. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 4.1.99.1.Histidine Ammonia-Lyase: An enzyme that catalyzes the first step of histidine catabolism, forming UROCANIC ACID and AMMONIA from HISTIDINE. Deficiency of this enzyme is associated with elevated levels of serum histidine and is called histidinemia (AMINO ACID METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS).Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Allantoin: A urea hydantoin that is found in URINE and PLANTS and is used in dermatological preparations.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Enzyme Induction: An increase in the rate of synthesis of an enzyme due to the presence of an inducer which acts to derepress the gene responsible for enzyme synthesis.Lactose: A disaccharide of GLUCOSE and GALACTOSE in human and cow milk. It is used in pharmacy for tablets, in medicine as a nutrient, and in industry.XylosePromoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Arabinosebeta-Galactosidase: A group of enzymes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal, non-reducing beta-D-galactose residues in beta-galactosides. Deficiency of beta-Galactosidase A1 may cause GANGLIOSIDOSIS, GM1.Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in fungi.Glycerol: A trihydroxy sugar alcohol that is an intermediate in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. It is used as a solvent, emollient, pharmaceutical agent, and sweetening agent.Genes, Regulator: Genes which regulate or circumscribe the activity of other genes; specifically, genes which code for PROTEINS or RNAs which have GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION functions.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Urocanate Hydratase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of 4,5-dihydro-4-oxo-5-imidazolepropanoate to urocanate and water. EC 4.2.1.49.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Lac Operon: The genetic unit consisting of three structural genes, an operator and a regulatory gene. The regulatory gene controls the synthesis of the three structural genes: BETA-GALACTOSIDASE and beta-galactoside permease (involved with the metabolism of lactose), and beta-thiogalactoside acetyltransferase.Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.Lyases: A class of enzymes that catalyze the cleavage of C-C, C-O, and C-N, and other bonds by other means than by hydrolysis or oxidation. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 4.Glycoside HydrolasesPseudomonas putida: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria isolated from soil and water as well as clinical specimens. Occasionally it is an opportunistic pathogen.Cyclic AMP: An adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to both the 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety. It is a second messenger and a key intracellular regulator, functioning as a mediator of activity for a number of hormones, including epinephrine, glucagon, and ACTH.Galactose: An aldohexose that occurs naturally in the D-form in lactose, cerebrosides, gangliosides, and mucoproteins. Deficiency of galactosyl-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALACTOSE-1-PHOSPHATE URIDYL-TRANSFERASE DEFICIENCY DISEASE) causes an error in galactose metabolism called GALACTOSEMIA, resulting in elevations of galactose in the blood.Receptors, Cyclic AMP: Cell surface proteins that bind cyclic AMP with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The best characterized cyclic AMP receptors are those of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The transcription regulator CYCLIC AMP RECEPTOR PROTEIN of prokaryotes is not included nor are the eukaryotic cytoplasmic cyclic AMP receptor proteins which are the regulatory subunits of CYCLIC AMP-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASES.Ammonia-Lyases: Enzymes that catalyze the formation of a carbon-carbon double bond by the elimination of AMMONIA. EC 4.3.1.Carbohydrate Metabolism: Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.Succinic Acid: A water-soluble, colorless crystal with an acid taste that is used as a chemical intermediate, in medicine, the manufacture of lacquers, and to make perfume esters. It is also used in foods as a sequestrant, buffer, and a neutralizing agent. (Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed, p1099; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1851)GATA Transcription Factors: A family of transcription factors that contain two ZINC FINGER MOTIFS and bind to the DNA sequence (A/T)GATA(A/G).Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Genetics, Microbial: A subdiscipline of genetics which deals with the genetic mechanisms and processes of microorganisms.Maltose: A dextrodisaccharide from malt and starch. It is used as a sweetening agent and fermentable intermediate in brewing. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Carbohydrate Epimerases: Enzymes that catalyze the epimerization of chiral centers within carbohydrates or their derivatives. EC 5.1.3.Genes, Fungal: The functional hereditary units of FUNGI.Cellobiose: A disaccharide consisting of two glucose units in beta (1-4) glycosidic linkage. Obtained from the partial hydrolysis of cellulose.beta-Fructofuranosidase: A glycoside hydrolase found primarily in PLANTS and YEASTS. It has specificity for beta-D-fructofuranosides such as SUCROSE.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Fungal Proteins: Proteins found in any species of fungus.Hexokinase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ATP and a D-hexose to ADP and a D-hexose 6-phosphate. D-Glucose, D-mannose, D-fructose, sorbitol, and D-glucosamine can act as acceptors; ITP and dATP can act as donors. The liver isoenzyme has sometimes been called glucokinase. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.7.1.1.alpha-Amylases: Enzymes that catalyze the endohydrolysis of 1,4-alpha-glycosidic linkages in STARCH; GLYCOGEN; and related POLYSACCHARIDES and OLIGOSACCHARIDES containing 3 or more 1,4-alpha-linked D-glucose units.Molecular Biology: A discipline concerned with studying biological phenomena in terms of the chemical and physical interactions of molecules.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Aspergillus nidulans: A species of imperfect fungi from which the antibiotic nidulin is obtained. Its teleomorph is Emericella nidulans.Acetoin Dehydrogenase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of acetoin to diacetyl in the presence of NAD.ArbutinFructose: A monosaccharide in sweet fruits and honey that is soluble in water, alcohol, or ether. It is used as a preservative and an intravenous infusion in parenteral feeding.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Escherichia coli Proteins: Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.Glucokinase: A group of enzymes that catalyzes the conversion of ATP and D-glucose to ADP and D-glucose 6-phosphate. They are found in invertebrates and microorganisms, and are highly specific for glucose. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.7.1.2.RNA, Bacterial: Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Regulon: In eukaryotes, a genetic unit consisting of a noncontiguous group of genes under the control of a single regulator gene. In bacteria, regulons are global regulatory systems involved in the interplay of pleiotropic regulatory domains and consist of several OPERONS.Lactobacillus casei: A rod-shaped bacterium isolated from milk and cheese, dairy products and dairy environments, sour dough, cow dung, silage, and human mouth, human intestinal contents and stools, and the human vagina.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Acetate-CoA Ligase: An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of CoA derivatives from ATP, acetate, and CoA to form AMP, pyrophosphate, and acetyl CoA. It acts also on propionates and acrylates. EC 6.2.1.1.Aldose-Ketose Isomerases: Enzymes that catalyze the interconversion of aldose and ketose compounds.Galactokinase: An enzyme that catalyzes reversibly the formation of galactose 1-phosphate and ADP from ATP and D-galactose. Galactosamine can also act as the acceptor. A deficiency of this enzyme results in GALACTOSEMIA. EC 2.7.1.6.Operator Regions, Genetic: The regulatory elements of an OPERON to which activators or repressors bind thereby effecting the transcription of GENES in the operon.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Genes: A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.PhosphoenolpyruvateGene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in enzyme synthesis.Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins: Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.Artificial Gene Fusion: The in vitro fusion of GENES by RECOMBINANT DNA techniques to analyze protein behavior or GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, or to merge protein functions for specific medical or industrial uses.Protocatechuate-3,4-Dioxygenase: An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of protocatechuate to 3-carboxy-cis-cis-muconate in the presence of molecular oxygen. It contains ferric ion. EC 1.13.11.3.Carbon Isotopes: Stable carbon atoms that have the same atomic number as the element carbon, but differ in atomic weight. C-13 is a stable carbon isotope.Ribose: A pentose active in biological systems usually in its D-form.Leucine-Responsive Regulatory Protein: A LEUCINE and DNA-binding protein that is found primarily in BACTERIA and ARCHAEA. It regulates GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION involved in METABOLISM of AMINO ACIDS in response to the increased concentration of LEUCINE.Anaerobiosis: The complete absence, or (loosely) the paucity, of gaseous or dissolved elemental oxygen in a given place or environment. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)alpha-Glucosidases: Enzymes that catalyze the exohydrolysis of 1,4-alpha-glucosidic linkages with release of alpha-glucose. Deficiency of alpha-1,4-glucosidase may cause GLYCOGEN STORAGE DISEASE TYPE II.Genes, Reporter: Genes whose expression is easily detectable and therefore used to study promoter activity at many positions in a target genome. In recombinant DNA technology, these genes may be attached to a promoter region of interest.Glucosidases: Enzymes that hydrolyze O-glucosyl-compounds. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 3.2.1.-.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Suppression, Genetic: Mutation process that restores the wild-type PHENOTYPE in an organism possessing a mutationally altered GENOTYPE. The second "suppressor" mutation may be on a different gene, on the same gene but located at a distance from the site of the primary mutation, or in extrachromosomal genes (EXTRACHROMOSOMAL INHERITANCE).Aconitate Hydratase: An enzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of cis-aconitate to yield citrate or isocitrate. It is one of the citric acid cycle enzymes. EC 4.2.1.3.Phosphotransferases (Nitrogenous Group Acceptor): A group of enzymes that catalyzes the transfer of a phosphate group onto a nitrogenous group acceptor. EC 2.7.3.Xylosidases: A group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of alpha- or beta-xylosidic linkages. EC 3.2.1.8 catalyzes the endo-hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-xylosidic linkages; EC 3.2.1.32 catalyzes the endo-hydrolysis of 1,3-beta-D-xylosidic linkages; EC 3.2.1.37 catalyzes the exo-hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-linkages from the non-reducing termini of xylans; and EC 3.2.1.72 catalyzes the exo-hydrolysis of 1,3-beta-D-linkages from the non-reducing termini of xylans. Other xylosidases have been identified that catalyze the hydrolysis of alpha-xylosidic bonds.Glycerol Kinase: An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of glycerol 3-phosphate from ATP and glycerol. Dihydroxyacetone and L-glyceraldehyde can also act as acceptors; UTP and, in the case of the yeast enzyme, ITP and GTP can act as donors. It provides a way for glycerol derived from fats or glycerides to enter the glycolytic pathway. EC 2.7.1.30.Regulatory Sequences, Nucleic Acid: Nucleic acid sequences involved in regulating the expression of genes.Acetoin: A product of fermentation. It is a component of the butanediol cycle in microorganisms. In mammals it is oxidized to carbon dioxide.PyruvatesStyrene: A colorless, toxic liquid with a strong aromatic odor. It is used to make rubbers, polymers and copolymers, and polystyrene plastics.Acetates: Derivatives of ACETIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxymethane structure.Aerobiosis: Life or metabolic reactions occurring in an environment containing oxygen.Benzyl Alcohols: Alcohols derived from the aryl radical (C6H5CH2-) and defined by C6H5CHOH. The concept includes derivatives with any substituents on the benzene ring.Indole-3-Glycerol-Phosphate Synthase: An enzyme in the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway. EC 4.1.1.48.Genetic Complementation Test: A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.Mutagenesis, Insertional: Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.Histidine: An essential amino acid that is required for the production of HISTAMINE.Cell-Free System: A fractionated cell extract that maintains a biological function. A subcellular fraction isolated by ultracentrifugation or other separation techniques must first be isolated so that a process can be studied free from all of the complex side reactions that occur in a cell. The cell-free system is therefore widely used in cell biology. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p166)Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Phosphotransferases: A rather large group of enzymes comprising not only those transferring phosphate but also diphosphate, nucleotidyl residues, and others. These have also been subdivided according to the acceptor group. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.7.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.MalatesBacillus megaterium: A species of bacteria whose spores vary from round to elongate. It is a common soil saprophyte.Toluene: A widely used industrial solvent.AmidohydrolasesFermentation: Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.GlucosidesLac Repressors: Bacterial repressor proteins that bind to the LAC OPERON and thereby prevent the synthesis of proteins involved in catabolism of LACTOSE. When lactose levels are high lac repressors undergo an allosteric change that causes their release from the DNA and the resumption of lac operon transcription.Transduction, Genetic: The transfer of bacterial DNA by phages from an infected bacterium to another bacterium. This also refers to the transfer of genes into eukaryotic cells by viruses. This naturally occurring process is routinely employed as a GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUE.Fructose-Bisphosphatase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of D-fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and water to D-fructose 6-phosphate and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.11.Biodegradation, Environmental: Elimination of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS; PESTICIDES and other waste using living organisms, usually involving intervention of environmental or sanitation engineers.Sugar Alcohol Dehydrogenases: Reversibly catalyzes the oxidation of a hydroxyl group of sugar alcohols to form a keto sugar, aldehyde or lactone. Any acceptor except molecular oxygen is permitted. Includes EC 1.1.1.; EC 1.1.2. and EC 1.1.99.DNA, Fungal: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of fungi.MethylglucosidesMutagenesis: Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria commonly isolated from clinical specimens (wound, burn, and urinary tract infections). It is also found widely distributed in soil and water. P. aeruginosa is a major agent of nosocomial infection.Restriction Mapping: Use of restriction endonucleases to analyze and generate a physical map of genomes, genes, or other segments of DNA.Thiogalactosides: Galactosides in which the oxygen atom linking the sugar and aglycone is replaced by a sulfur atom.Membrane Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of molecules across a biological membrane. Included in this broad category are proteins involved in active transport (BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT, ACTIVE), facilitated transport and ION CHANNELS.Alcohol Oxidoreductases: A subclass of enzymes which includes all dehydrogenases acting on primary and secondary alcohols as well as hemiacetals. They are further classified according to the acceptor which can be NAD+ or NADP+ (subclass 1.1.1), cytochrome (1.1.2), oxygen (1.1.3), quinone (1.1.5), or another acceptor (1.1.99).Endo-1,4-beta Xylanases: Enzymes which catalyze the endohydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-xylosidic linkages in XYLANS.DNA Footprinting: A method for determining the sequence specificity of DNA-binding proteins. DNA footprinting utilizes a DNA damaging agent (either a chemical reagent or a nuclease) which cleaves DNA at every base pair. DNA cleavage is inhibited where the ligand binds to DNA. (from Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)Trans-Activators: Diffusible gene products that act on homologous or heterologous molecules of viral or cellular DNA to regulate the expression of proteins.Hydro-Lyases: Enzymes that catalyze the breakage of a carbon-oxygen bond leading to unsaturated products via the removal of water. EC 4.2.1.Proline: A non-essential amino acid that is synthesized from GLUTAMIC ACID. It is an essential component of COLLAGEN and is important for proper functioning of joints and tendons.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Pectins: High molecular weight polysaccharides present in the cell walls of all plants. Pectins cement cell walls together. They are used as emulsifiers and stabilizers in the food industry. They have been tried for a variety of therapeutic uses including as antidiarrheals, where they are now generally considered ineffective, and in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia.Transcriptional Activation: Processes that stimulate the GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of a gene or set of genes.Agmatine: Decarboxylated arginine, isolated from several plant and animal sources, e.g., pollen, ergot, herring sperm, octopus muscle.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Down-Regulation: A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Citric Acid Cycle: A series of oxidative reactions in the breakdown of acetyl units derived from GLUCOSE; FATTY ACIDS; or AMINO ACIDS by means of tricarboxylic acid intermediates. The end products are CARBON DIOXIDE, water, and energy in the form of phosphate bonds.NitrosoguanidinesElectrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay: An electrophoretic technique for assaying the binding of one compound to another. Typically one compound is labeled to follow its mobility during electrophoresis. If the labeled compound is bound by the other compound, then the mobility of the labeled compound through the electrophoretic medium will be retarded.Zinc Fingers: Motifs in DNA- and RNA-binding proteins whose amino acids are folded into a single structural unit around a zinc atom. In the classic zinc finger, one zinc atom is bound to two cysteines and two histidines. In between the cysteines and histidines are 12 residues which form a DNA binding fingertip. By variations in the composition of the sequences in the fingertip and the number and spacing of tandem repeats of the motif, zinc fingers can form a large number of different sequence specific binding sites.Dicarboxylic AcidsGlutamate-Ammonia Ligase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ATP, L-glutamate, and NH3 to ADP, orthophosphate, and L-glutamine. It also acts more slowly on 4-methylene-L-glutamate. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 6.3.1.2.Cellulase: An endocellulase with specificity for the hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-glucosidic linkages in CELLULOSE, lichenin, and cereal beta-glucans.Sequence Deletion: Deletion of sequences of nucleic acids from the genetic material of an individual.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Pseudomonas: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. Some species are pathogenic for humans, animals, and plants.Ketoglutaric Acids: A family of compounds containing an oxo group with the general structure of 1,5-pentanedioic acid. (From Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p442)Isomerases: A class of enzymes that catalyze geometric or structural changes within a molecule to form a single product. The reactions do not involve a net change in the concentrations of compounds other than the substrate and the product.(from Dorland, 28th ed) EC 5.Alkanes: The generic name for the group of aliphatic hydrocarbons Cn-H2n+2. They are denoted by the suffix -ane. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.HexosephosphatesBlotting, Northern: Detection of RNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.Glutamates: Derivatives of GLUTAMIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the 2-aminopentanedioic acid structure.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Streptococcus gordonii: A species of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria in the family STREPTOCOCCACEAE. It is a normal inhabitant of the human oral cavity, and causes DENTAL PLAQUE and ENDOCARDITIS. It is being investigated as a vehicle for vaccine delivery.Salmonella typhimurium: A serotype of Salmonella enterica that is a frequent agent of Salmonella gastroenteritis in humans. It also causes PARATYPHOID FEVER.Pectobacterium chrysanthemi: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that causes vascular wilts on a wide range of plant species. It was formerly named Erwinia chrysanthemi.Sorbitol: A polyhydric alcohol with about half the sweetness of sucrose. Sorbitol occurs naturally and is also produced synthetically from glucose. It was formerly used as a diuretic and may still be used as a laxative and in irrigating solutions for some surgical procedures. It is also used in many manufacturing processes, as a pharmaceutical aid, and in several research applications.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.CitratesTryptophan: An essential amino acid that is necessary for normal growth in infants and for NITROGEN balance in adults. It is a precursor of INDOLE ALKALOIDS in plants. It is a precursor of SEROTONIN (hence its use as an antidepressant and sleep aid). It can be a precursor to NIACIN, albeit inefficiently, in mammals.Acetic Acid: Product of the oxidation of ethanol and of the destructive distillation of wood. It is used locally, occasionally internally, as a counterirritant and also as a reagent. (Stedman, 26th ed)Protein Biosynthesis: The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Hydrolases: Any member of the class of enzymes that catalyze the cleavage of the substrate and the addition of water to the resulting molecules, e.g., ESTERASES, glycosidases (GLYCOSIDE HYDROLASES), lipases, NUCLEOTIDASES, peptidases (PEPTIDE HYDROLASES), and phosphatases (PHOSPHORIC MONOESTER HYDROLASES). EC 3.GlucosephosphatesSinorhizobium meliloti: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that causes formation of root nodules on some, but not all, types of sweet clover, MEDICAGO SATIVA, and fenugreek.Asparaginase: A hydrolase enzyme that converts L-asparagine and water to L-aspartate and NH3. EC 3.5.1.1.Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Glycosides: Any compound that contains a constituent sugar, in which the hydroxyl group attached to the first carbon is substituted by an alcoholic, phenolic, or other group. They are named specifically for the sugar contained, such as glucoside (glucose), pentoside (pentose), fructoside (fructose), etc. Upon hydrolysis, a sugar and nonsugar component (aglycone) are formed. (From Dorland, 28th ed; From Miall's Dictionary of Chemistry, 5th ed)Consensus Sequence: A theoretical representative nucleotide or amino acid sequence in which each nucleotide or amino acid is the one which occurs most frequently at that site in the different sequences which occur in nature. The phrase also refers to an actual sequence which approximates the theoretical consensus. A known CONSERVED SEQUENCE set is represented by a consensus sequence. Commonly observed supersecondary protein structures (AMINO ACID MOTIFS) are often formed by conserved sequences.Multigene Family: A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Spores, Bacterial: Heat and stain resistant, metabolically inactive bodies formed within the vegetative cells of bacteria of the genera Bacillus and Clostridium.Monosaccharide Transport Proteins: A large group of membrane transport proteins that shuttle MONOSACCHARIDES across CELL MEMBRANES.Transformation, Genetic: Change brought about to an organisms genetic composition by unidirectional transfer (TRANSFECTION; TRANSDUCTION, GENETIC; CONJUGATION, GENETIC, etc.) and incorporation of foreign DNA into prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells by recombination of part or all of that DNA into the cell's genome.Streptococcus mutans: A polysaccharide-producing species of STREPTOCOCCUS isolated from human dental plaque.Gene Silencing: Interruption or suppression of the expression of a gene at transcriptional or translational levels.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Epigenetic Repression: The turning off of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION in certain regions of CHROMATIN without changes in the DNA sequence. Typically epigenetic repression is a way that developmental changes are programmed at the cellular level.Mannitol: A diuretic and renal diagnostic aid related to sorbitol. It has little significant energy value as it is largely eliminated from the body before any metabolism can take place. It can be used to treat oliguria associated with kidney failure or other manifestations of inadequate renal function and has been used for determination of glomerular filtration rate. Mannitol is also commonly used as a research tool in cell biological studies, usually to control osmolarity.Oxidoreductases: The class of all enzymes catalyzing oxidoreduction reactions. The substrate that is oxidized is regarded as a hydrogen donor. The systematic name is based on donor:acceptor oxidoreductase. The recommended name will be dehydrogenase, wherever this is possible; as an alternative, reductase can be used. Oxidase is only used in cases where O2 is the acceptor. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p9)Chromosomes, Bacterial: Structures within the nucleus of bacterial cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.Carboxylic Acids: Organic compounds containing the carboxy group (-COOH). This group of compounds includes amino acids and fatty acids. Carboxylic acids can be saturated, unsaturated, or aromatic.Mutagenesis, Site-Directed: Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.Glycolysis: A metabolic process that converts GLUCOSE into two molecules of PYRUVIC ACID through a series of enzymatic reactions. Energy generated by this process is conserved in two molecules of ATP. Glycolysis is the universal catabolic pathway for glucose, free glucose, or glucose derived from complex CARBOHYDRATES, such as GLYCOGEN and STARCH.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Adenylate Cyclase: An enzyme of the lyase class that catalyzes the formation of CYCLIC AMP and pyrophosphate from ATP. EC 4.6.1.1.Extrachromosomal Inheritance: Vertical transmission of hereditary characters by DNA from cytoplasmic organelles such as MITOCHONDRIA; CHLOROPLASTS; and PLASTIDS, or from PLASMIDS or viral episomal DNA.Integration Host Factors: Bacterial proteins that are used by BACTERIOPHAGES to incorporate their DNA into the DNA of the "host" bacteria. They are DNA-binding proteins that function in genetic recombination as well as in transcriptional and translational regulation.

Transcriptional analysis of differential carbohydrate utilization by Clostridium acetobutylicum. (1/31)

 (+info)

Catabolite repression of Aox in Pichia pastoris is dependent on hexose transporter PpHxt1 and pexophagy. (2/31)

 (+info)

Simultaneous consumption of pentose and hexose sugars: an optimal microbial phenotype for efficient fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass. (3/31)

 (+info)

Escherichia coli mhpR gene expression is regulated by catabolite repression mediated by the cAMP-CRP complex. (4/31)

 (+info)

Metabolomics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals compartmentalized co-catabolism of carbon substrates. (5/31)

 (+info)

Computational prediction of the Crc regulon identifies genus-wide and species-specific targets of catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas bacteria. (6/31)

 (+info)

cAMP receptor protein (CRP) positively regulates the yihU-yshA operon in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. (7/31)

 (+info)

Multifactorial induction of an orphan PKS-NRPS gene cluster in Aspergillus terreus. (8/31)

 (+info)

*Diauxie

Stülke J, Hillen W. (1999). "Carbon catabolite repression in bacteria". Current Opinion in Microbiology. 2 (2): 195-201. doi: ... is required for the catabolite activator protein (CAP) to bind to DNA and activate the transcription of the lac operon, which ...

*Fed-batch culture

4. Catabolite repression[1] When a microorganism is provided with a rapidly metabolizable carbon-energy source such as glucose ... A powerful method of overcoming the catabolite repression in the enzyme biosynthesis is a fed-batch culture in which glucose ... This phenomenon is known as catabolite repression. Many enzymes, especially those involved in catabolic pathways, are subject ... Substrate limitation also allows the metabolic control, to avoid osmotic effects, catabolite repression and overflow metabolism ...

*Streptomyces albaduncus

Harchand, R. K.; Singh, S (1994). "Catabolite repression of cellulase biosynthesis in Streptomyces albaduncus". Journal of ...

*Ian A. Graham

Graham, I. A.; Denby, K. J.; Leaver, C. J. (1994). "Carbon Catabolite Repression Regulates Glyoxylate Cycle Gene Expression in ...

*Thermotoga neapolitana

Vargas M; Noll KM (January 1996). "Catabolite repression in the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana is ...

*CrcZ

... is a small RNA found in Pseudomonas bacteria, which acts as a global regulator of carbon catabolite repression. In P. ... Sonnleitner, E; Bläsi, U (Jun 2014). "Regulation of Hfq by the RNA CrcZ in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Carbon Catabolite Repression ... Sonnleitner, E.; Abdou, L.; Haas, D. (2009). "Small RNA as global regulator of carbon catabolite repression in Pseudomonas ... and catabolite repression is high. In the presence of poor sources of carbon, such as mannitol, CrcZ expression is high, ...

*Super Optimal Broth

... with Catabolite repression (SOC) is SOB with added glucose. (Figures in parentheses are the masses required ...

*Clostridium difficile toxin A

Environmental stresses such as antibiotics and catabolite repression can influence toxin expression. The tcdA and tcdB genes ...

*Crc (protein)

2012). "The catabolite repression control protein Crc plays a role in the development of antimicrobial-tolerant subpopulations ... The Catabolite repression control (Crc) protein participates in suppressing expression of several genes involved in utilization ... Sonnleitner, E; Bläsi, U (2014). "Regulation of Hfq by the RNA CrcZ in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Carbon Catabolite Repression". ... Sonnleitner, E; Bläsi, U (2014). "Regulation of Hfq by the RNA CrcZ in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Carbon Catabolite Repression". ...

*Aspergillus versicolor

Xylanase is a secondary metabolite controlled through gene-specific induction and carbon catabolite repression. Many ...

*Lac operon

Two puzzles of catabolite repression relate to how cAMP levels are coupled to the presence of glucose, and secondly, why the ... Catabolite repression Griffiths, Anthony J.F.; Wessler, Susan R.; Carroll, Sean B.; Doebley, John (2015). An Introduction to ... Görke B, Stülke J (August 2008). "Carbon catabolite repression in bacteria: many ways to make the most out of nutrients". ... Binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter is aided by the cAMP-bound catabolite activator protein (CAP, also known as the cAMP ...

*Mechanistic target of rapamycin

Peter GJ, Düring L, Ahmed A (March 2006). "Carbon catabolite repression regulates amino acid permeases in Saccharomyces ... "Sustained translational repression by eIF2α-P mediates prion neurodegeneration". Nature. 485 (7399): 507-11. doi:10.1038/ ... "PML inhibits HIF-1alpha translation and neoangiogenesis through repression of mTOR". Nature. 442 (7104): 779-85. doi:10.1038/ ...

*Isobutanol

Nakashima, Nobutaka; Tamura, Tomohiro (1 July 2012). "A new carbon catabolite repression mutation of Escherichia coli, mlc∗, ...

*Penicillium decumbens

"Transcription analysis of lignocellulolytic enzymes of Penicillium decumbens 114-2 and its catabolite-repression-resistant ...

*Sucrose phosphorylase

Global regulation of DNA molecules containing the gene for sucrose phosphorylase is performed by catabolite repression. First ...

*Walter Dobrogosz

Lee JH, Dobrogosz WJ (May 1983). "Effects of aerobic and anaerobic shock on catabolite repression in cyclic AMP suppressor ... In particular, his research focused on the phenomenon of catabolite repression, a regulatory system involving interactions of ... cyclic AMP, the catabolite repressor protein (CRP) complex, and the lac operon and other inducible systems in bacteria. The ...

*KduI/IolB isomerase family

Glucose repression of the iol operon induced by inositol is exerted through catabolite repression mediated by CcpA and the iol ... Miwa Y, Fujita Y (October 2001). "Involvement of two distinct catabolite-responsive elements in catabolite repression of the ...

*GalP (protein)

Galactose is an alternate carbon source to the preferable glucose . The cAMP/CRP catabolite repression regulator is most likely ... 5. El Qaidi, S., Allemand, J.O., and Plumbridge, J. (2009). Repression of galP, the galactose transporter in Escerichia coli, ... so both of these proteins are required for repression (11). cAMP is what modulates CRP at the promoter. The cAMP-CRP complex ... a protein from the nagC gene which is responsible for N-acetylglucosamine repression (5). This study suspects that NagC ...

*Morpheein

2004). "HPr kinase/phosphorylase, a Walker motif A-containing bifunctional sensor enzyme controlling catabolite repression in ...

*Spot 42 RNA

"The Base-Pairing RNA Spot 42 Participates in a Multioutput Feedforward Loop to Help Enact Catabolite Repression in Escherichia ... The direct responsiveness of Spot 42 levels to glucose and cAMP is due to repression of spf expression by a cAMP-CRP (cAMP- ...

*P. N. Rangarajan

CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Vijay Kumar, N. ; Rangarajan, P. N. (2011). "Catabolite repression of ... Rabies vaccine Foot-and-mouth disease Plasmodium falciparum Catabolite repression India portal Medicine portal Long link - ...

*Quorum sensing

This explains why, when grown with glucose, E. coli will lose the ability to internalize AI-2 (because of catabolite repression ...

*Changestat

... biology approach reveals that overflow metabolism of acetate in Escherichia coli is triggered by carbon catabolite repression ...

*Expression vector

... most commonly used lac or lac-derived promoters are based on the lacUV5 mutant which is insensitive to catabolite repression. ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Silverstone AE, Arditti RR, Magasanik B (1970). "Catabolite-insensitive ...

*Selman A. Waksman Award in Microbiology

Boris Magasanik (1993) For his contributions to our understanding of catabolite repression, amino acid metabolism, and ...

*Dcu family

... while it is repressed by nitrate and subject to CRP-mediated catabolite repression. DcuC family Zientz E, Six S, Unden G ( ...

*Farnesoid X receptor

nitrogen catabolite activation of transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter. • negative regulation of tumor necrosis factor ... "Correlation of farnesoid X receptor coactivator recruitment and cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase gene repression by bile acids". ...

*Boris Magasanik

... catabolite repression, and intracellular signaling via two-component systems. Magasanik retired in 1990 and died in 2013. ...
URC will again have a significant presence at this years Union World Conference on Lung Health from October 30-November 3 in Paris, France. In many of the 22 countries that account for more than 80% of TB cases worldwide, we are supporting national TB programs through innovative approaches to address systemic barriers to effective prevention and treatment. The conference provides an opportunity to share our TB work with thousands of health care professionals, researchers, and advocates.
The USAID Applying Science to Strengthen and Improve Systems (ASSIST) Project published a 24-page technical report, Tanzania-Kenya knowledge exchange for the Partnership for HIV-Free Survival, in May 2016 for the Partnership for HIV-Free Survival (PHFS) Project. The knowledge exchange was held between PHFS-participating country representatives from Tanzania and Kenya in partnership with the Ministries of Health of Tanzania and Kenya. It was organized by the ASSIST Project with support from University Research Co., LLC (URC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), and the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP). The report was authored by Patty Webster of IHI, Sidhartha Deka of CCP, and Amy Stern of URC.
... je systém yogového cvičenia, ktorý je zameraný na plynulé prepájanie pohybu s dychom. Počas hodiny sú podrobne vysvetľované princípy každej yogovej pozície (asány) a je vždy možné zvoliť aj ich jednoduchšie varianty. Aj preto je hodina vhodná tak pre začiatočníkov, ako aj pokročilých cvičencov, obtiažnosť je možné zvoliť si individuálne. Celkovo je však Vinyasa Power Joga dynamickejšia v nadväznosti jednotlivých asán. Určite si zacvičia všetci, ktorí majú vysoké nároky na náročnosť a aj na samotnú techniku.. ...
AMSTERDAM, NL (February 11, 2020)-URC, a global leader in smart automation and control for residential and commercial applications, launched today a 2-way IP module for integration of its award-winning Total Control system with Symetrix Radius NX, Prism, Solus and Edge DSP models. The module, available today to authorized URC installers via URCs dealer portal, allows commercial facilities managers using any URC Total Control touch screen or the Total Control smartphone application to control independent channels or zones of audio routed thru compatible Symetrix DSP models.. "The addition of these new models from Symetrix to our portfolio of two-way modules greatly expands the commercial applications - from bars and restaurants, houses of worship, meeting rooms, to larger venues such as whole resort facilities, banquet halls and stadiums," said Lars Granoe, URCs Vice President of Product Management. "Symetrix is world-renown for delivering high performance audio DSP hardware and software, ...
Biotin-11-dUTP is able to replace dTTP in growing DNA-strands and is used for efficient non-radioactive DNA-labelling. As a general rule, the labelled DNA is then detected using streptavidin-conjugates by colorimetric (e.g. streptavidin-AP) or fluorometric (e.g. fluorescein-streptavidin) assays ...
The [email protected] Centre provides a platform for research students to deposit their Ph.D. theses and make it available to the entire scholarly community in open access ...
University Records Center Ltd. (URC) was set up in 2010 to enable employers to assess the academic results of Japanese universities.
(Blogpost from Usha Periyanayagam in Cambodia) This project Im working on is through Stanfords collaboration with URC, University Research Consortion, and is funded by USAID. URC is in the middle of a five year project (Better Health Services) with the Cambodia government that has wide goals, including providing funding for very low income patients, implementing…
Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) is a mechanism by which micro-organisms preferentially utilize more easily metabolizable carbon sources in comparison to less easily metabolizable carbon sources. It prevents the organisms from unnecessary expenditure of energy and enables them to exploit the nutrients in appropriate manner. It represents a complex system of gene regulation. The main aim of this study was to study the intracellular localization of proteins involved in CCR including CreA, CreB, CreC and CreD in A. nidulans in repressing and derepressing conditions. The major regulatory protein involved in CCR in A. nidulans is CreA. It is a DNA-binding repressor, but very little is known about the molecular events that allow CreA function to result in appropriate regulation in response to carbon source. To determine the amount and localization of CreA in different carbon sources, strains were made over-expressing GFP and HA tagged CreA. Western analysis showed that high levels of full length ...
pkgsrc 2009Q1 bulk build results NetBSD 4.0/powerpc Compiler: gcc Summary: Build started: Mon May 11 15:59:54 2009 UTC Build ended: Fri May 15 10:51:33 2009 UTC Successfully packaged: 6268 Packages really broken: 261 Pkgs broken due to them: 1433 Total broken: 1694 Not packaged: 0 Not available: 323 Total: 1694 Packages not listed here resulted in a binary package. The build report, including logs of failed/not-packaged is available from: ftp://malus.urc.uninett.no/pub/NetBSD/pkgstat/20090511.1545/report.html Top Ten Offenders Package Breaks Maintainer -------------------------------------------------------------- devel/libffi 1293 asau%[email protected] fonts/libfontenc 49 joerg%[email protected] x11/xkbcomp 44 joerg%[email protected] math/p5-Math-Pari 8 pkgsrc-users%[email protected] www/p5-Catalyst-Devel 7 pkgsrc-users%[email protected] emulators/darwin_lib 6 abacau%[email protected] math/cln 6 adam%[email protected] x11/libXprintUtil 6 joerg%[email protected] ...
The catabolism of glucose and xylose was studied in a wild type and creA deleted (carbon catabolite de-repressed) strain of Aspergillus nidulans. Both strains were cultivated in bioreactors with either glucose or xylose as the sole carbon source, or in the presence of both sugars. In the cultivations on single carbon sources, it was demonstrated that xylose acted as a carbon catabolite repressor (xylose cultivations), while the enzymes in the xylose utilisation pathway were also subject to repression in the presence of glucose (glucose cultivations). In the wild type strain growing on the sugar mixture, glucose repression of xylose utilisation was observed; with xylose utilisation occurring only after glucose was depleted. This phenomenon was not seen in the creA deleted strain, where glucose and xylose were catabolised simultaneously. Measurement of key metabolites and the activities of key enzymes in the xylose utilisation pathway revealed that xylose metabolism was occurring in the creA ...
The ACO1 gene, encoding mitochondrial aconitase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is required both for oxidative metabolism and for glutamate prototrophy. This gene is subject to catabolite repression; the ACO1 mRNA level is further reduced when glutamate is supplied with glucose. To further explore regulation of ACO1 expression, we have screened for mutations that reduce expression of an ACO1-lacZ fusion borne on a multicopy vector. We identified a gene required for wild-type expression of ACO1 only under catabolite repression conditions. Sequencing of the corresponding cloned gene revealed that it is identical to RTG2 previously cloned as a pivotal gene in controlling interorganelle retrograde communication. Cells containing either the original rtg2-2 mutation or a null rtg2 allele are not petite but show a residual growth on minimum glucose medium with ammonium sulfate as the sole nitrogen source. This growth defect is partially restored by supplying aspartate or threonine, and fully with ...
M-am uitat in clipa aceea in jos, si nu vedeam "josul", pamantul, solul, sau capatul inferior al scarii, insa am vazut, atunci, prima data, si m-a luat ameteala, ca scara este dreapta, abrupta, la 90 de grade, si imi era teribil de frica ca voi cadea si chiar nu stiam cum sa nu cad, pentru ca mai stiam ca va trebui sa ma ridic de pe treapta aceea, la un moment dat, si sa urc, indarat, deci mai sus, sa ma intorc cu spatele la treapta pe care sedeam acum si sa urc scara, in sus ( fac un pleonasm, dar sa fie foarte, foarte precis ce spun ). ...
Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO·) are toxic metabolites that immune cells use to attack pathogens. These antimicrobials can be present at the same time in phagosomes, and it remains unclear how bacteria deal with these insults when simultaneously present. Here, using Escherichia coli, we observed that simultaneous exposure to H2O2 and NO· leads to prioritized detoxification, where enzymatic removal of NO· is impeded until H2O2 has been eliminated. This phenomenon is reminiscent of carbon catabolite repression (CCR), where preferred carbon sources are catabolized prior to less desirable substrates; however, H2O2 and NO· are toxic, growth-inhibitory compounds rather than growth-promoting nutrients. To understand how NO· detoxification is delayed by H2O2 whereas H2O2 detoxification proceeds unimpeded, we confirmed that the effect depended on Hmp, which is the main NO· detoxification enzyme, and used an approach that integrated computational modeling and experimentation to ...
Dear netters, Can anyone here tell me some recently published reviews on gene cloning technique? Thanks. -- --------------------------------------K.U.Leuven--------------------- HUANG Zhong Lab of Gut Hormone =, http://urc1.cc.kuleuven.ac.be/~m9631766/ Gasthuisberg, B-3000 =, e-mail: huang.zhong at med.kuleuven.ac.be Leuven, Belgium =, Fax: 32-16-345939 Tel: 32-16-345750 ...
An easy-to-use directory for life science and biomedical research products. Find special deals on products, order catalogs and browse product lines from suppliers of reagents, antibodies, laboratory equipment, and more.
More information is available in the following publications:. Colombo, G. V., Urine Pretreatment Mixer (UPM), Final Report NASA Contract NAS8-36526, October 1986.. Colombo, G. V. and Putnam, D.F., Removal of Contaminant Gases from an Electrolytic Urine Pretreatment Process, SAE Technical Paper Series No. 77-ENAs-61, presented at 7th Intersociety Conference on Environmental Systems, San Francisco, CA, July 1977.. Colombo, G. V. and Putnam, D.F., Electrolytic Pretreatment Unit Gaseous Effluent Conditioning, Final Report NASA Contract NAS9-14217, August 1976.. ...
The acronym IBD identifies the ulcerative colitis (URC), Crohns disease (CD) and the undeterminate colitis (UC) 7. Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by variegated etiopathogenesis, probably autoimmune. They have in common a histological damage of a granulomatous/ulcerative kind and also the same manifestations which includes the alternation of remissions and exacerbations 1. They have a remarkable familiarity (13.5%) although it is more evident in CD than in URC. The incidence of IBD varies according to different geographical areas but with a steady increasing trend above all in CD and the diffusion seems to be linked to genetic factors (association with HLA-A2 and B 18) and to geographical factors ...
Background Many Firmicutes bacteria, including solvent-producing clostridia such as Clostridium acetobutylicum, are able to utilize xylose, an abundant carbon source in nature. Nevertheless, homology...
There is provided an engineered host cells comprising (a) one or more mutations in one or more endogenous genes encoding a protein associated with iron metabolism; and (b) at least one gene encoding a polypeptide having xylose isomerase activity, and methods of their use thereof.
Synthesis of penicillinamidohydrolase (penicillin acylase, EC 3.5.1.11) inEscherichia coli is subjected to the absolute catabolite repression by glucose and partial repression by acetate. Both types of catabolite repression of synthesis of the enzyme inEscherichia coli are substantially influenced by cyclic 3,′5′-adenosinemonophosphate (cAMP). Growth diauxie in a mixed medium containing glucose and phenylaoetic acid serving as carbon and energy sources is overcome by cAMP. cAMP does not influence the basal rate of the enzyme synthesis (without the inducer). Derepression of synthesis of penicillinamidohydrolasa by cAMP in a medium with glucose and inducer (phenylacetic acid) is associated with utilization of the inducer, due probably to derepression of other enzymes responsible for degradation of phenylacetic acid. Lactate can serve as a
MIU 1 p. . VOL. XXXIII. COLUMBUS, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1872. tNO. 39. I xll I I II i ,f ir . i" :t::to oCiuk a. m. HAYLER-KEMF tAHE. We publish In another column the majority report of the committee on Privileges and Election in the contented election cone in the Ohio Semite After ft very careful rcperuna. of thin report, we urc fully prepared to coincide in the opin Ion bo universally expmwed umour Repub Ikw. both In and oat.of the Senate, that it in art unanswerable argument. Hhorf, clear and comprehenHtve, the very utatc-mcnt of the proportion nddueed aro in tliemwlvena logical chain nf Impregnable reasoning. The author of the report-Mr. Hart, chairman of the committee Iiuh con lined himwlf strictly to the legal , and condtitutionul qnesUoiM involved in the cane, and I kip excluded all political or patriotic side-iiwuo which no naturally connect tlirmwlvc with the qucftionH, and muxt have ho htrongly tempted him in that direction. - w . The report hIiowh with great clenrneii that "no ...
When both glucose and lactose are present in the medium, the transcription of the genes z, y and a are inhibited. This phenomenon is called catabolite repression or glucose effect. The effect of
1MO1: Crystal Structure at 1.8 A of the Bacillus Subtil Catabolite Bacillus Subtilis Catabolite Repression Containing Protein (Crh) Reveals an Unexpected Swapping Domain as an Untertwinned Dimer
Exogenous anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate specifically increases xylose utilization during mixed sugar fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB ...
The discipline of soil science continued its wide coverage of research programme on organic matter management supported by (USAID), soil test crop response studies for fertilizer recommendation (URC), diagnosis of nutrient disorders of the root crops of the South Pacific Asian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR), management of sloping land (IBSRAM), and the studies on patterns of soil moisture depletion (URC). Most of these studies were carried out at the Alafua and Laloanea research fields of the Alafua Campus and some were on farmers fields.. The objective of the organic matter management study was to compare the effects of lime and green manure on dry matter yield and nutrient content of two consecutive 28-day cropping of maize seedlings, and on selected soil chemical properties of an acid Oxisol in Samoa. The growth responses of maize in this experiment demonstrated that soil acidity of an acid Oxisol can be alleviated by either lime or green manure additions. Furthermore, ...
Summary: A mutation in a gene designated gmdA has been found to lead to loss of ability of Aspergillus nidulans to use benzamide, phenylacetamide and several other amides as sole nitrogen sources for growth. The gmdAI lesion results in low levels of an enzyme, called the general amidase, which has activity for a wide range of amide substrates. This enzyme is repressed by certain nitrogen-containing metabolites, including ammonium, but is probably not regulated by induction or by carbon catabolite repression. Evidence is presented for the general amidase being distinct from the previously characterized acetamidase and formamidase enzymes. The data also indicate that there is a fourth amidase capable of the hydrolysis of valeramide and hexanamide.
Cameron McCoy is the AVP for Economic Engagement at Lehigh University. He is responsible for developing and executing an integrated strategic plan for the Lehigh Universitys economic engagement functions, including Industry Relations, Foundation Engagement, Career Services, Federal Agency - Industry - Lehigh relations, Research Park Development assessment, and some elements of Technology Transfer and Economic Development.. Prior to joining Lehigh in June of 2014, he served as the Executive Director of the Corporate Engagement Office (CEO) at the University of Oklahoma (OU) where he was responsible for the award winning University Research Campus (URC); supporting, coordinating, and integrating Research Enterprise activities with industry; simplifying external access to OU resources to maximize the impact of OU capabilities; expanding the engagement pipeline (current and new relationships) via targeted solutions; and growing external relationships with Oklahoma economic development ...
Margaret Hackett, 81, of Delray Beach said a nice man named Bob has been calling her on the telephone between 8 and 10 a.m. for the past three years.She had never met him, she said. She didn`t know
There was a weird experience I had, though, that I wanted to mention. One of the poster presentations was a summary of events that surrounded the end of the Korean War, including photos of the people involved: MacArthur, Truman, and others. I was looking at the poster and thinking about the current insanity happening on the Korean peninsula, and standing next to me was an Eastern Orthodox priest - I want to say he is a hieromonk because he was wearing a cassock and a rounded hat rather than a shirt and trousers with a collar. Additionally he was wearing a three-bar pectoral crucifix that is common especially to the Russian church. He had a full long gray beard, and I suspect he had a lot of hair; this is their tradition, and my immediate impression was that he was the genuine article. He also had a cane, which I think had nothing to do with the habit; he was an older gentleman, and I suspect is was a necessary appliance for him to use. In any case, as I looked at this poster, the student who was ...
Efficient xylose utilisation by microorganisms is of importance to the lignocellulose fermentation industry. The aim of this work was to develop constitutive catabolite repression mutants in a xylose-utilising recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain and evaluate the differences in xylose consumption under fermentation conditions. S. cerevisiae YUSM was constitutively catabolite repressed through specific disruptions within the MIG1 gene. The strains were grown aerobically in synthetic complete medium with xylose as the sole carbon source. Constitutive catabolite repressed strain YCR17 grew four-fold better on xylose in aerobic conditions than the control strain YUSM. Anaerobic batch fermentation in minimal medium with glucose-xylose mixtures and N-limited chemostats with varying sugar concentrations were performed. Sugar utilisation and metabolite production during fermentation were monitored. YCR17 exhibited a faster xylose consumption rate than YUSM under high glucose conditions in ...
For many years scientists have believed they understood how closely re... New research from the University of Washingtons Friday Harbor Lab... The importance for people is understanding the process. People co... In some places different sea urchin species breed at different ti... The purple sea urchin has been the most closely studied of the urc...,Sugar-coated,sea,urchin,eggs,could,have,sweet,implications,for,human,fertility,biological,biology news articles,biology news today,latest biology news,current biology news,biology newsletters
Posted on 03/22/2012 7:58:02 AM PDT by darrellmaurina. If youre a Free Republic participant, I already know youre a political conservative. If youre a member of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church, Presbyterian Church in America, or United Reformed Churches, and if you dont know what two kingdoms theology is, you need to read this post. What follows is the CO-URC version of posts I made today on the United Reformed and Orthodox Presbyterian listserves run by Christian Observer magazine. It responds to this thread on the Green Baggins blog owned by Rev. Lane Keister: http://greenbaggins.wordpress.com/2012/02/29/review-of-_the-escondido-theology_-general-considerations/#comments You can find the OPC and URC versions of my posts here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/co-urc/message/25024 http://groups.yahoo.com/group/presbyterians-opc/message/44787 Brothers, what is being taught by some professors at Weatminster Theological Seminary in California simply is not in accord with our Reformed ...
Grieve, Sarah and Young, Nicole, "Cytokeratin 8/18 Intermediate Filaments and their Role in Regression of the Bovine Corpus Luteum" (2006). Undergraduate Research Conference (URC) Student Presentations. 354 ...
AVAILABLE ON: Key Features: This amazing product is exactly what you need to treat dry, dull and damaged hairs in an effective manner for this beneficial solution helps repair, rejuvenate and revitalize the tresses like never before. Most importantly, this shampoo is free from dangerous chemicals, harsh metals and a
The BioPrime DNA Labeling System is specifically designed for use in the preparation of biotinylated probes. Random primers (octamers) are annealed to the denatured DNA template and extended by Klenow fragment in the presence of biotin-14-dCTP to produce sensitive biotinylated-DNA probes for use in
Dai unocchiata a questi esempi di libri sfogliabili per bambini per trovare ispirazione in vista delle tue pubblicazioni future e dei progetti da te ideati.
article{3edb5e2c-caaf-4646-9ecb-432a6bbf667b, abstract = {ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) is a promising process option for ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials. However, both the overall ethanol yield and the final ethanol concentration in the fermentation broth must be high. Hence, almost complete conversion of both hexoses and pentoses must be achieved in SSF at a high solid content. A principal difficulty is to obtain an efficient pentose uptake in the presence of high glucose and inhibitor concentrations. Initial glucose present in pretreated spruce decreases the xylose utilization by yeast, due to competitive inhibition of sugar transport. In the current work, prefermentation was studied as a possible means to overcome the problem of competitive inhibition. The free hexoses, initially present in the slurry, were in these experiments fermented before adding the enzymes, thereby lowering the glucose concentration. RESULTS: This work ...
Had the Committee checked with Baby Milk Action during the past three years, would it have come to a different decision about Nestlés claims and the proposal to put to the Assembly? In response to a Baby Milk Action letter-writing campaign in 2003 backed by pressure from the boycott, Nestlé not only admitted producing the above leaflets, it said it was "preparing new materials for health professionals in Southern Africa with increased focus on the factual and scientific matters in these materials." The boycott brings results. No wonder Nestlé wants the URC to end its support for the boycott and compromise its independence by profiting from its latest marketing campaign claiming Nestlé baby milk reduces diarrhoea.. The March 2010 decision by the Committee to invest came after Nestlés Vice President, Neils Christiansen, briefed Church officials in December 2009. On first glance the Baby Milk Action information included in the report for the Assembly has been taken from a briefing from 6 ...
QIAquick® Spin Columns can now be used on any vacuum manifold with luer connectors, for example, the QIAvac 6S or QIAvac 24 with QIAvac Luer Adapters. This protocol is designed for removal of primers ,10 bases, enzymes, salts, and unincorporated nucleotides from biotin-, or DIG-labeled DNA fragments and oligonucleotides ,17 nucleotides ...

A constitutive catabolite repression mutant of a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain improves xylose consumption during...A constitutive catabolite repression mutant of a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain improves xylose consumption during...

A constitutive catabolite repression mutant of a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain improves xylose consumption during ... The aim of this work was to develop constitutive catabolite repression mutants in a xylose-utilising recombinant Saccharomyces ... Constitutive catabolite repressed strain YCR17 grew four-fold better on xylose in aerobic conditions than the control strain ... This study shows that a constitutive catabolite repressed mutant could be used to enhance the xylose consumption rate even in ...
more infohttp://scholar.sun.ac.za/handle/10019.1/11872

The effect of CreA in glucose and xylose catabolism in Aspergillus nidulans - DTU OrbitThe effect of CreA in glucose and xylose catabolism in Aspergillus nidulans - DTU Orbit

The catabolism of glucose and xylose was studied in a wild type and creA deleted (carbon catabolite de-repressed) strain of ... glucose repression of xylose utilisation was observed; with xylose utilisation occurring only after glucose was depleted. This ... In the cultivations on single carbon sources, it was demonstrated that xylose acted as a carbon catabolite repressor (xylose ... activities of the key enzymes for xylose metabolism increased only when the effects of glucose repression had been relieved. ...
more infohttp://orbit.dtu.dk/en/publications/the-effect-of-crea-in-glucose-and-xylose-catabolism-in-aspergillus-nidulans

Catabolite repression - WikipediaCatabolite repression - Wikipedia

... β-galactosidase is under repression due to the effect of catabolite repression caused by glucose. The catabolite repression in ... Carbon catabolite repression, or simply catabolite repression, is an important part of global control system of various ... Note that E. coli has a similar cAMP-independent catabolite repression mechanism that utilizes a protein called catabolite ... Catabolite repression was extensively studied in Escherichia coli. E. coli grows faster on glucose than on any other carbon ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catabolite_repression

Adenosine 3:5-cyclic monophosphate as mediator of catabolite repression in Escherichia coli | PNASAdenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate as mediator of catabolite repression in Escherichia coli | PNAS

... in both catabolite repression and transient repression. These results, combined with extensive genetic and in vitro studies ... Adenosine 3:5-cyclic monophosphate as mediator of catabolite repression in Escherichia coli. W Epstein, L B Rothman-Denes, ... Adenosine 3:5-cyclic monophosphate as mediator of catabolite repression in Escherichia coli ... Adenosine 3:5-cyclic monophosphate as mediator of catabolite repression in Escherichia coli ...
more infohttps://www.pnas.org/content/72/6/2300?ijkey=6c121732e8c29764f247515f028986b3b9795145&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

Regulatory exaptation of the catabolite repression protein (Crp)-cAMP system in Pseudomonas putida.  - PubMed - NCBIRegulatory exaptation of the catabolite repression protein (Crp)-cAMP system in Pseudomonas putida. - PubMed - NCBI

Regulatory exaptation of the catabolite repression protein (Crp)-cAMP system in Pseudomonas putida.. Milanesio P1, Arce- ... encoding the catabolite repression protein, Crp) and cyaA (adenylate cyclase) of Escherichia coli. The levels of cAMP formed by ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21281420

Analysis of a cis-active sequence mediating catabolite repression in gram-positive bacteria.  - PubMed - NCBIAnalysis of a cis-active sequence mediating catabolite repression in gram-positive bacteria. - PubMed - NCBI

One form of catabolite repression (CR) in the Gram-positive genus, Bacillus, is mediated by a cis-acting element (CRE). We use ... Analysis of a cis-active sequence mediating catabolite repression in gram-positive bacteria.. Hueck CJ1, Hillen W, Saier MH Jr. ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7855437?dopt=Abstract

The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RTG2 Gene Is a Regulator of Aconitase Expression Under Catabolite Repression Conditions | GeneticsThe Saccharomyces cerevisiae RTG2 Gene Is a Regulator of Aconitase Expression Under Catabolite Repression Conditions | Genetics

This gene is subject to catabolite repression; the ACO1 mRNA level is further reduced when glutamate is supplied with glucose. ... We identified a gene required for wild-type expression of ACO1 only under catabolite repression conditions. Sequencing of the ... The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RTG2 Gene Is a Regulator of Aconitase Expression Under Catabolite Repression Conditions. Christian ... The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RTG2 Gene Is a Regulator of Aconitase Expression Under Catabolite Repression Conditions. Christian ...
more infohttp://www.genetics.org/content/144/3/893

Characterization of Escherichia coli Flagellar Mutants That are Insensitive to Catabolite Repression | Journal of BacteriologyCharacterization of Escherichia coli Flagellar Mutants That are Insensitive to Catabolite Repression | Journal of Bacteriology

Characterization of Escherichia coli Flagellar Mutants That are Insensitive to Catabolite Repression. Michael Silverman, Melvin ... Their synthesis was depressed in strains grown under conditions of catabolite repression. The presence of the cfs mutation ... In Escherichia coli, the synthesis of the flagellar organelle is sensitive to catabolite repression. Synthesis requires the ... Characterization of Escherichia coli Flagellar Mutants That are Insensitive to Catabolite Repression ...
more infohttps://jb.asm.org/content/120/3/1196?ijkey=5cbed8efef201ff4da737700950c8ab7607726d1&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

Mechanism of Catabolite Repression In The Archaeon Sulfolobus solfatar by Yukari Maezato"Mechanism of Catabolite Repression In The Archaeon Sulfolobus solfatar" by Yukari Maezato

Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) is a strategy to ensure optimal carbon metabolism. In this study, we employed Sulfolobus ... Mechanism of Catabolite Repression In The Archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. Yukari Maezato, University of Nebraska - Lincoln. ... Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) is a strategy to ensure optimal carbon metabolism. In this study, we employed Sulfolobus ... Maezato, Yukari, "Mechanism of Catabolite Repression In The Archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus" (2012). ETD collection for ...
more infohttps://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3512072/

Structure Cluster 









- 1MO1: CRYSTAL STRUCTURE AT 1.8 ANGSTROMS OF SELENO METHIONYLED CRH, THE BACILLUS SUBTILIS...Structure Cluster - 1MO1: CRYSTAL STRUCTURE AT 1.8 ANGSTROMS OF SELENO METHIONYLED CRH, THE BACILLUS SUBTILIS...

Crystal Structure at 1.8 A of the Bacillus Subtil Catabolite Bacillus Subtilis Catabolite Repression Containing Protein (Crh) ... CRYSTAL STRUCTURE AT 1.8 ANGSTROMS OF SELENO METHIONYLED CRH, THE BACILLUS SUBTILIS CATABOLITE REPRESSION CONTAINING PROTEIN ...
more infohttp://www.rcsb.org/pdb/explore/structureCluster.do?structureId=1MO1

Elements Involved in Catabolite Repression and Substrate Induction of the Lactose Operon in Lactobacillus casei | Journal of...Elements Involved in Catabolite Repression and Substrate Induction of the Lactose Operon in Lactobacillus casei | Journal of...

Elements Involved in Catabolite Repression and Substrate Induction of the Lactose Operon in Lactobacillus casei María José ... 1997) Catabolite repression in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 is mediated by CcpA. J. Bacteriol. 179:6657-6664. ... Elements Involved in Catabolite Repression and Substrate Induction of the Lactose Operon in Lactobacillus casei ... Elements Involved in Catabolite Repression and Substrate Induction of the Lactose Operon in Lactobacillus casei ...
more infohttps://jb.asm.org/content/181/13/3928?ijkey=3624b93e6e38167df0de432dc41b623f3cbd4cb0&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

CcpA mediates the catabolite repression of tst in Staphylococcus aureus  - Zurich Open Repository and ArchiveCcpA mediates the catabolite repression of tst in Staphylococcus aureus - Zurich Open Repository and Archive

Seidl, K; Bischoff, M; Berger-Bächi, B (2008). CcpA mediates the catabolite repression of tst in Staphylococcus aureus. ... We identified a putative catabolite responsive element (cre) in the promoter region of all known tst genes, indicating that tst ... We identified a putative catabolite responsive element (cre) in the promoter region of all known tst genes, indicating that tst ... whereas glucose repression was abolished in the corresponding DeltaccpA mutant. Stabilizing the pH ruled out a pH effect due to ...
more infohttp://www.zora.uzh.ch/id/eprint/3953/

DIGITAL.CSIC: Isolation of the MIG1 gene from Candida albicans and effects of its disruption on catabolite repressionDIGITAL.CSIC: Isolation of the MIG1 gene from Candida albicans and effects of its disruption on catabolite repression

Isolation of the MIG1 gene from Candida albicans and effects of its disruption on catabolite repression. ...
more infohttps://digital.csic.es/handle/10261/24308

Protein phosphorylation and allosteric control of inducer exclusion and catabolite repression by the bacterial...Protein phosphorylation and allosteric control of inducer exclusion and catabolite repression by the bacterial...

One of the best characterized of these is the process by which the PTS regulates inducer uptake and catabolite repression. ... Although the PTS-mediated regulation of cyclic AMP synthesis (catabolite repression) is not as well defined from a mechanistic ... Protein phosphorylation and allosteric control of inducer exclusion and catabolite repression by the bacterial ... Protein phosphorylation and allosteric control of inducer exclusion and catabolite repression by the bacterial ...
more infohttps://mmbr.asm.org/content/53/1/109?ijkey=4356e417fd953522191ff0d474b94f9cabb733ce&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

The Yeast GATA Factor Gat1 Occupies a Central Position in Nitrogen Catabolite Repression-Sensitive Gene Activation | Molecular...The Yeast GATA Factor Gat1 Occupies a Central Position in Nitrogen Catabolite Repression-Sensitive Gene Activation | Molecular...

Nitrogen catabolite repression of DAL80 expression depends on the relative levels of Gat1p and Ure2p production in ... Nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) restrains the yeasts capacity to use poor nitrogen sources when rich ones are available. ... The Yeast GATA Factor Gat1 Occupies a Central Position in Nitrogen Catabolite Repression-Sensitive Gene Activation. Isabelle ... Saccharomyces cerevisiae GATA sequences function as TATA elements during nitrogen catabolite repression and when Gln3p is ...
more infohttps://mcb.asm.org/content/29/13/3803?ijkey=270c2d1718f84a70442d6ae98d74939520dadb9c&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

The creC carbon catabolite repression gene of Aspergillus nidulans encodes a protein containing WD40 repeats.  | Aspergillus &...The creC carbon catabolite repression gene of Aspergillus nidulans encodes a protein containing WD40 repeats. | Aspergillus &...

Many microbial genes are subject to carbon catabolite repression (CCR), the repression in the presence of a preferred carbon ... The creC carbon catabolite repression gene of Aspergillus nidulans encodes a protein containing WD40 repeats. Richard B. Todd, ...
more infohttps://www.aspergillus.org.uk/content/crec-carbon-catabolite-repression-gene-aspergillus-nidulans-encodes-protein-containing-wd40

Yarrowia Lipolytica Yeast Possesses An Atypical Catabolite RepressionYarrowia Lipolytica Yeast Possesses An Atypical Catabolite Repression

Catabolite repression was thoroughly studied in the bacterium Escherihia coli and, though not so well, in the yeast ... Yarrowia Lipolytica Yeast Possesses An Atypical Catabolite Repression. Catabolite repression was thoroughly studied in the ... Glucose Repression (Catabolite Repression) in Yeast. In: Yeast Sugar Metabolism. Biochemistry, Genetics, Biotechnology and ... but there are different circuits of repression for different groups of genes (2). Catabolite repression allows the respective ...
more infohttp://www.jbsdonline.com/c4304/c4306/iyarrowia-lipolytica-iyeast-possesses-atypical-catabolite-repression-p17970.html

The role of the regulator-gene product (repressor) in catabolite repression of β-galactosidase synthesis in Escherichia coli |...The role of the regulator-gene product (repressor) in catabolite repression of β-galactosidase synthesis in Escherichia coli |...

The role of the regulator-gene product (repressor) in catabolite repression of β-galactosidase synthesis in Escherichia coli. J ... 1. The specific role of the lac repressor (i-gene product) in transient catabolite repression evoked by the introduction of ... The role of the regulator-gene product (repressor) in catabolite repression of β-galactosidase synthesis in Escherichia coli ... The role of the regulator-gene product (repressor) in catabolite repression of β-galactosidase synthesis in Escherichia coli ...
more infohttp://www.biochemj.org/content/106/2/339

Machine learning techniques to identify putative genes involved in nitrogen catabolite repression in the yeast Saccharomyces...Machine learning techniques to identify putative genes involved in nitrogen catabolite repression in the yeast Saccharomyces...

Nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) refers to this selection mechanism. All known nitrogen catabolite pathways are regulated ... Nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) refers to this selection mechanism [1, 2]. More specifically, NCR inhibits the ... Yeast Gene Variable Selection Method Bioinformatics Study Good Nitrogen Source Nitrogen Catabolite Repression ... Machine learning techniques to identify putative genes involved in nitrogen catabolite repression in the yeast Saccharomyces ...
more infohttps://rd.springer.com/article/10.1186/1753-6561-2-s4-s5

Effect of point mutations in the lac promoter on transient and severe catabolite repression of the lac operon of Escherichia...Effect of point mutations in the lac promoter on transient and severe catabolite repression of the lac operon of Escherichia...

... insensitive to catabolite repression, and (b) that transient repression is an exceptionally severe form of catabolite ... Effect of point mutations in the lac promoter on transient and severe catabolite repression of the lac operon of Escherichia ... Effect of point mutations in the lac promoter on transient and severe catabolite repression of the lac operon of Escherichia ... Effect of point mutations in the lac promoter on transient and severe catabolite repression of the lac operon of Escherichia ...
more infohttp://www.biochemj.org/content/123/4/579

Effect of the pho85 Mutation on Catabolite Repression of the CIT1 Gene in Yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Russian Journal of...Effect of the pho85 Mutation on Catabolite Repression of the CIT1 Gene in Yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Russian Journal of...

"Effect of the pho85 Mutation on Catabolite Repression of the CIT1 Gene in Yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Russian Journal of ... Effect of the pho85 Mutation on Catabolite Repression of the CIT1 Gene in Yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Padkina, M.; Tarasov ... Effect of the pho85 Mutation on Catabolite Repression of the CIT1 Gene in Yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Effect of the pho85 ... lp/springer_journal/effect-of-the-pho85-mutation-on-catabolite-repression-of-the-cit1-gene-6C0GSS0Klj ...
more infohttps://www.deepdyve.com/lp/springer_journal/effect-of-the-pho85-mutation-on-catabolite-repression-of-the-cit1-gene-6C0GSS0Klj

Alleviation of carbon catabolite repression in Enterobacter aerogenes for efficient utilization of sugarcane molasses for 2,3...Alleviation of carbon catabolite repression in Enterobacter aerogenes for efficient utilization of sugarcane molasses for 2,3...

... such as carbon catabolite repression (CCR). In this study, 2,3-butanediol-producing Enterobacter aerogenes was engineered to ... The gene encoding catabolite repressor/activator (Cra) was deleted in the genome of E. aerogenes to increase the fructose ... Deutscher J (2008) The mechanisms of carbon catabolite repression in bacteria. Curr Opin Microbiol 11:87-93View ArticleGoogle ... Ji XJ, Nie ZK, Huang H, Ren LJ, Peng C, Ouyang PK (2011) Elimination of carbon catabolite repression in Klebsiella oxytoca for ...
more infohttps://biotechnologyforbiofuels.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13068-015-0290-3

catabolite repressioncatabolite repression

Repression in E. coli is partially relieved if cAMP is bound to the cAMP catabolite… 📐 📓 📒 📝 ... catabolite repression - catabolite repression. См. глюкозный эффект. (Источник: «Англо русский толковый словарь генетических ... Repression in E. coli is partially relieved if cAMP is bound to the cAMP-catabolite activator protein (cAMP receptor protein; ... catabolite repression. Inducible enzyme systems in some microorganisms (such as the lac operon) that are repressed when a more ...
more infohttps://enacademic.com/dic.nsf/en_molecular_biology/1110/catabolite

Catabolite Repression and Induction of Beta-galactosidase Synthesis Lab ReportCatabolite Repression and Induction of Beta-galactosidase Synthesis Lab Report

"Catabolite Repression and Induction of Beta-galactosidase Synthesis Lab Report", n.d.). Catabolite Repression and Induction of ... Catabolite Repression and Induction of Beta-Galactosidase Synthesis Lab Report). Catabolite Repression and Induction of Beta- ... The paper "Catabolite Repression and Induction of Beta-galactosidase Synthesis" demonstrates both catabolite repression and ... Extract of sample "Catabolite Repression and Induction of Beta-galactosidase Synthesis". Download file to see previous pages ...
more infohttps://studentshare.org/biology/1685209-writers-choice

Shodhganga@INFLIBNET: Role of catabolite repression in sporulation of Bacillus subtilis[email protected]: Role of catabolite repression in sporulation of Bacillus subtilis

The [email protected] Centre provides a platform for research students to deposit their Ph.D. theses and make it available to the entire scholarly community in open access ...
more infohttp://shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in:8080/jspui/handle/10603/158321
  • The phenomenon of catabolite repression in Yarrowia lipolytica yeast is poorly studied. (jbsdonline.com)
  • It has previously been reported ( 22 , 34 ) that the expression of the lac operon in L. casei ATCC 393[pLZ15 − ] is subject to dual regulation: carbon catabolite repression (CR) and induction by lactose through transcriptional antitermination. (asm.org)
  • One of the best characterized of these is the process by which the PTS regulates inducer uptake and catabolite repression. (asm.org)
  • Catabolite repression allows the respective microorganisms effectively use carbohydrate substrates, which first assimilate one of the two available substrates (commonly, a carbohydrate), whereas the assimilation of the other substrate starts only after the first substrate is fully consumed from the medium. (jbsdonline.com)
  • The degree of catabolite repression varies very significantly in microorganisms. (jbsdonline.com)
  • There are different catabolite-specific EIIA in a single cell, even though different bacterial groups have specificities to different sets of catabolites. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the term "glucose effect" is actually a misnomer since other carbon sources are known to induce catabolite repression. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dal80-dependent repression of NCR-sensitive gene expression occurred at three possible levels: Dal80 represses GAT1 expression, it competes with Gat1 for binding, and it directly represses NCR gene transcription. (asm.org)
  • Nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) restrains the yeast's capacity to use poor nitrogen sources when rich ones are available. (asm.org)
  • The catabolite repression in this case is achieved through the utilization of phosphotransferase system . (wikipedia.org)
  • We identified a gene required for wild-type expression of ACO1 only under catabolite repression conditions. (genetics.org)
  • The catabolite repression was first shown to be initiated by glucose and therefore sometimes referred to as the glucose effect . (wikipedia.org)
  • Analysis of a cis-active sequence mediating catabolite repression in gram-positive bacteria. (nih.gov)
  • S. cerevisiae YUSM was constitutively catabolite repressed through specific disruptions within the MIG1 gene. (sun.ac.za)