Common name for Ricinus communis, a species in the family EUPHORBIACEAE. It is the source of CASTOR OIL.
Oil obtained from seeds of Ricinus communis that is used as a cathartic and as a plasticizer.
A plant genus of the family EUPHORBIACEAE, order Euphorbiales, subclass Rosidae. The seed of Ricinus communis L. is the CASTOR BEAN which is the source of CASTOR OIL; RICIN; and other lectins.
Eighteen carbon fatty acids that comprise the great majority of CASTOR OIL, which is from the seed of RICINUS.
A protein phytotoxin from the seeds of Ricinus communis, the castor oil plant. It agglutinates cells, is proteolytic, and causes lethal inflammation and hemorrhage if taken internally.
Plants or plant parts which are harmful to man or other animals.
The large family of plants characterized by pods. Some are edible and some cause LATHYRISM or FAVISM and other forms of poisoning. Other species yield useful materials like gums from ACACIA and various LECTINS like PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS from PHASEOLUS. Many of them harbor NITROGEN FIXATION bacteria on their roots. Many but not all species of "beans" belong to this family.
Protein or glycoprotein substances of plant origin that bind to sugar moieties in cell walls or membranes. Some carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) from PLANTS also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. Many plant lectins change the physiology of the membrane of BLOOD CELLS to cause agglutination, mitosis, or other biochemical changes. They may play a role in plant defense mechanisms.
The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.
A key enzyme in the glyoxylate cycle. It catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate to succinate and glyoxylate. EC 4.1.3.1.
A major class of water-soluble seed storage proteins. Many proteins from this class are major PLANT ALLERGENS.
Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.
Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.
The genetic complement of CHLOROPLASTS as represented in their DNA.

Functional characterization and expression analysis of the amino acid permease RcAAP3 from castor bean. (1/96)

A polymerase chain reaction-based library screening procedure was used to isolate RcAAP3, an amino acid permease cDNA from castor bean (Ricinus communis). RcAAP3 is 1.7 kb in length, with an open reading frame that encodes a protein with a calculated molecular mass of 51 kD. Hydropathy analysis indicates that the RcAAP3 protein is highly hydrophobic in nature with nine to 11 putative transmembrane domains. RcAAP3-mediated uptake of citrulline in a yeast transport mutant showed saturable kinetics with a K(m) of 0.4 mM. Transport was higher at acidic pH and was inhibited by the protonophore carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone, suggesting a proton-coupled transport mechanism. Citrulline uptake was strongly inhibited (72%) by the permeable sulfydryl reagent N-ethylmaleimide, but showed lower sensitivity (30% inhibition) to the nonpermeable reagent p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid. Diethylpyrocarbonate, a histidine modifier, inhibited citrulline uptake by 80%. A range of amino acids inhibited citrulline uptake, suggesting that RcAAP3 may be a broad substrate permease that can transport neutral and basic amino acids with a lower affinity for acidic amino acids. Northern analysis indicated that RcAAP3 is widely expressed in source and sink tissues of castor bean, and that the pattern of expression is distinct from RcAAP1 and RcAAP2.  (+info)

Programmed cell death in castor bean endosperm is associated with the accumulation and release of a cysteine endopeptidase from ricinosomes. (2/96)

The cells of the endosperm of castor bean seeds (Ricinus communis) undergo programmed cell death during germination, after their oil and protein reserves have been mobilized. Nuclear DNA fragmentation first was observed at day 3 in the endosperm cells immediately adjacent to the cotyledons and progressed across to the outermost cell layers by day 5. We also detected the accumulation of small organelles known as ricinosomes, by using an antibody against a cysteine endoprotease. By the time the nuclear DNA was susceptible to heavy label by terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling, the ricinosomes had released into the cytoplasm their content of cysteine endoprotease, which became activated because of the cleavage of its propeptide. The cysteine endoprotease is distinguished by a C-terminal KDEL sequence, although it is not retained in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum and is a marker for ricinosomes. Homologous proteases are found in the senescing tissues of other plants, including the petals of the daylily. Ricinosomes were identified in this tissue by electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry. It seems that ricinosomes are not unique to Ricinus and play an important role in the degradation of plant cell contents during programmed cell death.  (+info)

Variation in the oxygen isotope ratio of phloem sap sucrose from castor bean. Evidence in support of the Peclet effect. (3/96)

Theory suggests that the level of enrichment of (18)O above source water in plant organic material (Delta) may provide an integrative indicator of control of water loss. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of the processes affecting Delta. One such gap is the observed discrepancy between modeled enrichment of water at the sites of evaporation within the leaf and measured enrichment of the leaf water as a whole (Delta(L)). Farquhar and Lloyd (1993) suggested that this may be caused by a Peclet effect. It is also unclear whether organic material formed in the leaf reflects enrichment of water at the sites of evaporation within the leaf or Delta(L). To investigate this question castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) leaves, still attached to the plant, were sealed into a controlled-environment gas exchange chamber and subjected to a step change in leaf-to-air vapor pressure difference. Sucrose was collected from a cut on the petiole of the leaf in the chamber under equilibrium conditions and every hour for 6 h after the change in leaf-to-air vapor pressure difference. Oxygen isotope composition of sucrose in the phloem sap (Delta(suc)) reflected modeled Delta(L). A model is presented describing Delta(suc) at isotopic steady state, and accounts for 96% of variation in measured Delta(suc). The data strongly support the Peclet effect theory.  (+info)

Engineering delta 9-16:0-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase specificity based on combinatorial saturation mutagenesis and logical redesign of the castor delta 9-18:0-ACP desaturase. (4/96)

Six amino acid locations in the soluble castor Delta(9)-18:0-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase were identified that can affect substrate specificity. Combinatorial saturation mutagenesis of these six amino acids, in conjunction with selection, using an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph system, led to the isolation of variants with up to 15-fold increased specific activity toward 16-carbon substrates. The most improved mutant, com2, contained two substitutions (T117R/G188L) common to five of the 19 complementing variants subjected to further analysis. These changes, when engineered into otherwise wild-type 18:0-ACP desaturase to make mutant 5.2, produced a 35-fold increase in specific activity with respect to 16-carbon substrates. Kinetic analysis revealed changes in both k(cat) and K(m) that result in an 82-fold improvement in specificity factor for 16-carbon substrate compared with wild-type enzyme. Improved substrate orientation apparently compensated for loss of binding energy that results from the loss of desolvation energy for 16-carbon substrates. Mutant 5.2 had specific activity for 16-carbon substrates 2 orders of magnitude higher than those of known natural 16-carbon specific desaturases. These data support the hypothesis that it should be possible to reengineer archetypal enzymes to achieve substrate specificities characteristic of recently evolved enzymes while retaining the desired stability and/or turnover characteristics of a parental paralog.  (+info)

Lipolytic activity of ricin from Ricinus sanguineus and Ricinus communis on neutral lipids. (5/96)

The present study was carried out with a view of determining ricin lipolytic activity on neutral lipids in emulsion and in a membrane-like model. Using 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol tributyrate (BAL-TC(4)) as substrate, the lipolytic activity of ricin was found to be proportional to ricin and substrate concentrations, with an apparent K(m) (K(m,app)) of 2.4 mM, a k(cat) of 200 min(-1) and a specific activity of 1.0 unit/mg of protein. This work was extended to p-nitrophenyl (pNP) fatty acid esters containing two to twelve carbon atoms. Maximum lipolytic activity was registered on pNP decanoate (pNPC(10)), with a K(m,app) of 3.5 mM, a k(cat) of 173 min(-1) and a specific activity of 3.5 units/mg of protein. Ricin lipolytic activity is pH and galactose dependent, with a maximum at pH 7.0 in the presence of 0.2 M galactose. Using the monolayer technique with dicaprin as substrate, ricin showed a lipolytic activity proportional to the ricin concentration at 20 mN/m, which is dependent on the surface pressure of the lipid monolayer and is detectable up to 30 mN/m, a surface pressure that is of the same order of magnitude as that of natural cell membranes. The methods based on pNPC(10) and BAL-TC(4) hydrolysis are simple and reproducible; thus they can be used for routine studies of ricin lipolytic activity. Ricin from Ricinus communis and R. sanguineus were treated with diethyl p-nitrophenylphosphate, an irreversible serine esterase inhibitor, and their lipolytic activities on BAL-TC(4) and pNPC(10), and cytotoxic activity, were concurrently recorded. A reduction in lipolytic activity was accompanied by a decrease in cytotoxicity on Caco2 cells. These data support the idea that the lipolytic activity associated with ricin is relevant to a lipase whose activity is pH and galactose dependent, sensitive to diethyl p-nitrophenylphosphate, and that a lipolytic step may be involved in the process of cell poisoning by ricin. Both colorimetric tests used in this study are sensitive enough to be helpful in the detection of possible lipolytic activities associated with other cytotoxins or lectins.  (+info)

Graviresponsiveness and the development of columella tissue in primary and lateral roots of Ricinus communis. (6/96)

Half-tipped primary and lateral roots of Ricinus communis cv Hale bend toward the side of the root on which the intact half-tip remains. Therefore, the minimal graviresponsiveness of lateral roots is not due to the inability of their caps to produce growth effectors (presumably inhibitors). The columella tissues of primary (i.e. graviresponsive) roots are (a) 4.30 times longer, (b) 2.95 times wider, (c) 37.4 times more voluminous, and (d) composed of 17.2 times more cells than those of lateral roots. The onset of positive gravitropism by lateral roots is positively correlated with a (a) 2.99-fold increase in length, (b) 2.63-fold increase in width, (c) 20.7-fold increase in volume of their columella tissues. We propose that the minimal graviresponsiveness of lateral roots is due to the small size of their columella tissues, which results in their caps being unable to (a) establish a concentration gradient of the effector sufficient to induce gravicurvature and (b) produce as much as the effector as caps of graviresponsive roots.  (+info)

The breakdown of lipid reserves in the endosperm of germinating castor beans. (7/96)

1. Lipid extracts were obtained from castor-bean endosperm tissue at various times during germination and, after purification, the total lipid content was determined. Quantitative measurements of the triglyceride and phospholipid content together with the fatty acid composition were made. 2. The total lipid content of the endosperm rapidly decreased during germination; after 10 days less than 20% of the original weight of lipid remained. In contrast, the phospholipid content (initially less than 0.5% of the total lipid) increased slightly during this time. The fatty acid composition and the relative proportions of the triglyceride species of the total lipid extract remained constant during 10 days of germination. 3. Gibberellic acid (0.3 mM) markedly stimulated the rate of lipid breakdown but did not alter either the fatty acid composition or the relative proportion of triglyceride species. 4. The embryo had little effect on lipid metabolism in the endosperm tissue; only after 6 days of germination were differences observed in the rate of fat utilization in the presence and absence of the embryo.  (+info)

Isolation of lysophosphatidic acid phosphatase from developing peanut cotyledons. (8/96)

The soluble fraction of immature peanut (Arachis hypogaea) was capable of dephosphorylating [(3)H]lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) to generate monoacylglycerol (MAG). The enzyme responsible for the generation of MAG, LPA phosphatase, has been identified in plants and purified by successive chromatography separations on octyl-Sepharose, Blue Sepharose, Superdex-75, and heparin-agarose to apparent homogeneity from developing peanuts. This enzyme was purified 5,048-fold to a final specific activity of 858 nmol min(-1) mg(-1). The enzyme has a native molecular mass of approximately 39 kD determined by gel filtration and migrates as a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a subunit molecular mass of 39 +/- 1.5 kD. The K(m) values for oleoyl-, stearoyl-, and palmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate were determined to be 28.6, 39.3, and 47.9 microM, respectively. The LPA phosphatase was specific to LPA and did not utilize any other substrate such as glycerol-3-phosphate, phosphatidic acid, or p-nitrophenylphosphate. The enzyme activity was stimulated by the low concentrations of detergents such as Triton X-100 and octylglucoside. Cations had no effect on the enzyme activity. Fatty acids, sphingosine, and sphingomyelin at low concentrations stimulated the enzyme activity. The identification of LPA phosphatase in plants demonstrates the existence of MAG biosynthetic machinery in plants.  (+info)

A castor bean, also known as Ricinus communis, is a plant that produces seeds called castor beans. The seed of the castor bean contains ricin, a highly toxic protein that can cause serious illness or death if ingested, inhaled, or injected. Despite its toxicity, the oil from the castor bean, known as castor oil, is used in a variety of industrial and medicinal applications due to its unique chemical properties.

It's important to note that all parts of the castor bean plant are considered poisonous, but the seed is the most toxic. Handling or coming into contact with the plant or seeds can cause skin irritation and other adverse reactions in some people. It is recommended to handle the plant with care and keep it out of reach of children and pets.

Castor oil is a colorless or pale yellow vegetable oil that is derived from the seeds of the castor bean plant (Ricinus communis). It has a wide range of uses, including as a laxative, a moisturizer in skin and hair products, and a component in industrial lubricants and biodiesel.

Medically, castor oil is often used as a stimulant laxative to relieve constipation. It works by increasing the movement of the intestines, which helps to promote bowel movements. Castor oil is typically taken orally, and its effects usually begin to be felt within 2-6 hours after ingestion.

It's important to note that castor oil should not be used in large amounts or for prolonged periods of time, as it can lead to electrolyte imbalances and other serious side effects. It is also not recommended for use during pregnancy, as it may stimulate uterine contractions. As with any medication or supplement, it's always best to consult with a healthcare provider before using castor oil.

"Ricinus" is the botanical name for the castor oil plant. Its scientific name is "Ricinus communis." It is a species of flowering plant in the spurge family, Euphorbiaceae. The castor oil that comes from this plant is used in various industries and as a traditional medicine, although the raw seed is toxic due to its ricin content.

Ricinoleic acid is not typically defined in the context of medical terminology, but it is a chemical compound with potential medical relevance. It is a fatty acid that is the main constituent of castor oil, which is obtained from the seeds of the Ricinus communis plant. Ricinoleic acid has been studied for its potential medicinal properties, including its anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antibacterial effects. However, it is important to note that ricinoleic acid can also cause irritation and inflammation in high concentrations or with prolonged exposure. Therefore, medical definitions of this compound typically focus on its chemical structure and properties rather than its potential medicinal uses.

Ricin is defined as a highly toxic protein that is derived from the seeds of the castor oil plant (Ricinus communis). It can be produced as a white, powdery substance or a mistable aerosol. Ricin works by getting inside cells and preventing them from making the proteins they need. Without protein, cells die. Eventually, this can cause organ failure and death.

It is not easily inhaled or absorbed through the skin, but if ingested or injected, it can be lethal in very small amounts. There is no antidote for ricin poisoning - treatment consists of supportive care. Ricin has been used as a bioterrorism agent in the past and continues to be a concern due to its relative ease of production and potential high toxicity.

'Toxic plants' refer to those species of plants that contain toxic substances capable of causing harmful effects or adverse health reactions in humans and animals when ingested, touched, or inhaled. These toxins can cause a range of symptoms from mild irritation to serious conditions such as organ failure, paralysis, or even death depending on the plant, the amount consumed, and the individual's sensitivity to the toxin.

Toxic plants may contain various types of toxins, including alkaloids, glycosides, proteins, resinous substances, and essential oils. Some common examples of toxic plants include poison ivy, poison oak, nightshade, hemlock, oleander, castor bean, and foxglove. It is important to note that some parts of a plant may be toxic while others are not, and the toxicity can also vary depending on the stage of growth or environmental conditions.

If you suspect exposure to a toxic plant, it is essential to seek medical attention immediately and, if possible, bring a sample of the plant for identification.

Fabaceae is the scientific name for a family of flowering plants commonly known as the legume, pea, or bean family. This family includes a wide variety of plants that are important economically, agriculturally, and ecologically. Many members of Fabaceae have compound leaves and produce fruits that are legumes, which are long, thin pods that contain seeds. Some well-known examples of plants in this family include beans, peas, lentils, peanuts, clover, and alfalfa.

In addition to their importance as food crops, many Fabaceae species have the ability to fix nitrogen from the atmosphere into the soil through a symbiotic relationship with bacteria that live in nodules on their roots. This makes them valuable for improving soil fertility and is one reason why they are often used in crop rotation and as cover crops.

It's worth noting that Fabaceae is sometimes still referred to by its older scientific name, Leguminosae.

Plant lectins are proteins or glycoproteins that are abundantly found in various plant parts such as seeds, leaves, stems, and roots. They have the ability to bind specifically to carbohydrate structures present on cell membranes, known as glycoconjugates. This binding property of lectins is reversible and non-catalytic, meaning it does not involve any enzymatic activity.

Lectins play several roles in plants, including defense against predators, pathogens, and herbivores. They can agglutinate red blood cells, stimulate the immune system, and have been implicated in various biological processes such as cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Some lectins also exhibit mitogenic activity, which means they can stimulate the proliferation of certain types of cells.

In the medical field, plant lectins have gained attention due to their potential therapeutic applications. For instance, some lectins have been shown to possess anti-cancer properties and are being investigated as potential cancer treatments. However, it is important to note that some lectins can be toxic or allergenic to humans and animals, so they must be used with caution.

In medical terms, "seeds" are often referred to as a small amount of a substance, such as a radioactive material or drug, that is inserted into a tissue or placed inside a capsule for the purpose of treating a medical condition. This can include procedures like brachytherapy, where seeds containing radioactive materials are used in the treatment of cancer to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Similarly, in some forms of drug delivery, seeds containing medication can be used to gradually release the drug into the body over an extended period of time.

It's important to note that "seeds" have different meanings and applications depending on the medical context. In other cases, "seeds" may simply refer to small particles or structures found in the body, such as those present in the eye's retina.

Isocitrate lyase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the glyoxylate cycle, a metabolic pathway found in plants, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. This cycle bypasses two steps of the citric acid cycle (TCA cycle) and allows these organisms to grow on two-carbon compounds as their sole carbon source.

Isocitrate lyase specifically catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate into succinate and glyoxylate, which are further processed in the glyoxylate cycle to generate oxaloacetate and other metabolic intermediates. In humans, isocitrate lyase is not typically found in healthy tissues but has been observed in certain pathological conditions such as tumor growth and during periods of nutrient deprivation. It is also involved in the biosynthesis of fatty acids and steroids in some organisms.

2S albumins are a type of protein found in plants. They are part of the larger family of storage proteins, which are abundant in seeds and provide nutrients to the developing plant embryo. 2S albumins are characterized by their small size, stable structure, and ability to resist digestion in the gut, making them important allergens in some plants.

The name "2S albumins" refers to their sedimentation coefficient, which is a measure of their size and shape in an ultracentrifuge. These proteins typically have a molecular weight of around 8-16 kDa and consist of two subunits held together by disulfide bonds. They are found in a wide variety of plant species, including legumes, cereals, and nuts.

In addition to their role as allergens, 2S albumins have been studied for their potential health benefits. Some studies suggest that they may have antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties, although more research is needed to confirm these effects and understand their mechanisms of action.

Medicinal plants are defined as those plants that contain naturally occurring chemical compounds which can be used for therapeutic purposes, either directly or indirectly. These plants have been used for centuries in various traditional systems of medicine, such as Ayurveda, Chinese medicine, and Native American medicine, to prevent or treat various health conditions.

Medicinal plants contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, including alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, terpenes, and saponins, among others. These compounds have been found to possess various pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities.

Medicinal plants can be used in various forms, including whole plant material, extracts, essential oils, and isolated compounds. They can be administered through different routes, such as oral, topical, or respiratory, depending on the desired therapeutic effect.

It is important to note that while medicinal plants have been used safely and effectively for centuries, they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Some medicinal plants can interact with prescription medications or have adverse effects if used inappropriately.

"Plant proteins" refer to the proteins that are derived from plant sources. These can include proteins from legumes such as beans, lentils, and peas, as well as proteins from grains like wheat, rice, and corn. Other sources of plant proteins include nuts, seeds, and vegetables.

Plant proteins are made up of individual amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. While animal-based proteins typically contain all of the essential amino acids that the body needs to function properly, many plant-based proteins may be lacking in one or more of these essential amino acids. However, by consuming a variety of plant-based foods throughout the day, it is possible to get all of the essential amino acids that the body needs from plant sources alone.

Plant proteins are often lower in calories and saturated fat than animal proteins, making them a popular choice for those following a vegetarian or vegan diet, as well as those looking to maintain a healthy weight or reduce their risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. Additionally, plant proteins have been shown to have a number of health benefits, including improving gut health, reducing inflammation, and supporting muscle growth and repair.

A chloroplast genome is the entire genetic material that is present in the chloroplasts, which are organelles found in plant cells and some protists. The chloroplast genome is circular in shape and contains about 120-160 kilobases (kb) of DNA. It encodes for a small number of proteins, ribosomal RNAs, and transfer RNAs that are required for the function of the chloroplasts, particularly in photosynthesis. The chloroplast genome is usually inherited maternally, meaning it is passed down from the mother to her offspring.

The chloroplast genome is relatively simple compared to the nuclear genome, which contains many more genes and regulatory elements. However, most of the proteins required for chloroplast function are actually encoded in the nucleus and imported into the chloroplasts. The study of chloroplast genomes can provide insights into the evolutionary history of plants and their photosynthetic ancestors.

Ricinus communis (Castor bean) - Cornell University 2008. "Castorbean". Archived from the original on 8 May 1998.{{cite web}}: ... Wedin, GP; Neal, JS; Everson, GW; Krenzelok, EP (May 1986). "Castor bean poisoning". The American Journal of Emergency Medicine ... Castor Bean Plant". Faculty.ucc.edu. Archived from the original on 24 May 2013. Retrieved 19 February 2013. Poisonous Plants ...
Reported lethal doses are anywhere from two to eight seeds, though only a few deaths have been reported when castor beans have ... Wedin GP; Neal JS; Everson GW; Krenzelok EP (May 1986). "Castor bean poisoning". Am J Emerg Med. 4 (3): 259-261. doi:10.1016/ ... Albretsen JC; Gwaltney-Brant SM; Khan SA (2000). "Evaluation of castor bean toxicosis in dogs: 98 cases". J Am Anim Hosp Assoc ... Many seeds have been used as beads in necklaces and rosaries including Job's tears, Chinaberry, rosary pea, and castor bean. ...
Wedin GP, Neal JS, Everson GW, Krenzelok EP (May 1986). "Castor bean poisoning". The American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 4 ... Seeds of the castor oil plant (Ricinus communis L.) contain the extremely potent toxin, ricin. Although some species of the ... Some species of Euphorbiaceae have economic significance, such as cassava (Manihot esculenta), castor oil plant (Ricinus ... The seeds of the castor oil plant Ricinus communis contain the highly toxic carbohydrate-binding protein ricin. A milky latex ...
... at Purdue University Castor beans - at Purdue University Ricinus communis (castor bean) at Cornell University Ricinus communis ... Ricinus communis, the castor bean or castor oil plant, is a species of perennial flowering plant in the spurge family, ... "Castorbean". Archived from the original on 8 May 1998. Union County College: Biology: Plant of the Week: Castor Bean Plant ... Translated in 1872, it describes castor oil as a laxative. The use of castor bean oil (eranda) in India has been documented ...
"Trialeurodes ricini (Castor bean whitefly)". "Monomorium destructor (Singapore ant)". "Xyleborus perforans (island pinhole ... castor bean whitefly) Trichomyrmex destructor (destructive trailing ant) Vespula germanica (European wasp) Wasmannia ... Mexican bean beetle) Erionota torus (rounded palm-redeye) Euscepes postfasciatus (West Indian sweetpotato weevil) Frankliniella ...
"Thaumastocoris peregrinus (Bronze bug)". "Trialeurodes ricini (Castor bean whitefly)". "Vespula germanica (German wasp)". " ... castor bean whitefly) Vespa velutina nigrithorax (Yellow-legged Asian hornet) Vespula germanica (European wasp) Vespula ... "Callosciurus finlaysonii (Finlayson's squirrel)". "Capra hircus (Goats)". "Castor canadensis (Beaver)". "Equus asinus (Donkeys ... Castor canadensis (North American beaver) Cervus nippon (sika deer) Equus asinus (donkey) Muntiacus reevesi (Reeves's muntjac) ...
85 thousand tons of castor bean; 66 thousand tons of pineapple; 65 thousand tons of sesame seed; 50 thousand tons of beans; 48 ... beans, groundnut, sweet potatoes and a wide variety of vegetables. Maize is grown in all regions of the country by about 79 ...
85 thousand tons of castor bean; 66 thousand tons of pineapple; 65 thousand tons of sesame seed; 50 thousand tons of beans; 48 ...
Ricin cannot be made from castor oil. The recipe requires castor beans. It can be made using a recipe Cutler had downloaded ... "Great WMD failures: Casey, the castor oil killer". The Register. October 18, 2006. Retrieved 2008-10-18. "United States of ... after sparking a full terrorism investigation and raid over his attempts to extract ricin from castor oil. ...
... is a vegetable oil pressed from castor beans. It is a colourless or pale yellow liquid with a distinct taste and ... Harvesting castor beans, though, may not be without risk. The International Castor Oil Association FAQ document states that ... "The Castor Bean: A Plant Named After A Tick". Wayne's Word: An Online Textbook of Natural History. March 1999. Archived from ... The Promise of the Castor Bean Archived March 9, 2016, at the Wayback Machine by Elizabeth Johnson, Biodiesel Magazine, 2004-12 ...
Castor beans or the castor oil plant contain ricin which is toxic to dogs. It can be fatal depending on how much of the plant ... Albretsen, J.C. (May 2000). "Evaluation of castor bean toxicosis in dogs: 98 cases". Journal of the American Animal Hospital ... The beans of the plant have a higher concentration of ricin and if chewed instead of swallowed whole will cause increased ...
Fitri N, Kastenholz B, Buchari B, Amran MB, Warganegara FM (2008). "Molybdenum speciation in raw phloem sap of castor bean". ...
... castor bean, the source of the infamous poison ricin; passionfruit, which produces an edible fruit and psychoactive flowers ...
There is a subspecies, S. cynthia ricini in India and Thailand that feeds upon the leaves of castor bean, and is known for the ... The subspecies S. cynthia ricini feeds upon castor bean. Sericulture "The Queen of Textiles." Nina Hyde. National Geographic ...
Rue, squill, fritillaria and castor bean have a similar function. Pests are more effective in areas where only one type of farm ...
Prud'homme MP, Moore TS (November 1992). "Phosphatidylcholine synthesis in castor bean endosperm : free bases as intermediates ... certain beans, nuts and seeds. Vegetables with pasta and rice also contribute to choline intake in the American diet. In plants ...
Moreau, Robert A.; Liu, Kitty D. F.; Huang, Anthony H. C. (1980). "Spherosomes of Castor Bean Endosperm: Membrane Components, ... of South Carolina found that the specific phospholipid content of the spherosome single membrane within a castor bean endospore ...
... castor bean)". Phytochemistry. 78: 20-8. doi:10.1016/j.phytochem.2012.02.022. PMID 22459969. Alpha-copaene+synthase at the U.S ...
F. solani is a facultative pathogen of the castor bean tick. It is also lethal to southern pine beetles. F. solani rots the ... beans, potatoes, and many types of cucurbits. Symptoms include general plant decline, wilting, and large necrotic spots on tap ...
Ratner, Bret; Gruehl, Helen Lee (July 1, 1929). "Respiratory Anaphylaxis (Asthma) and Ricin Poisoning Induced with Castor Bean ... and Ricin Poisoning Induced with Castor Bean Dust" "Identity of Animal Anaphylaxis and Human Allergy (Protein ...
Swallowing castor beans rarely proves to be fatal unless the bean is thoroughly chewed. The survival rate of castor bean ... Studies showing lack of toxicity of castor oil from the US Public Health Service Castor bean information at Purdue University ... Castor bean)". UniProtKB. UniProt Consortium. Aplin PJ, Eliseo T (September 1997). "Ingestion of castor oil plant seeds". Med. ... The castor bean plant from which ricin is derived is a common ornamental and can be grown at home without any special care. ...
"Ixodes ricinus: European Castor Bean Tick, Castor Bean Tick, Sheep Tick" (PDF). Iowa State University. September 2009. Mikula, ... though the castor bean tick is not I. hookeri's sole host. The scientific name of the castor bean tick dates back to the ... Ixodes ricinus, the castor bean tick, is a chiefly European species of hard-bodied tick. It may reach a length of 11 mm (0.43 ... The parasitic wasp Ixodiphagus hookeri lays its eggs inside castor bean ticks, ...
Plant isoforms of PLD were first purified from cabbage and castor bean; PLDα was ultimately cloned and characterized from a ...
... a castor bean derivative which can kill by inhibiting protein synthesis. She also admitted conducting research into cholera, ...
... a castor bean derivative which can kill by inhibiting protein synthesis. She also admitted conducting research into cholera, ...
... from a Non-Lethal Castor Bean Ingestion". Journal of Analytical Toxicology. 36 (9): 660-662. doi:10.1093/jat/bks077. PMC ... Ricinine is a toxic alkaloid found in the castor plant. It can serve as a biomarker of ricin poisoning. It was first isolated ... p. 5. Rao, N. V. Subra (Feb 12, 1945). "A Note on the Chemical Composition of Castor Leaves". Proceedings of the Indian Academy ... Castor oil plant, All stub articles, Alkaloid stubs). ... from the castor seeds by Tuson in 1864. Ricinine has ...
Later, gourds, watermelons, castor beans, and cotton were also collected. Sorghum was first domesticated in Eastern Sudan ...
Oklahoma legislators want castor beans to be outlawed, Tulsa World. Published Nov. 6, 2011. v t e (Articles with short ... an extract of castor beans. GOP DeWitt named House floor leader, Tulsa World. Published November 5, 2011. Representative Dale ...
Triheptanoin (C7 oil), a triglyceride oil synthesized from castor beans. is an investigational pharmaceutical-grade medical ... Bean, Lora J.H.; Stephens, Karen; Amemiya, Anne (eds.). GeneReviews®. Seattle (WA): University of Washington, Seattle. PMID ...
Castor beans were processed in Woodburn to make castor oil. This was the main lubricant until petroleum was discovered in 1854 ... Castor oil cost about two dollars a gallon, while petroleum cost only pennies for the same amount. There were two coal mines in ...
... user ratings and products that contain CASTOR BEAN. ... Learn more about CASTOR BEAN uses, effectiveness, possible side ... Castor oil is made from the beans (seeds) of the castor plant (Ricinus communis). Its taste is initially bland, then becomes ... Water pills (Diuretic drugs) interacts with CASTOR BEAN Castor oil is a laxative. Some laxatives can cause diarrhea and ... CASTOR BEAN - Uses, Side Effects, and More. OTHER NAME(S): African Coffee Tree, Arandi, Bi Ma Zi, Bofareira, ... Show More ...
Castor bean plant), Share amazing gardening photos at Grows on You, the gardening community ...
... and civil society body Solidaridad are to extend their ongoing Pragati project in sustainable castor bean production for a ... Castor bean projected extended 8 May 2019 - 0 Submitted by Andrew Warmington ... of the worlds castor beans are grown. Since then, the partners claimed, it has "empowered more than 2,700 Indian farmers in ... and civil society body Solidaridad are to extend their ongoing Pragati project in sustainable castor bean production for a ...
Castor Bean, Castor-Oil Plant, Palma Christi, Gourd, خرّوب, Kharrub, קיקיון מצוי ... The seed is also called Castor bean, even though it is not a bean. The flowers of the Castor-Oil Plant are monoecious, meaning ... Ricinus communis, Castor Bean, Castor-Oil Plant,. Palma Christi, Gourd, Hebrew: קיקיון מצוי, Arabic: خرّوب, Kharrub Scientific ... About 50% of the weight of the seeds is made of Castor Oil (שמן קיק) Castor oil and its by-products have applications in the ...
Learn about organic castor bean oil which adds mildness and richness to soap and provides a conditioning, fluffy lather with ... Castor Bean Oil, Ricinus communis, also known as Palma Christi oil, is expeller-pressed from the castor bean plant. It is a ... Despite internet information, Castor Oil is not poisonous. For more information read our blog "Castor Bean Oil in Skin Care" ... Castor bean oil adds mildness and richness to soap and provides a conditioning, fluffy lather with thick, large bubbles. ...
Castor Bean Plant History. The history of the castor bean plant is a long one. If you get a copy of the 1896 catalog from R. & ... In this country, castor bean plants were also grown to produce castor oil. The U.S. military used the oil in aircraft ... cultivated for its castor bean oil. But even for gardeners who have no immediate use for castor oil fall for this fast growing ... Castor bean plant is capable of rising to 8 feet tall in a very short time in the wild. However, the variety Gibsonii is more ...
If the item was marked as a gift when purchased and shipped directly to you, youll receive a gift credit for the value of your return. Once the returned item is received, a gift certificate will be mailed to you.. If the item wasnt marked as a gift when purchased, or the gift giver had the order shipped to themselves to give to you later, we will send a refund to the gift giver and he will find out about your return.. Shipping ...
Castor-bean probably originated in Africa, and is cultivated worldwide as a crop. The seed (not a bean) yields castor oil, ...
You can buy castor seeds from us as we have developed different varieties to suit the climatic conditions and yield - ... Order Castor Seeds. Order Castor bean Cultivation. Interested in Oil / Biofuel crop cultivation? No, matter, whether you have ... Castor oil is one of the most useful and economically important natural plant oils used in more than 700 Industries. ... Now you have easy access to plant worlds most high productivity oil crop AGF HYBRID CASTOR SEEDS. ...
Q.Castor Beans - When should I start castor beans?*Q.How Do I Start Castor Beans Inside - How do I start castor beans inside?*Q ... Q.About Castor Beans - Will they deter snakes*Q.Castor Bean Plant Safe In Compost? - is it safe to put the remains of a castor ... Q.castor bean plant safe in compost?. is it safe to put the remains of a castor bean plant in my compost? will it kill off the ... Q.Castor bean plant growing out not up. I have planted a number of castor bean plants from seeds. They seem to be growing out ...
"The castor bean plant is the most deadly of all plants. Eat a single castor bean, or perhaps two if youre an adult, and youll ... Wikipedia has a lot of information about the the castor bean plant, castor oil, and ricin. ... Castor bean seedling. A bit of common sense should go a long way toward keeping everybody safe. For my part, I will remove all ... What makes the castor bean plant so poisonous is a chemical called ricin. I wont go into detail as to how it works and what ...
castor bean: cant stop! >> Monday, August 20, 2012 - castor bean #fullpost{display:inline;}. Do you like my posts about garden ... Ive got more castor bean photos for you.. I know Ive recently done not just one, but two photographic "studies" of castor ... I think my castor bean doesnt get enough sun. Its all flopped over. I assume yours get full sun all the time? They look ... Okay, I think Im castor beaned out for a while now.. I guess its fitting that posts about this plant have been dominating the ...
Castor belongs to a monotypic genus Ricinus and a subtribe Ricininae. The origin of the castor bean plant appears to be in East ... Castor oil, which is produced from castor beans, has long been considered an important commercial value due to its very diverse ... The Green Gold of Africa - Castor Bean. Africa points to a rapid rise in biodegradable products. Here, castor oil is considered ... However, both local and international demand for castor bean is very high. Various castor plants in Nigeria require a steady ...
Learn how to grow castor beans in your garden and give the plant care so that you get to enjoy its tropical beauty throughout ... Growing Castor Bean Plants at Home*How to Plant Castor Beans Indoors**How to Grow Castor Beans in the Garden**Making a Homemade ... Additionally, explore how using castor bean leaves reduces muscular swelling.. How to Plant Castor Beans Indoors. Castor bean ... How to Grow Castor Beans in the Garden. After planting castor bean seeds indoors, its time to move them outside in the full ...
Castor beans, Castor oil plant, Ricinus plant red giant, Ricinus seeds, Perennial flower seeds ◈ Packing 10 pcs. ◈ High ... Castor beans, Castor oil plant, Ricinus plant red giant (Lat. Ricinus, Ricinus communis). In tropical and subtropical areas , ... Ricinus communis 10 PCS fresh seeds, Castor beans, Castor oil plant, Ricinus plant red giant, Ricinus seeds, Perennial flower ... Castor is a monoecious plant: male and female flowers are located on the same plant; male in the lower, and female in the upper ...
... in Ghana is looking for loan funding on Merar. You can contact the ... The company also intends to forward integrate into the processing of castor beans into castor oil in the next 3 years. Castor ... Castor Seeds Farm With a Refinery and Soya Bean Plantation. no longer available. We are sorry, the investment opportunity you ... advantage by becoming the first castor beans and castor oil producer in Ghana. With no local competition, we will enjoy a ...
Castor Oil Application: Typically Applied Directly To The Skin Using A Cotton Ball. Price: 100 INR (Approx.) ... Whether youre looking for Refined Edible Oil, Lemon grass oil, Castor Oil etc, you can explore and find the best products from ...
... castor, sesame, neem seed, sheanut, palm kernel and the like. ... ome information about265tpd good quality castor seed oil ... Castor bean oil machine. Castor bean is a kind of high oil yield material, the main two technologies to get castor oil from ... This machine has special teeth, its function is to crush the castor beans, then you can get the mixture of castor bean seed and ... castor seed oil expeller. Type:. castor seed oil expeller. Automatic Grade:. Automatic. Production Capacity:. 98%. Place of ...
Elsewhere, castor bean plant grows as an annual that can get 4-10 tall in a single growing season. This is a fast growing, ... Castor bean is a very fast growing evergreen herbaceous or semi-woody large shrub or small tree that gets usually 6-12 tall, ... Fast Growing Giant Castor Oil Bean Plant Mix Ricinus Communis - 8 Seeds. ... Grows quick like a regular bean.. A noble foliage plant, often used to give a tropical appearance to the border or ....to repel ...
Use a facial oil the right way:. Gently smooth the oil from nose to ears, eyebrows to the hairline, and neck to jawline. Less is definitely more-so no need to go overboard! Always use an upward motion or use a patting technique, taking extra care around the eye area as oils are highly concentrated products and a few drops is plenty for one application.. ...
Ricinus communis (Castor bean) - Cornell University 2008. "Castorbean". Archived from the original on 8 May 1998.{{cite web}}: ... Wedin, GP; Neal, JS; Everson, GW; Krenzelok, EP (May 1986). "Castor bean poisoning". The American Journal of Emergency Medicine ... Castor Bean Plant". Faculty.ucc.edu. Archived from the original on 24 May 2013. Retrieved 19 February 2013. Poisonous Plants ...
Castor (Argentine). Castor bean (USA). Castor-oil (USA). Higuereta (Cuba, Puerto Rico). Koli, Paaila (Hawaii). Laau-aila ( ... Jequirity Bean. Jumble bead. Juquiriti. Lucky bean. Prayer bead. Precatory bean. Rosary beads. Rosary Pea. Ruti. Tentos da ...
Find Sanguineus Castor Bean (Ricinus communis Sanguineus) in Brandon Manitoba MB at The Green Spot Home & Garden (Castor Oil ... Find Sanguineus Castor Bean (Ricinus communis Sanguineus) in Brandon Manitoba MB at The Green Spot Home & Garden (Castor Oil ... Sanguineus Castor Bean will grow to be about 10 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 6 feet. When grown in masses or used as ... Sanguineus Castor Bean features showy clusters of coral-pink pincushion flowers at the ends of the stems from mid to late ...
Thus, the aim of this work is to identify and isolate micro-organisms involved in the fermentation of castor seed bean "ogiri" ... PRODUCTION OF OGIRI FROM SOYABEAN USING MICRO ORGANISM RESPONSIBLE FOR FERMENTATION OF CASTOR BEANS SEED OGIRI PRODUCTION OF ... Some of them which contain toxic substances example Ricin in castor oil beansee trysinhbitor from soya bean are detoxified ... However, castor bean seed cause irritation in the mouth, throat and stomach also vomiting. ...
Poisoning of livestock and humans by castor beans has been reported. Ingestion of two to four seeds may cause serious poisoning ... Application of castor oil at 10 mg kg-1 to mung bean prevented damage by C. chinensis introduced 18 months after treatment ( ... 2.5 ml/kg applied to Phaseolus vulgaris protected the beans against attack by A. obtectus for six months. Damage by A. obtectus ... Highly unsaturated soya bean (Glycine max) oil reduced Aspegillus ruber infection by about half when compared with untreated ...
Cis-element analyses for each castor bean SAP gene showed that no common cis-elements are shared across the nine castor bean ... In this study, we used the castor bean genome to identify and characterize nine castor bean SAP genes (RcSAP). Structural ... High throughput RNA-seq data showed that castor bean SAP gene profiles varied among different tissues. In addition, castor bean ... Castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) is one of the most economically valuable non-edible woody oilseed crops, able to be widely ...
Castor oil ; Refining) ; ( Air pollution ; Vegetable oils) ; ( Industrial wastes ; Castor oil) ; Seeds ; Beans ; Processing ; ... Castor bean processing ; Castor pomace Holdings. Library. Call Number. Additional Info. Location. Last. Modified. Checkout. ...
Die Neunköder and the castor bean. August 30, 2020. Around the Sophienburg, Sophienblog ...
Bean 3. Gram 4. Pea Morphology of Flowering Plants Botany Practice questions, MCQs, Past Year Questions (PYQs), NCERT Questions ...
  • Castor oil is made from the beans (seeds) of the castor plant (Ricinus communis). (webmd.com)
  • See who else is growing Ricinus communis (Castor bean plant) . (growsonyou.com)
  • The Castor-Oil Plant is the only member of the genus Ricinus and it has no immediate relatives and is native only to Africa. (flowersinisrael.com)
  • Castor Bean Oil , Ricinus communis , also known as Palma Christi oil, is expeller-pressed from the castor bean plant. (chagrinvalleysoapandsalve.com)
  • There is no denying that the castor bean plant ( Ricinus communis ) is the botanical equivalent of a black widow spider, but its deadliness is concealed in a most attractive package. (succulentsandmore.com)
  • In this future-oriented development, the castor oil plant (Ricinus communis L.) plays an extremely important role. (das-infoportal.de)
  • Castor belongs to a monotypic genus Ricinus and a subtribe Ricininae. (das-infoportal.de)
  • Growing castor beans (Ricinus communis) is easy, and they are both annuals and perennials. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • Castor beans, Castor oil plant, Ricinus plant red giant (Lat. (oreshka-seeds.com)
  • Most of the leytable protein seeds used in preparational of this traditional condiment logired are castor bean (Ricinus communis), oil bean (pentaclethera macrophylla), sesame seed (sesamum indicum), saya bean (Glycine max) etc. (codemint.net)
  • Castor bean ( Ricinus communis L.) is one of the most economically valuable non-edible woody oilseed crops, able to be widely cultivated in marginal lands worldwide because of its broad adaptive capacity to soil and climate conditions. (kib.ac.cn)
  • Genomic characterization and expression profiles of stress-associated proteins (SAPs) in castor bean ( Ricinus communis )[J]. Plant Diversity, 2021, 43(02): 152-162. (kib.ac.cn)
  • Ricin is a toxin contained in the seeds (beans) of the castor oil plant ( Ricinus communis ). (medscape.com)
  • The outer coat (hull) of the castor seed contains a deadly poison called ricin. (webmd.com)
  • What makes the castor bean plant so poisonous is a chemical called ricin. (succulentsandmore.com)
  • Wikipedia has a lot of information about the the castor bean plant, castor oil, and ricin. (succulentsandmore.com)
  • They are poisonous plants with bean pods that naturally contain ricin, and their toxicity is harmful to small children and pets. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • Some of them which contain toxic substances example Ricin in castor oil beansee trysinhbitor from soya bean are detoxified during processing to avoid an unpleasant effects they cause. (codemint.net)
  • Ricin is present in all parts of the plant but is most highly concentrated in the beans or seeds. (medscape.com)
  • This is a brief outline of how laboratory testing is done on environmental samples or human clinical specimens that may contain ricin, a poisonous protein from the castor bean plant. (cdc.gov)
  • Ricinine is present along with ricin in castor beans. (cdc.gov)
  • DANGEROUS BEANS The potent toxin ricin is found in castor beans (shown). (sciencenews.org)
  • A source familiar with the ongoing joint federal investigation said that based on preliminary investigative activity, the White House and Pentagon letters were believed to be connected and the substance in question was a very crude castor bean concoction that authorities were not technically calling "ricin" until further testing. (10news.com)
  • Ricin is a highly toxic compound extracted from castor beans. (10news.com)
  • Ricin is a deadly poison that's naturally found in castor beans. (vox.com)
  • Ricin is a leftover in the extraction of the harmless castor oil from castor beans. (opednews.com)
  • Castor beans contain ricin, an extremely concentrated cellular poison. (msdmanuals.com)
  • If castor beans are chewed and swallowed, the released ricin can cause injury. (cdc.gov)
  • Ricin can be made from the waste material left over from processing castor beans. (cdc.gov)
  • It is a vegetable oil obtained by pressing the seeds of the castor bean plant and is mainly grown in Africa, South America and India. (das-infoportal.de)
  • My neighbor was told by a friend that putting castor bean seeds into the ground will 'take care of' moles. (succulentsandmore.com)
  • In related news, Arkema has named Jurong Island in Singapore as the site for its new world-scale plant for the manufacture of amino 11 monomer and Rilsan polyamide 11 resins from castor oil. (specchemonline.com)
  • The flowers of the Castor-Oil Plant are monoecious, meaning having both the male and female reproductive organs on the same plant and appear in clusters, with the male white blossoms below and the pink female blossoms above. (flowersinisrael.com)
  • Castor-Oil plant was known to Herodotus (484 BC - ca.425 BC) , who calls it Kiki , and states: The Egyptians who live in the marshes use for the anointing of their bodies an oil made from the fruit of the sillicyprium, which is known among them by the name of "kiki. (flowersinisrael.com)
  • The enormous leaves and dramatic flower spikes of the Gibsonii castor bean plant make this heirloom annual a "must-grow. (gardeningknowhow.com)
  • The history of the castor bean plant is a long one. (gardeningknowhow.com)
  • If you get a copy of the 1896 catalog from R. & J. Farquars seed house, you'll find many varieties of the castor bean plant listed. (gardeningknowhow.com)
  • Castor bean plant is capable of rising to 8 feet tall in a very short time in the wild. (gardeningknowhow.com)
  • No, matter, whether you have got access to small scale or large scale castor seed oil production project, Now you have easy access to plant world's most high productivity oil crop AGF HYBRID CASTOR SEEDS. (hybridcastorseeds.com)
  • Castor oil is one of the most useful and economically important natural plant oils used in more than 700 Industries. (hybridcastorseeds.com)
  • What Plant Food Or Fertilizer To Use For Caster Bean Plants? (gardeningknowhow.com)
  • Castor Bean Plant Growing Out Not Up - I have planted a number of castor bean plants from seeds. (gardeningknowhow.com)
  • Castor Bean Plant Safe In Compost? (gardeningknowhow.com)
  • is it safe to put the remains of a castor bean plant in my compost? (gardeningknowhow.com)
  • Castor Bean Plant And Toxicity - I have been given three castor bean seeds from a friend who grows them. (gardeningknowhow.com)
  • The castor bean plant is the most deadly of all plants. (succulentsandmore.com)
  • Notwithstanding these obviously negative characteristics, I have wanted a castor bean plant for a long time. (succulentsandmore.com)
  • Also check out this humorous article about a Orem, UT gardener who was questioned by Homeland Security for growing a castor bean plant in his front yard. (succulentsandmore.com)
  • The castor bean plant is easy to establish in the field, resistant to drought, tolerates different soil types, including marginal soils, and yields up to 1 ton of oil per hectare. (das-infoportal.de)
  • Castor bean is a species of flowering plant in the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae), which includes a variety of plants native mainly to the tropics. (das-infoportal.de)
  • The origin of the castor bean plant appears to be in East Africa and was introduced to China from India ~1,400 years ago. (das-infoportal.de)
  • Discover how to plant castor beans by starting them indoors in the early spring and transplanting them in an ample garden space outside. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • Castor bean plants are fast-growers, and a great way to get them started is to plant them inside before the last frost. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • Find out when to plant castor beans indoors and sow the seeds properly for germination. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • The castor oil plant is a tropical plant native to the Mediterranean basin that grows in warm regions worldwide. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • Here is how to plant castor beans in the garden with the proper soil conditions and spacing. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • If you plant more than one castor bean, space them 36 to 48 inches apart to allow them room to flourish. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • Castor oil is a colourless or pale yellowish oil extracted from the seeds of the castor plant and is cultivated around the world because of the commercial importance of its oil. (merar.com)
  • Castor Oil is a colourless or pale yellowish oil extracted from the seeds of the castor plant and is cultivated around the world because of the commercial importance of its oil which is used in the manufacturing of several industrial chemicals like surfactants, greases and lubricants, speciality, surface coatings, food and beverages, cosmetics, personal care products, pharmaceuticals, etc. (merar.com)
  • The entire Year 2 CAPEX is intended at purchasing plant and machinery for the setting up of the castor oil processing plant. (merar.com)
  • Elsewhere, castor bean plant grows as an annual that can get 4-10' tall in a single growing season. (ecrater.com)
  • Castor bean plant is often cultivated for ornamental effect in the southern United States. (emedicinal.com)
  • The castor oil plant has long enjoyed the reputation as a fly and mosquito repelling plant and will also rid the garden of moles and gophers. (emedicinal.com)
  • For several years I have been told that a castor bean plant in the garden would to some extent control grasshoppers. (emedicinal.com)
  • Polymerase chain reaction (PCR): PCR is a test used to locate and make copies of parts of the DNA contained in the castor bean plant. (cdc.gov)
  • There isn't enough reliable information to know if hulled castor seeds are safe or what the side effects might be. (webmd.com)
  • Castor-bean probably originated in Africa, and is cultivated worldwide as a crop. (herokuapp.com)
  • Investing in castor seed production is a feasible agribusiness through oil processing in Africa. (das-infoportal.de)
  • Since castor is not used as food and can be grown productively on field margins, it is a unique opportunity to expand industrial vegetable oil production in Africa. (das-infoportal.de)
  • Major players in the Castor industry in Africa include Mozambique, Ethiopia, Kenya, and South Africa. (merar.com)
  • The potential for Castor farming and Castor Oil processing in Africa is huge with substantial bases (Land, Climate and Rainfall) to tap the natural assets. (merar.com)
  • It is the seeds of the Castor-Oil plants that have historically, and currently, been of interest. (flowersinisrael.com)
  • In this country, castor bean plants were also grown to produce castor oil. (gardeningknowhow.com)
  • If you want to grow Gibsonii castor bean plants, sow the seeds in a site with direct sun and deep, rich soil. (gardeningknowhow.com)
  • Castor bean plants are ornamental plants grown for beauty and health benefits. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • Learn what these plants are and their many uses, and how to grow castor beans of your own. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • Palmate castor bean plants have stunningly large, star-shaped maroon or green leaves that grow up to three feet in length, making them a bold statement in the garden. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • While these plants grow best outside, it is possible to grow castor bean plants as a houseplant. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • After planting castor beans seeds indoors and the danger of frost is gone, harden off your plants by taking them outside for an hour or two each day for a week. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • Castor beans are not the first thing that comes to mind when growing garden plants. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • English-ivy and castor-bean plants cause allergic contact dermatitis. (cdc.gov)
  • Castor is a widely accepted agricultural solution for tropical and subtropical regions to meet general needs for crops with low input costs and profitable yields. (das-infoportal.de)
  • Pragati was launched in May 2016, following a baseline survey of more than 1,000 castor farmers in Gujarat, where over 80% of the world's castor beans are grown. (specchemonline.com)
  • India contributes to about 90 per cent of the world's production of castor oil, followed by Brazil and China. (merar.com)
  • In southern Nigeria where soil fertility is high, castor is grown fertilizer productive. (das-infoportal.de)
  • The beans are covered by a hard, relatively impervious outer shell that must be chewed or broken in some way in order for the toxalbumin to be released and, thus, present a toxic hazard. (medscape.com)
  • I use the castor oil pellets to deter moles and voles. (succulentsandmore.com)
  • Make your own castor oil and put castor oil on eyebrows or make a spray to deter rodents in the yard. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • Soya bean has a bitter taste and similar processing method such as fermentation, heating and boiling are required prepare them for food use. (codemint.net)
  • Highly unsaturated soya bean ( Glycine max ) oil reduced Aspegillus ruber infection by about half when compared with untreated controls (Hall and Harman, 1991) but saturated oils had minimal effect. (fao.org)
  • The seed (not a bean) yields castor oil, which is used as an industrial lubricant, leather preservative, and component of paints, varnishes, waxes and polishes, among other uses. (herokuapp.com)
  • Jequirity beans contain abrin, a related and even more potent toxin. (msdmanuals.com)
  • thus, the bean must be chewed to release the toxin. (msdmanuals.com)
  • However, the seed coating of the jequirity bean is often not intact, and simple bacterial digestion can release the abrin toxin. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In just one season, it grows from a seed the size of a bean into a tree-like shrub that can reach 10 ft. in height if conditions are favorable. (succulentsandmore.com)
  • Grows quick like a regular bean. (ecrater.com)
  • Castor oil has laxative and anti-inflammatory effects. (webmd.com)
  • Castor oil is a laxative. (webmd.com)
  • You may be familiar with the many great uses of castor oil , an old-time laxative. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • Due to the toxicity, it's not safe to use the bean seeds after growing castor beans. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • In line with our decarbonization strategy, we are developing circular economy projects, in particular the cultivation of castor oil as a feedstock for our bio-refineries. (eni.com)
  • Castor oil, prized for its anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties, helps clear the skin bacteria that can cause blemishes. (chagrinvalleysoapandsalve.com)
  • Castor bean is a very fast growing evergreen herbaceous or semi-woody large shrub or small tree that gets usually 6-12' tall, sometimes taller. (ecrater.com)
  • Sanguineus Castor Bean is an herbaceous annual with an upright spreading habit of growth. (greenspotbrandon.com)
  • The primary ingredient - castor beans - can be obtained easily and cheaply, while directions for producing the poison can be readily found on the Internet. (opednews.com)
  • 2012. Tissue-specific whole transcriptome sequencing in castor, directed at understanding triacylglycerol lipid biosynthetic pathways. (kib.ac.cn)
  • Castor bean is a kind of high oil yield material, the main two technologies to get castor oil from beans are pressing and prepressing solvent extraction. (europebyair.com)
  • Castor-bean processors frequently experience hay fever, asthma, and urticaria resulting from a potent allergen in the dried pomace remaining after extraction of the castor oil. (cdc.gov)
  • After planting castor bean seeds indoors, it's time to move them outside in the full sun. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • Because castor bean is extremely sensitive to frost, seed must be started indoors in early spring in cooler climates, or outdoors only in warm ground. (emedicinal.com)
  • People use castor oil for constipation , dry eye , childbirth , and to empty the colon before a colonoscopy . (webmd.com)
  • Taking castor oil by mouth seems to help relieve constipation. (webmd.com)
  • Currently, the major castor oil producing countries include Brazil, China and India. (das-infoportal.de)
  • Major sourcing destinations for castor oil are India, China, and Brazil. (merar.com)
  • Group G3 was grafted with bovine bone (Gen-ox, Baumer S.A., Mogi Mirin, Brazil) and group G4 with castor bean polymer (Poliquil Araraquara Produtos Quimicos Ltda. (bvsalud.org)
  • Whether SAPs in castor bean plays a key role in adapting diverse soil conditions and stresses remains unknown. (kib.ac.cn)
  • Eat a single castor bean, or perhaps two if you're an adult, and you'll die - maybe. (succulentsandmore.com)
  • 2.5 ml/kg applied to Phaseolus vulgaris protected the beans against attack by A. obtectus for six months. (fao.org)
  • Castor bean is considered an ideal candidate for agricultural revenue-generating products that have the potential to become the leading vegetable oil for industries around the world the globe. (das-infoportal.de)
  • Increasing global consumption of castor oil and derivatives by end-use industries for the manufacturing of bio-based plastics, lubricants, coatings, skincare, hair care, and medicinal products is expected to trigger market growth over the forecast period. (merar.com)
  • Whether you're looking for Refined Edible Oil, Lemon grass oil, Castor Oil etc, you can explore and find the best products from Tradeindia. (tradeindia.com)
  • The application of oils of botanical origin (vegetable oils) to beans is a method of protection against bruchid beetle attack, which has been confirmed as effective by many workers. (fao.org)
  • Additionally, explore how using castor bean leaves reduces muscular swelling. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • The base of the system is created with reclaimed carbon fiber (20%) and new bio-based rubber feet made from castor bean oil (39%).3 This renewable material reduces reliance on petroleum-based materials. (dell.com)
  • In 1909 Castrol (that takes its name from castor oil), originally named the Wakefield Oil Company , began production of a new automotive lubricant named "Castrol" (a contraction of castor oil, from which it was made). (flowersinisrael.com)
  • Ogbogu (1999) and African oil bean seed in ugba preparation, presopis African for the preparation of okpehi a seasoning agent temper an Indonesian fermented vegetable protein food prepared from soyabean in which Bacilus spp have been found to be responsible for the fermentation. (codemint.net)
  • Arkema, BASF, Jayant Agro-Organics, an Indian castor oil specialist, and civil society body Solidaridad are to extend their ongoing Pragati project in sustainable castor bean production for a further three years in order to reach more Indian farmers and end users. (specchemonline.com)
  • Castor oil's high yield potential and unique fatty acid composition allow it to be economically competitive in production. (das-infoportal.de)
  • In most regions of castor production, seed yield can be increased quickly by using improved agronomy practices methods exercises. (das-infoportal.de)
  • Castor bean varies greatly in growth and appearance. (das-infoportal.de)
  • Structural analysis showed that castor bean SAP gene structures and functional domain types vary greatly, differing in intron number, protein sequence, and functional domain type. (kib.ac.cn)
  • Sanguineus Castor Bean will grow to be about 10 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 6 feet. (greenspotbrandon.com)
  • Demand for castor oil has increased massively in the international market since recent years, ensured by more than 700 different applications, ranging from medicine and cosmetics to biodiesel, plastics and lubricants. (das-infoportal.de)
  • China represents the largest market demand for castor oil. (merar.com)
  • India is a net exporter of castor oil, accounting for over 90% of castor oil exports, while the United States, the European Union, and China are the main importers, accounting for 84% of imported castor oil. (das-infoportal.de)
  • Shandong Leader Machinery Co.,ltd. supply different capacities for different 265tpd good quality castor seed oil expeller needs. (europebyair.com)
  • High throughput RNA-seq data showed that castor bean SAP gene profiles varied among different tissues. (kib.ac.cn)
  • Castor oil is possibly unsafe when taken long-term or in large doses. (webmd.com)
  • Castor bean oil adds mildness and richness to soap and provides a conditioning, fluffy lather with thick, large bubbles. (chagrinvalleysoapandsalve.com)
  • Break the castor bean leaves into small pieces and place them into a mortar. (tipsbulletin.com)
  • Castor oil, which is produced from castor beans, has long been considered an important commercial value due to its very diverse applications. (das-infoportal.de)
  • Taking castor oil along with "water pills" might make potassium levels drop too low. (webmd.com)
  • Its function is to cook the castor seed, make it cooked and smell better from the fresh seeds. (europebyair.com)