Casimiroa: A plant genus of the family RUTACEAE. The fruit is edible and the seed has cardiovascular activity.Flaveria: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE that is used for experiments in molecular genetic studies in plant physiology and development.Oils, Volatile: Oils which evaporate readily. The volatile oils occur in aromatic plants, to which they give odor and other characteristics. Most volatile oils consist of a mixture of two or more TERPENES or of a mixture of an eleoptene (the more volatile constituent of a volatile oil) with a stearopten (the more solid constituent). The synonym essential oils refers to the essence of a plant, as its perfume or scent, and not to its indispensability.Parasympatholytics: Agents that inhibit the actions of the parasympathetic nervous system. The major group of drugs used therapeutically for this purpose is the MUSCARINIC ANTAGONISTS.Uterine Contraction: Contraction of the UTERINE MUSCLE.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Frozen FoodsEurope, EasternFood Industry: The industry concerned with processing, preparing, preserving, distributing, and serving of foods and beverages.Sunscreening Agents: Chemical or physical agents that protect the skin from sunburn and erythema by absorbing or blocking ultraviolet radiation.BooksFreezing: Liquids transforming into solids by the removal of heat.Physics: The study of those aspects of energy and matter in terms of elementary principles and laws. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Ethnobotany: The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Search Engine: Software used to locate data or information stored in machine-readable form locally or at a distance such as an INTERNET site.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Rectal Prolapse: Protrusion of the rectal mucous membrane through the anus. There are various degrees: incomplete with no displacement of the anal sphincter muscle; complete with displacement of the anal sphincter muscle; complete with no displacement of the anal sphincter muscle but with herniation of the bowel; and internal complete with rectosigmoid or upper rectum intussusception into the lower rectum.Cat's Claw: A vine (Uncaria tomentosa) indigenous to the Amazon rainforest whose name is derived from its hook-like thorns. It contains oxindole alkaloids and glycosides and has many medicinal uses.BrazilArizonaDemocracy: A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.Togaviridae: A family of RNA viruses, mainly arboviruses, consisting of two genera: ALPHAVIRUS (group A arboviruses), and RUBIVIRUS. Virions are spherical, 60-70 nm in diameter, with a lipoprotein envelope tightly applied to the icosahedral nucleocapsid.Albizzia: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that contains julibroside (triterpenoid saponins).Atlantic Islands: Widely scattered islands in the Atlantic Ocean as far north as the AZORES and as far south as the South Sandwich Islands, with the greatest concentration found in the CARIBBEAN REGION. They include Annobon Island, Ascension, Canary Islands, Falkland Islands, Fernando Po (also called Isla de Bioko and Bioko), Gough Island, Madeira, Sao Tome and Principe, Saint Helena, and Tristan da Cunha.Planets: Celestial bodies orbiting around the sun or other stars.History of NursingBeer: An alcoholic beverage usually made from malted cereal grain (as barley), flavored with hops, and brewed by slow fermentation.Umbelliferones: 7-Hydroxycoumarins. Substances present in many plants, especially umbelliferae. Umbelliferones are used in sunscreen preparations and may be mutagenic. Their derivatives are used in liver therapy, as reagents, plant growth factors, sunscreens, insecticides, parasiticides, choleretics, spasmolytics, etc.Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.EsculinCell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Saudi ArabiaJordanArchivesHawaii: A group of islands in Polynesia, in the north central Pacific Ocean, comprising eight major and 114 minor islands, largely volcanic and coral. Its capital is Honolulu. It was first reached by Polynesians about 500 A.D. It was discovered and named the Sandwich Islands in 1778 by Captain Cook. The islands were united under the rule of King Kamehameha 1795-1819 and requested annexation to the United States in 1893 when a provisional government was set up. Hawaii was established as a territory in 1900 and admitted as a state in 1959. The name is from the Polynesian Owhyhii, place of the gods, with reference to the two volcanoes Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, regarded as the abode of the gods. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p493 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p2330)Populus: A plant genus of the family SALICACEAE. Balm of Gilead is a common name used for P. candicans, or P. gileadensis, or P. jackii, and sometimes also used for ABIES BALSAMEA or for COMMIPHORA.Nurseries: Facilities which provide care for infants.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Prunus: A plant genus in the family ROSACEAE, order Rosales, subclass Rosidae. It is best known as a source of edible fruits such as apricot, plum, peach, cherry, and almond.Acacia: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. The gums and tanning agents obtained from Acacia are called GUM ARABIC. The common name of catechu is more often used for Areca catechu (ARECA).Physalis: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain physalin and withangulatin.Malvaceae: The mallow family of the order Malvales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. Members include GOSSYPIUM, okra (ABELMOSCHUS), HIBISCUS, and CACAO. The common names of hollyhock and mallow are used for several genera of Malvaceae.Rheum: A plant genus of the family POLYGONACEAE. Members contain chrysophanic acid, rhein, EMODIN, and other ANTHRAQUINONES. The roots were formerly used as PURGATIVES.Acer: A plant genus of the family ACERACEAE, best known for trees with palmately lobed leaves.Expert Testimony: Presentation of pertinent data by one with special skill or knowledge representing mastery of a particular subject.Herbal Medicine: The study of medicines derived from botanical sources.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Plant Preparations: Material prepared from plants.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Herb-Drug Interactions: The effect of herbs, other PLANTS, or PLANT EXTRACTS on the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of drugs.Quinolinium CompoundsDequalinium: A topical bacteriostat that is available as various salts. It is used in wound dressings and mouth infections and may also have antifungal action, but may cause skin ulceration.Collateral Ligaments: A number of ligaments on either side of, and serving as a radius of movement of, a joint having a hingelike movement. They occur at the elbow, knee, wrist, metacarpo- and metatarsophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, and distal interphalangeal joints of the hands and feet. (Stedman, 25th ed)Vasodilation: The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Vasodilator Agents: Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.Forearm: Part of the arm in humans and primates extending from the ELBOW to the WRIST.Vocabulary, Controlled: A specified list of terms with a fixed and unalterable meaning, and from which a selection is made when CATALOGING; ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING; or searching BOOKS; JOURNALS AS TOPIC; and other documents. The control is intended to avoid the scattering of related subjects under different headings (SUBJECT HEADINGS). The list may be altered or extended only by the publisher or issuing agency. (From Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed, p163)Tupaiidae: The only family of the order SCANDENTIA, variously included in the order Insectivora or in the order Primates, and often in the order Microscelidea, consisting of five genera. They are TUPAIA, Ananthana (Indian tree shrew), Dendrogale (small smooth-tailed tree shrew), Urogale (Mindanao tree shrew), and Ptilocercus (pen-tailed tree shrew). The tree shrews inhabit the forest areas of eastern Asia from India and southwestern China to Borneo and the Philippines.Mangifera: A plant genus of the family ANACARDIACEAE best known for the edible fruit.Bertholletia: A plant genus of the family Lecythidaceae which is the source of edible Brazil nuts.Mediterranean Islands: Scattered islands in the Mediterranean Sea. The chief islands are the Balearic Islands (belong to Spain; Majorca and Minorca are among these), Corsica (belongs to France), Crete (belongs to Greece), CYPRUS (a republic), the Cyclades, Dodecanese and Ionian Islands (belong to Greece), MALTA (a republic), Sardinia and SICILY (belong to Italy). (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p747)Nuts: Botanically, a type of single-seeded fruit in which the pericarp enclosing the seed is a hard woody shell. In common usage the term is used loosely for any hard, oil-rich kernel. Of those commonly eaten, only hazel, filbert, and chestnut are strictly nuts. Walnuts, pecans, almonds, and coconuts are really drupes. Brazil nuts, pistachios, macadamias, and cashews are really seeds with a hard shell derived from the testa rather than the pericarp.Tephritidae: A large family of fruit flies in the order DIPTERA, comprising over 4,500 species in about 100 genera. They have patterned wings and brightly colored bodies and are found predominantly in the tropical latitudes.Citrus sinensis: A plant species of the genus CITRUS, family RUTACEAE that provides the familiar orange fruit which is also a source of orange oil.Citrus: A plant genus of the family RUTACEAE. They bear the familiar citrus fruits including oranges, grapefruit, lemons, and limes. There are many hybrids which makes the nomenclature confusing.Origanum: A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE that is the source of a familiar food seasoning.Excipients: Usually inert substances added to a prescription in order to provide suitable consistency to the dosage form. These include binders, matrix, base or diluent in pills, tablets, creams, salves, etc.Technology, Pharmaceutical: The application of scientific knowledge or technology to pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation in the manufacture, preparation, compounding, dispensing, packaging, and storing of drugs and other preparations used in diagnostic and determinative procedures, and in the treatment of patients.Pharmaceutical Preparations: Drugs intended for human or veterinary use, presented in their finished dosage form. Included here are materials used in the preparation and/or formulation of the finished dosage form.Dosage Forms: Completed forms of the pharmaceutical preparation in which prescribed doses of medication are included. They are designed to resist action by gastric fluids, prevent vomiting and nausea, reduce or alleviate the undesirable taste and smells associated with oral administration, achieve a high concentration of drug at target site, or produce a delayed or long-acting drug effect.Tablets: Solid dosage forms, of varying weight, size, and shape, which may be molded or compressed, and which contain a medicinal substance in pure or diluted form. (Dorland, 28th ed)Sex Attractants: Pheromones that elicit sexual attraction or mating behavior usually in members of the opposite sex in the same species.Psidium: A plant genus of the family MYRTACEAE that bears an edible fruit and contains guavin B and quercetin glycosides.Click Chemistry: Organic chemistry methodology that mimics the modular nature of various biosynthetic processes. It uses highly reliable and selective reactions designed to "click" i.e., rapidly join small modular units together in high yield, without offensive byproducts. In combination with COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES, it is used for the synthesis of new compounds and combinatorial libraries.Fish Venoms: Venoms produced by FISHES, including SHARKS and sting rays, usually delivered by spines. They contain various substances, including very labile toxins that affect the HEART specifically and all MUSCLES generally.Judaism: The religion of the Jews characterized by belief in one God and in the mission of the Jews to teach the Fatherhood of God as revealed in the Hebrew Scriptures. (Webster, 3d ed)Bible: The book composed of writings generally accepted by Christians as inspired by God and of divine authority. (Webster, 3d ed)Leukocyte Elastase: An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of proteins, including elastin. It cleaves preferentially bonds at the carboxyl side of Ala and Val, with greater specificity for Ala. EC 3.4.21.37.Crops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Malnutrition: An imbalanced nutritional status resulted from insufficient intake of nutrients to meet normal physiological requirement.Mars: The fourth planet in order from the sun. Its two natural satellites are Deimos and Phobos. It is one of the four inner or terrestrial planets of the solar system.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Amaranthus: A plant genus, in the family AMARANTHACEAE, best known as a source of high-protein grain crops and of Red Dye No. 2 (AMARANTH DYE). Tumbleweed sometimes refers to Amaranthus but more often refers to SALSOLA.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.Benin: A republic in western Africa, south of NIGER and between TOGO and NIGERIA. Its capital is Porto-Novo. It was formerly called Dahomey. In the 17th century it was a kingdom in the southern area of Africa. Coastal footholds were established by the French who deposed the ruler by 1892. It was made a French colony in 1894 and gained independence in 1960. Benin comes from the name of the indigenous inhabitants, the Bini, now more closely linked with southern Nigeria (Benin City, a town there). Bini may be related to the Arabic bani, sons. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p136, 310 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p60)

Synthesis and cancer chemopreventive activity of zapotin, a natural product from Casimiroa edulis. (1/2)

An efficient method has been developed to synthesize zapotin (5,6,2',6'-tetramethoxyflavone), a component of the edible fruit Casimiroa edulis, on a multigram scale. The synthesis utilizes a regioselective C-acylation of a dilithium dianion derived from a substituted o-hydroxyactophenone to afford a beta-diketone intermediate that can be cyclized to zapotin in good overall yield, thus avoiding the inefficient Baker-Venkataraman rearrangement pathway. Zapotin was found to induce both cell differentiation and apoptosis with cultured human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60 cells). In addition, the compound inhibits 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-induced ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity with human bladder carcinoma cells (T24 cells), and TPA-induced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) activity with human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells (HepG2 cells). These data suggest that zapotin merits further investigation as a potential cancer chemopreventive agent.  (+info)

Synthesis of casimiroin and optimization of its quinone reductase 2 and aromatase inhibitory activities. (2/2)

 (+info)

*Casimiroa

... calderoniae Casimiroa edulis - white sapote Casimiroa emarginata Casimiroa greggii Casimiroa microcarpa Casimiroa ... GRIN Species Records of Casimiroa. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Casimiroa. The Plant List. Casimiroa ... pringlei Casimiroa pubescens Casimiroa sapota - matasano Casimiroa tetrameria - woolly-leaf white sapote, yellow sapote, ... Casimiroa is a genus of flowering plants in the citrus family, Rutaceae. It includes about 10 species native to Mexico and ...

*Sapote

"Casimiroa edulis". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States ... Casimiroa edulis: Rutaceae) is native to northern and central Mexico, Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. South American ...

*White sapote

Casimiroa edulis, with English common names casimiroa, white sapote, and Mexican apple, and known as cochitzapotl in the ... Morton, J.; Julia F. Morton (1987). "White Sapote: Casimiroa edulus Llave". Fruits of warm climates. Miami, Florida. pp. 191- ... Sondheimer, F (1960). "Constituents of Casimiroa edulis Llave et Lex.-VI 2′,5,6-Trimethoxyflavone, 2′,5,6,7-tetramethoxyflavone ... Usages du sapotier blanc (Casimiroa spp.) en Mésoamérique. Histoire, ethnographie et botanique. Anthropobotanica 1.7-2010. in ...

*Rutaceae

Ruta, Zanthoxylum and Casimiroa species are medicinals. Several plants are also used by the perfume industry, such as the ... Non-citrus fruits include the White sapote (Casimiroa edulis), Orangeberry (Glycosmis pentaphylla), Clymenia (Clymenia ...

*Zapotin

... is a natural chemical compound, classified as a flavone, isolated from White sapote (Casimiroa edulis). Several recent ... Sondheimer, F (1960). "Constituents of Casimiroa edulis Llave et Lex.-VI 2′,5,6-Trimethoxyflavone, 2′,5,6,7-tetramethoxyflavone ... a natural product from Casimiroa edulis". Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. American Chemical Society. 50 (2): 350-5. doi:10.1021 ...

*List of culinary fruits

Casimiroa edulis; Rutaceae) Whortleberry, see bilberry Wild grape (Ampelocissus acetosa) Wild orange (Capparis mitchellii; ...

*List of MeSH codes (B06)

... casimiroa (wd , gwp gwe g , in it p) MeSH B06.388.100.875.177 --- citrus (wd , gwp gwe g , in it p) MeSH B06.388.100.875. ...

*List of Rutaceae genera

Casimiroa La Llave Chloroxylon DC Ceylon Satinwood Choisya Kunth - Mexican orange Chorilaena Endl. Citropsis (Engl.) Swingle & ...

*Papilio anchisiades

The larvae feed on various species of the Rutaceae family, including Citrus, Casimiroa, and Zanthoxylum species. The adults ...

*Cherimoya

Casimiroa edulis) - sometimes mislabeled as cherimoya Wild soursop (Annona senegalensis) "Annona cherimola Miller". Integrated ...

*Papilio rumiko

Eggs are laid singly on young leaves and shoots of Zanthoxylum fagara, Ptelea trifoliata, Amyris texana and Casimiroa greggii, ...

*Toddalioideae

Acronychia Amyris Araliopsis Balfourodendron Casimiroa Dictamnus Diphasia Fagaropsis Halforida Helietta Hortia Maclurodendron ...

*Giardini Botanici Hanbury

Casimiroa edulis (1867), olive trees, Olmediella betschleriana, and Pinus canariensis (1870). An orchard of rare fruits ...

*Desarrollo Forestal Montreal

Some of the arboreal species that can be seen are the oak (Quercus oocarpa), wooly-leaved sapote (Casimiroa tetrameria), gum ...

*Buenavista, Michoacán

Diospyros digyna and Casimiroa edulis). There are also areas of tropical spiny brush. Typical fauna includes species such as ...

*List of flora of the Sonoran Desert Region by common name

Casimiroa edulis) Bonpland willow (Salix bonplandiana) brush holly (Xylosma flexuosa) Frémont cottonwood (Populus fremontii) ...

*Tequixquiac

... casimiroa edulis). The native animals are cacomistle, skunk, gopher, Virginia opossum, rabbit, Mexican gray squirrel, turkey, ...

*Tropical Gardens of Maui

Casimiroa edulis, Clausena lansium, Eugenia malaccensis, Euphoria longan, Malpighia emarginata, Manilkara zapota, Nephelium ...

*Pouteria sapota

Casimiroa edulis). Leaves on tree Fruit flesh and kernel Mamey at a Tepoztlan market The fruit is eaten raw or made into ...

*Custard apple

... a tree and fruit called wild custard-apple Casimiroa edulis, under the Rutaceae (rue or citrus) family "Custard Apple". Hort. ...

*Neglected and underutilized crop

Artocarpus heterophyllus Averrhoa carambola Bactris gasipaes Canarium indicum Carissa edulis Carya cathayensis Casimiroa edulis ...

*C. edulis

... mat-forming succulent plant species Casimiroa edulis, the white sapote, custard apple and cochitzapotl in Nahuatl, a plant ...
The Casimiroa pringlei essential oil was analyzed to determine its chemical composition. Its effect on rat uterine smooth muscle was studied and compared with verapamil. Pure commercial piperitone, eucalyptol, and ?-terpineol, the major constituents of C. pringlei essential oil, were tested on the uterine tonic contraction induced by high-potassium depolarizing solution (KCl 60 mM). ...
unfought remica folkmoter courtroom Casimiroa demal melanemic vanity spare visionarily lessn outby sulfonyl gizzern pablo colorin bloodcurdling scraggily cavity Seasan spogel stomatograph reforger pigritude outpour rakshasa [email protected] ...
[email protected] ABSTRACT. The objective of this study was to determine the genetic structure of populations of the mexican fruit fly Anastrepha ludens (Loew) in NE citrus growing regions of Mexico. The work was conducted during 2005 at the Center of Genomic Biotechnology in Reynosa, Tamaulipas, Mexico. AFLP markers using four different pairs of initiators were used on specimens collected from the native, ancestral host, yellow chapote (Casimiroa greggii S. Wats) and the exotic host, citrus (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck cv Valencia). The four combinations of initiators amplified an average of 95 AFLP fragments. A total of 382 products were obtained and 259 (67%) of them were polymorphous. The overall index of genetic diversity was 28%, with 3% difference between the genotypes collected from yellow chapote as compared to the genotypes collected from sweet orange. Cluster analysis and principal components showed a close genetic relation among A. ludens specimens regardless of the ...
Objective: To evaluate a comprehensive multislice computed tomography (MSCT) protocol in patients with previous infarction, including assessment of coronary artery stenoses, left ventricular (LV) function and perfusion.. Patients and methods: 16-slice MSCT was performed in 21 patients with previous infarction; from the MSCT data, coronary artery stenoses, (regional and global) LV function and perfusion were assessed. Invasive coronary angiography and gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) served as the reference standards for coronary artery stenoses and LV function/perfusion, respectively.. Results: 236 of 241 (98%) coronary artery segments were interpretable on MSCT. The sensitivity and specificity for detection of stenoses were 91% and 97%. Pearsons correlation showed excellent agreement for assessment of LV ejection fraction between MSCT and SPECT (49 (13)% v 53 (12)%, respectively, r = 0.85). Agreement for assessment of regional wall motion was excellent (92%, κ = 0.77). ...

Category:Casimiroa edulis - Wikimedia CommonsCategory:Casimiroa edulis - Wikimedia Commons

Vernacular names [edit wikidata Category:Casimiroa edulis linked to current category] [edit wikidata Casimiroa edulis main ... Media in category "Casimiroa edulis". The following 38 files are in this category, out of 38 total. ... Casimiroa edulis - Fruit and Spice Park - Homestead, Florida - DSC08989.jpg 5,472 × 3,648; 13.79 MB. ... Casimiroa edulis, bas met lentiselle, a, Voortrekkerbad.jpg 4,000 × 3,000; 4.3 MB. ...
more infohttps://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Casimiroa_edulis

Casimiroa - WikipediaCasimiroa - Wikipedia

Casimiroa calderoniae Casimiroa edulis - white sapote Casimiroa emarginata Casimiroa greggii Casimiroa microcarpa Casimiroa ... GRIN Species Records of Casimiroa. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Casimiroa. The Plant List. Casimiroa ... pringlei Casimiroa pubescens Casimiroa sapota - matasano Casimiroa tetrameria - woolly-leaf white sapote, yellow sapote, ... Casimiroa is a genus of flowering plants in the citrus family, Rutaceae. It includes about 10 species native to Mexico and ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casimiroa

Chemical composition and antispasmodic effect of Casimiroa pringlei essential oil on rat uterusChemical composition and antispasmodic effect of Casimiroa pringlei essential oil on rat uterus

... Ponce Monter, Héctor Antonio. ... The Casimiroa pringlei essential oil was analyzed to determine its chemical composition. Its effect on rat uterine smooth ... Chemical composition and antispasmodic effect of Casimiroa pringlei essential oil on rat uterus. Fitoterapia. 2008;79(6):446-50 ...
more infohttps://www.uaeh.edu.mx/investigacion/productos/1928/

Studio in vitro e ex vivo dellattivit  antiossidante di Casimiroa spp, Croton lechleri, Ribes nigrum e Boswellia serrata nella...Studio in vitro e ex vivo dell'attivit antiossidante di Casimiroa spp, Croton lechleri, Ribes nigrum e Boswellia serrata nella...

... le specie più comuni sono Casimiroa edulis Llave et lex. e Casimiroa pubescens Ramirez. Il decotto di foglie e semi è ... the most common are Casimiroa edulis Llave et lex. and Casimiroa pubescens Ramirez. The decoction of leaves and seeds are ... bud extract showed higher scavenging activity in comparison with Casimiroa extracts, whereas in the ORAC assay the Casimiroa ... The genus Casimiroa (Rutaceae) includes few species which have their habitat in Central America and Mexico; among these, ...
more infohttp://paduaresearch.cab.unipd.it/6658/

New Biological Activities of Casimiroa edulis Leaf Extract and Isolated CompoundsNew Biological Activities of Casimiroa edulis Leaf Extract and Isolated Compounds

... Academic Article * View record in Web of ... The phytochemical investigation of Casimiroa edulis Llave et Lex (Rotaceae) afforded four coumarins: umbelliferone (1), ...
more infohttps://scholars.latrobe.edu.au/display/publication133644

Molecules  | Free Full-Text | A Systematic Review of the Anxiolytic-Like Effects of Essential Oils in Animal Models | HTMLMolecules | Free Full-Text | A Systematic Review of the Anxiolytic-Like Effects of Essential Oils in Animal Models | HTML

Casimiroa pringlei. Oral acute administration of Casimiroa pringlei essential oil in male rats induced an increase in % time ... Casimiroa pringlei. Oral (acute). Rat. Elevated plus-maze Holeboard. No effect (compared to control). No change. Positive ... Casimiroa pringlei, Citrus aurantium, Citrus aurantium subsp. bergomia (bergamot), Citrus junos, Citrus latifolia, Citrus limon ... Anxiolytic and sedative effects of essential oil from Casimiroa pringlei on Wistar rats. J. Med. Plants Res. 2009, 3, 791-798 ...
more infohttp://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/20/10/18620/htm

White Sapote - California Rare Fruit Growers, Inc.White Sapote - California Rare Fruit Growers, Inc.

Casimiroa edulis Llave & Lex. Rutaceae. Common Names: White Sapote, Sapote, Zapote blanco, Casimiroa. ...
more infohttps://crfg.org/wiki/fruit/white-sapote/

Peat Watering 3 (-5 to 0 ° C) Plants, Seeds & Bulbs | eBayPeat Watering 3 (-5 to 0 ° C) Plants, Seeds & Bulbs | eBay

WHITE SAPOTE/ Casimiroa edulis TREE - organically grown tubestock. Rare WHITE SAPOTE fruit tree.akaCasimiroa Edulis fruit. ...
more infohttps://www.ebay.com.au/b/Peat-Watering-3-5-to-0-C-Plants-Seeds-Bulbs/181003/bn_10556949

Manual for the preparation and sale of fruits and vegetablesManual for the preparation and sale of fruits and vegetables

The fruit and vegetable production sector of Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia and Eastern Europe is facing a new situation where, on the one hand, supermarket chains account for an increasing percentage of the domestic food retail market and, on the other hand, producers must compete in an increasingly demanding global market for non- traditional and off-season fruits and vegetables. Producers with the necessary financial, management and technological skills are already meeting the new challenges; however, small farmers are increasingly being marginalized and will be facing unequal market conditions unless they are able to change their practices to meet the needs of a modern food marketing system. Regardless of the production system, the technological challenge is to increase returns through the rational use of available resources, reducing production costs and post-harvest losses, enhancing competitiveness and adding value to the final product. On the basis of these principles, this manual
more infohttp://www.fao.org/docrep/008/y4893e/y4893e0b.htm

Frost protection: fundamentals, practice, and economics - Volume 1Frost protection: fundamentals, practice, and economics - Volume 1

The book comes in two volumes. They describe the physics and biology of frost occurrence and damage, passive and active protection methods and how to assess the cost-effectiveness of active protection techniques. Nighttime energy balance is used to demonstrate how protection methods are used to reduce the likelihood of frost damage. Simple methods and programs are provided to help predict temperature trends and to help determine the timing for active methods. Plant physiology related to freeze damage and critical damage temperatures for a wide range of crops and ornamentals are presented. Finally, an economic analysis program with examples is included to assist users to evaluate cost-effectiveness of various active methods. Although the book contains considerable technical information, it was specifically written for growers rather than scientists as a practical guide for frost protection. The volume 2 reviews concepts of probability and risk of frost damage and uses that information to help readers
more infohttp://www.fao.org/docrep/008/y7223e/y7223e0a.htm

Pfaf Plant SearchPfaf Plant Search

Casimiroa edulis. White Sapote, Mexican Apple. 5. 3. Cedrelopsis grevei. Katrafay, Kathrafay. 2. 4. ...
more infohttps://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rutaceae

University of Hawaii Campus Plants, UH BotanyUniversity of Hawaii Campus Plants, UH Botany

Casimiroa edulis; white sapote; Rutaceae. *Cassia bakeriana; pink shower tree; Caesalpiniaceae. *Cassia fistula; golden shower ...
more infohttp://www.botany.hawaii.edu/faculty/carr/160webindex.htm

Plant Search ResultPlant Search Result

Casimiroa edulis. White Sapote, Mexican Apple. Rutaceae. Fagara bobacifolia (A.Rich.) Krug. & Urb. Zanthoxylum araliaceum Turcz ...
more infohttp://www.pfaf.org/User/DatabaseSearhResult.aspx?CName=W%25

Category:Images from Forest & Kim Starr - Wikimedia CommonsCategory:Images from Forest & Kim Starr - Wikimedia Commons

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. ...
more infohttps://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Images_from_Forest_%26_Kim_Starr

Fruits of the Hawiian Islands - Gerrit Parmile Wilder - Google BooksFruits of the Hawiian Islands - Gerrit Parmile Wilder - Google Books

Page 60 - J. pachyphloaa ericoides. DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS. This species is one of the most massive of our junipers. In early life the crown is open and broadly conical, and in old age, dense and round. The trunk is short and clear of branches for 6 or perhaps 10 feet. As a rule, the tree attains a height of from 30 to 40 feet, and a diameter of from 1J to 3J feet. ...
more infohttps://books.google.ca/books?id=-bNsZ59C3PUC&vq=found+growing&dq=editions:ISBN1465583092&source=gbs_navlinks_s

Fruits of the Hawiian Islands - Gerrit Parmile Wilder - Google BooksFruits of the Hawiian Islands - Gerrit Parmile Wilder - Google Books

Page 60 - J. pachyphloaa ericoides. DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS. This species is one of the most massive of our junipers. In early life the crown is open and broadly conical, and in old age, dense and round. The trunk is short and clear of branches for 6 or perhaps 10 feet. As a rule, the tree attains a height of from 30 to 40 feet, and a diameter of from 1J to 3J feet. ...
more infohttps://books.google.ca/books?id=-bNsZ59C3PUC&q=gardens&dq=editions:ISBN1465583092&output=html_text&source=gbs_word_cloud_r&cad=6

Flora del municipio de Culiacán, SinaloaFlora del municipio de Culiacán, Sinaloa

Casimiroa edulis. common name: cochitzápotl, iztac-zápotl (l. azteca); guía, yaga-guía (l. zapoteca, Oax); mayon-jih, se-ney (l ...
more infohttps://www.gbif.org/dataset/1a523735-7023-4457-8075-55ed885a5163

Plantas exóticas del centro de México y obtención de imágenes para una flora virtual de malezasPlantas exóticas del centro de México y obtención de imágenes para una flora virtual de malezas

Casimiroa edulis. common name: cochitzápotl, iztac-zápotl (l. azteca); guía, yaga-guía (l. zapoteca, Oax); mayon-jih, se-ney (l ...
more infohttps://www.gbif.org/dataset/8043a3a6-f762-11e1-a439-00145eb45e9a

Sapote - WikipediaSapote - Wikipedia

"Casimiroa edulis". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States ... Casimiroa edulis: Rutaceae) is native to northern and central Mexico, Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. South American ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sapote

Phototoxicity. Plants that produce adverse reactions on the skin - Botanical onlinePhototoxicity. Plants that produce adverse reactions on the skin - Botanical online

Casimiroa edulis (White sapote). Bergapten. Dictamnine. Skimmianine. Bark. Contact with the plant. ...
more infohttps://www.botanical-online.com/en/photography/photosensibility

Key Lime - Citrus aurantifolia - SeedsKey Lime - Citrus aurantifolia - Seeds

Casimiroa edulis. White Sapote. Casimiroa tetrameria. Wooly Leaved Sapote. Citrus articulata. West African Cherry Orange. ...
more infohttp://www.tradewindsfruit.com/content/key-lime.htm

ITIS Standard Report Page: RutaceaeITIS Standard Report Page: Rutaceae

Casimiroa La Llave & Lex. - sapote. Genus. Choisya Kunth - Mexican orange. Genus. X Citroncirus J.W. Ingram & H.E. Moore ...
more infohttps://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=28848

Fruits - Appropedia: The sustainability wikiFruits - Appropedia: The sustainability wiki

White SapoteW (Casimiroa edulis; RutaceaeW). * Whortleberry, see [bilberry. * Wild grapeW (Ampelocissus acetosa) ...
more infohttps://www.appropedia.org/index.php?title=Fruits&

Volume 99 Issue 6 | Journal of Economic EntomologyVolume 99 Issue 6 | Journal of Economic Entomology

Casimiroa edulis Oerst. (Rutaceae), volatiles were investigated. Females flew upwind and landed more often on fruit than on ...
more infohttps://bioone.org/journals/Journal-of-Economic-Entomology/volume-99/issue-6

Frontiers | The Anti-diarrheal Activity of the Non-toxic Dihuang Powder in Mice | PharmacologyFrontiers | The Anti-diarrheal Activity of the Non-toxic Dihuang Powder in Mice | Pharmacology

Spasmolytic and antidiarrhoeal properties of the Yucatec Mayan medicinal plant Casimiroa tetrameria. J. Pharm. Pharmacol. 57, ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fphar.2018.01037/full
  • Ponce-Monter H, Campos MG, Pérez S, Pérez C, Zavala M, Macías A, Oropeza M, Cárdenas N. Chemical composition and antispasmodic effect of Casimiroa pringlei essential oil on rat uterus. (edu.mx)
  • The Casimiroa pringlei essential oil was analyzed to determine its chemical composition. (edu.mx)
  • 1) paragrahvi 2 lõike 1 punkti 5 täiendatakse pärast tekstiosa „tsitrus ( Citrus L.) ja selle hübriidide" tekstiosaga „, kasimiiropuu ( Casimiroa La Llave), Clausena Burm. (riigiteataja.ee)
  • 2) paragrahvi 2 punkti 7 täiendatakse pärast tekstiosa „seltsi okaspuulaadsed ( Coniferales )" tekstiosaga „ning perekondade Amyris P. Browne, kasimiiropuu ( Casimiroa La Llave), Citropsis Swingle & Kellerman, kõrbelaimipuu ( Eremocitrus Swingle), Esenbeckia Kunth, Glycosmis Corrêa, Merrillia Swingle, Naringi Adans. (riigiteataja.ee)