Ceftriaxone: A broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic with a very long half-life and high penetrability to meninges, eyes and inner ears.Cefotaxime: Semisynthetic broad-spectrum cephalosporin.Cephalosporins: A group of broad-spectrum antibiotics first isolated from the Mediterranean fungus ACREMONIUM. They contain the beta-lactam moiety thia-azabicyclo-octenecarboxylic acid also called 7-aminocephalosporanic acid.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Meningitis, Pneumococcal: An acute purulent infection of the meninges and subarachnoid space caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, most prevalent in children and adults over the age of 60. This illness may be associated with OTITIS MEDIA; MASTOIDITIS; SINUSITIS; RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS; sickle cell disease (ANEMIA, SICKLE CELL); skull fractures; and other disorders. Clinical manifestations include FEVER; HEADACHE; neck stiffness; and somnolence followed by SEIZURES; focal neurologic deficits (notably DEAFNESS); and COMA. (From Miller et al., Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p111)Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Cephalosporin Resistance: Non-susceptibility of an organism to the action of the cephalosporins.Cefixime: A third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic that is stable to hydrolysis by beta-lactamases.Gonorrhea: Acute infectious disease characterized by primary invasion of the urogenital tract. The etiologic agent, NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE, was isolated by Neisser in 1879.Neisseria gonorrhoeae: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria primarily found in purulent venereal discharges. It is the causative agent of GONORRHEA.Streptococcus pneumoniae: A gram-positive organism found in the upper respiratory tract, inflammatory exudates, and various body fluids of normal and/or diseased humans and, rarely, domestic animals.beta-Lactams: Four-membered cyclic AMIDES, best known for the PENICILLINS based on a bicyclo-thiazolidine, as well as the CEPHALOSPORINS based on a bicyclo-thiazine, and including monocyclic MONOBACTAMS. The BETA-LACTAMASES hydrolyze the beta lactam ring, accounting for BETA-LACTAM RESISTANCE of infective bacteria.Penicillin Resistance: Nonsusceptibility of an organism to the action of penicillins.Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: A glutamate plasma membrane transporter protein found in ASTROCYTES and in the LIVER.Penicillins: A group of antibiotics that contain 6-aminopenicillanic acid with a side chain attached to the 6-amino group. The penicillin nucleus is the chief structural requirement for biological activity. The side-chain structure determines many of the antibacterial and pharmacological characteristics. (Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1065)Meningitis: Inflammation of the coverings of the brain and/or spinal cord, which consist of the PIA MATER; ARACHNOID; and DURA MATER. Infections (viral, bacterial, and fungal) are the most common causes of this condition, but subarachnoid hemorrhage (HEMORRHAGES, SUBARACHNOID), chemical irritation (chemical MENINGITIS), granulomatous conditions, neoplastic conditions (CARCINOMATOUS MENINGITIS), and other inflammatory conditions may produce this syndrome. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1994, Ch24, p6)Cefuroxime: Broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic resistant to beta-lactamase. It has been proposed for infections with gram-negative and gram-positive organisms, GONORRHEA, and HAEMOPHILUS.Drug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Lactams: Cyclic AMIDES formed from aminocarboxylic acids by the elimination of water. Lactims are the enol forms of lactams.Meningitis, Haemophilus: Infections of the nervous system caused by bacteria of the genus HAEMOPHILUS, and marked by prominent inflammation of the MENINGES. HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE TYPE B is the most common causative organism. The condition primarily affects children under 6 years of age but may occur in adults.Ciprofloxacin: A broad-spectrum antimicrobial carboxyfluoroquinoline.Drug Resistance, Microbial: The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Serum Bactericidal Test: Method of measuring the bactericidal activity contained in a patient's serum as a result of antimicrobial therapy. It is used to monitor the therapy in BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS; OSTEOMYELITIS and other serious bacterial infections. As commonly performed, the test is a variation of the broth dilution test. This test needs to be distinguished from testing of the naturally occurring BLOOD BACTERICIDAL ACTIVITY.beta-Lactamases: Enzymes found in many bacteria which catalyze the hydrolysis of the amide bond in the beta-lactam ring. Well known antibiotics destroyed by these enzymes are penicillins and cephalosporins.Cefotiam: One of the CEPHALOSPORINS that has a broad spectrum of activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms.Ampicillin: Semi-synthetic derivative of penicillin that functions as an orally active broad-spectrum antibiotic.Ceftazidime: Semisynthetic, broad-spectrum antibacterial derived from CEPHALORIDINE and used especially for Pseudomonas and other gram-negative infections in debilitated patients.Meningitis, Bacterial: Bacterial infections of the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space, frequently involving the cerebral cortex, cranial nerves, cerebral blood vessels, spinal cord, and nerve roots.Injections, Intramuscular: Forceful administration into a muscle of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the muscle and any tissue covering it.Netilmicin: Semisynthetic 1-N-ethyl derivative of SISOMYCIN, an aminoglycoside antibiotic with action similar to gentamicin, but less ear and kidney toxicity.Azithromycin: A semi-synthetic macrolide antibiotic structurally related to ERYTHROMYCIN. It has been used in the treatment of Mycobacterium avium intracellulare infections, toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis.Spectinomycin: An antibiotic produced by Streptomyces spectabilis. It is active against gram-negative bacteria and used for the treatment of gonorrhea.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Ceftizoxime: A semisynthetic cephalosporin antibiotic which can be administered intravenously or by suppository. The drug is highly resistant to a broad spectrum of beta-lactamases and is active against a wide range of both aerobic and anaerobic gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. It has few side effects and is reported to be safe and effective in aged patients and in patients with hematologic disorders.Anti-Infective Agents: Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Sulbactam: A beta-lactamase inhibitor with very weak antibacterial action. The compound prevents antibiotic destruction of beta-lactam antibiotics by inhibiting beta-lactamases, thus extending their spectrum activity. Combinations of sulbactam with beta-lactam antibiotics have been used successfully for the therapy of infections caused by organisms resistant to the antibiotic alone.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Veterinary Drugs: Drugs used by veterinarians in the treatment of animal diseases. The veterinarian's pharmacological armamentarium is the counterpart of drugs treating human diseases, with dosage and administration adjusted to the size, weight, disease, and idiosyncrasies of the species. In the United States most drugs are subject to federal regulations with special reference to the safety of drugs and residues in edible animal products.Lyme Disease: An infectious disease caused by a spirochete, BORRELIA BURGDORFERI, which is transmitted chiefly by Ixodes dammini (see IXODES) and pacificus ticks in the United States and Ixodes ricinis (see IXODES) in Europe. It is a disease with early and late cutaneous manifestations plus involvement of the nervous system, heart, eye, and joints in variable combinations. The disease was formerly known as Lyme arthritis and first discovered at Old Lyme, Connecticut.Clostridium difficile: A common inhabitant of the colon flora in human infants and sometimes in adults. It produces a toxin that causes pseudomembranous enterocolitis (ENTEROCOLITIS, PSEUDOMEMBRANOUS) in patients receiving antibiotic therapy.Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous: An acute inflammation of the INTESTINAL MUCOSA that is characterized by the presence of pseudomembranes or plaques in the SMALL INTESTINE (pseudomembranous enteritis) and the LARGE INTESTINE (pseudomembranous colitis). It is commonly associated with antibiotic therapy and CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE colonization.Borrelia burgdorferi: A specific species of bacteria, part of the BORRELIA BURGDORFERI GROUP, whose common name is Lyme disease spirochete.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Haplosporida: A phylum of EUKARYOTES in the RHIZARIA group. They are small endoparasites of marine invertebrates. Spores are structurally complex but without polar filaments or tubes.
  • Due to precipitation of ceftriaxone in bile, biliary sludging, gallstones, and cholecystitis are also possible, if less common.It should not be used in newborns due to the risks of bilirubin encephalopathy and ceftriaxone-calcium precipitation. (made-in-china.com)
  • Ceftriaxone is available for administration via the intramuscular or the intravenous routes.Diluents containing calcium should not be used to reconstitute ceftriaxone and it must not be administered in intravenous lines containing other calcium-containing solutions, as a ceftriaxone-calcium precipitate could form. (made-in-china.com)
  • If you will be using more than one dose of ceftriaxone injection, use the medication until you finish the prescription, even if you feel better. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Ceftriaxone for Injection and Dextrose Injection in the DUPLEX® Container should be used only in patients who require the entire 1 or 2 gram dose and not any fraction thereof. (drugs.com)
  • Use this formulation of ceftriaxone only in patients who require the entire 1 or 2 gram dose and not any fraction thereof. (nih.gov)
  • The aim of this study was to assess whether ceftriaxone associated nephrolithiasis develops by the same mechanism, and whether this condition is dose related. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusions: The study showed that children taking a 7 day course of normal or high dose ceftriaxone may develop small sized asymptomatic renal stones. (bmj.com)
  • Our aim in this study was to assess for precipitation of ceftriaxone in the renal calyces of a paediatric population and to examine the possible relationship between nephrolithiasis and ceftriaxone dose. (bmj.com)
  • Recommended therapy includes ceftriaxone 250 mg IM as a single dose with doxycycline 100 mg orally twice daily for a total of 10 days. (medscape.com)
  • Deux cent patientes ont reçu de manière aléatoire soit de la ceftriaxone (dose unique) soit de l'ampicilline-cloxacilline (3 doses) par voie intraveineuse à l'induction de l'anesthésie. (who.int)
  • Une dose de ceftriaxone était aussi efficace que l'ampicilline- cloxacilline dans la prévention des complications de la césarienne et elle est plus facile à administrer. (who.int)
  • Less than one hour had elapsed between the time he staggered into my office and he got his first dose of ceftriaxone, but in retrospect I think that was about an hour too long to wait. (sgvtribune.com)
  • The CDC currently recommends gonorrhea be treated with a single shot of ceftriaxone and an oral dose of azithromycin. (ibtimes.com)
  • Further anamnesis prompted by spread of the lesions during hospitalization revealed that the patient had been receiving ceftriaxone for several days. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The patient reported that 2 days prior to admission, she had been discharged from another hospital with a diagnosis of pneumonia, and she had been receiving ceftriaxone for 4 days. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This patient is the first case of minimal change glomerular disease associated with chronic Lyme borreliosis. (nih.gov)
  • This case reports the detection and molecular characterization of an ESBL-producing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain isolated from a patient with typhoid fever who was admitted to a private hospital in Sri Lanka. (hindawi.com)
  • Vancomycin and ceftriaxone are discontinued and the patient is treated with oxacillin. (hawaii.edu)
  • White and Sprague 2 reported a case of Tetralogy of Fallot in which the patient lived to the age of 59 years and nine months. (annals.org)
  • We describe what is, to our knowledge, the first case of infective endocarditis (IE) caused by Lactobacillus rhamnosus in a patient with HHT. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In this study we report the first fatal case of a toxin A and B gene positive strain of C. difficile associated with pseudomembraneous colitis in a patient from Trinidad and Tobago. (omicsonline.org)
  • We present a description of a rare but dangerous case of fungal meningitis caused by Aspergillus terreus in an immunocompetent patient with a history of sinus disease. (frontiersin.org)
  • A one year-old child patient who was a known case of Down syndrome and had previously experienced cardiac surgery was hospitalized and treated for pneumonia. (medsci.org)
  • In this report, the first case of S. paucimobilis identified in Turkey in a pediatric patient with Down syndrome is presented. (medsci.org)
  • The committee concludes that, in this particular case, it would be a reasonable option to discharge the patient to home with a PICC line in place to complete OPAT. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • This report describes a case where Salmonella typhi was isolated from the blood and urine of a patient with echocardiographically documented aortic valve disease and endocarditis. (ebscohost.com)
  • The patient was treated with two weeks of ceftriaxone (3. (ebscohost.com)
  • The following case report highlights myocarditis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as complications in a severely ill patient with spotted fever group of rickettsioses where timely diagnosis and intervention saved the life. (springer.com)
  • The authors conclude that ceftriaxone and cefotaxime provide effective prophylaxis for abdominal surgeries, but that cefotaxime does not provide adequate coverage for appendectomy without the addition of metronidazole. (aafp.org)
  • In this context, our purpose was, first, to investigate the in vitro interaction between amoxicillin and ceftriaxone and between vancomycin and ceftriaxone against PRP and, second, to identify the range of concentrations that are of clinical interest. (asm.org)
  • Ceftriaxone injection is also sometimes given before certain types of surgery to prevent infections that may develop after the operation. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The first cases of ESBL-producing enterobacteriaceae (EBLSE) infections were described during the 1980s and subsequently experienced global spread. (centerwatch.com)
  • This case is reported to emphasize that S. paucimobilis should be kept in mind as a nosocomial infectious agent in patients with Down syndrome and immunosuppressive patients and the infections should be treated according to the sensitivity test results. (medsci.org)
  • However, infections are rare, with rates approximating 0.5 cases per 100,000 persons per year. (epmonthly.com)
  • ARDS and myocarditis are rare complications of Rickettsia conorii infections and only a few cases are reported to date. (springer.com)
  • Limited availability of IFA has led to underreporting of the cases with rickettsial infections. (springer.com)
  • This study is the third consecutive Phase III clinical trial in CAP demonstrating a strong response trend favouring ceftaroline over ceftriaxone (both 1 and 2g/day) adding to the overall body of ZINFORO™ data. (prnewswire.co.uk)
  • Our current knowledge of the clinical characteristics of enteric fever is drawn mainly from population-based studies in disease-endemic countries, and there are limited data published on cases in returning travelers. (ajtmh.org)
  • We aimed to study the clinical pattern of nocardiosis in a tertiary care hospital in Saudi Arabia using a retrospective review of cases from 1987 to 2003. (who.int)
  • A 60-year-old man presented with pneumococcal meningitis which did not respond to the ceftriaxone therapy, in spite of in-vitro susceptibility ( minimal inhibitory concentration of 0.016 μg/dLit ) of the isolated organism to this antibacterial agent, although ceftriaxone is still the drug of choice for such pneumococcal meningitis. (hindawi.com)
  • Ceftriaxone is one of only two drugs recommended by WHO and the CDC to treat gonorrhea, the other being azithromycin. (healio.com)
  • Amanda Macmillan, Health.com , "A British Man Has the 'World's Worst' Case of Super-Gonorrhea. (merriam-webster.com)
  • Gonorrhea - Reported Cases and Rates of Reported Cases by State/Area and Region in Alphabetical Order, United States and Outlying Areas, 2012-2016. (medscape.com)
  • For cefexime, the proportion of gonorrhea cases with elevated MIC levels went from 0.2 percent to 1.4 percent. (npr.org)
  • For instance, in Honolulu, nearly 8 percent of all gonorrhea cases had elevated MIC levels last year, and in California it was nearly 5 percent. (npr.org)
  • Renal stone formation with ceftriaxone therapy can result in postrenal acute renal failure in children. (aappublications.org)
  • Patients with hepatic impairment and significant renal impairment should not receive more than 2 grams per day of ceftriaxone. (nih.gov)
  • There are only few cases of renal pathology induced by Lyme borreliosis in the literature, as this damage is rare and uncommon in humans. (nih.gov)
  • During January-April 2002, Salmonella serotype Newport was isolated from 47 persons in five states: New York (34 cases), Michigan (five), Pennsylvania (four), Ohio (two), and Connecticut (two). (nih.gov)
  • The most common adverse reactions occurring in greater than 2% of patients receiving ceftriaxone include diarrhea, eosinophilia, thrombocytosis, leukopenia, and elevations of SGOT and SGPT. (nih.gov)
  • Although pediatric patients rarely develop gallbladder disorders, this complication may lead to adverse events in high-risk patients with predisposing factors, particularly in neonates and infants treated with ceftriaxone. (dovepress.com)
  • In the safety population, 45.1% (172/381) of patients randomised to ceftaroline fosamil and 42.6% (163/383) of patients randomised to ceftriaxone experienced ≥1 adverse event (AE). (prnewswire.co.uk)
  • No adverse events were associated with the use of ceftriaxone. (aafp.org)
  • To determine the cause of the outbreak, the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) and CDC conducted a case-control study. (nih.gov)