Carpal Bones: The eight bones of the wrist: SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; TRIQUETRUM BONE; PISIFORM BONE; TRAPEZIUM BONE; TRAPEZOID BONE; CAPITATE BONE; and HAMATE BONE.Carpal Joints: The articulations between the various CARPAL BONES. This does not include the WRIST JOINT which consists of the articulations between the RADIUS; ULNA; and proximal CARPAL BONES.Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Entrapment of the MEDIAN NERVE in the carpal tunnel, which is formed by the flexor retinaculum and the CARPAL BONES. This syndrome may be associated with repetitive occupational trauma (CUMULATIVE TRAUMA DISORDERS); wrist injuries; AMYLOID NEUROPATHIES; rheumatoid arthritis (see ARTHRITIS, RHEUMATOID); ACROMEGALY; PREGNANCY; and other conditions. Symptoms include burning pain and paresthesias involving the ventral surface of the hand and fingers which may radiate proximally. Impairment of sensation in the distribution of the median nerve and thenar muscle atrophy may occur. (Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1995, Ch51, p45)Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Hamate Bone: A carpal bone located between the CAPITATE BONE and the TRIQUETRUM BONE. The hamate has a prominent process that projects anteriorly.Carpus, Animal: The region corresponding to the human WRIST in non-human ANIMALS.Scaphoid Bone: The bone which is located most lateral in the proximal row of CARPAL BONES.Age Determination by Skeleton: Establishment of the age of an individual by examination of their skeletal structure.Wrist Joint: The joint that is formed by the distal end of the RADIUS, the articular disc of the distal radioulnar joint, and the proximal row of CARPAL BONES; (SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; triquetral bone).Lunate Bone: A moon-shaped carpal bone which is located between the SCAPHOID BONE and TRIQUETRUM BONE.Capitate Bone: A carpal bone with a rounded head located between the TRAPEZOID BONE and the HAMATE BONE.Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Metacarpal Bones: The five cylindrical bones of the METACARPUS, articulating with the CARPAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF FINGERS distally.Radius: The outer shorter of the two bones of the FOREARM, lying parallel to the ULNA and partially revolving around it.Metacarpus: The region of the HAND between the WRIST and the FINGERS.Ulna: The inner and longer bone of the FOREARM.Wrist Injuries: Injuries to the wrist or the wrist joint.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Bone Resorption: Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Median Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the median nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C6 to T1), travel via the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the forearm and hand.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Bone Development: The growth and development of bones from fetus to adult. It includes two principal mechanisms of bone growth: growth in length of long bones at the epiphyseal cartilages and growth in thickness by depositing new bone (OSTEOGENESIS) with the actions of OSTEOBLASTS and OSTEOCLASTS.Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Bone Diseases: Diseases of BONES.Bone Regeneration: Renewal or repair of lost bone tissue. It excludes BONY CALLUS formed after BONE FRACTURES but not yet replaced by hard bone.Bone Matrix: Extracellular substance of bone tissue consisting of COLLAGEN fibers, ground substance, and inorganic crystalline minerals and salts.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Bone Substitutes: Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.Bone Diseases, MetabolicTomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Bone Morphogenetic Proteins: Bone-growth regulatory factors that are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of proteins. They are synthesized as large precursor molecules which are cleaved by proteolytic enzymes. The active form can consist of a dimer of two identical proteins or a heterodimer of two related bone morphogenetic proteins.Fracture Healing: The physiological restoration of bone tissue and function after a fracture. It includes BONY CALLUS formation and normal replacement of bone tissue.Finger Phalanges: Bones that make up the SKELETON of the FINGERS, consisting of two for the THUMB, and three for each of the other fingers.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.HumanitiesThumb: The first digit on the radial side of the hand which in humans lies opposite the other four.Burial: The act or ceremony of putting a corpse into the ground or a vault, or into the sea; or the inurnment of CREMAINS.Fingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.
  • There are 8 carpal bones which can be classified as either belonging to two transverse rows, or three longitudinal columns. (wikipedia.org)
  • No statistically significant changes in electrophysiologic function of the median nerve, cross-sectional area of the median nerve, or transverse carpal ligament bowing were observed. (jaoa.org)
  • After treatment, the increase in transverse carpal ligament length was statistically significant, but no side-to-side difference was detected. (jaoa.org)
  • Transverse carpal ligament (TCL) response was observed by measuring changes in the width of the transverse carpal arch (TCA) with three-dimensional video analysis and precision calipers. (jaoa.org)
  • 1 However, osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) and stretching exercises have shown promising results when used in combination therapy as a potential treatment modality for CTS, demonstrating an increase in the width of the transverse carpal arch (TCA) as confirmed with nerve conduction improvements and findings from magnetic resonance imaging. (jaoa.org)
  • The only scientifically established disease modifying treatment is surgery to cut the transverse carpal ligament. (scribd.com)
  • The condition was initially identified in the proximal articular surface of the third carpal bone and is considered to be a consequence of cyclic trauma. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • A skyline view radiograph is critical for diagnosis and typically shows lysis and sclerosis in the third carpal bone (typically radial facet). (merckvetmanual.com)
  • The aims of this thesis were to evaluate the DPr-DDiO projection for the assessment of sclerosis and to study the relationships between altered third carpal bone (C3) radiopacity and previous exercise, previous carpal lameness, clinical appearance, and prognosis for future performance. (slu.se)
  • Uhlhorn H, Ekman S, Haglund A, Carlsten J. The accuracy of the dorsoproximal-dorsodistal projection in assessing third carpal bone sclerosis in Standardbred trotters. (slu.se)
  • Uhlhorn H, Carlsten J. Retrospective study of subchondral sclerosis and lucency in the third carpal bone of Standardbred trotters. (slu.se)
  • Uhlhorn H, Eksell P Sandgren B, Carlsten J. Sclerosis of the Third Carpal Bone. (slu.se)
  • Plain radiograph in a middle-aged man with shoulder discomfort demonstrates an irregularly calcified bone infarct in the diametaphysis of the right humerus. (medscape.com)