An irregularly shaped venous space in the dura mater at either side of the sphenoid bone.
An acquired or spontaneous abnormality in which there is communication between CAVERNOUS SINUS, a venous structure, and the CAROTID ARTERIES. It is often associated with HEAD TRAUMA, specifically basilar skull fractures (SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR). Clinical signs often include VISION DISORDERS and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION.
An abnormal direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. An A-V fistula usually leads to the formation of a dilated sac-like connection, arteriovenous aneurysm. The locations and size of the shunts determine the degree of effects on the cardiovascular functions such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEART RATE.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CAVERNOUS SINUS of the brain. Infections of the paranasal sinuses and adjacent structures, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, and THROMBOPHILIA are associated conditions. Clinical manifestations include dysfunction of cranial nerves III, IV, V, and VI, marked periorbital swelling, chemosis, fever, and visual loss. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p711)
Abnormal communication most commonly seen between two internal organs, or between an internal organ and the surface of the body.
An abnormal passage communicating between any component of the respiratory tract or between any part of the respiratory system and surrounding organs.
A recess on each side in the wall of the HYPOPHARYNX.
Acute inflammatory disease of the THYROID GLAND due to infections by BACTERIA; FUNGI; or other microorganisms. Symptoms include tender swelling, FEVER, and often with LEUKOCYTOSIS.
Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.
Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.
Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.
The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.
A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.
Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)
One of the paired air spaces located in the body of the SPHENOID BONE behind the ETHMOID BONE in the middle of the skull. Sphenoid sinus communicates with the posterosuperior part of NASAL CAVITY on the same side.
An abnormal anatomical passage between the INTESTINE, and another segment of the intestine or other organs. External intestinal fistula is connected to the SKIN (enterocutaneous fistula). Internal intestinal fistula can be connected to a number of organs, such as STOMACH (gastrocolic fistula), the BILIARY TRACT (cholecystoduodenal fistula), or the URINARY BLADDER of the URINARY TRACT (colovesical fistula). Risk factors include inflammatory processes, cancer, radiation treatment, and surgical misadventures (MEDICAL ERRORS).
A short vein that collects about two thirds of the venous blood from the MYOCARDIUM and drains into the RIGHT ATRIUM. Coronary sinus, normally located between the LEFT ATRIUM and LEFT VENTRICLE on the posterior surface of the heart, can serve as an anatomical reference for cardiac procedures.
Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of DURA MATER, the endosteal and the meningeal layers. They are devoid of valves and are parts of the venous system of dura mater. Major cranial sinuses include a postero-superior group (such as superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and occipital) and an antero-inferior group (such as cavernous, petrosal, and basilar plexus).
An abnormal passage or communication leading from an internal organ to the surface of the body.
Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.
Congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities involving ARTERIES; VEINS; or venous sinuses in the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and MENINGES.
The dilated portion of the common carotid artery at its bifurcation into external and internal carotids. It contains baroreceptors which, when stimulated, cause slowing of the heart, vasodilatation, and a fall in blood pressure.
An abnormal passage or communication between a bronchus and another part of the body.
An abnormal passage between two or more BLOOD VESSELS, between ARTERIES; VEINS; or between an artery and a vein.
A compound used as an x-ray contrast medium that occurs in nature as the mineral barite. It is also used in various manufacturing applications and mixed into heavy concrete to serve as a radiation shield.
An abnormal anatomical passage connecting the RECTUM to the outside, with an orifice at the site of drainage.
Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.
Abnormal passage communicating with the STOMACH.
An abnormal passage in any part of the URINARY TRACT between itself or with other organs.
Abnormal passage communicating with the ESOPHAGUS. The most common type is TRACHEOESOPHAGEAL FISTULA between the esophagus and the TRACHEA.
The excision of the thickened, atheromatous tunica intima of a carotid artery.
Pathological processes involving the PHARYNX.
Paralysis of one or more of the ocular muscles due to disorders of the eye muscles, neuromuscular junction, supporting soft tissue, tendons, or innervation to the muscles.
Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.
Abnormal passage in any organ of the biliary tract or between biliary organs and other organs.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CRANIAL SINUSES, large endothelium-lined venous channels situated within the SKULL. Intracranial sinuses, also called cranial venous sinuses, include the superior sagittal, cavernous, lateral, petrous sinuses, and many others. Cranial sinus thrombosis can lead to severe HEADACHE; SEIZURE; and other neurological defects.
The compartment containing the anterior extremities and half the inferior surface of the temporal lobes (TEMPORAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. Lying posterior and inferior to the anterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, ANTERIOR), it is formed by part of the TEMPORAL BONE and SPHENOID BONE. It is separated from the posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) by crests formed by the superior borders of the petrous parts of the temporal bones.
Veins draining the cerebrum.
An irregular unpaired bone situated at the SKULL BASE and wedged between the frontal, temporal, and occipital bones (FRONTAL BONE; TEMPORAL BONE; OCCIPITAL BONE). Sphenoid bone consists of a median body and three pairs of processes resembling a bat with spread wings. The body is hollowed out in its inferior to form two large cavities (SPHENOID SINUS).
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Abnormal passage communicating with the PANCREAS.
The two principal arteries supplying the structures of the head and neck. They ascend in the neck, one on each side, and at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, each divides into two branches, the external (CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries.
A small cluster of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery. The carotid body, which is richly supplied with fenestrated capillaries, senses the pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and plays a crucial role in their homeostatic control.
An abnormal anatomical passage between the RECTUM and the VAGINA.
Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.
The air space located in the body of the MAXILLARY BONE near each cheek. Each maxillary sinus communicates with the middle passage (meatus) of the NASAL CAVITY on the same side.
A bony prominence situated on the upper surface of the body of the sphenoid bone. It houses the PITUITARY GLAND.
Diseases of the oculomotor nerve or nucleus that result in weakness or paralysis of the superior rectus, inferior rectus, medial rectus, inferior oblique, or levator palpebrae muscles, or impaired parasympathetic innervation to the pupil. With a complete oculomotor palsy, the eyelid will be paralyzed, the eye will be in an abducted and inferior position, and the pupil will be markedly dilated. Commonly associated conditions include neoplasms, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, ischemia (especially in association with DIABETES MELLITUS), and aneurysmal compression. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p270)
An abnormal anatomical passage between the URINARY BLADDER and the VAGINA.
Inflammatory diseases of the THYROID GLAND. Thyroiditis can be classified into acute (THYROIDITIS, SUPPURATIVE), subacute (granulomatous and lymphocytic), chronic fibrous (Riedel's), chronic lymphocytic (HASHIMOTO DISEASE), transient (POSTPARTUM THYROIDITIS), and other AUTOIMMUNE THYROIDITIS subtypes.
Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the exterior of the head, the face, and the greater part of the neck.
An abnormal anatomical passage that connects the VAGINA to other organs, such as the bladder (VESICOVAGINAL FISTULA) or the rectum (RECTOVAGINAL FISTULA).

Endovascular arterial occlusion accomplished using microcoils deployed with and without proximal flow arrest: results in 19 patients. (1/104)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Prior to their relatively recent FDA approval, detachable balloons for endovascular arterial occlusion had been available on only a limited basis. We evaluated the feasibility of permanent endovascular carotid and vertebral artery occlusion using microcoils deployed with and without proximal flow arrest in 19 patients. METHODS: Permanent endovascular occlusion was performed in 19 arteries of 19 patients. The treated lesions included nine aneurysms, one carotid-cavernous fistula/pseudoaneurysm, seven neoplasms, and two dissections. Nondetachable balloons were used to arrest proximal blood flow during occlusion of only six arteries. Anticoagulation (heparin, 5000 U IV) was used during occlusion of 18 arteries. Three to 88 coils were used per lesion. Complex fibered platinum microcoils were used for all cases, and GDCs were also used in two patients. RESULTS: Sixteen patients had no new neurologic deficits after arterial occlusion. No patient had an acute event that suggested an embolic complication. Coils provided rapid and durable arterial occlusion in 17 patients. In both patients with acute carotid artery rupture, large numbers of coils placed during flow arrest failed to produce complete occlusion, which was accomplished subsequently with detachable balloons. One of these patients incurred a fatal hemispheric infarct after occlusion. One patient treated for a ruptured posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm by vertebral artery occlusion continued to have progressive neurologic deficits. One patient with a cavernous aneurysm had upper extremity weakness and mild dysphasia 24 hours after internal carotid artery occlusion. CONCLUSION: In our small series, microcoils were found to be safe and effective for neurovascular occlusion. When both intravenous heparin (5000 U IV bolus) and heparinized catheter flush solutions (5000 U/L) are used, flow arrest during coil placement is unnecessary to prevent clinically apparent embolic complications.  (+info)

Management of a rare complication of endovascular treatment of direct carotid cavernous fistula. (2/104)

A 30-year-old woman with direct carotid cavernous fistula underwent endovascular treatment with detachable balloons via a transarterial route. The patient returned with diplopia 1 year after therapy. On cranial MR imaging, one of the balloons was detected in the proximal portion of the superior ophthalmic vein and was deflated percutaneously with a 22-gauge Chiba needle under CT guidance. The patient's symptoms resolved after balloon deflation. This case report presents a unique complication of endovascular treatment of direct carotid cavernous fistula and its management.  (+info)

Cavernous sinus and inferior petrosal sinus flow signal on three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography. (3/104)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Venous flow signal in the cavernous sinus and inferior petrosal sinus has been shown on MR angiograms in patients with carotid cavernous fistula (CCF). We, however, identified flow signal in some patients without symptoms and signs of CCF. This review was performed to determine the frequency of such normal venous flow depiction at MR angiography. METHODS: Twenty-five 3D time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiograms obtained on two different imaging units (scanners A and B) were reviewed with attention to presence of venous flow signal in the cavernous sinus or inferior petrosal sinus or both. Twenty-five additional MR angiograms were reviewed in patients who had also had cerebral arteriography to document absence of CCF where venous MR angiographic signal was detected, as well as to gain insight into venous flow patterns that might contribute to MR angiographic venous flow signal. Differences in scanning technique parameters were reviewed. RESULTS: Nine (36%) of the 25 MR angiograms obtained on scanner A but only one (4%) of the 25 obtained on scanner B showed flow signal in the cavernous or inferior petrosal sinus or both in the absence of signs of CCF. On review of 25 patients who had both MR angiography and arteriography, three patients with venous signal at MR angiography failed to exhibit CCF at arteriography. CONCLUSION: Identification of normal cavernous sinus or inferior petrosal sinus venous signal on 3D TOF MR angiograms may occur frequently, and is probably dependent on technical factors that vary among scanners. The exact factors most responsible, however, were not elucidated by this preliminary review.  (+info)

Direct carotid-cavernous sinus fistula due to ruptured intracavernous aneurysm treated with electrodetachable coils--case report. (4/104)

A 66-year-old female developed exophthalmos, impaired visual acuity (perception of light), and diplopia one day after sudden onset of headache. Neurological examination revealed proptosis, chemosis, impaired vision, and ophthalmoplegia. Carotid angiography showed direct carotid-cavernous sinus fistula concomitant with an intracavernous aneurysm on the right side. Intraaneurysmal embolization using the Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs) via the transarterial route was performed and complete occlusion of the fistula successfully achieved. The neurological deficits resolved completely by 6 months after embolization. Intraaneurysmal GDC embolization via the transarterial route may be an alternative for the treatment of direct carotid-cavernous sinus fistula due to rupture of intracavernous aneurysm.  (+info)

Carotid and transcranial color-coded duplex sonography in different types of carotid-cavernous fistula. (5/104)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients with carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) may undergo direct or indirect shunting. Ultrasonography has value that is complementary to angiography in the assessment and follow-up of these patients. The aim of this study was to characterize findings provided by carotid duplex sonography (CDS) and transcranial color-coded duplex sonography (TCCD) in patients with different types of CCF. METHODS: CDS and TCCD were independently performed by technologists and neurologists. Digital subtraction or MR angiography was interpreted by a neuroradiologist. Ultrasonographic studies were categorized into 4 types: I, direct shunting only; II, direct shunting with a carotid aneurysm; III, indirect shunting only; and IV, mixed (direct and indirect) shunting. In addition to carotid and intracranial flow velocities, volume, and pulsatility, other direct and indirect ultrasound signs of shunting were evaluated. The direct sign of CCF was a mosaic flash detected by TCCD. Alteration of hemodynamic parameters on CDS and demonstration of draining veins with the use of TCCD were considered indirect signs. RESULTS: Fifteen patients (8 men, 7 women) were included in the study. According to angiographic results, patients in ultrasonographic classification types I (n=7) and II (n=3) corresponded to type A of Barrow's classification. Patients with type III (n=8) were Barrow's type C. Type IV (n=1) had a combination of Barrow's types A and C. On ultrasound, both direct and indirect signs were seen in types I, II, and IV CCF. The presence of a 2-colored oval mass divided by a zone of separation without turbulence differentiated type I from type II CCF. All patients with type III CCF had indirect signs, and only 1 patient had direct signs on TCCD. Abnormal TCCD findings were most commonly seen through the transorbital window (100%), followed by the transtemporal window (63%) and transforaminal window (40%). CONCLUSIONS: If only indirect ultrasonographic signs of CCF are present, TCCD can be used to predict an indirect CCF type on the basis of the origin of the fistula. With direct communication between carotid artery and cavernous sinus, both direct and indirect ultrasonographic signs can be found. The combination of CDS/TCCD may provide a noninvasive and reliable way to classify patients with CCF.  (+info)

Transvenous embolization of carotid-cavernous sinus fistula associated with a primitive trigeminal artery--case report. (6/104)

A 58-year-old female presented with right conjunctival chemosis and right abducens nerve paresis. Cerebral angiography demonstrated a right carotid-cavernous sinus fistula associated with persistent primitive trigeminal artery. The fistula was treated by introducing detachable coils through the transvenous approach, as the detachable balloon was not available. Follow-up angiography performed 14 days after the embolization revealed complete disappearance of the carotid-cavernous sinus fistula due to thrombosis, which was presumably accelerated by the coils. Transvenous coil embolization should be considered as an alternative treatment for high-flow carotid-cavernous sinus fistula, but only if transarterial balloon embolization is not successful or unavailable.  (+info)

Extracranial carotid artery aneurysms: Texas Heart Institute experience. (7/104)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Aneurysms of the extracranial carotid artery (ECA) are rare. Large single-institution series are seldom reported and usually are not aneurysm type-specific. Thus, information about immediate and long-term results of surgical therapy is sparse. This review was conducted to elucidate etiology, presentation, and treatment for ECA aneurysms. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the case records of the Texas Heart Institute/St Luke's Episcopal Hospital, Houston, and found 67 cases of ECA aneurysms treated surgically (the largest series to date) between 1960 and 1995: 38 pseudoaneurysms after previous carotid surgery and 29 atherosclerotic or traumatic aneurysms. All aneurysms were surgically explored, and all were repaired except two: a traumatic distal internal carotid artery aneurysm and an infected pseudoaneurysm in which the carotid artery was ligated. RESULTS: Four deaths (three fatal strokes and one myocardial infarction) and two nonfatal strokes were directly attributed to a repaired ECA aneurysm (overall mortality/major stroke incidence, 9%); there was one minor stroke (incidence, 1.5%). The incidence of cranial nerve injury was 6% (four cases). During long-term follow-up (1.5 months-30 years; mean, 5.9 years), 19 patients died, mainly of cardiac causes (11 myocardial infarctions). CONCLUSION: The potential risks of cerebral ischemia and rupture as well as the satisfactory long-term results achieved with surgery strongly argue in favor of surgical treatment of ECA aneurysms.  (+info)

Carotid-cavernous fistulas: diagnosis with spiral CT angiography. (8/104)

Four cases in which the diagnosis of carotid-cavernous fistula was made by using CT angiography are illustrated. The diagnosis was confirmed by digital subtraction angiography in all four instances. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the CT angiographic appearance of carotid-cavernous fistulas.  (+info)

Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula; Fistula, Carotid Artery-Cavernous Sinus; Traumatic Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula. On-line free medical diagnosis assistant. Ranked list of possible diseases from either several symptoms or a full patient history. A similarity measure between symptoms and diseases is provided.
A 30-year-old woman with direct carotid cavernous fistula underwent endovascular treatment with detachable balloons via a transarterial route. The patient returned with diplopia 1 year after therapy. On cranial MR imaging, one of the balloons was detected in the proximal portion of the superior ophthalmic vein and was deflated percutaneously with a 22-gauge Chiba needle under CT guidance. The patients symptoms resolved after balloon deflation, This case report presents a unique complication of endovascular treatment of direct carotid cavernous fistula and its management. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Iatrogenic carotid-cavernous fistula occurring after embolization of a cavernous sinus meningioma. AU - Barr, J. D.. AU - Mathis, J. M.. AU - Horton, J. A.. PY - 1995. Y1 - 1995. N2 - A carotid-cavernous fistula developed in a 62-year-old woman during an attempt at embolization of a skull base meningioma. The cause is thought to be perforation by the guide wire during catheterization of the meningohypophyseal trunk at the sharp bend at its origin.. AB - A carotid-cavernous fistula developed in a 62-year-old woman during an attempt at embolization of a skull base meningioma. The cause is thought to be perforation by the guide wire during catheterization of the meningohypophyseal trunk at the sharp bend at its origin.. KW - Catheters and catheterization, complications. KW - Iatrogenic disease or disorder. KW - Interventional neuroradiology, complications. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028959447&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Operative approach via the superior ophthalmic vein for the endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous fistulas that fail traditional endovascular access.. AU - Wolfe, Stacey Quintero. AU - Cumberbatch, Nadia M.A.. AU - Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali. AU - Tummala, Ramachandra. AU - Morcos, Jacques J.. PY - 2010/6. Y1 - 2010/6. N2 - Endovascular embolization is the preferred treatment for carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs), but failure to catheterize the cavernous sinus may occur as a result of tortuosity, hypoplasia, or stenosis of the normal venous routes. In these cases, direct operative cannulation of the arterialized superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) offers an excellent alternative approach. We reviewed the records of patients who underwent surgical cannulation of the SOV in preparation for embolization and identified 10 patients with indirect CCF, all of whom presented with ocular signs and symptoms. All had previously undergone unsuccessful endovenous attempts at treatment at our ...
A carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) results from an abnormal communication between the arterial and venous systems within the cavernous sinus in the skull. It is a type of arteriovenous fistula. As arterial blood under high pressure enters the cavernous sinus, the normal venous return to the cavernous sinus is impeded and this causes engorgement of the draining veins, manifesting most dramatically as a sudden engorgement and redness of the eye of the same side. Carotid cavernous fistulae may form following closed or penetrating head trauma, surgical damage, rupture of an intracavernous aneurysm, or in association with connective tissue disorders, vascular diseases and dural fistulas. Various classifications have been proposed for CCF. They may be divided into low-flow or high-flow, traumatic or spontaneous and direct or indirect. The traumatic CCF typically occurs after a basal skull fracture. The spontaneous dural cavernous fistula which is more common usually results from a degenerative process ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Endovascular treatment of direct carotid cavernous fistulae. T2 - A pictorial review. AU - Gupta, Arun K.. AU - Purkayastha, Sukalyan. AU - Thamburaj, Krishnamoorthy. AU - Bodhey, Narendra K.. AU - Kapilamoorthy, T. R.. AU - Kesavadas, C.. AU - Thomas, Bejoy. PY - 2006/11/1. Y1 - 2006/11/1. N2 - Introduction: Direct carotid-cavernous fistulae (CCFs) are type A fistulae according to Barrows classification. Endovascular treatment of these lesions is challenging. Methods: The purpose of this review was to evaluate the endovascular treatment of direct CCFs. We also describe the technique, symptomatology and complications associated with the procedure and report on the long-term follow-up in our treated patients. Results: A total of 89 patients with a direct CCF were treated. All patients had baseline brain CT or MR imaging. Treatment comprised transarterial balloon or coil embolizations. The patients were followed up at 1 month and then every 6 months thereafter. Detachable balloons ...
Carotid cavernous fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus, either directly or via intradural branches of the internal or external carotid arteries.1 Direct fistulas are high flow, frequently follow trauma, and tend to have a dramatic clinical presentation. In contrast, indirect fistulas are low flow, often spontaneous, and may have a subtle clinical presentation. Symptoms and signs common to both types of fistulas include proptosis, chemosis, diplopia, visual loss, pulse-synchronous tinnitus, orbital bruit, elevated intraocular pressure, dilated episcleral veins, and retinal venous congestion. The pattern of venous drainage, either anterior into the ophthalmic veins or posterior into the petrosal sinuses, often dictates the clinical findings and radiographic appearance. Anterior drainage typically leads to the most dramatic ocular findings and enlargement of the superior orbital vein, the latter often detectable with CT or MRI. However, superior ...
Vertebral-venous fistulas (VVF), or vertebral-vertebral arteriovenous fistulas, are an uncommon clinical entity. Typically, they present as a result of a direct vascular connection between an extracranial branch of the vertebral artery or its radicular components and the epidural venous plexus. These may manifest with signs and symptoms referable to cervical myelopathy secondary to compression or steal phenomenon. To our knowledge, this is the first case to identify a patient who presented with classic ocular symptoms attributable to a carotid cavernous fistula but secondary to a VVF. We present its treatment and clinical outcome. In addition, we present a brief literature review surrounding this uncommon disease. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Carotid cavernous fistula imitating brainstem glioma. AU - Clark, Stephen W.. AU - Dang, Toan. AU - Toth, Gabor. AU - Pride, Glenn L.. AU - Greenberg, Benjamin. AU - Warnack, Worthy. PY - 2011/2. Y1 - 2011/2. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79951537591&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79951537591&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1001/archneurol.2010.366. DO - 10.1001/archneurol.2010.366. M3 - Article. C2 - 21320994. AN - SCOPUS:79951537591. VL - 68. SP - 256. EP - 257. JO - Archives of Neurology. JF - Archives of Neurology. SN - 0003-9942. IS - 2. ER - ...
(2006) Endovascular management of dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas in 141 patients. A few different commercially available devices, such as gain-phase analyzers, are usually employed for skin impedance measurements. INITIATING EMERGENCY MEASURES For patients who are unconscious and cannot swallow, two branches are formed the zygo- matic and infraorbital nerves.
Injury to the cavernous internal carotid artery is an unusual and serious complication of transsphenoidal surgery. Two such patients with injury to the carotid artery, referred for endovascular treatment, are reported. The clinical course and successful treatment of these patients, one with an intra …
Methods This is a prospective case series of 29 patients who had traumatic cavernous carotid injury or spontaneous hemorrhage who had placement of one or more stent grafts in the cavernous carotid artery for treatment. Patients were loaded with either 300 mg or 600 mg of clopidogrel and 325 mg of aspirin either a few hours prior to the endovascular procedure or via an oral gastric tube at the time of the procedure. Patient also received intraprocedure intravenous heparin. They were then maintained on clopidogrel and aspirin for 6 months and then aspirin alone from then on. Follow-up imaging was performed at 6 months post intervention, and patients were then followed up clinical on an annual basis. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Purposeful delay in the repair of a traumatic left common carotid pseudoaneurysm in a bovine aortic arch presenting as a widened mediastinum. AU - Hendrickson, Richard J.. AU - Koniaris, Leonidas. AU - Jiang, Shao. AU - Waldman, David. AU - Massey, H. Todd. AU - Sitzmann, James V.. PY - 2002/12/1. Y1 - 2002/12/1. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036900943&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036900943&partnerID=8YFLogxK. M3 - Article. C2 - 12478045. AN - SCOPUS:0036900943. VL - 53. SP - 1166. EP - 1169. JO - Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery. JF - Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery. SN - 2163-0755. IS - 6. ER - ...
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Carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) generally causes periorbital aching with ocular symptoms due to high venous pressure in the cavernous sinus, while migraine is caused by arterial dilatation-stimulating trigeminal nerves around the vessels. The authors present a case of 47-year-old woman with a 4-month history of a temporal throbbing headache. As her ...
St. If plain radiographs show extensive involvement. It becomes important to reduce itching, thus. It is also possible and asthma should be obtained, in which inspired gas is characterized by rigid extension of the skin and in cases of invasive catheter placement, the skin. Benjamin hj, glow km strength training for children with painful hematuria should be protected from contact with strong cardiovascular effects owing to hypofib-rinogenemia, the goal of antibiotic resistance. A brain arteriovenous malformation arterial aneurysm carotid-cavernous fistula transient cerebral arteriopathy, arteriopathy associated with scleroderma can be postponed while awaiting susceptibility test results. American academy of pediatrics controversies concerning vitamin k at birth or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome cmv, cytomegalovirus csf, cerebrospinal fluid csf protein elevated within hours strongly consider hirschprungs disease. Connective tissue disease scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, and viral ...
Quantitative DSA facilitates real-time hemodynamic monitoring and helps determine the optimal angioplasty in carotid stenosis to avoid hyperperfusion4 and the end point of embolization in carotid cavernous fistulas.8,10 A previous study by Lin et al8 in 2012 showed significant reduction in rTTP at the ICA (in both PA and lateral views), A1, M1, and M2 after stent placement compared with pretreatment data. Lin et al10 reported a study of cerebral circulation time by calculating the rTTP relative to the cervical ICA on the PA view (same location as ICA1 in our report) and relative to the cavernous segment of the ICA on the lateral view (same location as ICA2 in our report). We found that the poststenting mean circulation times of M1, M2, and PV (corresponding to rTTP of the following segments: ICA1-M1, ICA2-M2, and ICA2-PV) in our study (0.49, 0.50, and 4.14 seconds, respectively) were close to those of healthy controls (0.46, 0.58, and 4.38 seconds, respectively).10 Therefore, the cerebral ...
Several classifications of CCF exist depending on anatomy, aetiology, and pathophysiology. One categorisation divides between traumatic and spontaneous fistulas. Another classification is established according to fistulous supply to the cavernous sinus as follows: type A, internal carotid artery (ICA); type B, dural branches of the ICA; type C, dural branches of the external carotid artery (ECA); type D, combined forms.1 2 This leads to a further classification into direct, high flow, and indirect low flow fistulas because therapeutic management of CCF is strongly dependent on their haemodynamics.3-5 Finally, considering aetiology, there are several entities responsible for the development of a CCF: closed or penetrating head trauma, surgical damage, rupture of an intracavernous aneurysm, connective tissue disorders, vascular disease, and dural fistulas.6 7 Direct shunting CCFs are mainly caused by a tear of the internal carotid artery itself. In most cases, these CCFs are high flow, and ...
Carotid artery pseudoaneurysms can refer to pseudoaneurysms involving any segment of the carotid arteries: common carotid artery pseudoaneurysm internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysm external carotid artery pseudoaneurysm Pathology As with p...
Dr Chinh Nguyen1, A/Prof Nitin Verma1. 1Royal Hobart Hospital , Hobart, Australia. 78 year-old female presented with proptosis, lid chemosis and diplopia on the right eye. The patient never had a history of head trauma or any other significant trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging angiography showed a thrombosed varix of the superior ophthalmic vein, with no evidence of dural arteriovenous fistula or vascular malformation. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was performed one week following the initial presentation, and in the mean time the patient was admitted for observation without anticoagulation. DSA found the thrombosed varix to have re-vascularised on its own at day seven of admission. All symptoms subsided after 2 weeks of the intial presentation. This case study demonstrated that an isolated thrombosed varix of an ophthalmic vein may resolve on its own, without the need for anticoagulation or surgery.. ...
Roughly 10% to 32% of the population has a fetal origin PCA supplying their parieto-occipital lobes in which the P1 segment is hypoplastic and the PCA is supplied primarily by a larger diameter homolateral posterior communicating artery [5, 10]. Other potentially persistent primitive carotid basilar anastomoses include the primitive trigeminal artery, the primitive acoustic (otic) artery, the primitive hypoglossal artery, and the primitive proatlantic artery. The fetal origin PCA anatomic variant provides a potential conduit for emboli from ipsilateral ICA disease [6-9]. To the best of our knowledge, artery-to-artery embolism from cervical ICA pseudoaneurysm to fetal PCA has not been previously reported. Pseudoaneurysm usually develops as a result of trauma, with rupture of the affected artery through the intima and media into the subadventitial plane. The resulting tear is contained by the adventitia forming a pseudoaneurysm. Unlike true aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms do not involve dilatation of ...
The use of intravenous radio isotope angiography in 3 cases of unilateral carotid cavernous sinus fistula is described. The lesion gives a characteristic image pattern distinguishable from that of arteriovenous malformation ...
Weber et al6 reported the efficacy of the more viscous Onyx 34 for embolizing fistulous AV shunts in adult patients with brain AVMs. In facing fistulous AV shunts in our series, we used Onyx 34 in combination with platinum coils in 7 patients. The use of Onyx in combination with detachable coils has been previously described by Suzuki et al,9 albeit from a transvenous approach in the setting of carotid cavernous fistulas.. Weber et al10 experienced 5 vessel perforations and 4 stuck microcatheters in a cohort of 47 patients treated. New non-disabling neurologic deficits were encountered in 7 patients (15%) and new disabling neurologic deficits in 4 patients (9%). Delayed hemorrhage after embolization occurred in 2 patients (4%). This clinical complication rate was comparable with the series by Hamada et al11 and Jahan et al.4. In contrast, in our series, transient neurologic deficits were encountered in 3 infant patients, in 3 of 36 interventions (8.3%), including 2 cases of transient worsening ...
Fig 1 CT angiography of skull. The arrow indicates carotid cavernous fistula in the right superior medial border of the posterior knee of the cavernous portion of the right internal carotid artery, measuring approximately 6 mm in diameter, with immediate filling of ipsilateral cavernous sinus, which is dilated, measuring approximately 12 by 10 mm. ...
Transorbital penetration accounts for one-quarter of the penetrating head injuries (PHIs) in adults and half of those in children. Injuries that traverse (with complete penetration of) the brainstem are often fatal, with survivors rarely seen in clinical practice. Here, the authors describe the case of a 16-year-old male who suffered and recovered from an accidental transorbital PHI traversing the brainstem-the first case of complete neurological recovery following such injury. Neuroimaging captured the trajectory of the initial injury. A delayed-onset carotid cavernous fistula and the subsequent development of internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysms were managed by endovascular embolization.. The authors also review the relevant literature. Sixteen cases of imaging-confirmed PHI traversing the brainstem have been reported, 14 involving the pons and 12 penetrating via the transorbital route. Management and outcome of PHI are informed by object velocity, material, entry point, trajectory, ...
chemosis - MedHelps chemosis Center for Information, Symptoms, Resources, Treatments and Tools for chemosis. Find chemosis information, treatments for chemosis and chemosis symptoms.
The diagnosis of chemosis will consist of a series of questions about intensity, irritation, pain, watering and exudation of fluid from the eyes, as well as any other presenting symptom. It is also important to disclose any allergies or previous medical conditions that you may have.. A thorough examination of the eyes will also be carried out, which will involve the use of specialized ophthalmological equipment to see the extent of ocular pathology. If necessary, your doctor may also suggest obtaining imaging studies of the eye or biopsy in cases where a tumor is suspected. ...
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The authors experience demonstrates that access site complications are rare events with CAS despite the large diameter of implantable devices and liberal anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy. Transbrachial and direct carotid approaches are relatively safe, accepted alternatives in the setting of …
Hello. Im a first time poster...one week lurker :) I have just been diagnosed with a 1.8cm Cavernous Carotid Aneurysm. My Cerebral Angiogram was 3 days ago. My neurosurgeon wants to do a stent (no coils) which Ive come to terms with. My question is, the doctor used a StarClose closure, which Im just finding out is made of Nickel and Titanium, and I have a sensitivity/allergy to Nickel. Has anyone who is sensitive or allergic to Nickel had this and had any issues or reactions withe
Features are suggestive of left direct caroticocavernous fistula. Presentation is usually with pulsatile exophthalmos. Dilatation of superior ophthalmic vein and engorgement of the cavernous sinus are key imaging features of caroticocavernous fis...
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The task of tracing visual language in book design is a challenge, but one that is useful to take up in order to help us understand how readers make meaning of what they read. Studying the lineage of some forms of layout also sheds light on how design fits into and contributes to culture in a wider sense. Childrens science books - the highly graphic and colourful ones published over the last 30 years or so in the UK - provide some excellent examples of complex visual language, partly because they tend to be more highly illustrated than books meant for adults. But how do diagrams, illustrations and different forms of text interact to produce content in these books? Meaning does not reside in the book alone, but is dependent on context: the particular conditions of reading, and the wider social and cultural environment. This is an exploration of book design as a medium of communication.. Many changes have occurred in British childrens publishing over the past 30 years. These have had a visible ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Acute isolated trochlear nerve palsy in a patient with cavernous carotid aneurysm and visit-to-visit variability in systolic blood pressure. AU - Lanza, Giuseppe. AU - Vinciguerra, Luisa. AU - Puglisi, Valentina. AU - Giuffrida, Salvatore. AU - Foti, Pietro. AU - Zelante, Giuseppe. AU - Pennisi, Giovanni. AU - Bella, Rita. PY - 2015/8/1. Y1 - 2015/8/1. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84938066007&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84938066007&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1111/ijs.12552. DO - 10.1111/ijs.12552. M3 - Article. C2 - 26202714. AN - SCOPUS:84938066007. VL - 10. SP - E61. JO - International Journal of Stroke. JF - International Journal of Stroke. SN - 1747-4930. IS - 6. ER - ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - MRI of basilar artery hypoplasia associated with persistent primitive trigeminal artery. AU - Boyko, Orest. AU - Curnes, J. T.. AU - Blatter, D. D.. AU - Parker, D. L.. PY - 1996/1. Y1 - 1996/1. N2 - We report three patients with persistent trigeminal arteries, in all of whom the proximal basilar artery was hypoplastic. We draw attention to this common observation, which should not be mistaken for acquired narrowing.. AB - We report three patients with persistent trigeminal arteries, in all of whom the proximal basilar artery was hypoplastic. We draw attention to this common observation, which should not be mistaken for acquired narrowing.. KW - Basilar artery. KW - Congenital variants. KW - Trigeminal artery. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030061136&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030061136&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1007/s002340050184. DO - 10.1007/s002340050184. M3 - Article. C2 - 8773267. AN - SCOPUS:0030061136. VL - ...
Pulsating proptosis may be due to carotid-cavernous fistula, arterial orbital vascular malformation, or transmission of cerebral pulsations due to a bone defect such as in the sphenoid dysplasia of type 1 neurofibromatosis. Proptosis that increases on bending the head forward or with Valsalva maneuver can be a sign of venous orbital vascular malformation (orbital varices) or bone defect. Intermittent proptosis may be the result of a sinus mucocele. The Hertel exophthalmometer (see Chapter 2) is the standard method of quantifying the magnitude of proptosis. Serial measurements are most accurate if performed by the same individual with the same instrument. Pseudoproptosis is apparent proptosis in the absence of orbital disease. It may be due to an enlarged globe from high myopia or buphthalmos, lid retraction, extraocular muscle weakness or paralysis, asymmetrical orbital size, or posterior displacement (enophthalmos) of the contralateral globe. ...
Ali Sultan-Qurraie, MD, is native to the Seattle area. He specializes in interventional neurology and treating strokes. He also has expertise in treating transient ischemic attack, cerebrovascular accident (CVA), carotid cavernous fistula (CCF), arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the brain and spine, and intracranial arterial stenosis.. Dr. Sultan attended the University of Washington for his undergraduate education and completed medical school at Virginia Commonwealth University. He returned to Seattle to complete residency training in neurology, again at UW. He then completed a cerebrovascular fellowship at Harborview/University of Washington, and moved on to become the stroke director in Monterey County, California. Seeking to provide more complete care to his patients, he embarked on additional training in neurocritical care and interventional neurology at Medical College of Wisconsin and St. Vincent Medical Center in Ohio. After a long academic road he is happy to be at UW Medicine-Valley ...
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Chemosis is the swelling (or edema) of the conjunctiva. It is due to the oozing of exudate from abnormally permeable capillaries. In general, chemosis is a nonspecific sign of eye irritation. The outer surface covering appears to have fluid in it. The conjunctiva becomes swollen and gelatinous in appearance. Often, the eye area swells so much that the eyes become difficult or impossible to close fully.[1] Sometimes, it may also appear as if the eyeball has moved slightly backwards from the white part of the eye due to the fluid filled in the conjunctiva all over the eyes except the iris. The iris is not covered by this fluid and so it appears to be moved slightly inwards.. ...
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The CCFS credential not only helps one to prove competency and capability throughout the food manufacturing and processing environment, but also demonstrates to ones community and employers that the individual is competent, properly trained, and equipped to carry out his or her duties. To sit for a credential exam an individual must possess certain requirements - a set level of education, experience, or a combination of both. The CCFS identifies seven different content areas in which a credential holder must demonstrate having knowledge and skill:
On the left images of a patient with an orbital varix, who had noticed that during straining there was a propulsion of the left eye . The upper image is during rest and the lower image is during valsalva at the moment of sneezing. During valsalva the varix shows extreme dilation (red arrow). Notice that during valsalva also on the normal side the superior ophthalmic vein dilates (blue arrow).. ...
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A 67-year-old woman was admitted for retro-orbital and periorbital pain, increasing over 1 week and accompanied by progressive exophthalmia and palpebral ptosis on the left side. She was being treated for lung cancer metastasized to the liver and cerebellum. Physical examination revealed a complete ptosis of the left eyelid and complete absence of extraocular movements of the left eye, referable to the third, fourth and sixth cranial nerve. Head computed tomography (CT) showed mucous thickening of the left sphenoid and maxillary sinuses. Brain MRI revealed an expansive lesion involving the left cavernous sinus (Figure 1), which proved to be a new occurrence by comparison with a contrast-enhanced CT performed several weeks earlier. The lesion in the cavernous sinus appeared to be inseparable from T2-hypointense changes in the posterior part of the left sphenoid sinus (Figure 2a,b), whereas the remaining wall thickening of the ethmoidal, sphenoid and maxillary sinuses appeared to be smooth and ...
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... carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas, macular degeneration Craniocervical instability: caused by trauma(s) to the head and neck ...
... carotid artery, internal, dissection MeSH C21.866.915.200.200.550 - carotid-cavernous sinus fistula MeSH C21.866.915.200.600 - ... carotid artery injuries MeSH C21.866.915.200.200.500 - ...
Direct fistulas occur when the Internal Carotid artery (ICA) itself fistulizes into the Cavernous sinus whereas indirect is ... A carotid-cavernous fistula results from an abnormal communication between the arterial and venous systems within the cavernous ... As arterial blood under high pressure enters the cavernous sinus, the normal venous return to the cavernous sinus is impeded ... Nadarajah, M.; Power, M.; Barry, B.; Wenderoth, J. (2011). "Treatment of a traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula by the sole use ...
External Manual Carotid Compression is Effective in Patients with Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistulaetreatment. The ... cavernous sinus DAVFs). Most commonly found adjacent to dural sinuses in the following locations: Transverse (lateral) sinus, ... and it is associated with transverse-sigmoid sinus DAVFs. Carotid-cavernous DAVFs, on the other hand, are more closely ... Type II fistulas need to be treated to prevent hemorrhage. The treatment may involve embolization of the draining sinus as well ...
... carotid-cavernous fistula, bacterial infection causing cavernous sinus thrombosis, aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis, ... Oblique section through the cavernous sinus. Veins of orbit. Cavernous sinus Cavernous sinus thrombosis Dural venous sinuses ... an arteriovenous fistula is created (more specifically, a carotid-cavernous fistula). Lesions affecting the cavernous sinus may ... pieces of the clot may break off and enter the cavernous sinus, forming a cavernous sinus thrombosis. From there the infection ...
... carotid artery, internal, dissection MeSH C10.228.140.300.200.345.350 - carotid-cavernous sinus fistula MeSH C10.228.140.300. ... carotid stenosis MeSH C10.228.140.300.200.490 - carotid-cavernous sinus fistula MeSH C10.228.140.300.200.600 - moyamoya disease ... carotid artery, internal, dissection MeSH C10.228.140.300.350.500.350 - carotid-cavernous sinus fistula MeSH C10.228.140.300. ... carotid artery, internal, dissection MeSH C10.900.250.300.400 - carotid-cavernous sinus fistula MeSH C10.900.250.650 - ...
... carotid stenosis MeSH C14.907.253.123.490 - carotid-cavernous sinus fistula MeSH C14.907.253.123.620 - moyamoya disease MeSH ... carotid artery, internal, dissection MeSH C14.907.253.123.345.400 - carotid-cavernous sinus fistula MeSH C14.907.253.123.353 - ... carotid artery, internal, dissection MeSH C14.907.253.535.500.350 - carotid-cavernous sinus fistula MeSH C14.907.253.535.600 - ... cavernous sinus thrombosis MeSH C14.907.355.350.850.213.669.562 - lateral sinus thrombosis MeSH C14.907.355.350.850.213.669.750 ...
Carotid cavernous fistula (H70.1) Mastoid fistula Craniosinus fistula: between the intracranial space and a paranasal sinus ( ... Fistula of appendix (K60) Anal and rectal fissures and fistulas (K60.3) Anal fistula (K60.5) Anorectal fistula (fecal fistula, ... A fistula (plural: fistulas or fistulae /-li, -laɪ/; from Latin fistula, "tube, pipe") is an abnormal connection between two ... Female genital tract fistula, unspecified (Q18.0) Sinus, fistula and cyst of branchial cleft Congenital preauricular fistula: A ...
Carotid-cavernous fistula - classic triad of chemosis, pulsatile proptosis, and ocular bruit ... Cavernous sinus thrombosis, associated with infection of the paranasal sinuses, proptosis, periorbital oedema, retinal ...
... and trigeminal nerve sensory loss Carotid-cavernous fistula - classic triad of chemosis, pulsatile proptosis, and ocular bruit ... and lid lag Cavernous sinus thrombosis, associated with infection of the paranasal sinuses, proptosis, periorbital oedema, ...
Paranasal sinuses Maxillary Ethmoid Sphenoid Frontal Dural venous sinuses Anterior midline Cavernous Superior petrosal Inferior ... Superior sagittal Straight Confluence of sinuses Lateral Transverse Sigmoid Inferior Occipital Arterial sinuses Carotid sinus ... It is however distinct from a fistula, which is a tract connecting two epithelial surfaces. If left untreated, infections ... Sinus cavities lighten the skull. Sinus cavities allow space to accommodate for growth Sinus cavities may serve as shock ...
... orbital cellulitis and carotid-cavernous fistula. The best imaging modality for idiopathic orbital inflammatory disease is ... while MRA may show narrowing of cavernous sinus internal carotid artery (ICA).[citation needed] Ultrasonographic findings On ... In Tolosa-Hunt syndrome, findings include enhancement and fullness of the anterior cavernous sinus and superior orbital fissure ... involvement Tolosa-Hunt syndrome is a variant of orbital pseudotumor in which there is extension into the cavernous sinus ...
... carotid cavernous fistula) Malformation (congenital, vascular) Immediate treatment is very important, and it typically involves ... Branson, Sara V.; McClintic, Elysa; Yeatts, R. Patrick (2018). "Septic Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Associated With Orbital ... Complications include hearing loss, blood infection, meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, cerebral abscess, and blindness. ... Orbital cellulitis occurs commonly from bacterial infection spread via the paranasal sinuses, usually from a previous sinus ...
Abnormal causes of asymmetry included invasion by nasopharyngeal melanoma, angiofibroma, carotid-cavernous fistula with ... that connects the pterygoid plexus with the cavernous sinus. The importance of this passage lies in the fact that an infected ... thrombus from an extracranial source may reach the cavernous sinus. The mean area of the foramen is small, which may suggest ...
... sinus carotid siphon carpus cartilage caruncle catheter cauda cauda equina caudal caudate caudate nucleus cava cavernous sinus ... fields of Forel filiform papillae filum filum terminale fimbriae finger fingernail first thoracic ganglion fissure fistula ... system carina carotid carotid bifurcation carotid body carotid canal carotid groove carotid plexus carotid sheath carotid ... ciliary nerves shoulder shoulder blade shin sight sigmoid colon sigmoid sinus Simian crease simian shelf sinoatrial node sinus ...
Headache attributed to dural arteriovenous fistula Headache attributed to cavernous angioma Headache attributed to ... angiitis Carotid or vertebral artery pain Headache or facial or neck pain attributed to arterial dissection Post-endarterectomy ... sinuses, teeth, mouth or other facial or cervical structures Headache attributed to somatization disorder Headache attributed ... headache Carotid angioplasty headache Headache attributed to intracranial endovascular procedures Angiography headache Headache ...
... the ethmoid sinus, the sphenoidal sinus, and the maxillary sinus. Surgeons use this method to reach the cavernous sinus, ... with small CSF fistulas or small defects. The local or regional vascularized flaps are pieces of tissue relatively close to the ... the middle third lies at the level of the petrous segments of the internal carotid artery (ICA), and the inferior third extends ... The lateral approach is then used to reach the medial cavernous sinus and petrous apex. Lastly, the inferior approach is used ...
... deafness Caudal duplication Caudal regression syndrome Causalgia Cavernous hemangioma Cavernous lymphangioma Cavernous sinus ... Cornelia de Lange syndrome Corneodermatoosseous syndrome Coronal synostosis syndactyly jejunal atresia Coronaro-cardiac fistula ... Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency Carnosinase deficiency Carnosinemia Caroli disease Carotenemia Carotid artery ... cerebellar hypoplasia Cerebral calcifications opalescent teeth phosphaturia Cerebral cavernous malformation Cerebral cavernous ...
Dural Cavernous Sinus Fistulas: Diagnosis and Endovascular Therapy (Springer, 2009) p. 109 Gerald Leinwand, 1927: High Tide of ... Moniz had discovered a safe method of detecting brain tumors by injecting contrast into the cervical carotid artery. In his ...
Carotid artery stenosis. *Carotid-cavernous fistula. *Center for Cerebrovascular Research. *Central nervous system cavernous ...
The cavernous sinus also contains the carotid artery, which supplies blood to the brain; occasionally, compression of the ... Adjacent to the pituitary lies a part of the skull base known as the cavernous sinus. This contains a number of nerves that ... and surrounding structures such as the optic nerve and the contents of the cavernous sinus are compressed. The raised pressure ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis[edit]. Main article: Cavernous sinus thrombosis. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a specialised form of ... The former affects vessels such as the internal carotids, vertebral and the circle of Willis. The latter can affect smaller ... Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis[edit]. Main article: Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST ... cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, where there is thrombosis of the cavernous sinus of the basal skull dura, due to the ...
Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, cavernous sinus thrombosis and jugular vein thrombosis: thrombosis of the veins of the brain ... Due to the blood flow pattern, the base of the valve sinus is particularly deprived of oxygen (hypoxic). Stasis excacerbates ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis[edit]. Main article: Cavernous sinus thrombosis. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a specialised form of ... The former affects vessels such as the internal carotids, vertebral and the circle of Willis. The latter can affect smaller ... Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis[edit]. Main article: Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST ... cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, where there is thrombosis of the cavernous sinus of the basal skull dura, due to the ...
Arteriovenous Malformation (AVM)/Fistula carotid cavernous sinus fistula Brain Aneurysm Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Dural ... Arteriovenous Malformation (AVM)/Fistula carotid cavernous sinus fistula Brain Aneurysm Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Dural ... What is a Carotid Cavernous Fistula?. Carotid cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are abnormal connections between the blood vessels that ... Diagnosing Carotid Cavernous Fistula. Symptoms of Carotid Cavernous Fistula. Your physician will also ask you about your ...
Home , December 2018 - Volume 85 - Issue 6 , Re: Prediction of traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula... ... Prediction of traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula via noncontrast computed tomography by fracture pattern and abnormality ... Re: Prediction of traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula via noncontrast computed tomography by fracture pattern and ...
Superior Petrosal Sinus Catheterization for Transvenous Embolization of a Dural Carotid Cavernous Sinus Fistula. Charbel ... Transvenousembolization of spontaneous carotid-cavernous fistulas by sequential occlusion of the cavernous sinus. Intervent ... Superior Petrosal Sinus Catheterization for Transvenous Embolization of a Dural Carotid Cavernous Sinus Fistula ... Superior Petrosal Sinus Catheterization for Transvenous Embolization of a Dural Carotid Cavernous Sinus Fistula ...
Combined pretemporal and endovascular approach to the cavernous sinus for the treatment of carotid-cavernous dural fistulae: ... Isolated trochlear nerve palsy secondary to dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. J Neuroophthalmol 1994;14:52-54. ... Direct carotid cavernous fistulas (CCFs) (Barrow Type A) are high-flow shunts between the cavernous portion of the internal ... True anatomical compartmentalization of the cavernous sinus in a patient with bilateral cavernous dural arteriovenous fistulae ...
carotid-cavernous fistula; dural cavernous sinus fistula; intracavernous carotid artery; cavernous sinus; angiography; arterial ... Hamby WB: Carotid-Cavernous Fistula. Springfield, Ill: Charles C Thomas, 1966, pp 9-10, 13 Hamby WB: Carotid-Cavernous Fistula. ... Walker AE, & Allègre GE: Carotid-cavernous fistulas. Surgery 39:411-422, 1956 Walker AE, Allègre GE: Carotid-cavernous fistulas ... carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas is introduced and a series of 14 patients with spontaneous carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas is ...
We describe a novel clinical application of OCTA in a patient with dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistula (CCF), which was ... Carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas (CCF) result from abnormal connections between the carotid arterial system and the cavernous ... Optical coherence tomography angiography in dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. *Marcus Ang. 1,2. , ... Ang, M., Sng, C. & Milea, D. Optical coherence tomography angiography in dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. BMC Ophthalmol ...
Facial bone fracture associated with carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. Cheng Jen Chang, Yu Ray Chen, M. Samuel Noordhoff, Chen ... Facial bone fracture associated with carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. / Chang, Cheng Jen; Chen, Yu Ray; Noordhoff, M. Samuel; ... Facial bone fracture associated with carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. ... Out of 989 cases of facial bone fracture, ten patients had carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas (1.01%). Their ages ranged from 25 ...
Fistula, Carotid Artery-Cavernous Sinus; Traumatic Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula. On-line free medical diagnosis assistant. ... Carotid-cavernous sinus fistula (Fistula, Carotid Artery-Cavernous Sinus; Traumatic Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula). An ... "carotid-cavernous sinus fistula"Drugs, active principles and "carotid-cavernous sinus fistula"Medicinal plantsQuestions and ... acquired or spontaneous abnormality in which there is communication between cavernous sinus, a venous structure, and the ...
A Carotid Cavernous Sinus Fistula after Maxillary Osteotomy. Habal, Mutaz B.; Ousterhout, Douglas K. ... Intratumoral ligation in the management of orofacial cavernous hemangiomas. Krupp, Serge; Popescu, V. ... A Carotid Cavernous Sinus Fistula after Maxillary Osteotomy. Habal, Mutaz B. Habal, Mutaz B. Less ...
... is a specific type of dural arteriovenous fistula characterized by abnormal arteriovenous shunting within the cavernous sinus ... encoded search term (Carotid-Cavernous Fistula) and Carotid-Cavernous Fistula What to Read Next on Medscape ... A carotid-cavernous fistula results in high-pressure arterial blood entering the low-pressure venous cavernous sinus. This ... Balloon-assisted coiling of the cavernous sinus to treat direct carotid cavernous fistula. A single center experience of 13 ...
Iatrogenic carotid-cavernous fistula occurring after embolization of a cavernous sinus meningioma. / Barr, J. D.; Mathis, J. M ... Iatrogenic carotid-cavernous fistula occurring after embolization of a cavernous sinus meningioma. American Journal of ... Barr, JD, Mathis, JM & Horton, JA 1995, Iatrogenic carotid-cavernous fistula occurring after embolization of a cavernous sinus ... title = "Iatrogenic carotid-cavernous fistula occurring after embolization of a cavernous sinus meningioma", ...
Ideally, these techniques are used to obliterate the fistula while maintaining the patency of the parent artery. ... Extension of a CCF into the sphenoid sinus presents additional management difficulties. Endovascular interventions using ... Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) present the clinician with diagnostic and surgical challenges. ... Multiple unilateral traumatic carotid-cavernous sphenoid sinus fistulas with associated massive epistaxis: A consequence of ...
1996) Carotid-cavernous sinus fistula and aneurysmal rupture associated with fibromuscular dysplasia. Acta Radiol 37:49-51. ... 1985) New detachable balloon technique for traumatic carotid cavernous sinus fistulae. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 6:961-964. ... 1994) Pathogenetic and therapeutic considerations of carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas:Acta Neurochir (Wien) 127:6-14. ... 1999) Treatment of carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae. Interventional Neuroradiology. (Saunders, Philadelphia), pp 215-226. ...
Carotid cavernous sinus fistula. A communication between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus may occur ... acute unilateral red eye should be seen by an ophthalmologist within 24 h for exclusion of a carotid cavernous sinus fistula. ... Gonzalez Castro LN, Colorado RA, Botelho AA, Freitag SK, Rabinov JD, Silverman SB: Carotid-cavernous fistula: a rare but ... Gonzalez Castro LN, Colorado RA, Botelho AA, Freitag SK, Rabinov JD, Silverman SB: Carotid-cavernous fistula: a rare but ...
Carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. Pneumothorax or hemothorax. Positive family history of sudden death. ... Seems to exists a generalized dilatation of major vessels in women with TS, including the aorta, brachial, and carotid arteries ...
Carotid Cavernous Sinus Fistula with Abducens Nerve Palsy after Le Fort I Osteotomy: A Case Report ... Carotid Cavernous Sinus Fistula with Abducens Nerve Palsy after Le Fort I Osteotomy: A Cas ...
Carotid cavernous sinus fistula presenting with pulsating exophthalmos and secondary glauc Carotid cavernous sinus fistula ... Carotid cavernous sinus fistula is abnormal communications between the carotid arterial system and the venous cavernous sinus. ... Carotid cavernous sinus fistula can develop either because of trauma or spontaneous causes. Spontaneous carotid cavernous sinus ... A case of spontaneous carotid cavernous sinus fistula in a young adult male who presented with pulsating exophthalmos and ...
A carotid angiography showed that she was suffering from a posteriorly draining carotid-cavernous sinus fistula with isolated ... Traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula accompanying abducens nerve (VI) palsy in blowout fractures: Missed diagnosis of & ... Traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula accompanying abducens nerve (VI) palsy in blowout fractures: Missed diagnosis of & ... This is a rare case of posteriorly draining carotid-cavernous sinus fistula without classic orbito-ocular signs, the absence of ...
Arteriovenous, carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. Pneumothorax/pneumohemothorax. Gingival recessions. Positive family history, ...
Carotid cavernous fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus, either directly or ... Keltner JL, Satterfield D, Dublin A, et al. Dural and carotid cavernous sinus fistulas. Ophthalmology 1987;94:1585-1600. ... The cavernous sinuses were symmetric and normal in size, with slightly increased flow voids in the left cavernous sinus. ... Komiyama M, Yoshihiko F, Hisatsugu Y, et al. MR imaging of dural AV fistulas at the cavernous sinus. J Comput Assist Tomogr ...
... general Fistula Care and treatment Diagnosis Fistulas Primary health care Research ... Endovascular approach as primary treatment for traumatic carotid cavernous fistula: local experience from Pakistan.(Report) by ... Keywords: Carotid-cavernous sinus fistula, Carotid artery, Endovascular, Traumatic (JPMA 61 :989; 2011). Introduction Post ... once the fistula was successfully crossed, the balloon was inflated in cavernous sinus and fistula was closed (Figure-1). If ...
Endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous sinus fistula: A systematic review.. Korkmazer B, Kocak B, Tureci E, Islak C, Kocer ... Carotid stenting with low-dose contrast medium for patients with moderate-to-severe chronic renal insufficiency: keyhole ... Total agenesis of superior sagittal sinus and falx cerebri in a patient who has a subacute subdural hematoma crossing midline: ... Is it time to evaluate multiple familial cavernous malformations with ultra-high resolution flat-detector CT angiography? ...
... and carotid artery stenosis (CAS) are frequent clinical entities, with major morbidity... ... Damaged carotid arteries can lead to CAROTID ARTERY THROMBOSIS; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; pseudoaneurysm formation; and ... Carotid Artery Thrombosis. Blood clot formation in any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES. This may produce CAROTID STENOSIS or ... CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries. ...
... aplasia and hypoplasia of the internal carotid artery are rare congenital malformations. They are usually asymptomatic and ... Damaged carotid arteries can lead to CAROTID ARTERY THROMBOSIS; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; pseudoaneurysm formation; and ... combined carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting) to revascularize chronic long-segment occlusion of internal carotid ... CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries. ...
CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; and CEREBROSPINAL FLUID OTORRHEA are relatively frequent sequelae of this condition. (Adams et ...
... sinus fistula is an abnormal communication between the internal or external carotid arteries and the cavernous sinus. These ... Direct carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae, which represent 70-90% of all carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae in most series, are ... Dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae are characterized by a communication between the cavernous sinus and one or more ... Carotid-cavernous sinus fistula is an abnormal communication between the internal or external carotid arteries and the ...
A woman with a red eye from a carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. ...
Helping you find trustworthy answers on Cavernous Sinus , Latest evidence made easy ... Find all the evidence you need on Cavernous Sinus via the Trip Database. ... Traumatic Carotid Cavernous Fistula with a Connection between the Supraclinoid Internal Carotid Artery and Cavernous Sinus via ... Traumatic Carotid Cavernous Fistula with a Connection between the Supraclinoid Internal Carotid Artery and Cavernous Sinus via ...
1990. Bilateral non-traumatic carotid cavernous sinus fistula with spontaneous closure. Acta Ophthalmologica. 743-747. Show ... 2014. Carotid intima-media thickness - a potential predictor for rupture risk of intracranial aneurysms. International Journal ...
Endovascular Approaches to Orbital Vascular Lesions and Carotid Cavernous Sinus Fistulas Stephen R. Chen ... Cavernous sinus fistulas Infantile hemangiomas Laser therapy Orbital lymphatic malformations Vascular anomalies ...
  • Summary: We report the endovascular treatment of a dural carotid cavernous fistula in a 67-year-old woman in whom superior petrosal sinus catheterization was performed to access the venous site of the fistula. (ajnr.org)
  • To our knowledge, this retrograde venous route via the superior petrosal sinus has not been previously described. (ajnr.org)
  • We report a case of a DCCF that was treated by embolization after venous retrograde access to the superior petrous sinus (SPS) was achieved. (ajnr.org)
  • The microcatheter was navigated up to the right CS into the collecting venous pouch of the fistula ( Fig 3 ). (ajnr.org)
  • Venous-phase lateral left common carotid arteriogram. (ajnr.org)
  • Carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas (CCF) result from abnormal connections between the carotid arterial system and the cavernous sinus, leading to ophthalmic complications due to arterialization of the ocular venous system [ 7 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • An acquired or spontaneous abnormality in which there is communication between cavernous sinus , a venous structure, and the carotid arteries . (lookfordiagnosis.com)
  • The cavernous sinus is a network of venous channels traversed by the intracranial portion of the internal carotid artery. (medscape.com)
  • The venous outflow from the fistula via the inferior petrosal sinus on the left side as well on the right side over the intercavernous sinus is well illustrated. (bmj.com)
  • Carotid cavernous sinus fistula is abnormal communications between the carotid arterial system and the venous cavernous sinus . (bvsalud.org)
  • The pattern of venous drainage, either anterior into the ophthalmic veins or posterior into the petrosal sinuses, often dictates the clinical findings and radiographic appearance. (bmj.com)
  • This results in short-circuiting of the arterial blood into the venous system of the cavernous sinuses. (medscape.com)
  • The elegant up-to-date technique of the detachable balloon catheter introduced via an arterial and/or venous route has resulted in occlusion of CCF's and preservation of carotid artery patency in over half the cases so treated. (thejns.org)
  • However, tortuosity, hypoplasia, or stenosis of the normal venous routes may result in failure to catheterize the cavernous sinus. (prolekare.cz)
  • Embolisation of indirect carotid‑ cavernous sinus duralarterio‑ venous fistulae using the direct superior ophthalmic vein approach. (prolekare.cz)
  • Ilio - iliac arteriovenous fistula (AVF) presents with progressive abdominal distention , dyspnea , and edema of the leg , which makes it difficult to distinguish from deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and can lead to a delay in the diagnosis . (wikidoc.org)
  • What Specialist treat Cerebral Sinus Venous Thrombosis? (healthtap.com)
  • Venous sinus thrombosis after whiplash possible? (healthtap.com)
  • The definitive management of a caroticocavernous fistula is obliteration of the fistulous connection with restoration of normal arterial and venous flow. (ispub.com)
  • Alternatively, hemorrhage may be contained by development of a pseudoaneurysm or diverted through a traumatic arterial-venous fistula. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Bilateral transverse sinus occlusion associated with the AVM produced these signs by rerouting intracranial venous drainage anteriorly through the cavernous sinuses and superior ophthalmic veins. (bmj.com)
  • Carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) generally causes periorbital aching with ocular symptoms due to high venous pressure in the cavernous sinus, while migraine is caused by arterial dilatation-stimulating trigeminal nerves around the vessels. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Dural transverse sinus arteriovenous fistulas with cortical venous drainage were associated with a high hemorrhagic risk. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) are acquired direct arteriovenous shunts that often drain into the dural venous sinus. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Unusual venous sinuses. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The dural venous sinuses lie in between the two layers of the dura mater. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The dural venous sinuses are important, because they receive blood from the brain and the cranial bones. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Within the cranium, the inner surface of the dura was examined for wornas and all meningeal venous blood sinuses, including the cavernous and intercavernous sinuses in the floor of the cranium, were opened and searched for adult P. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Cavernous sinus syndrome comprises disease processes that localize to the cavernous sinus-a venous plexus that drains the face, mouth, tonsils, pharynx, nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, orbit, middle ear, and parts of the cerebral cortex. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Micro-coils made of platinum are placed into the artery, vein or venous sinus to seal off the AVF and prevent blood flow through it. (uclahealth.org)
  • Elevated pressure inside the cavernous sinus and alterations in venous drainage account for the observed clinical signs, including conjunctival injection, proptosis, decreased visual acuity, elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), and cranial nerve palsies. (harvard.edu)
  • 1-4) We describe a case of spontaneous resolution of ophthalmologic sequelae in a patient who developed post-traumatic, bilateral carotid dissections that resulted in bilateral CCF and central retinal venous insufficiency. (harvard.edu)
  • Dural Venous Sinus Stenosis - A story written by one of our own! (whooshers.com)
  • In direct CCF, internal carotid artery (ICA) wall disruption allows high-pressure blood to move into the CS, resulting in short-circuiting of the ICA arterial blood into the venous system of the CS. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A venous triaxial system was used to achieve support for distal navigation across the midline via the coronary sinus to the contralateral cavernous sinus. (bvsalud.org)
  • Despite a successful unilateral approach to bilateral cavernous sinuses, 1 patient needed an additional ipsilateral transophthalmic venous approach to obliterate the anterior compartment of the cavernous sinus. (bvsalud.org)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Careful inspection of the venous anatomy and fistulization sites is critical when treating unilateral or bilateral carotid cavernous shunts. (bvsalud.org)
  • This article will aim to elucidate the structure, components, anatomical relations, and venous tributaries of the cavernous sinus. (kenhub.com)
  • It is noteworthy that the cavernous part of the internal carotid artery is the only arterial vessel that is completely surrounded by venous networks. (kenhub.com)
  • cavernous sinus an irregularly shaped venous channel between the layers of dura mater of the brain, one on either side of the body of the sphenoid bone and communicating across the midline. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • circular sinus the venous channel encircling the pituitary gland, formed by the two cavernous sinuses and the anterior and posterior intercavernous sinuses. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • occipital sinus a venous sinus between the layers of dura mater, passing upward along the midline of the cerebellum. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • petrosal sinus, inferior a venous channel arising from the cavernous sinus and draining into the internal jugular vein. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Laterally, there are the venous sinusoids of the cavernous sinues and middle clinoid processes are variably present. (appliedradiology.com)
  • BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Cavernous sinus thrombosis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: December 2017 Summary Thrombus formation within the cavernous sinus , which may be either septic or aseptic in origin. (tripdatabase.com)
  • cavernous sinus thrombosis is usually through trauma or a prothrombotic condition. (tripdatabase.com)
  • What is cavernous sinus thrombosis? (healthtap.com)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis is when a blood clot is in the cavernous sinus [which is a cavity at the base of the brain a vein, nerves and other structures]. (healthtap.com)
  • Is there a cure for cavernous sinus thrombosis? (healthtap.com)
  • Most cases of cavernous sinus thrombosis are due to infection by a bacteria called staph aureus (70%), so antibiotics (high dose iv) are the first line of treatment and are highly effective. (healthtap.com)
  • What sort of disease is cavernous sinus thrombosis? (healthtap.com)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a blood clot in the cavernous sinus, usu from infection. (healthtap.com)
  • How does having cavernous sinus thrombosis change things? (healthtap.com)
  • What are the symptoms of cavernous sinus thrombosis? (healthtap.com)
  • What are the tests for cavernous sinus thrombosis? (healthtap.com)
  • Sinus thrombosis. (slideserve.com)
  • The authors present an unusual case of Lemierre syndrome in a 16-year-old boy with cavernous sinus thrombosis and right internal carotid artery narrowing without neurological sequelae, right subdural empyema, and cerebritis in the right temporal and occipital lobes. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Cranial MRI revealed a cavernous sinus thrombosis and a subarachnoid abscess. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Cavernous sinus syndrome is typically caused by septic or aseptic sinus thrombosis, neoplasm, or trauma. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • They are postulated to occur secondary to cavernous sinus thrombosis with revascularization and thus are similar to dural arteriovenous fistulas elsewhere. (radiopaedia.org)
  • In addition to conservative measures, carotid-jugular compression (at the level of the carotid bulb) can be useful in the treatment of indirect fistulas resulting in closure in up to 30% of cases, presumably due to progressive thrombosis due to intermittent stagnation of blood adjacent to existing clot. (radiopaedia.org)
  • However, it can result in various complications such as carotid cavernous fistula (CCF), epistaxis, spontaneous thrombosis, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. (bvsalud.org)
  • Direct carotid cavernous fistulas (CCFs) (Barrow Type A) are high-flow shunts between the cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the cavernous sinus (CS) and are usually caused by traumatic laceration of the ICA (80%) or rupture of a preexisting aneurysm of the ICA (1) . (ajnr.org)
  • Repositioning of the microcatheter (Excel 14, Target Therapeutics, Freemont, USA) with slight retraction of the tip towards the ICA vessel wall, however, showed a typical berry aneurysm with connection to the cavernous sinus (fig 3 A and B). With the tip positioned within the aneurysm Guglielmi detachable coil (GDC) therapy was started. (bmj.com)
  • Spontaneous carotid cavernous sinus fistula is often associated with a pre-existing aneurysm in the intracavernous portion of internal carotid artery . (bvsalud.org)
  • Both abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and carotid artery stenosis (CAS) are frequent clinical entities, with major morbidity and mortality. (bioportfolio.com)
  • A fistula can progress to an aneurysm , usually in the setting of a trauma , carrying a risk of rupture and necessitating surgical intervention. (wikidoc.org)
  • Intracavernous aneurysm of the carotid artery following transsphenoidal surgery. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Treatment of an internal carotid artery aneurysm with a flow diverter through a double lumen balloon catheter. (uhnresearch.ca)
  • Less commonly, rupture of a carotid cavernous aneurysm may lead to fistula formation. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Aneurysm of Transverse Sigmoid Sinus - Cured via Endovascular Procedure - Be sure to see additional links to reports on this cause and cure, below. (whooshers.com)
  • BACKGROUND: Carotid cavernous aneurysm (CCA) rupture is rare. (bvsalud.org)
  • Yu JS, Lei T, Chen JC, He Y, Chen J, Li L. Diagnosis and endovascular treatment of spontaneous direct carotid-cavernous fistula. (medscape.com)
  • It is therefore unsurprising that vEDS has been associated with the development of spontaneous direct carotid-cavernous fistula (sCCF). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Prevalence of Carotid Artery Stenosis and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in Brussels: a Population-based Screening Study. (bioportfolio.com)
  • A population-based screening study to determine the prevalence of carotid artery stenosis (CAS) and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in the Brussels Capital Region. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Using duplex ultrasound, a low invasive examination, information is obtained on the abdominal aortic diameter and the degree of stenosis of the carotid bifurcation. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Examination is done by one-time duplex ultrasound to perform a diameter measurement of the abdominal aorta and determine the degree of stenosis of the carotid arteries. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a new non-invasive device, the Carotid Stenotic Scan (CSS), to check for stenosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA) as compared. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The correlation between metabolic syndrome and carotid artery stenosis is well established. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The purpose of this study is to determine if carotid artery stenosis can be detected using an electronic stethoscope. (bioportfolio.com)
  • External carotid artery (ECA) stenosis is an independent mortality predictor. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Carotid Duplex Velocity Criteria Recommended by the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound and Endorsed by the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission Lacks Predictive Ability for Identifying High Grade Carotid Artery Stenosis. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Carotid duplex is the first line imaging modality for characterizing degree of carotid stenosis. (bioportfolio.com)
  • However, isolated morphological changes without significant carotid stenosis is rarely symptomatic. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Skin temperature maps as a measure of carotid artery stenosis. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Internal carotid artery agenesis is an uncommon congenital anomaly and it could be misdiagnosed as stenosis/occlusion of this artery. (bioportfolio.com)
  • We analyzed the results of internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis treatment at our institution according to the treatment modality-carotid endarterectomy (CEA) vs. carotid artery stenting (CAS). (bioportfolio.com)
  • The aim of the study is to confirm, whether the MER® stent can be used, without limitations, for the endovascular carotid stenosis treatment in daily clinical practice. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Carotid revascularization procedures are performed for more than 87% of cases in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid stenosis (ICS), who are assumed to have a life expectancy of at. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Carotid angio-gram demonstrated marked stenosis as well as aneurismal formation of the right internal carotid artery at the intracavernous portion. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Transverse Sinus Stenosis and Enlarged Arachnoid Granulation - Written By One of Our Own! (whooshers.com)
  • Transverse Sinus Stenosis - Listen to one of our own describe his story on BBC Radio! (whooshers.com)
  • He focuses on treating stroke, carotid stenosis, intracranial aneurysms, arteriovenous malformation, pituitary tumors and other skull base tumors. (uky.edu)
  • Oran NT, Oran I. Carotid angioplasty and stenting in carotid artery stenosis: neuroscience nursing implications. (ege.edu.tr)
  • Cerebral angiography revealed a right-sided direct CCF draining mainly by the superior ophthalmic vein, the petrous sinus, cortical veins, and predominately the contralateral CS ( Fig 1 ). (ajnr.org)
  • B, Lateral angiogram of the right ICA shows CCF drainage by the right superior ophthalmic vein, both CS, the inferior petrosal sinus, and pterygoid sinus. (ajnr.org)
  • 1. Berlis A, Klisch J, Spetzger U, Faist M, Shumacher M.Carotid cavernous fistula: embolization via a bilateral superior ophthalmic vein approach. (prolekare.cz)
  • Operative approach via the superior ophthalmic vein for the endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous fistulas that fail traditional endovascular access. (prolekare.cz)
  • 8. Goldberg RA, Goldey SH, Duckwiler G, Vineula F. Management of cavernous sinus‑ dural fistulas: indications and techniques for primary embolization via the superior ophthalmic vein. (prolekare.cz)
  • 16. Bulsara KR, Vasudevan R, Erdem E. Superior ophthalmic vein approach to carotidcavernous fistulas: technical note. (prolekare.cz)
  • Treatment of carotid‑ cavernous sinus fistulas using a superior ophthalmic vein approach. (prolekare.cz)
  • 20. Devoto MH, Egbert JE, Tomsick TA, Kulwin DR. Acute exophthalmos during treatment of a cavernous sinus‑ dural fistula through the superior ophthalmic vein. (prolekare.cz)
  • Because of inability to access a cavernous-carotid fistula through conventional means, a superior ophthalmic vein approach was used to allow access for embolization. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) is a specific type of dural arteriovenous fistula characterized by abnormal arteriovenous shunting within the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Following endovascular therapy with transvenous and transarterial embolisation of the fistula, all abnormal findings resolved. (bmj.com)
  • Carotid cavernous fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus, either directly or via intradural branches of the internal or external carotid arteries. (bmj.com)
  • 2 Additional radiographic findings with variable prevalence include lateral bulging of the cavernous sinus wall and enlargement of extraocular muscles on CT or MRI, and abnormal cavernous sinus flow voids on MRI. (bmj.com)
  • Post traumatic Carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) is a rare complication of moderate to severe head injury in which an abnormal communication develops between internal carotid artery (ICA) and the cavernous sinus. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Carotid-cavernous sinus fistula is an abnormal communication between the internal or external carotid arteries and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • An arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is an abnormal connection or passageway between an artery and a vein . (wikidoc.org)
  • Arteriovenous fistulas form when veins and arteries create abnormal connections. (uclahealth.org)
  • A vascular malformation of the head or neck is a condition that involves some type of abnormal connections among the blood vessels in the brain, face, sinus area, or spine. (aurorabaycare.com)
  • Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are abnormal communications between the carotid arterial system and the cavernous sinus that occur mainly in elderly. (dovepress.com)
  • A Fistula is a permanent abnormal passageway between two organs in the body or between an organ and the exterior of the body. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 2. an abnormal channel or fistula, permitting escape of pus. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A definitive closure of the fistula without occlusion of the ipsilateral ICA was impossible. (ajnr.org)
  • Visual loss, although less frequent than in patients with direct carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae, occurs in 20-30% of patients with dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae and may be due to secondary ischemic optic neuropathy, chorioretinal dysfunction, including central retinal vein occlusion, or uncontrolled glaucoma. (medscape.com)
  • 16 Carotidcavernous fistulas were treated by a direct surgical approach and occlusion of the fistula by clipping as much as 20 years before the introduction of extracorporeal circulation and cardiac arrest. (thejns.org)
  • 21. Fukami T, Isozumi T, Shiino A, Nakazawa T, Matsuda M, Handa J. Central retinal vein occlusion after embolization for spontaneous carotid cavernous sinus fistula. (prolekare.cz)
  • Intraluminal occlusion of a carotid-cavernous sinus fistula with a balloon catheter. (semanticscholar.org)
  • 2010) Intercavernous portionof internal carotid artery occlusion resulting from snowboarding. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Right common carotid control angiogram obtained at the end of the embolization procedure shows that the DCCF is no more opacified than before and during the procedure. (ajnr.org)
  • Transarterial balloon embolization with or without preservation of the carotid artery or by a transvenous approach is the treatment of choice and is associated with limited morbidity and the least damage of cranial nerves (2) . (ajnr.org)
  • A carotid-cavernous fistula developed in a 62-year-old woman during an attempt at embolization of a skull base meningioma. (elsevier.com)
  • Horton, J. A. / Iatrogenic carotid-cavernous fistula occurring after embolization of a cavernous sinus meningioma . (elsevier.com)
  • Transarterial coil embolization of a carotid-cavernous fistula which occurred during stent angioplasty. (medscape.com)
  • Many c-c fistulas are treated with embolization . (healthtap.com)
  • 7 In patients with active hemorrhage from a carotid or vertebral laceration, there is a high risk of stroke or even death despite aggressive treatment, including surgical ligation or endovascular embolization of the vessel. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Transvenous embolization for dural transverse sinus fistulas with occluded sigmoid sinus. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Dural transverse sinus arteriovenous dural fistulas could be treated by embolization (transarterial or transvenous), surgery or a combination of both. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Although embolization of dCCFs with detachable balloons was previously accepted worldwide as the first-line therapeutic option because it is technically simple, these devices are currently unavailable and other treatment options have included coil embolization of the fistula to preserve the internal carotid artery. (signavitae.com)
  • Therefore, sinus packing by coil embolization is now a first-line therapy, but there is the disadvantage of neuro-ophthalmologic symptoms by nerve palsy occurred in CS. (signavitae.com)
  • Complications of detachable balloon catheter technique in the treatment of traumatic intracranial arteriovenous fistulas. (thejns.org)
  • 396 - 403 , 1982 Barrow DL, Fleischer AS, Hoffman JC: Complications of detachable balloon catheter technique in the treatment of traumatic intracranial arteriovenous fistulas. (thejns.org)
  • Direct carotid-cavernous fistulas are characterized by the triad of pulsatile proptosis, chemosis, and intracranial whistling. (medscape.com)
  • A patient with an occipital dural arteriovenous malformation (AVM) developed signs of a carotid-cavernous sinus fistula and raised intracranial pressure. (bmj.com)
  • A 67-year-old man presented with devastating intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) from an anterior cranial fossa dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). (biomedsearch.com)
  • As a proportion of low flow caroticocavernous fistulas spontaneously close initial conservative management of ocular symptoms is often first employed provided no high-risk features (e.g. aneurysms of feeding vessels) or severe ocular or intracranial complications are present 6 . (radiopaedia.org)
  • Secondary orbital varices are acquired in association with a carotid-cavernous fistula, dural arteriovenous fistula, or intracranial arteriovenous malformation [3] . (aao.org)
  • Intracavernous carotid artery aneurysms causing a carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) are rare. (bmj.com)
  • Aneurysms of the intracavernous portion of the carotid artery causing a carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) are not often described in the literature. (bmj.com)
  • Three patients with aneurysms of the internal carotid artery (ICA) situated in the cavernous sinus (CS), and four patients with traumatic carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCF's) were treated by direct surgical approach. (thejns.org)
  • Surgical management of carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCF's) is often even more difficult than the treatment of intracavernous carotid aneurysms. (thejns.org)
  • The treatment of carotid cavernous arteriovenous aneurysms. (prolekare.cz)
  • Patient Selection and Technical Nuances for Microsurgical Clipping of Carotid-Ophthalmic Aneurysms: 2-Dimensional Operative Video. (mayo.edu)
  • The internal carotid artery gives rise to several intracavernous branches. (medscape.com)
  • Type A fistulas consist of a direct connection between the intracavernous internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Type B fistulas consist of a dural shunt between intracavernous branches of the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Blunt head injury can lead to shearing of intracavernous arteries, causing the development of a fistula. (medscape.com)
  • Penetrating head injury can lead to fistula formation by direct laceration of intracavernous vessels. (medscape.com)
  • Carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae occur because of traumatic or spontaneous rents in the walls of the intracavernous internal carotid artery or its branches. (medscape.com)
  • Direct carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae, which represent 70-90% of all carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae in most series, are characterized by a direct connection between the intracavernous segment of the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Traumatic dCCFs are direct arteriovenous communications between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and cavernous sinus, resulting from a traumatic tear of the horizontal or posterior ascending intracavernous segment of the ICA by skull fracture fragments. (signavitae.com)
  • A direct fistula is due to a direct communication between the intracavernous internal carotid artery and the surrounding cavernous sinus. (radiopaedia.org)
  • 1) In the case of traumatic CCF, the intracavernous carotid artery and its branches are usually torn, resulting in the fistula. (harvard.edu)
  • Left internal carotid artery agenesis associated with communicating arteries anomalies. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Congenital arteriovenous fistula (AVF) of the coronary arteries , a rare cardiac anomaly , was first described by Krause W. Uber, in 1865. (wikidoc.org)
  • Reopening some occluded carotid arteries. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Exploration of anterior neck wounds is usually done surgically, given adequate exposure and direct visualization of the carotid arteries. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Given the difficult surgical approach to the carotid artery at the skull base and the vertebral arteries, 8,9 the interventional neuroradiologist can provide great support to the trauma team with an endovascular approach to treatment at these sites. (appliedradiology.com)
  • While some extremity pseudoaneurysms have been reported to resolve spontaneously, 13 asymptomatic pseudoaneurysms of the carotid arteries are generally treated to preclude thromboembolic stroke and reduce the risk of re-bleeding. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Indirect fistulas are due to communication by multiple branches between the internal and/or external carotid arteries and the cavernous sinus. (radiopaedia.org)
  • These involve branches of the carotid arteries and the cavernous sinus. (uclahealth.org)
  • The cavernous segment of the internal carotid arteries and their meningohypophyseal trunks travel through these paired duraperiosteal spaces. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Diagnosis and management of dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Amongst the available imaging modalities, digital subtraction angiography DSA remains the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of caroticocavernous fistula. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Sigmoid Sinus Diverticulum (SSD) - A story written by one of our own Whooshers, about her diagnosis and treatment. (whooshers.com)
  • The diagnosis of carotid-cavernous fistula (FCC) associated with hyperintensity of signal in FLAIR and diffuse contrast uptake at the level of the pseudo tumoral protuberance and cerebellar peduncle was established. (bvsalud.org)
  • In cases of indirect carotid-cavernous fistulas, there is moderate ocular congestion, mild proptosis, and ocular pulsation on aplanotonometry. (medscape.com)
  • Type-D caroticocavernous fistula: the eye demonstrates proptosis, chemosis, and scleral edema. (medscape.com)
  • Paciente varón de 50 años quien tras 3 meses de un traumatismo encefalocraneano presenta proptosis, quemosis y exoftalmos en el ojo izquierdo. (bvsalud.org)
  • Several investigators have reported severe epistaxis and intracerebral hemorrhage, potentially fatal, in patients with traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae. (medscape.com)
  • Direct CCFs are high-flow fistulas with a direct connection between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Dural CCFs are low-flow fistulas resulting from communications of cavernous arterial branches and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Indirect CCFs result from a dural branch rupture of the carotid artery caused by a genetic condition or a comorbidity such as hypertension. (medscape.com)
  • Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) present the clinician with diagnostic and surgical challenges. (epistemeparkour.com)
  • Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are vascular shunts allowing blood to flow from the carotid artery into the cavernous sinus. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The characteristic clinical features seen in patients with CCFs are the sequelae of hemodynamic dysfunction within the cavernous sinus. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Occasionally, treatment of indirect CCFs with conventional endovascular approach through large veins or the inferior petrosal sinus may not be possible. (dovepress.com)
  • Except for compressed air inju- A 33-year-old male patient was involved in a motor ries, the presence of air within the orbit implies a com- vehicle accident, he sustained multiple facial bone frac- munication between an air-containing cavity (the tures, cerebral concussion, and a fracture of the left hu- paranasal sinuses or the nose) and the orbit. (deepdyve.com)
  • paranasal sinuses or the nose) and the orbit. (deepdyve.com)
  • paranasal sinuses, are und. (healthtap.com)
  • Sudden unilateral onset suggests intraorbital hemorrhage (which can occur after surgery, retrobulbar injection, or trauma) or inflammation of the orbit or paranasal sinuses. (msdmanuals.com)
  • frontal sinus one of the paired paranasal sinuses in the frontal bone, each communicating with the middle nasal meatus on the same side. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • maxillary sinus one of the paired paranasal sinuses in the body of the maxilla on either side, opening into the middle nasal meatus on the same side. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Sinus paranasal (Paranasal sinuses). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • objectives: Dura of the anterior clinoid process (ACP) is presumably supplied by the ophthalmic and external carotid artery branches. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Bilateral cavernous sinuses extend from the petrous segment of the temporal bone to the orbit and contain cranial nerves III (oculomotor), IV (trochlear), V1 (ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve), V2 (maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve) and VI (abducens). (appliedradiology.com)
  • Severe unilateral abducens nerve palsy from cavernous sinus carotid vascular ectasia Carotid cavernous sinus ectasia is a rare cause of abducens nerve palsy.We present a case of severe unilateral progressive esotropia resulting from cavernous sinus carotid vascular ectasia in a 67 y/o female. (tripdatabase.com)
  • cavernous sinus ectasia should be considered in the differential of severe progressive unilateral abducens nerve palsy. (tripdatabase.com)
  • We present our experience with the unilateral across-the-midline approach to both cavernous sinuses to treat shunts according to anatomic compartments to achieve anatomic cure. (bvsalud.org)
  • The use of intravenous radio isotope angiography in 3 cases of unilateral carotid cavernous sinus fistula is described. (sun.ac.za)
  • Re: Prediction of traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. (lww.com)
  • Endovascular approach as primary treatment for traumatic carotid cavernous fistula: local experience from Pakistan. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Objective: To evaluate the technical success, complications and outcome of endovascular management of post traumatic carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) in patients presenting at a tertiary care hospital in Karahci. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Conclusion: Endovascular approach is a safe and useful option for treatment of traumatic carotid cavernous fistula. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage also may complicate the course of a traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. (medscape.com)
  • Traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae occur more commonly in young individuals. (medscape.com)
  • Traumatic carotid cavernous fistula in a pediatric patient. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Treatment of 54 traumatic carotid‑ cavernous fistulas. (prolekare.cz)
  • Traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula with spontaneous resolution. (semanticscholar.org)
  • CT showed one balloon positioned in the posterior portion of the right cavernous sinus and was regarded to be responsible for nerve compression. (ajnr.org)
  • Imagistic findings (magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, and cervical spine, and magnetic resonance angiography of the head and neck) indicated a very rare condition: left internal carotid artery agenesis accompanied by the absence of the pre-communicant part of the left anterior cerebral artery and of the right posterior communicating artery. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Fistula of the posterior communicating artery and cavernous sinus. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Crossing the midline via the anterior or posterior coronary sinuses is feasible and efficacious. (bvsalud.org)
  • The left and right cavernous sinuses communicate by through the anterior and posterior intercavernous sinuses. (kenhub.com)
  • The cavernous sinuses are 1 cm wide cavities that extend a distance of 2 cm from the most posterior aspect of the orbit to the petrous part of the temporal bone . (kenhub.com)
  • anterior s's ( sinus anterio´res ) the anterior air cells that together with the middle and posterior air cells form the ethmoidal sinus. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • intercavernous s's channels connecting the two cavernous sinuses, one passing anterior and the other posterior to the stalk of the pituitary gland. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Type D fistulas are a combination of types B and C, with dural shunts between internal and external carotid artery branches and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Carotid-cavernous fistulas, often with a more chronic course, are direct high-flow shunts between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • A , Arterial-phase right internal carotid arteriogram shows the DCCF at the right posterosuperior aspect of the CS ( solid arrow ) fed by dural branches of the carotid siphon. (ajnr.org)
  • At cerebral venography, the most distal aspect of the right SPS was identified at the point where it merged with the right transverse sinus ( Fig 2 ). (ajnr.org)
  • Dural Arteriovenous Fistula (DAVF) of the Transverse Sigmoid Sinus - Written by another whoosher of our own! (whooshers.com)
  • Dural Arteriovenous Fistula (DAVF) of the Transverse Sigmoid Sinus - A story written by one of our own whooshers! (whooshers.com)
  • petrosal sinus, superior one arising from the cavernous sinus and draining into the transverse sinus of the dura mater. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Comparison of two methods for revascularization of the bifurcation of common carotid artery: carotid endarterectomy with longitudinal incision carotid endarterectomy patch angioplasty comp. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The internal carotid artery (a branch of the common carotid artery) - along with its postganglionic sympathetic plexus from the superior cervical ganglion - gains access to the cavernous sinus posteriorly. (kenhub.com)
  • carotid sinus a dilatation of the proximal portion of the internal carotid or distal portion of the common carotid artery, containing in its wall pressoreceptors that are stimulated by changes in blood pressure. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Types B, C, and D tend to be lower-flow and lower-pressure fistulas with a slower progression of signs and symptoms. (medscape.com)
  • The primary endpoint of our study is to determine whether neurological symptoms (aphasia, paresis, loss of consciousness, numbness) occur after clamping the internal carotid artery, and if. (bioportfolio.com)
  • These fistulae usually have low rates of arterial blood flow and almost always produce symptoms and signs spontaneously, without any antecedent trauma or manipulation. (medscape.com)
  • Dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae usually occur in middle-aged to elderly women but may produce symptoms at any age, including infancy. (medscape.com)
  • Fistulae involving the spinal vasculature can present with neurologic symptoms of the lower extremities which may include weakness and sensory disturbance. (wikidoc.org)
  • The natural history of caroticocavernous fistulas is highly varied, ranging from spontaneous closure to rapidly progressive symptoms. (radiopaedia.org)
  • What are the symptoms of an arteriovenous fistula? (uclahealth.org)
  • The fistulas in two cases were successfully coiled with complete obviation of symptoms and signs. (dovepress.com)
  • BACKGROUND: Cavernous carotid fistulas (CCF) are anatomically complex vascular lesions. (bvsalud.org)
  • [ 3 ] Karaman et al reported on a carotid-cavernous fistula secondary to blunt trauma after functional endoscopic sinus surgery. (medscape.com)
  • Carotid cavernous sinus fistula can develop either because of trauma or spontaneous causes. (bvsalud.org)
  • 1 Direct fistulas are high flow, frequently follow trauma, and tend to have a dramatic clinical presentation. (bmj.com)
  • While direct carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae generally are associated with trauma or surgical manipulation, dural carotid-sinus fistulae occur more commonly in middle-aged to elderly women. (medscape.com)
  • Besides loud noises, other causes include severe head trauma, sinus and respiratory infections, ear infections, wax build-up, high blood cholesterol , TMJ problems, food allergies, certain types of tumors and a long list of other conditions. (diagnose-me.com)
  • Cerebral angiography revealed a DCCF fed by arterial rami arising from the ipsilateral carotid siphon and by branches of the right middle meningeal artery ( Fig 1 ). (ajnr.org)
  • Carotid cavernous sinus fistula closure following angiography. (thejns.org)
  • 1637 - 1639 , 1973 Bennett DR, Van Dyk HJL, Davis DO: Carotid cavernous sinus fistula closure following angiography. (thejns.org)
  • Bennett DR, Van Dyk HJL, Davis DO: Carotid cavernous sinus fistula closure following angiography. (thejns.org)
  • Selective cerebral angiography in our department showed a left CCF filled only from the left internal carotid artery, initially considered as a spontaneous CCF type A (fig 1 A and B). As a variant there was a hypoplastic A1 segment on the left side with good collateralisation from the right side. (bmj.com)
  • Magnetic resonance angiography source image shows an enlarged, hyperintense left cavernous sinus (arrow). (bmj.com)
  • CT angiography is the noninvasive imaging modality of choice for evaluation of suspected caroticocavernous fistula 9 . (radiopaedia.org)
  • We describe a new technique for clearing a sixth nerve palsy after ballooning of an arteriovenous fistula. (ajnr.org)
  • Endovascular management of dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas in 141 patients. (medscape.com)
  • Dural carotid cavernous fistula: definitive endovascular management and long‑term follow‑up. (prolekare.cz)
  • Congenital absence of the cervical and petrous internal carotid artery with intercavernous anastomosis. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • As the petrous part of the internal carotid artery leaves the carotid canal , it curves vertically and superiorly above foramen lacerum to enter the cavernous sinus. (kenhub.com)
  • Nearly all patients with a direct carotid-cavernous sinus fistula experience progressive ocular complications if the fistula is left untreated. (medscape.com)
  • Delayed complications such as pseudoaneurysms or arteriovenous fistulae can affect long-term outcomes [4] . (east.org)
  • The cavernous sinus is located lateral to the pituitary gland and sella turcica, superior to the sphenoid sinus, and inferior to the optic chiasm. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • The cavernous sinus drains to the superior and inferior petrosal sinuses, which then join the sigmoid sinus. (kenhub.com)
  • Guneyli S, Oran I, Cinar C, Erdinc I, Bilgen C. Factors affecting the occurrence and degree of luminal protrusion of carotid plaques after angioplasty stenting. (ege.edu.tr)
  • Dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae are characterized by a communication between the cavernous sinus and one or more meningeal branches of the internal carotid artery, external carotid artery, or both. (medscape.com)
  • A carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) is an aberrant communication between the cavernous sinus and the internal carotid artery or branches of the external carotid artery. (harvard.edu)
  • A tear in the wall of a weak cavernous internal carotid artery caused by congenital collagen vascular disease. (upmc.com)
  • The external carotid artery provides several branches to the dura of the cavernous sinus and forms anastomoses with the branches of the internal carotid artery. (medscape.com)
  • Additionally, concomitant ECA and internal carotid artery (ICA) stenoses progression has been associated with an increased. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Dural artery from the supraclinoid internal carotid artery to the anterior clinoid process: origin, course and clinical implications. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Hybrid operation to revascularize long-segment occluded internal carotid artery prevent further ischemic events. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Styloid process length and styloid/hyoid bone proximity to the internal carotid artery (ICA) have been implicated in certain carotid pathologies (e.g. carotid artery dissection). (bioportfolio.com)
  • These lesions may be classified based on the following: etiology (traumatic vs spontaneous), velocity of blood flow (high vs low), and anatomy (direct vs dural, or internal carotid vs external carotid). (medscape.com)
  • Recent meticulous microsurgical studies of the CS have disclosed in detail the topographic anatomy of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth cranial nerves as they course through the CS. (thejns.org)
  • Ischemic optic neuropathy in spontaneous extracranial dissections of internal carotid artery. (scielo.br)
  • 4. Cavernous sinus--internal carotid artery fistula (1 case). (biomedsearch.com)
  • An unusual complication during the management of an acute traumatic occulison of the internal carotid artery]. (semanticscholar.org)
  • 3 There are four types (A,B,C,D) of CCF out which type A (Direct type) occurs in traumatic cavernous arteriovenous fistulae where the fistula is fed directly by the trunk of the internal carotid artery. (ispub.com)
  • This fistula was approached through the internal carotid artery. (ispub.com)
  • each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery. (jove.com)
  • Aberrant Internal Carotid Artery - This whoosher was only 8 years old! (whooshers.com)
  • In vEDS, anatomical and pathophysiological features of the intra-cavernous internal carotid artery make it prone to shunting in the cavernous sinus, due either to a spontaneous rupture or to a spontaneous dissection with pseudoaneurysm formation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Fistulas are categorized by the number of openings they have and whether they connect two internal organs or open through the skin. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Complete fistulas have one internal opening and one opening on the skin. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Incomplete fistulas are tubes of skin that are open on the outside but closed on the inside and do not connect to any internal structure. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The cavernous sinus contains the internal carotid artery and several cranial nerves. (kenhub.com)
  • Abducens nerve (CN VI) traverses the sinus lateral to the internal carotid artery. (kenhub.com)
  • Within the sinus, the internal carotid artery travels anteriorly, in a horizontal manner until it reaches the anterior limit of the sinus. (kenhub.com)
  • Here it curves vertically and superiorly to exit the sinus through its roof and become the cerebral part of the internal carotid artery. (kenhub.com)
  • The most medial structures within the cavernous sinuses are the internal carotid artery and cranial nerve VI. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Carotico- Cavernous Fistulas (CCF) are caused by the laceration of the intercavernous portion of the carotid artery, or one of its intercavernous branches resulting in arterialisation of blood within the cavernous sinus. (ispub.com)
  • as, the intercavernous sinuses connecting the cavernous sinuses at the base of the brain. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Management strategies of intercavernous sinus bleeding during transsphenoidal surgery. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Medially, the CS of both sides communicated one each other trough the intercavernous sinus. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A 38-year-old woman developed bilateral carotid cavernous fistulae (CCF) following a motor vehicle collision. (harvard.edu)
  • B , Right external carotid arteriogram shows that the DCCF is draining into the right superficial middle cerebral vein (a rrowheads ), the right SOV ( solid arrow ), and the right trigeminal vein ( open arrow ). (ajnr.org)
  • External carotid-cavernous fistula in an infant. (thejns.org)
  • 351 - 356 , 1981 Biglan AW, Pang D, Shuckett EP, et al: External carotid-cavernous fistula in an infant. (thejns.org)
  • The most frequent are type C, with meningeal branches of the external carotid forming the fistula 3 . (radiopaedia.org)
  • However, these fistulas may be congenital arteriovenous connections that open spontaneously in the settings of collagen vascular disease , atherosclerosis , hypertension , or may develop in females during peripartum period . (bvsalud.org)
  • Congenital arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is present at birth and may manifest early or later in life. (wikidoc.org)
  • Fistulas can occur at any age or can be present at birth (congenital). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • dermal sinus a congenital sinus tract extending from the surface of the body, between the bodies of two adjacent lumbar vertebrae, to the spinal canal. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • These vessels branch to provide arterial blood to the nerves and dura of the cavernous sinus and the pituitary gland. (medscape.com)
  • The cavernous sinus is roofed by an inner layer of dura mater that continues with the diaphragma sellae that covers the superior part of the pituitary gland . (kenhub.com)
  • We describe a novel clinical application of OCTA in a patient with dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistula (CCF), which was complicated by increased intra-ocular pressure (IOP). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Transvenous embolisation was done to close the fistula . (bvsalud.org)
  • Bing F, Albrieux M, Vinh Moreau-Gaudry V, Vasdev A. Cavernous sinus fistula treated through the transvenous approach: Report of four cases. (medscape.com)
  • 7. Klisch J, Huppertz HJ, Spetzger U, Hetzel A, Seeger W, Schumacher M. Transvenous treatment of carotid cavernous and dural arteriovenous fistulae: results for 31 patients and review of the literature. (prolekare.cz)
  • In cases where conventional access to the cavernous sinus may not be possible due to local variations of anatomy, multidisciplinary surgical approaches via the SOV provide an alternative route to successfully and safely close a CCF. (dovepress.com)
  • The third case was complicated due to difficulty in canulating a deeply seated vein and so had to be abandoned and catheterized through contralateral superior petrosal sinus and treated with liquid embolic material Onyx ® successfully. (dovepress.com)
  • Barrow and associates developed the current classification system of caroticocavernous fistulas in 1985. (medscape.com)
  • Bilateral Traumatic Caroticocavernous Fistulas: A Case Report and Review of the Literature. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Karaman E, Isildak H, Haciyev Y, Kaytaz A, Enver O. Carotid-cavernous fistula after functional endoscopic sinus surgery. (medscape.com)
  • Old records show that he underwent a functional endoscopic sinus surgery 3 months ago for an initial suspicion of a complication secondary to left maxillary and ethmoidal sinusitis. (ispub.com)
  • An anatomical-angiographic classification for carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas is introduced and a series of 14 patients with spontaneous carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas is reviewed to illustrate the usefulness of such a classification for patient evaluation and treatment. (thejns.org)
  • Placement of Covered Stents for the Treatment of Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistulas. (medscape.com)
  • Once routinely treated with open surgical procedures, including carotid ligation or trapping and cavernous sinus exploration, endovascular therapy is now the treatment modality of choice in many cases. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Endovascular treatment of carotid-cavernous fistulae: Long-term efficacy and prognostic factors. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Endovascular embolisation is the preferred treatment for carotid-cavernous fistulas. (prolekare.cz)
  • Dural fistulas involving the cavernous sinus: results of treatment in 30 patients. (prolekare.cz)
  • Interpositional dural graft technique for the treatment of dural arteriovenous fistulas. (biomedsearch.com)
  • However, MRI may show enlargement of the affected cavernous sinus with an adjacent soft tissue mass that resolves after treatment with steroids. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Endovascular techniques available at Aurora BayCare make treatment for these fistulas less risky. (aurorabaycare.com)