An acquired or spontaneous abnormality in which there is communication between CAVERNOUS SINUS, a venous structure, and the CAROTID ARTERIES. It is often associated with HEAD TRAUMA, specifically basilar skull fractures (SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR). Clinical signs often include VISION DISORDERS and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION.
An irregularly shaped venous space in the dura mater at either side of the sphenoid bone.
An abnormal direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. An A-V fistula usually leads to the formation of a dilated sac-like connection, arteriovenous aneurysm. The locations and size of the shunts determine the degree of effects on the cardiovascular functions such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEART RATE.
Abnormal communication most commonly seen between two internal organs, or between an internal organ and the surface of the body.
A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.
Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.
Abnormal protrusion of both eyes; may be caused by endocrine gland malfunction, malignancy, injury, or paralysis of the extrinsic muscles of the eye.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CAVERNOUS SINUS of the brain. Infections of the paranasal sinuses and adjacent structures, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, and THROMBOPHILIA are associated conditions. Clinical manifestations include dysfunction of cranial nerves III, IV, V, and VI, marked periorbital swelling, chemosis, fever, and visual loss. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p711)
Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.
Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.
Congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities involving ARTERIES; VEINS; or venous sinuses in the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and MENINGES.
Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.
The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.
An abnormal passage communicating between any component of the respiratory tract or between any part of the respiratory system and surrounding organs.
Disorders of the choroid including hereditary choroidal diseases, neoplasms, and other abnormalities of the vascular layer of the uvea.
A tissue adhesive that is applied as a monomer to moist tissue and polymerizes to form a bond. It is slowly biodegradable and used in all kinds of surgery, including dental.
Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)
An abnormal anatomical passage between the INTESTINE, and another segment of the intestine or other organs. External intestinal fistula is connected to the SKIN (enterocutaneous fistula). Internal intestinal fistula can be connected to a number of organs, such as STOMACH (gastrocolic fistula), the BILIARY TRACT (cholecystoduodenal fistula), or the URINARY BLADDER of the URINARY TRACT (colovesical fistula). Risk factors include inflammatory processes, cancer, radiation treatment, and surgical misadventures (MEDICAL ERRORS).
A recess on each side in the wall of the HYPOPHARYNX.
An abnormal passage or communication leading from an internal organ to the surface of the body.
The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.
Acute inflammatory disease of the THYROID GLAND due to infections by BACTERIA; FUNGI; or other microorganisms. Symptoms include tender swelling, FEVER, and often with LEUKOCYTOSIS.
An abnormal passage or communication between a bronchus and another part of the body.
Damages to the CAROTID ARTERIES caused either by blunt force or penetrating trauma, such as CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; THORACIC INJURIES; and NECK INJURIES. Damaged carotid arteries can lead to CAROTID ARTERY THROMBOSIS; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; pseudoaneurysm formation; and INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY DISSECTION. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1997, 18:251; J Trauma 1994, 37:473)
An abnormal passage between two or more BLOOD VESSELS, between ARTERIES; VEINS; or between an artery and a vein.
An abnormal anatomical passage connecting the RECTUM to the outside, with an orifice at the site of drainage.
Use of a balloon CATHETER to block the flow of blood through an artery or vein.
The therapy of the same disease in a patient, with the same agent or procedure repeated after initial treatment, or with an additional or alternate measure or follow-up. It does not include therapy which requires more than one administration of a therapeutic agent or regimen. Retreatment is often used with reference to a different modality when the original one was inadequate, harmful, or unsuccessful.
Abnormal passage communicating with the STOMACH.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
An abnormal passage in any part of the URINARY TRACT between itself or with other organs.
A spontaneous diminution or abatement of a disease over time, without formal treatment.
Abnormal passage communicating with the ESOPHAGUS. The most common type is TRACHEOESOPHAGEAL FISTULA between the esophagus and the TRACHEA.
The excision of the thickened, atheromatous tunica intima of a carotid artery.
Abnormal passage in any organ of the biliary tract or between biliary organs and other organs.
The dilated portion of the common carotid artery at its bifurcation into external and internal carotids. It contains baroreceptors which, when stimulated, cause slowing of the heart, vasodilatation, and a fall in blood pressure.
Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)
Abnormal passage communicating with the PANCREAS.
An abnormal anatomical passage between the RECTUM and the VAGINA.
The two principal arteries supplying the structures of the head and neck. They ascend in the neck, one on each side, and at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, each divides into two branches, the external (CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries.
One of the paired air spaces located in the body of the SPHENOID BONE behind the ETHMOID BONE in the middle of the skull. Sphenoid sinus communicates with the posterosuperior part of NASAL CAVITY on the same side.
A small cluster of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery. The carotid body, which is richly supplied with fenestrated capillaries, senses the pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and plays a crucial role in their homeostatic control.
A form of glaucoma in which the intraocular pressure increases because the angle of the anterior chamber is blocked and the aqueous humor cannot drain from the anterior chamber.
Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of DURA MATER, the endosteal and the meningeal layers. They are devoid of valves and are parts of the venous system of dura mater. Major cranial sinuses include a postero-superior group (such as superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and occipital) and an antero-inferior group (such as cavernous, petrosal, and basilar plexus).
An abnormal anatomical passage between the URINARY BLADDER and the VAGINA.
An abnormal anatomical passage that connects the VAGINA to other organs, such as the bladder (VESICOVAGINAL FISTULA) or the rectum (RECTOVAGINAL FISTULA).
A short vein that collects about two thirds of the venous blood from the MYOCARDIUM and drains into the RIGHT ATRIUM. Coronary sinus, normally located between the LEFT ATRIUM and LEFT VENTRICLE on the posterior surface of the heart, can serve as an anatomical reference for cardiac procedures.
Abnormal passage between the ESOPHAGUS and the TRACHEA, acquired or congenital, often associated with ESOPHAGEAL ATRESIA.
Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the exterior of the head, the face, and the greater part of the neck.
A compound used as an x-ray contrast medium that occurs in nature as the mineral barite. It is also used in various manufacturing applications and mixed into heavy concrete to serve as a radiation shield.
Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.
Pathological processes involving the PHARYNX.
Veins draining the cerebrum.
An abnormal passage in the URINARY BLADDER or between the bladder and any surrounding organ.
Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Abnormal communication between two ARTERIES that may result from injury or occur as a congenital abnormality.
Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.
Surgical shunt allowing direct passage of blood from an artery to a vein. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Paralysis of one or more of the ocular muscles due to disorders of the eye muscles, neuromuscular junction, supporting soft tissue, tendons, or innervation to the muscles.
Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.
The compartment containing the anterior extremities and half the inferior surface of the temporal lobes (TEMPORAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. Lying posterior and inferior to the anterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, ANTERIOR), it is formed by part of the TEMPORAL BONE and SPHENOID BONE. It is separated from the posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) by crests formed by the superior borders of the petrous parts of the temporal bones.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CRANIAL SINUSES, large endothelium-lined venous channels situated within the SKULL. Intracranial sinuses, also called cranial venous sinuses, include the superior sagittal, cavernous, lateral, petrous sinuses, and many others. Cranial sinus thrombosis can lead to severe HEADACHE; SEIZURE; and other neurological defects.
An irregular unpaired bone situated at the SKULL BASE and wedged between the frontal, temporal, and occipital bones (FRONTAL BONE; TEMPORAL BONE; OCCIPITAL BONE). Sphenoid bone consists of a median body and three pairs of processes resembling a bat with spread wings. The body is hollowed out in its inferior to form two large cavities (SPHENOID SINUS).
... carotid cavernous fistula) Malformation (congenital, vascular) Immediate treatment is very important, and it typically involves ... Surgery typically requires drainage of the sinuses and if a subperiosteal abscess is present in the medial orbit, drainage can ... Branson, Sara V.; McClintic, Elysa; Yeatts, R. Patrick (2018). "Septic Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Associated With Orbital ... Complications include hearing loss, blood infection, meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, cerebral abscess, and blindness. ...
... carotid-cavernous fistula with drainage through the emissary veins, and neurofibromatosis. Thus, for the usually symmetric ... that connects the pterygoid plexus with the cavernous sinus. The importance of this passage lies in the fact that an infected ... thrombus from an extracranial source may reach the cavernous sinus. The mean area of the foramen is small, which may suggest ...
External Manual Carotid Compression is Effective in Patients with Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistulaetreatment. The ... High pressure in sinus results in both anterograde drainage and retrograde drainage via subarachnoid veins. Type III: dural ... cavernous sinus DAVFs). Most commonly found adjacent to dural sinuses in the following locations: Transverse (lateral) sinus, ... and it is associated with transverse-sigmoid sinus DAVFs. Carotid-cavernous DAVFs, on the other hand, are more closely ...
Paranasal sinuses Maxillary Ethmoid Sphenoid Frontal Dural venous sinuses Anterior midline Cavernous Superior petrosal Inferior ... Superior sagittal Straight Confluence of sinuses Lateral Transverse Sigmoid Inferior Occipital Arterial sinuses Carotid sinus ... Medullary sinuses (space between the lymphatic cortex and efferent lymphatic drainage) The four paired sinuses or air cavities ... It is however distinct from a fistula, which is a tract connecting two epithelial surfaces. If left untreated, infections ...
Carotid cavernous fistula (H70.1) Mastoid fistula Craniosinus fistula: between the intracranial space and a paranasal sinus ( ... Catheters may be required to drain a fistula. Surgery is often required to assure adequate drainage of the fistula (so that pus ... Fistula of appendix (K60) Anal and rectal fissures and fistulas (K60.3) Anal fistula (K60.5) Anorectal fistula (fecal fistula, ... A fistula (plural: fistulas or fistulae /-li, -laɪ/; from Latin fistula, "tube, pipe") is an abnormal connection between two ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis[edit]. Main article: Cavernous sinus thrombosis. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a specialised form of ... The former affects vessels such as the internal carotids, vertebral and the circle of Willis. The latter can affect smaller ... This tends to lead to reduced drainage from the kidney.[citation needed] ... Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis[edit]. Main article: Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST ...
Contralateral drainage was not observed in all, supporting plausible compartmentalization of cavernous sinuses. Conclusion. ... Venous Drainage Patterns in Carotid Cavernous Fistulas. Ayse Aralasmak,1 Kamil Karaali,2 Can Cevikol,2 Utku Senol,2 Timur ... The carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) is an abnormal arteriovenous communication and its drainage pathways may affect the clinic ... Contrary to the literature, posterior and superior drainages were noted only in high flow and long standing direct fistulas. ...
... no increase in cortical drainage was seen after treatment. King et al (11) reported a subarachnoid hemorrhage owing to IPS ... Superior Petrosal Sinus Catheterization for Transvenous Embolization of a Dural Carotid Cavernous Sinus Fistula. Charbel ... Transvenousembolization of spontaneous carotid-cavernous fistulas by sequential occlusion of the cavernous sinus. Intervent ... Superior Petrosal Sinus Catheterization for Transvenous Embolization of a Dural Carotid Cavernous Sinus Fistula ...
Peeters FLMKröger R: Dural and direct cavernous sinus fistulas. Am J Roentgenol 132:599-6061979Peeters FLM Kröger R: Dural and ... Venous drainage is via the superior ophthalmic vein.. * View in gallery Case 2. Selective right external angiogram, frontal ... Walker AEAllegre G: Carotid-cavernous fistulas. Surgery 39:411-4221956Walker AE Allegre G: Carotid-cavernous fistulas. Surgery ... Hamby WB: Carotid-Cavernous Fistula. Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas1966 pp 9-1013Hamby WB: Carotid-Cavernous Fistula. ...
... is a specific type of dural arteriovenous fistula characterized by abnormal arteriovenous shunting within the cavernous sinus ... Abnormal contour of the cavernous sinus, internal signal void of the cavernous sinus, prominent venous drainage flow, and ... encoded search term (Carotid-Cavernous Fistula) and Carotid-Cavernous Fistula What to Read Next on Medscape ... A carotid-cavernous fistula results in high-pressure arterial blood entering the low-pressure venous cavernous sinus. This ...
Vascular causes include carotid-cavernous fistula and dural-sinus fistula. These vascular communications cause reversal of flow ... in the episcleral venous plexus, thus obstructing drainage FROM the suprachoroidal space. Clinical clues to fistulas are ...
Combined pretemporal and endovascular approach to the cavernous sinus for the treatment of carotid-cavernous dural fistulae: ... B, Lateral angiogram of the right ICA shows CCF drainage by the right superior ophthalmic vein, both CS, the inferior petrosal ... Isolated trochlear nerve palsy secondary to dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. J Neuroophthalmol 1994;14:52-54. ... Direct carotid cavernous fistulas (CCFs) (Barrow Type A) are high-flow shunts between the cavernous portion of the internal ...
Helping you find trustworthy answers on Cavernous Sinus , Latest evidence made easy ... Find all the evidence you need on Cavernous Sinus via the Trip Database. ... Isolated third nerve palsy with pupillary involvement caused by a posterior drainage carotid-cavernous sinus fistula (CCF) is ... Traumatic Carotid Cavernous Fistula with a Connection between the Supraclinoid Internal Carotid Artery and Cavernous Sinus via ...
... developed signs of a carotid-cavernous sinus fistula and raised intracranial pressure. Bilateral transverse sinus occlusion ... associated with the AVM produced these signs by rerouting intracranial venous drainage anteriorly through the cavernous sinuses ...
RATIONALE: Isolated third nerve palsy with pupillary involvement caused by a posterior drainage carotid-cavernous sinus fistula ... Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas with Venous Drainage Patterns Inducing Ocular Manifestations Mimicking a Carotid Cavernous Fistula ... A ruptured cavernous carotid aneurysm (CCA) with carotid cavernous fistula can appear as a benign headache but progress to a ... Orbital Compartment Syndrome Secondary to Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula After Carotid Cavernous Aneurysm Rupture: Case ...
Absence of orbito-ocular signs in a dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistula with a prominent anterior venous drainage. J Neurol ... A carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) is an aberrant communication between the cavernous sinus and the internal carotid artery or ... Ophthalmoplegia in carotid cavernous sinus fistula. Br J Ophthalmol 1984;68:128-34.. 10. Acierno MD, Trobe JD, Cornblath WT, ... Dural carotid cavernous sinus fistula: ocular characteristics, endovascular management and clinical outcome. J Med Assoc Thai ...
The pattern of venous drainage, either anterior into the ophthalmic veins or posterior into the petrosal sinuses, often ... Carotid cavernous fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus, either directly or ... Keltner JL, Satterfield D, Dublin A, et al. Dural and carotid cavernous sinus fistulas. Ophthalmology 1987;94:1585-1600. ... The cavernous sinuses were symmetric and normal in size, with slightly increased flow voids in the left cavernous sinus. ...
... general Fistula Care and treatment Diagnosis Fistulas Primary health care Research ... Endovascular approach as primary treatment for traumatic carotid cavernous fistula: local experience from Pakistan.(Report) by ... Keywords: Carotid-cavernous sinus fistula, Carotid artery, Endovascular, Traumatic (JPMA 61 :989; 2011). Introduction Post ... arterial anatomy and status of collateral vessels and the adequacy and route of venous drainage. Hallbach et al.10 has ...
This is an article covering the anatomy of the cavernous sinus - structure, contents, relations and communications. Learn all ... Intercavernous Sinuses & Drainage. *Clinical Significance. *Carotid-Cavernous Fistula. *Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis. * Related ... Carotid-Cavernous Fistula. Head trauma resulting in rupture of the cavernous part of the internal carotid artery can produce ... The cavernous sinus in turn drains to the superior and inferior petrosal sinuses. Both sinuses join the sigmoid sinus, which ...
1988) Matas procedure in the treatment of spontaneous carotid cavernous sinus fistula: a complication of retinal hemorrhage. No ... Leptomeningeal venous drainage, venous dilatations and galenic drainage were found to significantly correlate with aggressive ... 1989) Development of central retinal vein occlusion in dural carotid-cavernous fistula. Ophtalmologica 199:28-33.. (58) Cognard ... Spontaneous closure of cavernous sinus DAVM is frequently preceded by transient worsening of the symptoms, including retinal ...
A carotid-cavernous sinus fistula (CCF) is an abnormal communication between the cavernous sinus and the carotid arterial ... Dural transverse sinus arteriovenous fistulas with cortical venous drainage were associated with a high hemorrhagic risk. Dural ... BACKGROUND: Carotid cavernous sinus fistulae are abnormal communications between the carotid circulation and cavernous sinus ... A carotid cavernous fistula is an abnormal communication between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Rarely, ...
Carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae (CCSF) can involve the orbit indirectly via orbital venous drainage.2,11 Orbital and peri- ... Nine patients had carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae (CCSF) (6 direct, 3 indirect). Three patients had orbital cavernous venous ... orbital venous drainage through the sphenoparietal sinus and cavernous sinus in Case 6 and through the cavernous sinus in Case ... Key Words : arteriovenous malformation, carotid-cavernous sinus fistula, endovascular, meningioma, ophthalmic artery, orbit ...
Carotid-cavernous Fistula. A carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) typically presents with inflammatory orbital and lid findings (eg ... Posterior drainage of the fistula (ie, drainage into the inferior petrosal sinus) may lack orbital findings of the "red-eyed" ... Ipsilateral carotid dissection should also be considered in the differential diagnosis of pain (neck, head, face, eye) and ... Up to 25% of patients with ischemic internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery stroke have ipsilateral frontal or orbit ...
New concept in cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula: correlation with presenting symptom and venous drainage patterns. ... The clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. J Korean Ophthalmol Soc 2003;44 ... a granulomatous inflammation in the cavernous sinus may be followed by cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula and should ... Classification and treatment of spontaneous carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas. J Neurosurg 1985;62: ) Houser OW, Campbell JK, ...
Spontaneous obliteration of the direct fistulas probably results from thrombosis of the venous drainage and/or cavernous sinus ... Spontaneous regression of direct carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) is extremely rare. Most of the patients with direct CCFs are ... Spontaneous resolution of direct carotid-cavernous fistulas: case series and literature review. ... Introduction: Carotid endarterectomy is a major treatment modality for high-grade carotid stenosis. Preoperative identification ...
... showed a right carotid-cavernous fistula with retrograde venous drainage through the superior and inferior petrosal sinuses. ... Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula/complications , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/etiology , Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula , Carotid- ... Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage as the primary manifestation of carotid cavernous fistulas: case report ... cavernous, arteriovenous or venous, and usually located at soft tissue or bone, mainly in the spinal column. Pure epidural ...
A cavernous sinus fistula also may result as a direct large-hole fistula between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous ... sinus. Patients may have a discrepancy of symptoms depending on the locale, extent, and drainage pattern of the dural fistula. ... Dural arteriovenous fistulas betoken dural veins or sinuses and are most commonly located in the regions of the cavernous, ... In to boot, the left basic coronary artery has an intra- mural carry that courses across the commissure into Sinus 1, where it ...
... or the external carotid artery (ECA) and the cavernous sinus. Symptoms range from benign ocular disturbances and cranial nerve ... CCF supplied by small branches of both the right and left internal and external carotid arteries with primary venous drainage ... A carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) is an abnormal arteriovenous connexion between the internal carotid artery (ICA) ... 7 Ruby coils were deployed into the cavernous sinus and right SOV to occlude the CCF. Occlusion of the CCF was achieved by ...
... is commonly used as the most appropriate for carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) or cavernous sinus sampling. However, sometimes ... One dural CCF case had only cortical venous drainage, the second CCF also mainly drained into the cortical vein with slight ... A new transvenous approach to the carotid-cavernous sinus via the inferior petrooccipital vein Clinical article ... The transvenous approach to the cavernous sinus via the IPOV should be considered as an alternative in cases when use of the ...
... area of carotid artery within the cavernous sinuses theoretically increases the possibility of a carotid-cavernous fistula ... The cavernous sinuses are part of the venous drainage of the head and are located on each side of the sella turcica. The two ... The significance of the cavernous sinus is due to its contents. The cavernous sinuses are a network of trabeculated veins whose ... technical success rate in the treatment of eleven patients with traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas by using balloon ...
Carotid cavernous fistula (direct fistula) CN(s) Cranial nerve(s) CS(s) Cavernous sinus(es) CSF(s) Cavernous sinus fistula(s) ( ... CVD Cortical venous drainage DAVF(s) Dural arteriovenous fistula DAVS Dural arteriovenous shunt DCCF Withouut carotid cavernous ... AV shunt involving the cavernous sinus in general) CTA Computed tomographic angiography (based on conventional CT technology) ... 1996) reported vicodin cost without insurance walmart nine patients with type D fistulas, who were treated with 30Gy after ...
Carotid Cavernous Fistula. The carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) consists of an abnormal communication between the internal ... initial thrombosis of a dural sinus leading to impaired venous drainage and increased sinus pressure; 2) secondary dilatation ... Carotid Cavernous Fistula. The carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) consists of an abnormal communication between the internal ... These include the dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF), the cavernous carotid fistula (CCF) and the vein of Galen malformation ( ...
Carotid Cavernous Sinus Fistula. The patient had undergone a placement of dental implant 5 months before the presentation and ... We report a case of a subperiosteal orbital abscess due to acute maxillary sinusitis that underwent endoscopic drainage. [ncbi. ... Carotid-Cavernous Fistula (CCF) Orbital Cavernous Hemangioma Congenital Ptosis Dacryoadenitis Duane Syndrome Orbital Floor ... Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis following infection of ethmoidal and maxillary sinuses: a case report. [ajnr.org] ...
... carotid cavernous fistula) Malformation (congenital, vascular) Immediate treatment is very important, and it typically involves ... Surgery typically requires drainage of the sinuses and if a subperiosteal abscess is present in the medial orbit, drainage can ... Branson, Sara V.; McClintic, Elysa; Yeatts, R. Patrick (2018). "Septic Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Associated With Orbital ... Complications include hearing loss, blood infection, meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, cerebral abscess, and blindness. ...
... tinnitus due to sinus infection, risks of gun piercing ... Dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) of the cavernous sinus are ... Angiography showed the right carotid carvenous fistula (A), the dilated ophthalmic vein drainages toward the facial vein (B). ... Big fistula, the prolonged disease prognosed the complicated lesion of the carotid artery-carvenous sinus, the balloon sized 9× ... Ophthalmic veins often drainage blood from the eyes into the carvenous sinus, when CCFs exist, the high pressure in the CS ...
Parietal arteriovenous malformation mimicking carotid-cavernous fistula in context of sinus thrombosis: Bidirectional or ... the anomalous drainage of a cortical AVM into an anterior orbital venous drainage system; second, the impact of this drainage ... A common drainage is through respective cortical veins into superior sagittal or transverse sinuses. Through a case report and ... Ballon-assisted coil placement was performed for an unruptured intracavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm in a 62-year-old ...
  • Cerebral angiography revealed a DCCF fed by arterial rami arising from the ipsilateral carotid siphon and by branches of the right middle meningeal artery ( Fig 1 ). (ajnr.org)
  • A: The recurrent meningeal artery (single arrow) which arises from the left ophthalmic artery, and the meningohypophyseal trunk (double arrow) , drain into the cavernous sinus (arrowhead) . (thejns.org)
  • Direct CCFs are high-flow fistulas with a direct connection between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • The cavernous sinus is a network of venous channels traversed by the intracranial portion of the internal carotid artery. (medscape.com)
  • The internal carotid artery gives rise to several intracavernous branches. (medscape.com)
  • The external carotid artery provides several branches to the dura of the cavernous sinus and forms anastomoses with the branches of the internal carotid artery. (medscape.com)
  • Type A fistulas consist of a direct connection between the intracavernous internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Type B fistulas consist of a dural shunt between intracavernous branches of the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Type D fistulas are a combination of types B and C, with dural shunts between internal and external carotid artery branches and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Indirect CCFs result from a dural branch rupture of the carotid artery caused by a genetic condition or a comorbidity such as hypertension. (medscape.com)
  • Direct carotid cavernous fistulas (CCFs) (Barrow Type A) are high-flow shunts between the cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the cavernous sinus (CS) and are usually caused by traumatic laceration of the ICA (80%) or rupture of a preexisting aneurysm of the ICA (1) . (ajnr.org)
  • Transarterial balloon embolization with or without preservation of the carotid artery or by a transvenous approach is the treatment of choice and is associated with limited morbidity and the least damage of cranial nerves (2) . (ajnr.org)
  • A carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) is an aberrant communication between the cavernous sinus and the internal carotid artery or branches of the external carotid artery. (harvard.edu)
  • 1) In the case of traumatic CCF, the intracavernous carotid artery and its branches are usually torn, resulting in the fistula. (harvard.edu)
  • Carotid cavernous fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus, either directly or via intradural branches of the internal or external carotid arteries. (bmj.com)
  • Post traumatic Carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) is a rare complication of moderate to severe head injury in which an abnormal communication develops between internal carotid artery (ICA) and the cavernous sinus. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • The cavernous sinus contains the internal carotid artery and several cranial nerves. (kenhub.com)
  • Abducens nerve (CN VI) traverses the sinus lateral to the internal carotid artery. (kenhub.com)
  • The internal carotid artery (a branch of the common carotid artery) - along with its postganglionic sympathetic plexus from the superior cervical ganglion - gains access to the cavernous sinus posteriorly. (kenhub.com)
  • As the petrous part of the internal carotid artery leaves the carotid canal , it curves vertically and superiorly above foramen lacerum to enter the cavernous sinus. (kenhub.com)
  • Here the artery is also referred to as the cavernous part . (kenhub.com)
  • Within the sinus, the internal carotid artery travels anteriorly, in a horizontal manner until it reaches the anterior limit of the sinus. (kenhub.com)
  • Here it curves vertically and superiorly to exit the sinus through its roof and become the cerebral part of the internal carotid artery. (kenhub.com)
  • It is noteworthy that the cavernous part of the internal carotid artery is the only arterial vessel that is completely surrounded by venous networks. (kenhub.com)
  • The authors present an unusual case of Lemierre syndrome in a 16-year-old boy with cavernous sinus thrombosis and right internal carotid artery narrowing without neurological sequelae, right subdural empyema, and cerebritis in the right temporal and occipital lobes. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Carotid angio-gram demonstrated marked stenosis as well as aneurismal formation of the right internal carotid artery at the intracavernous portion. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Three patients had orbital cavernous venous malformations, two patients had traumatic arteriovenous fistulae, two patients had orbital-facial arteriovenous malformations, and one patient had a large olfactory groove meningioma supplied by the ophthalmic artery. (barrowneuro.org)
  • A carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) is an abnormal arteriovenous connexion between the internal carotid artery (ICA) or the external carotid artery (ECA) and the cavernous sinus. (ovid.com)
  • There are 2 types of carotid carvenous fistula (CCF) with different causes, the pathologic lesion and treatment but the same clinical manifestations: CCF due to trauma and dural arteriovenous fistular (DAVF) in which there are small branches of carotid artery flowing directly into the carvenous sinus (CS). (amazonaws.com)
  • Big fistula, the prolonged disease prognosed the complicated lesion of the carotid artery-carvenous sinus, the balloon sized 9×11 mm was fully inflated (A) could not make the fistula occlusion. (amazonaws.com)
  • No entrance to embolize the fistula via the carotid artery because the DAVF contents too small feeding arteries. (amazonaws.com)
  • Additional, all blood in the left internal carotid artery flows into the carvenous sinus, not toward the brain (blood-steal phenomenon) (C). (amazonaws.com)
  • After inflating 2 balloons to occlude the fistula, in angiogram, there was not any blood flowing into the carvenous sinus, the flow went toward the middle cerebral artery(B), however there was not any flow into the ophthalmic artery, so it is difficult to recover the eyesight of this patient. (amazonaws.com)
  • Arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) can develop between an artery and a vein in any part of the body. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • carotid sinus a dilatation of the proximal portion of the internal carotid or distal portion of the common carotid artery, containing in its wall pressoreceptors that are stimulated by changes in blood pressure. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Currently used treatment techniques include intraarterial approach, in which the cavernous sinus I catetherized through a tear in internal carotid artery wall, or transvenous approach, which consists in reaching the fistula through inverior petrosal sinus, facial vein or superior ophthalmic vein. (czytelniamedyczna.pl)
  • In a study of 69 patients with DAVFs, Tsai et al found venous intracranial surgery has been reported.5-12 We report a sinus thrombosis in two fifths of them.3 Dural arteriovenous case of appearance of a DAVF, absent in the initial examina- tion, after craniotomy for clipping a ruptured distal right anterior cerebral artery aneurysm. (bvsalud.org)
  • Large artery atherosclerosis (most) - Thrombosis or emboli of carotid bifurcation, origin of MCA, ends of basilar a. (radnotes.co.nz)
  • Solitaire stent-retriever mechanical thrombectomy in a 6-month-old patient with acute occlusion of the internal carotid artery terminus: case report. (amedeo.com)
  • Surgical Rescue Retrieval of a Filter Protection Device in Carotid Artery Stenting with Stent Deformation: Case Report and Literature Review. (amedeo.com)
  • Bibliometric Analysis of the Top 100 Influential Studies on Carotid Artery Stenting. (amedeo.com)
  • Intracavernous carotid artery aneurysms causing a carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) are rare. (bmj.com)
  • Aneurysms of the intracavernous portion of the carotid artery causing a carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) are not often described in the literature. (bmj.com)
  • Selective cerebral angiography in our department showed a left CCF filled only from the left internal carotid artery, initially considered as a spontaneous CCF type A (fig 1 A and B). As a variant there was a hypoplastic A1 segment on the left side with good collateralisation from the right side. (bmj.com)
  • Rheolytic Thrombectomy of the Occluded Internal Carotid Artery in the Setting of Acute Ischemic Stroke. (rianeurovascular.com)
  • Salvage of the carotid artery with covered stent after perforation with dialysis sheath. (uhnresearch.ca)
  • The most common vessel to be involved is the carotid artery in the neck that carries blood from the heart to the face and brain. (amazonaws.com)
  • The internal carotid artery is inappropriately contacting the malleus of the middle ear, which is in close contact with the inner ear. (amazonaws.com)
  • A case of macroprolactinoma encasing an internal carotid artery aneurysm, presenting as pituitary apoplexy. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Intracranial hemodynamics is altered by carotid artery disease and after endarterectomy: a dynamic magnetic resonance angiography study. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Adenomas with large and complex suprasellar extensions may require a two stage or simultaneous transcranial-transsphenoidal removal (7).Cavernous sinus invasion by a pituitary adenoma does not constitute a contraindication for the transsphenoidal approach,except when the epicenter of the tumor is lateral to the carotid artery (2, 16, 25, 46, 78). (pituitary.org)
  • Dr. Nick Telischak is a neurointerventional surgeon (neurointerventional radiologist) who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of stroke, brain aneurysms, brain arteriovenous malformations, brain and spinal dural arteriovenous fistulae, carotid artery stenosis, vertebral body compression fractures, spinal metastases, axial back pain, and congenital vascular malformations. (stanford.edu)
  • Dual antiplatelet therapy after carotid artery stenting: trends and outcomes in a large national database. (stanford.edu)
  • While dual antiplatelet therapy (dAPT) is standard of care following carotid artery stenting (CAS), the optimal dAPT regimen and duration has not been established.We canvassed a large national database (IBM MarketScan) to identify patients receiving carotid endarterectomy (CEA) or CAS for treatment of ischemic stroke or carotid artery stenosis from 2007 to 2016. (stanford.edu)
  • The CONFIDENCE Trial is a prospective, multicenter, single-arm, open label clinical study to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of Roadsaver™ carotid stent device used in con-junction with the Nanoparasol® embolic protection system for the treatment of carotid artery stenosis in patients with elevated risk for adverse events following carotid endarterectomy. (riaco.com)
  • Direct fistulas are usually caused by injury to the internal carotid artery. (neurokolkata.org)
  • Indirect fistulas are caused by abnormal channels connecting the internal carotid artery or other arterial branch from external carotid artery or vertebral artery to the cavernous sinus with outflow into the veins of eyes. (neurokolkata.org)
  • Endoscopic view of zodiacc internal carotid artery aneurysm presenting with hydrocephalus. (migroup.pro)
  • Arrow points at the fistula point from the artery of Bernasconi and Cassinari to the right transverse sinus. (ispn.guide)
  • The arrow indicates the large dilated and tortuous left occipital artery contributing to the fistula. (ispn.guide)
  • It is caused by various parasellar pathological condition that involves cavernous sinuses along with cranial nerves (3,4,5,6), Internal carotid artery and sympathetic plexus due to its close anatomical association and gives rise to various signs and symptoms in different combinations in different diseases. (epomedicine.com)
  • It is an abnormal communication (direct or indirect) between cavernous sinuses and carotid artery or its branches. (epomedicine.com)
  • A case of aneurysm and kinking of the extracranial internal carotid artery. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Slight dilatation on the common carotid artery at its bifurcation containing nerve cells sensitive to blood pressure. (drshehadi.com)
  • BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Cavernous sinus thrombosis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: December 2017 Summary Thrombus formation within the cavernous sinus , which may be either septic or aseptic in origin. (tripdatabase.com)
  • cavernous sinus thrombosis is usually through trauma or a prothrombotic condition. (tripdatabase.com)
  • However, it can result in various complications such as carotid cavernous fistula (CCF), epistaxis, spontaneous thrombosis, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. (bvsalud.org)
  • Cranial MRI revealed a cavernous sinus thrombosis and a subarachnoid abscess. (biomedsearch.com)
  • It is likely that at least some patients with apparently idiopathic fistulae had prior asymptomatic thrombosis, particularly as inherited prothrombotic conditions (e.g. antithrombin, protein C, and protein S deficiencies) have been associated with development of dAVFs 6 . (radiopaedia.org)
  • What is cavernous sinus thrombosis? (healthtap.com)
  • What Specialist treat Cerebral Sinus Venous Thrombosis? (healthtap.com)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis is when a blood clot is in the cavernous sinus [which is a cavity at the base of the brain a vein, nerves and other structures]. (healthtap.com)
  • Is there a cure for cavernous sinus thrombosis? (healthtap.com)
  • Most cases of cavernous sinus thrombosis are due to infection by a bacteria called staph aureus (70%), so antibiotics (high dose iv) are the first line of treatment and are highly effective. (healthtap.com)
  • What sort of disease is cavernous sinus thrombosis? (healthtap.com)
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a blood clot in the cavernous sinus, usu from infection. (healthtap.com)
  • How does having cavernous sinus thrombosis change things? (healthtap.com)
  • What are the symptoms of cavernous sinus thrombosis? (healthtap.com)
  • What are the tests for cavernous sinus thrombosis? (healthtap.com)
  • Venous sinus thrombosis after whiplash possible? (healthtap.com)
  • Most cases of dilated episcleral veins with increased IOP can be attributed to campimdtria fistula, cavernous sinus thrombosis, dural arterio-venous shunt, superior vena cava syndrome, Sturge-Weber syndrome, dysthyroid orbitopathy, obstructive orbital injuries, or orbital varices 2. (criticalopscredits.club)
  • Infections from the face can spread in retrograde direction and cause thrombosis of the cavernous sinus via facial vein and pterygoid plexus. (epomedicine.com)
  • We report a case of a DCCF that was treated by embolization after venous retrograde access to the superior petrous sinus (SPS) was achieved. (ajnr.org)
  • Right common carotid control angiogram obtained at the end of the embolization procedure shows that the DCCF is no more opacified than before and during the procedure. (ajnr.org)
  • Transvenous embolization for dural transverse sinus fistulas with occluded sigmoid sinus. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Dural transverse sinus arteriovenous dural fistulas could be treated by embolization (transarterial or transvenous), surgery or a combination of both. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Because of inability to access a cavernous-carotid fistula through conventional means, a superior ophthalmic vein approach was used to allow access for embolization. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Coil embolization of the cavernous sinus is often a long procedure using many small diameter microcoils with high radiation doses. (ovid.com)
  • Angiography showed the right carotid carvenous fistula (A), the dilated ophthalmic vein drainages toward the facial vein (B). The embolization via the veinous way, the inferior petrosal sinus (not shown) was obstructed so the microcatheter had to navigate via the interior carotid vein - the facial vein into the ophthalmic vein - carvenous sinus. (amazonaws.com)
  • Development of endovascular methods in recent years resuted with embolization becoming primary treatment approach for carotid cavernous fistulas. (czytelniamedyczna.pl)
  • Embolization materials used for endovascular treatment of the fistulas are detachable coils and liquid agents such n-BCA and Onyx. (czytelniamedyczna.pl)
  • Our distinguished staff members have published papers on endovascular transvenous embolization of sinus pericranii, deep brain reversible encephalopathy, computed tomography guided sacroplasty, stroke prevention, back pain management and stenting for brain aneurysms, with various clinical, basic and translational studies in progress at all times. (montefiore.org)
  • Bellon, R.J ., Liu A.Y., Adler J.R., and Norbash, A.M. Percutaneous Transfemoral Embolization of an Indirect Carotid Cavernous Fistula with Cortical Venous Access to the Cavernous Sinus: Case Report. (rianeurovascular.com)
  • Endovascular Embolization of a Paracavernous Arteriovenous Fistula Through a Cortical Venous Access: 2-Dimensional Operative Video. (harvard.edu)
  • In cases of high-risk dAVFs where embolization isn't an option, surgical disconnection can effectively cure the fistula. (upmc.com)
  • Many c-c fistulas are treated with embolization . (healthtap.com)
  • The site of the fistula was identified at the posterosuperior margin of the right cavernous sinus (CS). (ajnr.org)
  • Early opacification of part of the right cavernous sinus (arrowhead) and of the superior ophthalmic vein (double arrow) is noted. (thejns.org)
  • CT showed one balloon positioned in the posterior portion of the right cavernous sinus and was regarded to be responsible for nerve compression. (ajnr.org)
  • Magnetic resonance imaging including angiography, revealed hyperintensities in the right cavernous sinus consistent with inflammation and no vascular abnormalities. (docsplayer.org)
  • D) Gadolinium enhanced T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) showing increased signal intensity in the right cavernous sinus, indicated by red circle. (docsplayer.org)
  • A most unusual dural arteriovenous fistula is present, with extensive areas of fistulation shown on the lateral wall of the right cavernous sinus. (radiopaedia.org)
  • DSA confirms a complex dural arteriovenous fistula centered on the lateral wall of the right cavernous sinus-there is no history of nor angiographic evidence of drainage into the superior ophthalmic veins of the orbit or of the inferior petrosal vein. (radiopaedia.org)
  • A , Arterial-phase right internal carotid arteriogram shows the DCCF at the right posterosuperior aspect of the CS ( solid arrow ) fed by dural branches of the carotid siphon. (ajnr.org)
  • Dural CCFs are low-flow fistulas resulting from communications of cavernous arterial branches and the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • These vessels branch to provide arterial blood to the nerves and dura of the cavernous sinus and the pituitary gland. (medscape.com)
  • In addition to the thin walled veins that traverse the cavernous sinus, a lone arterial vessel also uses the area as a conduit. (kenhub.com)
  • Carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) generally causes periorbital aching with ocular symptoms due to high venous pressure in the cavernous sinus, while migraine is caused by arterial dilatation-stimulating trigeminal nerves around the vessels. (biomedsearch.com)
  • A carotid-cavernous sinus fistula (CCF) is an abnormal communication between the cavernous sinus and the carotid arterial system. (biomedsearch.com)
  • These lesions are further categorized into those that demonstrate shunting from arterial to venous systems (i.e. the AVM), and those that do not have shunting (DVA, cavernous malformation, and capillary telangiectasia). (jaocr.org)
  • The likelihood depends on venous drainage (reflected in both the Cognard and Borden classification systems), and not arterial supply. (radiopaedia.org)
  • This may include reduction in size of the AVM, closure of large fistulas, and treatment of aneurysms, which are associated with the AVM core or arterial supply. (neurokolkata.org)
  • Summary: We report the endovascular treatment of a dural carotid cavernous fistula in a 67-year-old woman in whom superior petrosal sinus catheterization was performed to access the venous site of the fistula. (ajnr.org)
  • Thus, when treating ACF DAVFs, endovascular treatment (EVT) can completely obliterate the fistula point and correct the venous shunting. (medsci.org)
  • Venous drainage patterns of 13 CCFs from 10 subjects were studied and categorized as anterior, posterior, superior, inferior, and contralateral on DSA. (hindawi.com)
  • Contrary to the literature, posterior and superior drainages were noted only in high flow and long standing direct fistulas. (hindawi.com)
  • Crossing the midline via the anterior or posterior coronary sinuses is feasible and efficacious. (bvsalud.org)
  • The pattern of venous drainage, either anterior into the ophthalmic veins or posterior into the petrosal sinuses, often dictates the clinical findings and radiographic appearance. (bmj.com)
  • The left and right cavernous sinuses communicate by through the anterior and posterior intercavernous sinuses. (kenhub.com)
  • The cavernous sinuses are 1 cm wide cavities that extend a distance of 2 cm from the most posterior aspect of the orbit to the petrous part of the temporal bone . (kenhub.com)
  • A Penumbra PX SLIM microcatheter was then advanced to the posterior cavernous sinus at the midline. (ovid.com)
  • anterior s's ( sinus anterio´res ) the anterior air cells that together with the middle and posterior air cells form the ethmoidal sinus. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • circular sinus the venous channel encircling the pituitary gland, formed by the two cavernous sinuses and the anterior and posterior intercavernous sinuses. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • intercavernous s's channels connecting the two cavernous sinuses, one passing anterior and the other posterior to the stalk of the pituitary gland. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Secretion is determined by the posterior abdominal wall lymphatic drainage of aqueous humour secretion contraction drainage neuromuscular junction decreased gastrointestinal skeletal muscle ossiication center and and scrotum. (puc.edu)
  • Further reflux occurs into a lateral mesencephalic vein which appears to connect to the petrosal vein, and superior petrosal sinus and to other posterior fossa veins related to the cerebellar hemisphere. (radiopaedia.org)
  • A 67-year-old man presented with devastating intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) from an anterior cranial fossa dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). (biomedsearch.com)
  • The one-year control angiogram showed a left arteriovenous fistula occipital DAVF. (bvsalud.org)
  • Dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVF) are a heterogeneous collection of conditions that share arteriovenous shunts from dural vessels. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Catheter digital subtraction angiography remains the gold standard in both diagnosis and accurate classification of dAVF (see below), allowing not only systematic evaluation of feeding vessels (and thus planning for potential intervention) but also demonstrating the presence and extent of retrograde venous drainage. (radiopaedia.org)
  • A dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) is an arteriovenous shunt located in the dural wall of the venous sinus or the expanded layer of the dura mater [ 1 - 3 ]. (medsci.org)
  • Dr. Bradley Gross discusses dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. (upmc.com)
  • Indications for using HASS on different types of cerebral vascular disease, including cerebral aneurysm, AVM, DAVF, carotid and vertebral stenosis/occlusion, are addressed. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We discuss the indications for using HASS on different types of cerebral vascular disease including cerebral aneurysm, arteriovenous malformation (AVM), dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF), carotid stenosis/occlusion and other non-cerebral vascular diseases. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) is an abnormal arteriovenous communication and its drainage pathways may affect the clinic presentation and change treatment approach. (hindawi.com)
  • The carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) is a specific type of dural arteriovenous fistula characterized by abnormal arteriovenous shunting within the cavernous sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Following endovascular therapy with transvenous and transarterial embolisation of the fistula, all abnormal findings resolved. (bmj.com)
  • 2 Additional radiographic findings with variable prevalence include lateral bulging of the cavernous sinus wall and enlargement of extraocular muscles on CT or MRI, and abnormal cavernous sinus flow voids on MRI. (bmj.com)
  • Dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) of the cavernous sinus are abnormal communications between the dural branches of the internal, or external carotid arteries, or both, and the carvenous sinus. (amazonaws.com)
  • A Fistula is a permanent abnormal passageway between two organs in the body or between an organ and the exterior of the body. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 2. an abnormal channel or fistula, permitting escape of pus. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Abnormal causes of asymmetry included invasion by nasopharyngeal melanoma, angiofibroma, carotid-cavernous fistula with drainage through the emissary veins, and neurofibromatosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) are rare, abnormal connections between arteries and veins in the lining of the brain (the dura). (upmc.com)
  • Carotid-cavernous fistulae are a specific type of abnormal connection of the arteries directly into the venous system. (neurokolkata.org)
  • A fistula is an abnormal connection between two hollow spaces (technically, two epithelialized surfaces), such as blood vessels , intestines , or other hollow organs . (wikipedia.org)
  • An abnormal communication between the internal and external portions of the carotid arteries or any of their branches and the cavernous sinus. (drshehadi.com)
  • Direct carotid-cavernous fistulas are characterized by the triad of pulsatile proptosis, chemosis, and intracranial whistling. (medscape.com)
  • A patient with an occipital dural arteriovenous malformation (AVM) developed signs of a carotid-cavernous sinus fistula and raised intracranial pressure. (bmj.com)
  • Bilateral transverse sinus occlusion associated with the AVM produced these signs by rerouting intracranial venous drainage anteriorly through the cavernous sinuses and superior ophthalmic veins. (bmj.com)
  • Endovascular recanalization of acute tandem cervical carotid and intracranial occlusions: efficacy of 'cervical balloon angioplasty alone then intracranial target recanalization' strategy. (amedeo.com)
  • BACKGROUND: Dural arteriovenous fistulas are intracranial vascular malformations, fed by dural arteries and draining venous sinuses or meningeal veins. (unipg.it)
  • METHODS: Data of 42 intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas of 40 patients concerning demographic characteristics, medical history and risk factors, clinical presentation and headache features, location and neuroimaging findings, as well as treatment and outcome, were collected. (unipg.it)
  • BACKGROUND: Dural arteriovenous fistulas are intracranial vascular malformations, fed by dural ar. (unipg.it)
  • Carotid-cavernous aneurysms. (thejns.org)
  • 77 206 77-113 165-206 1937 Dandy WE: Carotid-cavernous aneurysms. (thejns.org)
  • When most people around them who have spent the night before the condi- mal mesenchymal derivatives such as nauseating thoughts and sights, involving is convenient and more common than subarachnoid saccular (berry) aneurysms, carotid cavernous sinus fistula more common. (puc.edu)
  • Aneurysms of the extracranial internal carotid arteries are rare. (biomedsearch.com)
  • A definitive closure of the fistula without occlusion of the ipsilateral ICA was impossible. (ajnr.org)
  • The first and third cases were treated concomitantly by performing instrumented fusion with decompressive laminectomy along with occlusion of the fistula with good results. (bvsalud.org)
  • Transvenous treatment from the femoral approach at the same setting was unsuccessful due to complete occlusion of the inferior petrosal sinus (IPS) bilaterally. (ovid.com)
  • Complete occlusion of the CCF was demonstrated on the final right and left common carotid angiograms. (ovid.com)
  • The disadvantage: glue can cause occlusion of the cerebral venous sinus or go to pulmonary veins. (amazonaws.com)
  • Shows lesion over the right mastoid bone with evidence of right transverse sinus occlusion. (ispn.guide)
  • Vascular causes include carotid-cavernous fistula and dural-sinus fistula. (harvard.edu)
  • These vascular communications cause reversal of flow in the episcleral venous plexus, thus obstructing drainage FROM the suprachoroidal space. (harvard.edu)
  • Severe unilateral abducens nerve palsy from cavernous sinus carotid vascular ectasia Carotid cavernous sinus ectasia is a rare cause of abducens nerve palsy.We present a case of severe unilateral progressive esotropia resulting from cavernous sinus carotid vascular ectasia in a 67 y/o female. (tripdatabase.com)
  • BACKGROUND: Cavernous carotid fistulas (CCF) are anatomically complex vascular lesions. (bvsalud.org)
  • There are also other non-vascular structures that utilize the cavernous sinus as a pathway to their points of supply. (kenhub.com)
  • A variety of vascular malformations can occur in the orbit, including high-flow arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), slow-flow dural-vascular malformations, and cavernous-venous malformations. (barrowneuro.org)
  • Background Hemangiomas are congenital vascular malformations pathologically considered as harmatomas and classified as capillary, cavernous, arteriovenous or venous, and usually located at soft tissue or bone, mainly in the spinal column. (bvsalud.org)
  • Vascular malformations involving the brain are divided into subgroups, including arteriovenous malformations (AVM), developmental venous anomalies (DVA), cavernous malformations and capillary telangiectasias. (jaocr.org)
  • Ophthalmic veins often drainage blood from the eyes into the carvenous sinus, when CCFs exist, the high pressure in the CS makes the flow in the CS back to the eye causing exophthalmos, dilating the vessels of cornea and sclera forming vascular rays. (amazonaws.com)
  • Most dural arteriovenous fistulas present in adulthood and account for 10-15% of all cerebral vascular malformations 6 . (radiopaedia.org)
  • At cerebral venography, the most distal aspect of the right SPS was identified at the point where it merged with the right transverse sinus ( Fig 2 ). (ajnr.org)
  • B , Right external carotid arteriogram shows that the DCCF is draining into the right superficial middle cerebral vein (a rrowheads ), the right SOV ( solid arrow ), and the right trigeminal vein ( open arrow ). (ajnr.org)
  • One patient was a 21-year-old woman whose symptoms improved and in whom disappearance of the carotid-cavernous fistula was confirmed by cerebral angiography after she aborted in the 12th week of pregnancy. (thejns.org)
  • Carotid-cavernous fistula was confirmed by cerebral angiography, and the clinical symptoms then improved. (thejns.org)
  • On the basis of cerebral angiographic findings, both patients were considered to have dural arteriovenous fistulas in the region of the cavernous sinus and both demonstrated spontaneous improvement. (thejns.org)
  • Cerebral angiography revealed a right-sided direct CCF draining mainly by the superior ophthalmic vein, the petrous sinus, cortical veins, and predominately the contralateral CS ( Fig 1 ). (ajnr.org)
  • Cerebral angiography showed a cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula. (docsplayer.org)
  • Cerebral angiography was performed demonstrating an indirect CCF supplied by small branches of both the right and left internal and external carotid arteries with primary venous drainage into the right superior ophthalmic vein. (ovid.com)
  • cerebral sinus one of the ventricles of the brain. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Role of aspirin and statin therapy in patients with cerebral cavernous malformations. (harvard.edu)
  • Maas MB, Kwolek CJ , Hirsch JA , Jaff MR , Rordorf GA . Clinical risk predictors for cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid endarterectomy. (harvard.edu)
  • We evaluated drainage patterns of CCFs by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and categorized drainage pathways according to their types and etiology. (hindawi.com)
  • Magnetic resonance angiography source image shows an enlarged, hyperintense left cavernous sinus (arrow). (bmj.com)
  • Some angiography cases have been seen that the ophthalmic vein goes from the external carotid vein to the superficial temporal vein or others which can put microcatheter via this way. (amazonaws.com)
  • In patients with retrograde leptomeningeal venous drainage edema is present in approximately half of the patients, although it may also be seen in patients who do not have retrograde drainage on angiography 3 . (radiopaedia.org)
  • Parametric color coding of digital subtraction angiography in the evaluation of carotid cavernous fistulas. (nih.gov)
  • Workup (Imaging) 6/7 Underwent an MRI/ MRV study which showed 6/8 Underwent a contrast angiography study with an attempt to embolize the fistula 6/9 She underwent another angiographic study, with a facial cut-down to cannulate the right facial vein. (present5.com)
  • Orbital cellulitis occurs commonly from bacterial infection spread via the paranasal sinuses, usually from a previous sinus infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • frontal sinus one of the paired paranasal sinuses in the frontal bone, each communicating with the middle nasal meatus on the same side. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • maxillary sinus one of the paired paranasal sinuses in the body of the maxilla on either side, opening into the middle nasal meatus on the same side. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Sinus paranasal (Paranasal sinuses). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The orbit is also secondarily affected by the diseases of the cranium, eyelids, conjunctiva, and the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. (oculist.net)
  • paranasal sinuses, are und. (healthtap.com)
  • Venous-phase lateral left common carotid arteriogram. (ajnr.org)
  • Left common carotid angiogram, lateral projection. (thejns.org)
  • B, Lateral angiogram of the right ICA shows CCF drainage by the right superior ophthalmic vein, both CS, the inferior petrosal sinus, and pterygoid sinus. (ajnr.org)
  • The body of the sphenoid acts as the medial wall of the sinus while the lateral wall is formed from the visceral part of the dura mater. (kenhub.com)
  • The fistulas were located around or at the level of spinal canal stenosis and supplied by the anterior spinal and/or lateral sacral arteries with cranial drainage from the dilated vein of the filum terminale to the perimedullary veins. (bvsalud.org)
  • Dural transverse sinus arteriovenous fistulas with cortical venous drainage were associated with a high hemorrhagic risk. (biomedsearch.com)
  • petrosal sinus, superior one arising from the cavernous sinus and draining into the transverse sinus of the dura mater. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Dural arteriovenous fistulas represent 10-15% of all arterio- to the transverse-sigmoid sinus, classified as Borden I/Cog- venous malformations,2 being distinguished from pial or nard I (Fig. 3). (bvsalud.org)
  • In patients with a documented antecedent cause, most occur as the result of neovascularization induced by a previously thrombosed dural venous sinus (typically the transverse sinus). (radiopaedia.org)
  • K31.6) Gastrojejunocolic fistula - after a Billroth II a fistula forms between the transverse colon and the upper jejunum (which, post Billroth II, is attached to the remainder of the stomach). (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptomatic orbital cavernous-venous malformations can be treated with low morbidity by direct puncture and injection of a sclerosing agent. (barrowneuro.org)
  • Dr. Halbach has published over 240 scientific articles on stroke, dural fistulae, ateriovenous malformations and related topics and authored over 87 book chapters. (ucsf.edu)
  • Clinical clues to fistulas are dilated, and often "arterialized" conjunctival vessels, elevated intraocular pressure, and dilated retinal veins. (harvard.edu)
  • Dural arteriovenous fistulas exist, the ophthalmic veins will dilate and drainage blood through the facial vein then into the internal carotid vein. (amazonaws.com)
  • coronary sinus the dilated terminal portion of the great cardiac vein, receiving blood from other veins draining the heart muscle and emptying into the right atrium. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • teries and draining venous sinuses or meningeal veins. (unipg.it)
  • Low-risk dAVFs cause drainage into veins of the brain but keep drainage within the dura in the venous sinuses. (upmc.com)
  • Blood flow is shunted directly into the cavernous sinus and then into the superior and/or inferior ophthalmic veins. (neurokolkata.org)
  • This study shows the connection, generally from the extracranial circulation, with venous sinuses and/or subarachnoid veins. (ispn.guide)
  • Venous outflow is obstructed through the sagittal sinus and occurs through large dilated cortical veins mainly through Trolard, Labbe and large frontal veins. (ispn.guide)
  • BACKGROUND: Carotid cavernous aneurysm (CCA) rupture is rare. (bvsalud.org)
  • Repositioning of the microcatheter (Excel 14, Target Therapeutics, Freemont, USA) with slight retraction of the tip towards the ICA vessel wall, however, showed a typical berry aneurysm with connection to the cavernous sinus (fig 3 A and B). With the tip positioned within the aneurysm Guglielmi detachable coil (GDC) therapy was started. (bmj.com)
  • An 81-year-old woman was found to have a saccular aneurysm of 2.2 cm in diameter in the left internal carotid with concomitant kinking. (biomedsearch.com)
  • In cases of indirect carotid-cavernous fistulas, there is moderate ocular congestion, mild proptosis, and ocular pulsation on aplanotonometry. (medscape.com)
  • In contrast, indirect fistulas are low flow, often spontaneous, and may have a subtle clinical presentation. (bmj.com)
  • Nine patients had carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae (CCSF) (6 direct, 3 indirect). (barrowneuro.org)
  • Kalsi P, Padmanabhan R, Prasad K S M, Mukerji N . Treatment of low flow, indirect cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas with external manual carotid compression - the UK experience. (ichiasm.com)
  • Indirect carotid-cavernous fistula presenting with unilateral ptosis, limitation of extraocular movements, proptosis, and conjunctival injection. (harvard.edu)
  • The route via inferior petrosal sinus is the nearest approach and often used to go to carvenous sinus. (amazonaws.com)
  • The venous outflow from the fistula via the inferior petrosal sinus on the left side as well on the right side over the intercavernous sinus is well illustrated. (bmj.com)
  • The cavernous sinus drains anteriorly via the superior ophthalmic vein (single crossed arrow) and posteriorly via the superior petrosal sinus (double crossed arrow) . (thejns.org)
  • Venous drainage is via the superior ophthalmic vein. (thejns.org)
  • Anterior drainage typically leads to the most dramatic ocular findings and enlargement of the superior orbital vein, the latter often detectable with CT or MRI. (bmj.com)
  • The venous route usually goes through the jugular vein from the femoral vein up to the pathologic shunts of the carvenous sinus. (amazonaws.com)
  • The advantage of the direct approach is the shortest route to the carvenous sinus, no need to put the catheter via the femoral vein and few of interventional materials, therefore, the cost of the procedure is significantly decreased. (amazonaws.com)
  • petrosal sinus, inferior a venous channel arising from the cavernous sinus and draining into the internal jugular vein. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • If at all present, the sphenoidal emissary foramen gives passage to a small vein (vein of Vesalius) that connects the pterygoid plexus with the cavernous sinus. (wikipedia.org)
  • There was no drainage via the superior ophthalmic vein. (bmj.com)
  • As there is a combination of either an isolated sinus or direct drainage into the vein, with reflux and cortical venous drainage together with varicosities, this represents a high cognard grade ( grade 4 ) fistula. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Ophthalmic vein compression for selected benign low-flow cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas. (uhnresearch.ca)
  • Several investigations, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and orbital ultrasound are used to non-invasively screen for carotid cavernous fistula (CCF), with variable results. (bmj.com)
  • Carotid-cavernous sinus fistulae (CCSF) can involve the orbit indirectly via orbital venous drainage. (barrowneuro.org)
  • Upper respiratory infection, sinus infection, trauma to the eye, ocular or periocular infection, and systemic infection all increase one's risk of orbital cellulitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Streptococcus pneumoniae is also a gram-positive bacterium responsible for orbital cellulitis due to its ability to infect the sinuses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Risk factors for the development of orbital cellulitis include, but are not limited to: Recent upper respiratory illness Sinus infection Younger age Retained foreign bodies within the orbit Trauma Immunosuppression Systemic infection Dental infection Early diagnosis of orbital cellulitis is urgent, and it involves a complete and thorough physical examination. (wikipedia.org)
  • The differential for orbital cellulitis comprises the many causes of orbital masses and painful proptosis, including inflammatory conditions such as orbital pseudotumour, thyroid ophthalmopathy, benign or malignant neoplastic lesions, carotid-cavernous fistula, and retrobulbar hemorrhage in the context of trauma. (cfp.ca)
  • Ethmoidectomy with drainage of the orbital abscess was performed. (cfp.ca)
  • The orbital disease may be isolated (eg, orbital varices) or may be a manifestation of a more proximal problem (eg, carotid-cavernous fistula) or of systemic disease (eg, Graves' disease). (patient.info)
  • cavernous hemangioma and lymphangioma, thyroid eye disease (TED), and cancers and neoplasms like orbital lymphoma) create axial protrusion (bulging ahead) of the eye (also known as proptosis) and displacement of the eye. (debrajshome.com)
  • Anatomic study of the orbital venous system appears to be warranted because of its recently emerging importance in the surgical management of the carotid-cavernous sinus fistula (CCSF). (arvojournals.org)
  • No carotid or orbital murmurs were found. (criticalopscredits.club)
  • It is a painful ophthalmoplegia caused by nonspecific inflammation (noncaseating granulomatous or non-granulomatous) of the cavernous sinus or superior orbital fissure. (epomedicine.com)
  • Types B, C, and D tend to be lower-flow and lower-pressure fistulas with a slower progression of signs and symptoms. (medscape.com)
  • Treatment largely depends on the classification of the fistula and the age and comorbidities of the patient, as well as the presence of symptoms directly attributable to the fistula. (radiopaedia.org)
  • In particular, ocular symptoms accompanying non-migraine-like headache should be promptly recognized and raise the suspicion of a carotid-cavernous fistula, while migraine-like headache may suggests other dural arteriovenous fistulas. (unipg.it)
  • We present our experience with the unilateral across-the-midline approach to both cavernous sinuses to treat shunts according to anatomic compartments to achieve anatomic cure. (bvsalud.org)
  • METHODS: Patients included in this study presented with either bilateral or unilateral shunts with unilateral venous drainage. (bvsalud.org)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Careful inspection of the venous anatomy and fistulization sites is critical when treating unilateral or bilateral carotid cavernous shunts. (bvsalud.org)
  • Dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) are acquired direct arteriovenous shunts that often drain into the dural venous sinus. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Again, the diagnosis can be difficult in patients without retrograde venous drainage, with dilated pial vessels in the subarachnoid space being a potential clue. (radiopaedia.org)
  • To our knowledge, this retrograde venous route via the superior petrosal sinus has not been previously described. (ajnr.org)
  • These lesions were different from more common lesions, mainly schwanommas, mainly due to the foraminal extension, which sets them apart from cavernous hemangiomas. (bvsalud.org)
  • Conclusions Pure epidural capillary hemangiomas should be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural lesions, mainly schwanommas, especially due to the foraminal extension, which may differentiates them from cavernous hemangiomas. (bvsalud.org)
  • These lesions are subdivided into the classic arteriovenous malformation and the arteriovenous fistulas. (jaocr.org)
  • Special Surgical Techniques in the Orbit Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) may have value in selected cases oflymphoid lesions, secondary tumors invading the orbit from Buy Cheap tazalis 10 mg sinuses, suspected metastatic tumors. (tovopt.ru)
  • In all CCFs, anterior and inferior drainages were the most common. (hindawi.com)
  • Despite a successful unilateral approach to bilateral cavernous sinuses, 1 patient needed an additional ipsilateral transophthalmic venous approach to obliterate the anterior compartment of the cavernous sinus. (bvsalud.org)
  • Anterior cranial fossa (ACF) dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVFs) are rare, and a systematic review of the literature is lacking. (medsci.org)
  • From our review, the level of the fistulas in most patients is correlated with the level of spinal canal stenosis. (bvsalud.org)
  • Arterio-venous fistula is the most frequent cause of ocular hyperaemia with elevated IOP, due to episcleral venous hypertension 8,9. (criticalopscredits.club)
  • BACKGROUND: Spinal sparganosis associated with filum terminale arteriovenous fistula (FTAVF) has not been reported in the literature. (bvsalud.org)
  • dermal sinus a congenital sinus tract extending from the surface of the body, between the bodies of two adjacent lumbar vertebrae, to the spinal canal. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A 38-year-old woman developed bilateral carotid cavernous fistulae (CCF) following a motor vehicle collision. (harvard.edu)
  • Spontaneous carotid-ca. (thejns.org)
  • The authors report two cases of spontaneous carotid-cavernous fistula that occurred during pregnancy. (thejns.org)
  • 1-4) We describe a case of spontaneous resolution of ophthalmologic sequelae in a patient who developed post-traumatic, bilateral carotid dissections that resulted in bilateral CCF and central retinal venous insufficiency. (harvard.edu)
  • Elevated pressure inside the cavernous sinus and alterations in venous drainage account for the observed clinical signs, including conjunctival injection, proptosis, decreased visual acuity, elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), and cranial nerve palsies. (harvard.edu)
  • 1 Direct fistulas are high flow, frequently follow trauma, and tend to have a dramatic clinical presentation. (bmj.com)
  • Additionally, some clinical implications of abnormalities of the sinus will also be highlighted. (kenhub.com)
  • Technical and clinical efficacy of carotid-cavernous fistula is high. (czytelniamedyczna.pl)
  • Both classifications revolve around the knowledge that venous drainage pattern correlates with increasingly aggressive neurological clinical course. (radiopaedia.org)
  • In a 10-year single institution experience, clinical presentation of dural arteriovenous fistulas, and in particular headache and angiographic features, as well as long-term outcome were analyzed. (unipg.it)
  • According to different clinical presentation and evolution, related to their unique drainage pattern into the cavernous sinus, we examined the carotid-cavernous fistulas separately from other dural arteriovenous fistulas. (unipg.it)
  • The clinical presentation ranges from multiple draining sinuses to swellings resembling tumors and cysts. (worldwidescience.org)
  • Blunt head injury can lead to shearing of intracavernous arteries, causing the development of a fistula. (medscape.com)
  • Carotid caveronus fistulas are incorrect connections between carotid arteries and cavernous sinus. (czytelniamedyczna.pl)
  • Fistulas are categorized by the number of openings they have and whether they connect two internal organs or open through the skin. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Complete fistulas have one internal opening and one opening on the skin. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Incomplete fistulas are tubes of skin that are open on the outside but closed on the inside and do not connect to any internal structure. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Contralateral drainage was not observed in all, supporting plausible compartmentalization of cavernous sinuses. (hindawi.com)
  • A venous triaxial system was used to achieve support for distal navigation across the midline via the coronary sinus to the contralateral cavernous sinus. (bvsalud.org)
  • We can go into the contralateral carvenous sinus and through the vessels conecting between two sinuses to the target carvenous sinus. (amazonaws.com)
  • No supply is identified from either the vertebrobasilar system or contralateral left carotid system. (radiopaedia.org)
  • The cavernous sinus is roofed by an inner layer of dura mater that continues with the diaphragma sellae that covers the superior part of the pituitary gland . (kenhub.com)
  • DSA disclosed a CCF on the left side with drainage into the cavernous sinus and petrosal sinus on both sides. (bmj.com)
  • Drainage patterns were correlated to types and etiology of CCFs. (hindawi.com)
  • Types, etiology, and duration of the CCFs may affect their drainage patterns. (hindawi.com)
  • DSA is valuable for categorization of CCFs and verification of drainage patterns. (hindawi.com)
  • Angiographic assessment of carotid cavernous fistulas (CCFs) can be complex. (nih.gov)
  • The cavernous sinus drains to the superior and inferior petrosal sinuses, which then join the sigmoid sinus. (kenhub.com)
  • A strayed, overinflated, or dislodged balloon can cause neurologic deterioration attributable to a reopened fistula or local compression of cranial nerves (3, 4) . (ajnr.org)
  • Several cranial nerves course through this sinus. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Type-D caroticocavernous fistula: the eye demonstrates proptosis, chemosis, and scleral edema. (medscape.com)
  • Whether parametric color coding could facilitate evaluation of fistula architecture and provide a more precise estimation of fistula venous drainage patterns as well as whether flow analysis could reveal objective changes during and after treatment were investigated. (nih.gov)
  • Visualization of complex fistula architecture could be facilitated, and flow analysis might improve assessment of venous drainage patterns, thereby increasing overall diagnostic confidence. (nih.gov)
  • Endovascular approach as primary treatment for traumatic carotid cavernous fistula: local experience from Pakistan. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Objective: To evaluate the technical success, complications and outcome of endovascular management of post traumatic carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) in patients presenting at a tertiary care hospital in Karahci. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Conclusion: Endovascular approach is a safe and useful option for treatment of traumatic carotid cavernous fistula. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Post-traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula in a pediatric patient: a case-based literature review. (migroup.pro)
  • Penetrating head injury can lead to fistula formation by direct laceration of intracavernous vessels. (medscape.com)
  • Presence of such fistulas results with elevated blood pressure in caveronus sinus and draining vessels. (czytelniamedyczna.pl)
  • The dural venous sinuses lie in between the two layers of the dura mater. (biomedsearch.com)
  • cavernous sinus an irregularly shaped venous channel between the layers of dura mater of the brain, one on either side of the body of the sphenoid bone and communicating across the midline. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • occipital sinus a venous sinus between the layers of dura mater, passing upward along the midline of the cerebellum. (thefreedictionary.com)