Carotid Body Tumor: Benign paraganglioma at the bifurcation of the COMMON CAROTID ARTERIES. It can encroach on the parapharyngeal space and produce dysphagia, pain, and cranial nerve palsies.Carotid Body: A small cluster of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery. The carotid body, which is richly supplied with fenestrated capillaries, senses the pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and plays a crucial role in their homeostatic control.Vagus Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the VAGUS NERVE. Because the vagus nerve innervates multiple organs, injuries in the nerve fibers may result in any gastrointestinal organ dysfunction downstream of the injury site.Hypoglossal Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE.Horner Syndrome: A syndrome associated with defective sympathetic innervation to one side of the face, including the eye. Clinical features include MIOSIS; mild BLEPHAROPTOSIS; and hemifacial ANHIDROSIS (decreased sweating)(see HYPOHIDROSIS). Lesions of the BRAIN STEM; cervical SPINAL CORD; first thoracic nerve root; apex of the LUNG; CAROTID ARTERY; CAVERNOUS SINUS; and apex of the ORBIT may cause this condition. (From Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, pp500-11)Aortic Bodies: Small clusters of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the ARCH OF THE AORTA; the PULMONARY ARTERIES; and the CORONARY ARTERIES. The aortic bodies sense PH; CARBON DIOXIDE; and OXYGEN concentrations in the BLOOD and participate in the control of RESPIRATION. The aortic bodies should not be confused with the PARA-AORTIC BODIES in the abdomen (which are sometimes also called aortic bodies).Paraganglioma: A neural crest tumor usually derived from the chromoreceptor tissue of a paraganglion, such as the carotid body, or medulla of the adrenal gland (usually called a chromaffinoma or pheochromocytoma). It is more common in women than in men. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Paraganglioma, Extra-Adrenal: A relatively rare, usually benign neoplasm originating in the chemoreceptor tissue of the CAROTID BODY; GLOMUS JUGULARE; GLOMUS TYMPANICUM; AORTIC BODIES; and the female genital tract. It consists histologically of rounded or ovoid hyperchromatic cells that tend to be grouped in an alveolus-like pattern within a scant to moderate amount of fibrous stroma and a few large thin-walled vascular channels. (From Stedman, 27th ed)Succinate Dehydrogenase: A flavoprotein containing oxidoreductase that catalyzes the dehydrogenation of SUCCINATE to fumarate. In most eukaryotic organisms this enzyme is a component of mitochondrial electron transport complex II.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Chemoreceptor Cells: Cells specialized to detect chemical substances and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Chemoreceptor cells may monitor external stimuli, as in TASTE and OLFACTION, or internal stimuli, such as the concentrations of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE in the blood.Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Head and Neck Neoplasms: Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)Paraganglioma: A neural crest tumor usually derived from the chromoreceptor tissue of a paraganglion, such as the carotid body, or medulla of the adrenal gland (usually called a chromaffinoma or pheochromocytoma). It is more common in women than in men. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Carotid Sinus: The dilated portion of the common carotid artery at its bifurcation into external and internal carotids. It contains baroreceptors which, when stimulated, cause slowing of the heart, vasodilatation, and a fall in blood pressure.Bradycardia: Cardiac arrhythmias that are characterized by excessively slow HEART RATE, usually below 50 beats per minute in human adults. They can be classified broadly into SINOATRIAL NODE dysfunction and ATRIOVENTRICULAR BLOCK.Carotid Body: A small cluster of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery. The carotid body, which is richly supplied with fenestrated capillaries, senses the pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and plays a crucial role in their homeostatic control.Paraganglioma, Extra-Adrenal: A relatively rare, usually benign neoplasm originating in the chemoreceptor tissue of the CAROTID BODY; GLOMUS JUGULARE; GLOMUS TYMPANICUM; AORTIC BODIES; and the female genital tract. It consists histologically of rounded or ovoid hyperchromatic cells that tend to be grouped in an alveolus-like pattern within a scant to moderate amount of fibrous stroma and a few large thin-walled vascular channels. (From Stedman, 27th ed)Syncope: A transient loss of consciousness and postural tone caused by diminished blood flow to the brain (i.e., BRAIN ISCHEMIA). Presyncope refers to the sensation of lightheadedness and loss of strength that precedes a syncopal event or accompanies an incomplete syncope. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp367-9)Anesthesiology: A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.Massage: The systematic and methodical manipulations of body tissues best performed with the hands for the purpose of affecting the nervous and muscular systems and the general circulation.Pheochromocytoma: A usually benign, well-encapsulated, lobular, vascular tumor of chromaffin tissue of the ADRENAL MEDULLA or sympathetic paraganglia. The cardinal symptom, reflecting the increased secretion of EPINEPHRINE and NOREPINEPHRINE, is HYPERTENSION, which may be persistent or intermittent. During severe attacks, there may be HEADACHE; SWEATING, palpitation, apprehension, TREMOR; PALLOR or FLUSHING of the face, NAUSEA and VOMITING, pain in the CHEST and ABDOMEN, and paresthesias of the extremities. The incidence of malignancy is as low as 5% but the pathologic distinction between benign and malignant pheochromocytomas is not clear. (Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1298)Ophthalmology: A surgical specialty concerned with the structure and function of the eye and the medical and surgical treatment of its defects and diseases.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.GermanyPlant Infertility: The failure of PLANTS to complete fertilization and obtain seed (SEEDS) as a result of defective POLLEN or ovules, or other aberrations. (Dict. of Plant Genet. and Mol. Biol., 1998)Eye Diseases: Diseases affecting the eye.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.3-Iodobenzylguanidine: A guanidine analog with specific affinity for tissues of the sympathetic nervous system and related tumors. The radiolabeled forms are used as antineoplastic agents and radioactive imaging agents. (Merck Index, 12th ed) MIBG serves as a neuron-blocking agent which has a strong affinity for, and retention in, the adrenal medulla and also inhibits ADP-ribosyltransferase.Neuroblastoma: A common neoplasm of early childhood arising from neural crest cells in the sympathetic nervous system, and characterized by diverse clinical behavior, ranging from spontaneous remission to rapid metastatic progression and death. This tumor is the most common intraabdominal malignancy of childhood, but it may also arise from thorax, neck, or rarely occur in the central nervous system. Histologic features include uniform round cells with hyperchromatic nuclei arranged in nests and separated by fibrovascular septa. Neuroblastomas may be associated with the opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2099-2101; Curr Opin Oncol 1998 Jan;10(1):43-51)Adrenal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ADRENAL GLANDS.Iodine Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of iodine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. I atoms with atomic weights 117-139, except I 127, are radioactive iodine isotopes.IodobenzenesSuccinate Dehydrogenase: A flavoprotein containing oxidoreductase that catalyzes the dehydrogenation of SUCCINATE to fumarate. In most eukaryotic organisms this enzyme is a component of mitochondrial electron transport complex II.Iodine: A nonmetallic element of the halogen group that is represented by the atomic symbol I, atomic number 53, and atomic weight of 126.90. It is a nutritionally essential element, especially important in thyroid hormone synthesis. In solution, it has anti-infective properties and is used topically.Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: All tumors in the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT arising from mesenchymal cells (MESODERM) except those of smooth muscle cells (LEIOMYOMA) or Schwann cells (SCHWANNOMA).Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit: A protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is specific for STEM CELL FACTOR. This interaction is crucial for the development of hematopoietic, gonadal, and pigment stem cells. Genetic mutations that disrupt the expression of PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEINS C-KIT are associated with PIEBALDISM, while overexpression or constitutive activation of the c-kit protein-tyrosine kinase is associated with tumorigenesis.Gastrointestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, from the MOUTH to the ANAL CANAL.Benzamides: BENZOIC ACID amides.PiperazinesReceptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor alpha: A PDGF receptor that binds specifically to both PDGF-A chains and PDGF-B chains. It contains a protein-tyrosine kinase activity that is involved in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION.Pyrimidines: A family of 6-membered heterocyclic compounds occurring in nature in a wide variety of forms. They include several nucleic acid constituents (CYTOSINE; THYMINE; and URACIL) and form the basic structure of the barbiturates.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Fluorodeoxyglucose F18: The compound is given by intravenous injection to do POSITRON-EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY for the assessment of cerebral and myocardial glucose metabolism in various physiological or pathological states including stroke and myocardial ischemia. It is also employed for the detection of malignant tumors including those of the brain, liver, and thyroid gland. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1162)Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Glomus Tumor: A blue-red, extremely painful vascular neoplasm involving a glomeriform arteriovenous anastomosis (glomus body), which may be found anywhere in the skin, most often in the distal portion of the fingers and toes, especially beneath the nail. It is composed of specialized pericytes (sometimes termed glomus cells), usually in single encapsulated nodular masses which may be several millimeters in diameter (From Stedman, 27th ed). CHEMODECTOMA, a tumor of NEURAL CREST origin, is also sometimes called a glomus tumor.Glomus Jugulare Tumor: A paraganglioma involving the glomus jugulare, a microscopic collection of chemoreceptor tissue in the adventitia of the bulb of the jugular vein. It may cause paralysis of the vocal cords, attacks of dizziness, blackouts, and nystagmus. It is not resectable but radiation therapy is effective. It regresses slowly, but permanent control is regularly achieved. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, pp1603-4)Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Nail Diseases: Diseases of the nail plate and tissues surrounding it. The concept is limited to primates.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Aortic Bodies: Small clusters of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the ARCH OF THE AORTA; the PULMONARY ARTERIES; and the CORONARY ARTERIES. The aortic bodies sense PH; CARBON DIOXIDE; and OXYGEN concentrations in the BLOOD and participate in the control of RESPIRATION. The aortic bodies should not be confused with the PARA-AORTIC BODIES in the abdomen (which are sometimes also called aortic bodies).Head and Neck Neoplasms: Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)Imprinting (Psychology): A particular kind of learning characterized by occurrence in very early life, rapidity of acquisition, and relative insusceptibility to forgetting or extinction. Imprinted behavior includes most (or all) behavior commonly called instinctive, but imprinting is used purely descriptively.Skull Base: The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.Skull Base Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the base of the skull specifically, differentiated from neoplasms of unspecified sites or bones of the skull (SKULL NEOPLASMS).Surgical Equipment: Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.Trochlear Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the TROCHLEAR NERVE.Oculomotor Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. This may result in various eye movement dysfunction.PhiladelphiaCraniotomy: Any operation on the cranium or incision into the cranium. (Dorland, 28th ed)ADAM Proteins: A family of membrane-anchored glycoproteins that contain a disintegrin and metalloprotease domain. They are responsible for the proteolytic cleavage of many transmembrane proteins and the release of their extracellular domain.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Consent Forms: Documents describing a medical treatment or research project, including proposed procedures, risks, and alternatives, that are to be signed by an individual, or the individual's proxy, to indicate his/her understanding of the document and a willingness to undergo the treatment or to participate in the research.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Legal Guardians: A legal concept for individuals who are designated to act on behalf of persons who are considered incapable of acting in their own behalf, e.g., minors and persons found to be not mentally competent.Farnesyltranstransferase: An enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of geranylgeranyl diphosphate from trans, trans-farnesyl diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate.Alkyl and Aryl Transferases: A somewhat heterogeneous class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of alkyl or related groups (excluding methyl groups). EC 2.5.Contraception: Prevention of CONCEPTION by blocking fertility temporarily, or permanently (STERILIZATION, REPRODUCTIVE). Common means of reversible contraception include NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING METHODS; CONTRACEPTIVE AGENTS; or CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES.Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-pim-1: Serine-threonine protein kinases that relay signals from CYTOKINE RECEPTORS and are involved in control of CELL GROWTH PROCESSES; CELL DIFFERENTIATION; and APOPTOSIS.Research Subjects: Persons who are enrolled in research studies or who are otherwise the subjects of research.DNA Methylation: Addition of methyl groups to DNA. DNA methyltransferases (DNA methylases) perform this reaction using S-ADENOSYLMETHIONINE as the methyl group donor.CreatinineElectron Transport Complex II: A flavoprotein oxidase complex that contains iron-sulfur centers. It catalyzes the oxidation of SUCCINATE to fumarate and couples the reaction to the reduction of UBIQUINONE to ubiquinol.Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex: A multienzyme complex responsible for the formation of ACETYL COENZYME A from pyruvate. The enzyme components are PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE (LIPOAMIDE); dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase; and LIPOAMIDE DEHYDROGENASE. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is subject to three types of control: inhibited by acetyl-CoA and NADH; influenced by the energy state of the cell; and inhibited when a specific serine residue in the pyruvate decarboxylase is phosphorylated by ATP. PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE (LIPOAMIDE)-PHOSPHATASE catalyzes reactivation of the complex. (From Concise Encyclopedia Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 3rd ed)Search Engine: Software used to locate data or information stored in machine-readable form locally or at a distance such as an INTERNET site.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.Germ-Line Mutation: Any detectable and heritable alteration in the lineage of germ cells. Mutations in these cells (i.e., "generative" cells ancestral to the gametes) are transmitted to progeny while those in somatic cells are not.Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase ComplexOhioRetrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Surgery Department, Hospital: Hospital department which administers all departmental functions and the provision of surgical diagnostic and therapeutic services.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Stachybotrys: A mitosporic fungal genus including one species which forms a toxin in moldy hay that may cause a serious illness in horses.Philosophy, DentalRisk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.ConnecticutCellular Phone: Analog or digital communications device in which the user has a wireless connection from a telephone to a nearby transmitter. It is termed cellular because the service area is divided into multiple "cells." As the user moves from one cell area to another, the call is transferred to the local transmitter.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Hospitals, Religious: Private hospitals that are owned or sponsored by religious organizations.Medicare Part A: The compulsory portion of Medicare that is known as the Hospital Insurance Program. All persons 65 years and older who are entitled to benefits under the Old Age, Survivors, Disability and Health Insurance Program or railroad retirement, persons under the age of 65 who have been eligible for disability for more than two years, and insured workers (and their dependents) requiring renal dialysis or kidney transplantation are automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A.Needle-Exchange Programs: Organized services for exchange of sterile needles and syringes used for injections as a potential means of reducing the transmission of infectious diseases.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Indigo Carmine: Indolesulfonic acid used as a dye in renal function testing for the detection of nitrates and chlorates, and in the testing of milk.BooksAtlases as Topic: Collections of illustrative plates, charts, etc., usually with explanatory captions.Endovascular Procedures: Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Book SelectionBlood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Cervical Atlas: The first cervical vertebra.Book Reviews as Topic: Critical analyses of books or other monographic works.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Carotid Artery Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.Endarterectomy, Carotid: The excision of the thickened, atheromatous tunica intima of a carotid artery.Carotid Artery, Internal: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.Carotid Artery, Common: The two principal arteries supplying the structures of the head and neck. They ascend in the neck, one on each side, and at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, each divides into two branches, the external (CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries.Carotid Artery, External: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the exterior of the head, the face, and the greater part of the neck.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Neuroradiography: Radiography of the central nervous system.United StatesRadiology: A specialty concerned with the use of x-ray and other forms of radiant energy in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)ReadingNeurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Paraganglia, Chromaffin: Small bodies containing chromaffin cells occurring outside of the adrenal medulla, most commonly near the sympathetic ganglia and in organs such as the kidney, liver, heart and gonads.Paraganglia, Nonchromaffin: Several clusters of chemoreceptive and supporting cells associated with blood vessels and nerves (especially the glossopharyngeal and vagus). The nonchromaffin paraganglia sense pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and participate in respiratory, and perhaps circulatory, control. They include the CAROTID BODY; AORTIC BODIES; the GLOMUS JUGULARE; and the GLOMUS TYMPANICUM.Laryngeal Cartilages: The nine cartilages of the larynx, including the cricoid, thyroid and epiglottic, and two each of arytenoid, corniculate and cuneiform.Hemangioma, Cavernous: A vascular anomaly that is a collection of tortuous BLOOD VESSELS and connective tissue. This tumor-like mass with the large vascular space is filled with blood and usually appears as a strawberry-like lesion in the subcutaneous areas of the face, extremities, or other regions of the body including the central nervous system.Parathyroid Glands: Two pairs of small oval-shaped glands located in the front and the base of the NECK and adjacent to the two lobes of THYROID GLAND. They secrete PARATHYROID HORMONE that regulates the balance of CALCIUM; PHOSPHORUS; and MAGNESIUM in the body.Larynx: A tubular organ of VOICE production. It is located in the anterior neck, superior to the TRACHEA and inferior to the tongue and HYOID BONE.Artifacts: Any visible result of a procedure which is caused by the procedure itself and not by the entity being analyzed. Common examples include histological structures introduced by tissue processing, radiographic images of structures that are not naturally present in living tissue, and products of chemical reactions that occur during analysis.Parathyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PARATHYROID GLANDS.Hyperparathyroidism: A condition of abnormally elevated output of PARATHYROID HORMONE (or PTH) triggering responses that increase blood CALCIUM. It is characterized by HYPERCALCEMIA and BONE RESORPTION, eventually leading to bone diseases. PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is caused by parathyroid HYPERPLASIA or PARATHYROID NEOPLASMS. SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is increased PTH secretion in response to HYPOCALCEMIA, usually caused by chronic KIDNEY DISEASES.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.BrazilMedical Subject Headings: Controlled vocabulary thesaurus produced by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. It consists of sets of terms naming descriptors in a hierarchical structure that permits searching at various levels of specificity.Neuropsychiatry: A subfield of psychiatry that emphasizes the somatic substructure on which mental operations and emotions are based, and the functional or organic disturbances of the central nervous system that give rise to, contribute to, or are associated with mental and emotional disorders. (From Campbell's Psychiatric Dictionary, 8th ed.)Databases, Bibliographic: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of references and citations to books, articles, publications, etc., generally on a single subject or specialized subject area. Databases can operate through automated files, libraries, or computer disks. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, FACTUAL which is used for collections of data and facts apart from bibliographic references to them.Fibromuscular Dysplasia: An idiopathic, segmental, nonatheromatous disease of the musculature of arterial walls, leading to STENOSIS of small and medium-sized arteries. There is true proliferation of SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS and fibrous tissue. Fibromuscular dysplasia lesions are smooth stenosis and occur most often in the renal and carotid arteries. They may also occur in other peripheral arteries of the extremity.Nerve Sheath Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from nerve sheaths formed by SCHWANN CELLS in the PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM or by OLIGODENDROCYTES in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, NEUROFIBROMA, and NEURILEMMOMA are relatively common tumors in this category.Meningioma: A relatively common neoplasm of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and SPINAL CANAL. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from peripheral nerve tissue. This includes NEUROFIBROMAS; SCHWANNOMAS; GRANULAR CELL TUMORS; and malignant peripheral NERVE SHEATH NEOPLASMS. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp1750-1)Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Otolaryngology: A surgical specialty concerned with the study and treatment of disorders of the ear, nose, and throat.Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases: Pathological processes of the ear, the nose, and the throat, also known as the ENT diseases.Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the ear and its parts, the nose and nasal cavity, or the throat, including surgery of the adenoids, tonsils, pharynx, and trachea.Surgery, Oral: A dental specialty concerned with the diagnosis and surgical treatment of disease, injuries, and defects of the human oral and maxillofacial region.Voice Disorders: Pathological processes that affect voice production, usually involving VOCAL CORDS and the LARYNGEAL MUCOSA. Voice disorders can be caused by organic (anatomical), or functional (emotional or psychological) factors leading to DYSPHONIA; APHONIA; and defects in VOICE QUALITY, loudness, and pitch.Love: Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between individuals.Blogging: Using an INTERNET based personal journal which may consist of reflections, comments, and often hyperlinks.Designer Drugs: Drugs designed and synthesized, often for illegal street use, by modification of existing drug structures (e.g., amphetamines). Of special interest are MPTP (a reverse ester of meperidine), MDA (3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine), and MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine). Many drugs act on the aminergic system, the physiologically active biogenic amines.Educational Technology: Systematic identification, development, organization, or utilization of educational resources and the management of these processes. It is occasionally used also in a more limited sense to describe the use of equipment-oriented techniques or audiovisual aids in educational settings. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, December 1993, p132)Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Catalysis: The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.Narration: The act, process, or an instance of narrating, i.e., telling a story. In the context of MEDICINE or ETHICS, narration includes relating the particular and the personal in the life story of an individual.Hospital Shops: Stores located in hospitals selling merchandise or services for the convenience of patients, staff, and visitors.Pharmacies: Facilities for the preparation and dispensing of drugs.Neurilemmoma: A neoplasm that arises from SCHWANN CELLS of the cranial, peripheral, and autonomic nerves. Clinically, these tumors may present as a cranial neuropathy, abdominal or soft tissue mass, intracranial lesion, or with spinal cord compression. Histologically, these tumors are encapsulated, highly vascular, and composed of a homogenous pattern of biphasic fusiform-shaped cells that may have a palisaded appearance. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp964-5)Neurofibroma: A moderately firm, benign, encapsulated tumor resulting from proliferation of SCHWANN CELLS and FIBROBLASTS that includes portions of nerve fibers. The tumors usually develop along peripheral or cranial nerves and are a central feature of NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1, where they may occur intracranially or involve spinal roots. Pathologic features include fusiform enlargement of the involved nerve. Microscopic examination reveals a disorganized and loose cellular pattern with elongated nuclei intermixed with fibrous strands. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1016)Neurofibromatosis 1: An autosomal dominant inherited disorder (with a high frequency of spontaneous mutations) that features developmental changes in the nervous system, muscles, bones, and skin, most notably in tissue derived from the embryonic NEURAL CREST. Multiple hyperpigmented skin lesions and subcutaneous tumors are the hallmark of this disease. Peripheral and central nervous system neoplasms occur frequently, especially OPTIC NERVE GLIOMA and NEUROFIBROSARCOMA. NF1 is caused by mutations which inactivate the NF1 gene (GENES, NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1) on chromosome 17q. The incidence of learning disabilities is also elevated in this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1014-18) There is overlap of clinical features with NOONAN SYNDROME in a syndrome called neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome. Both the PTPN11 and NF1 gene products are involved in the SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION pathway of Ras (RAS PROTEINS).Neurothekeoma: A benign myxoma of cutaneous nerve sheath origin. Theke is from the Greek theke, sheath. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Neurofibroma, Plexiform: A type of neurofibroma manifesting as a diffuse overgrowth of subcutaneous tissue, usually involving the face, scalp, neck, and chest but occasionally occurring in the abdomen or pelvis. The tumors tend to progress, and may extend along nerve roots to eventually involve the spinal roots and spinal cord. This process is almost always a manifestation of NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1016; J Pediatr 1997 Nov;131(5):678-82)Genes, Neurofibromatosis 1: Tumor suppressor genes located on the long arm of human chromosome 17 in the region 17q11.2. Mutation of these genes is thought to cause NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1, Watson syndrome, and LEOPARD syndrome.Neurofibromin 1: A protein found most abundantly in the nervous system. Defects or deficiencies in this protein are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1, Watson syndrome, and LEOPARD syndrome. Mutations in the gene (GENE, NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1) affect two known functions: regulation of ras-GTPase and tumor suppression.Neurofibromatoses: A group of disorders characterized by an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with high rates of spontaneous mutation and multiple neurofibromas or neurilemmomas. NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1 (generalized neurofibromatosis) accounts for approximately 95% of cases, although multiple additional subtypes (e.g., NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2, neurofibromatosis 3, etc.) have been described. (From Neurochirurgie 1998 Nov;44(4):267-72)Prone Position: The posture of an individual lying face down.Visceral Prolapse: The prolapse or downward displacement of the VISCERA.Nephrectomy: Excision of kidney.Video-Assisted Surgery: Endoscopic surgical procedures performed with visualization via video transmission. When real-time video is combined interactively with prior CT scans or MRI images, this is called image-guided surgery (see SURGERY, COMPUTER-ASSISTED).Insufflation: The act of blowing a powder, vapor, or gas into any body cavity for experimental, diagnostic, or therapeutic purposes.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Retroperitoneal Space: An area occupying the most posterior aspect of the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. It is bounded laterally by the borders of the quadratus lumborum muscles and extends from the DIAPHRAGM to the brim of the true PELVIS, where it continues as the pelvic extraperitoneal space.Supine Position: The posture of an individual lying face up.ArchivesBiological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Directories as Topic: Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Serial Publications: Publications in any medium issued in successive parts bearing numerical or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p203)Cocaine: An alkaloid ester extracted from the leaves of plants including coca. It is a local anesthetic and vasoconstrictor and is clinically used for that purpose, particularly in the eye, ear, nose, and throat. It also has powerful central nervous system effects similar to the amphetamines and is a drug of abuse. Cocaine, like amphetamines, acts by multiple mechanisms on brain catecholaminergic neurons; the mechanism of its reinforcing effects is thought to involve inhibition of dopamine uptake.Consciousness: Sense of awareness of self and of the environment.Cocaine-Related Disorders: Disorders related or resulting from use of cocaine.Toxicology: The science concerned with the detection, chemical composition, and biological action of toxic substances or poisons and the treatment and prevention of toxic manifestations.Opioid-Related Disorders: Disorders related or resulting from abuse or mis-use of opioids.Substance Abuse Detection: Detection of drugs that have been abused, overused, or misused, including legal and illegal drugs. Urine screening is the usual method of detection.Consciousness Disorders: Organic mental disorders in which there is impairment of the ability to maintain awareness of self and environment and to respond to environmental stimuli. Dysfunction of the cerebral hemispheres or brain stem RETICULAR FORMATION may result in this condition.Buprenorphine: A derivative of the opioid alkaloid THEBAINE that is a more potent and longer lasting analgesic than MORPHINE. It appears to act as a partial agonist at mu and kappa opioid receptors and as an antagonist at delta receptors. The lack of delta-agonist activity has been suggested to account for the observation that buprenorphine tolerance may not develop with chronic use.Organic Anion Transport Protein 1: A polyspecific transporter for organic cations found primarily in the kidney. It mediates the coupled exchange of alpha-ketoglutarate with organic ions such as P-AMINOHIPPURIC ACID.Doxycycline: A synthetic tetracycline derivative with similar antimicrobial activity.Anti-Inflammatory Agents: Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.Surgery, Veterinary: A board-certified specialty of VETERINARY MEDICINE, requiring at least four years of special education, training, and practice of veterinary surgery after graduation from veterinary school. In the written, oral, and practical examinations candidates may choose either large or small animal surgery. (From AVMA Directory, 43d ed, p278)Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Lilium: A plant genus in the family LILIACEAE generally growing in temperate areas. The word lily is also used in the common names of many plants of other genera that resemble true lilies. True lilies are erect perennial plants with leafy stems, scaly bulbs, usually narrow leaves, and solitary or clustered flowers.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Respiratory Tract Infections: Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.Congresses as Topic: Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.Organizers, Embryonic: Cells in certain regions of an embryo that self-regulate embryonic development. These organizers have been found in dorsal and ventral poles of GASTRULA embryos, including Spemann organizer in amphibians, and Hensen node in chicken and mouse. These organizer cells communicate with each other via a network of secreted signaling proteins, such as BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEINS and their antagonists (chordin and noggin).Consensus Development Conferences as Topic: Presentations of summary statements representing the majority agreement of physicians, scientists, and other professionals convening for the purpose of reaching a consensus--often with findings and recommendations--on a subject of interest. The Conference, consisting of participants representing the scientific and lay viewpoints, is a significant means of evaluating current medical thought and reflects the latest advances in research for the respective field being addressed.Medical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.

Familial carotid body tumors: a closer look. (1/77)

PURPOSE: A family spanning three generations with a history of familial carotid body tumors (CBTs) was studied, and previously proposed hypotheses of tumor characteristics and genetic mode of transmission were addressed. METHODS: Clinically occult lesions in adult subjects were detected by means of high-resolution computed tomography. RESULTS: A 60% incidence of bilaterality of CBTs associated with multiple paragangliomas was noted in the family studied. The genetic mode for CBTs in this family was not simple autosomal dominant transmission and appeared to be paternally directed with complete penetrance. CONCLUSION: In patients with familial CBTs, high-resolution computed tomography is recommended for early screening as a means of prompting diagnosis and definitive treatment, an approach that minimizes morbidity and facilitates surgical excision.  (+info)

Mutations in SDHD, a mitochondrial complex II gene, in hereditary paraganglioma. (2/77)

Hereditary paraganglioma (PGL) is characterized by the development of benign, vascularized tumors in the head and neck. The most common tumor site is the carotid body (CB), a chemoreceptive organ that senses oxygen levels in the blood. Analysis of families carrying the PGL1 gene, described here, revealed germ line mutations in the SDHD gene on chromosome 11q23. SDHD encodes a mitochondrial respiratory chain protein-the small subunit of cytochrome b in succinate-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (cybS). In contrast to expectations based on the inheritance pattern of PGL, the SDHD gene showed no evidence of imprinting. These findings indicate that mitochondria play an important role in the pathogenesis of certain tumors and that cybS plays a role in normal CB physiology.  (+info)

Bilateral carotid body paraganglioma: case report. (3/77)

CONTEXT: Surgical treatment of carotid body paragangliomas is a challenge to the surgeon because of the large vascularization of the tumor, involvement of the carotid vessels and the close anatomical relationship with the cranial nerves. CASE REPORT: A 63-year-old patient was submitted to resection of two carotid body paraganglioma tumors found in the right-side and left-side carotid bodies at the bifurcation of the common carotid arteries. Two surgeries were performed at different times and neither of them presented any morbidity. Arteriography was fundamental for diagnosis of the small, asymptomatic tumor on the right side. DESIGN: Case Report  (+info)

Baroreflex failure syndrome after bilateral excision of carotid body tumors: an underestimated problem. (4/77)

Carotid body tumors (CBTs) are relatively rare paragangliomas that develop from neural crest cells at the bifurcation of the common carotid artery. They are generally slow growing and benign. Excision is currently considered the treatment of choice, although vascular and especially neural injuries are still relatively frequent in patients with large or bilaterally resected tumors. The baroreflex failure syndrome (BFS) has recently been identified as a severe, rarely recognized, and certainly underestimated complication after the bilateral excision of CBTs. The present report describes a case of a bilateral CBT followed by BFS and reviews the experiences reported in the literature. In light of the low incidence of malignancy of these tumors, their biologic behavior, their very high rate of cranial nerve palsy, and the occurrence of BFS in bilaterally resected paragangliomas, the current practice of bilaterally removing these tumors is questioned.  (+info)

Power Doppler scanning in the diagnosis of carotid body tumors. (5/77)

The aim of this work was to show contribution of power Doppler imaging in the diagnosis of the carotid body tumors. Six patients with a nontender mass beneath the mandibular angle were evaluated with gray scale and power Doppler sonography. Well-defined, solid, weakly hyperechoic masses were noted on gray scale sonography in the carotid bifurcation. Power Doppler sonography showed abundant flow, characterized as an intense blush, throughout the entire tumor in all patients. We believe that invasive and expensive diagnostic modalities are not necessary to evaluate carotid body tumors. Gray scale sonography and power Doppler imaging are sufficient for primary diagnosis of carotid body tumors.  (+info)

Malignant carotid body tumor: a case report. (6/77)

Carotid body tumors (CBTs) have an unpredictable history with no correlation between histology and clinical behavior. Of reported cases since 1891, local and distant metastases appear in approximately 10% of cases and remain the hallmark of malignancy. Currently, there are not enough data to support a single treatment regimen for malignant CBTs. The reported case demonstrates some unanswered issues with regard to malignant CBTs to include lymph node dissection, the need for carotid resection, and the role of radiation therapy. A 46-year-old pathologist underwent a resection of a Shamblin I CBT, to include jugular lymph node sampling, without complication. There was lymph node involvement, and tumor cells were found on the margins of the pathologic specimen. Subsequent carotid resection with reversed interposition saphenous vein graft and modified neck dissection were performed again without complication. Follow-up at 4 years has been uneventful. Diagnosis of CBTs with the use of magnetic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, color flow duplex scanning, and the role of arteriography are reviewed. The current treatment options are discussed with reference to primary lymph node sampling, carotid resection, and neck dissection in malignant cases. This case demonstrates that the unpredictable nature of CBTs and their malignant potential warrant aggressive initial local treatment to include jugular lymph node sampling and complete tumor resection.  (+info)

Long-term effects of carotid sinus denervation on arterial blood pressure in humans. (7/77)

BACKGROUND: After experimental carotid sinus denervation in animals, blood pressure (BP) level and variability increase markedly but normalize to preoperative levels within 10 to 14 days. We investigated the course of arterial BP level and variability after bilateral denervation of the carotid sinus baroreceptors in humans. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 4 women (age 41 to 63 years) who were referred for evaluation of arterial baroreflex function because of clinical suspicion of carotid sinus denervation attributable to bilateral carotid body tumor resection. The course of BP level and variability was assessed from repeated office and 24-hour ambulatory measurements (Spacelabs/Portapres) during 1 to 10 years of (retrospective) follow-up. Rapid cardiovascular reflex adjustments to active standing and Valsalva's maneuver were assessed. Office BP level increased from 132/86 mm Hg (range, 118 to 148/80 to 92 mm Hg) before bilateral surgery to 160/105 mm Hg (range, 143 to 194/90 to 116 mm Hg) 1 to 10 years after surgery. During continuous 24-hour noninvasive BP recording (Portapres), a marked BP variability was apparent in all 4 patients. Initial symptomatic hypotension on change to the upright posture and abnormal responses to Valsalva's maneuver were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Acute carotid sinus denervation, as a result of bilateral carotid body tumor resection, has a long-term effect on the level, variability, and rapid reflex control of arterial BP. Therefore, in contrast to earlier experimental observations, the compensatory ability of the baroreceptor areas outside the carotid sinus seems to be of limited importance in the regulation of BP in humans.  (+info)

Baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity after carotid body tumor resection. (8/77)

Bilateral carotid body tumor resection causes a permanent attenuation of vagal baroreflex sensitivity. We retrospectively examined the effects of bilateral carotid body tumor resection on the baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve traffic. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was recorded in 5 patients after bilateral carotid body tumor resection (1 man and 4 women, 51+/-11 years) and 6 healthy control subjects (2 men and 4 women, 50+/-7 years). Baroreflex sensitivity was calculated from changes in R-R interval and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in response to bolus injections of phenylephrine and nitroprusside. In addition, sympathetic responses to the Valsalva maneuver and cold pressor test were measured. The integrated neurogram of patients and control subjects contained a similar pattern of pulse synchronous burst of nerve activity. Baroreflex control of both heart rate and sympathetic nerve activity were attenuated in patients as compared with control subjects [heart rate baroreflex sensitivity: 3.68+/-0.93 versus 11.61+/-4.72 ms/mm Hg (phenylephrine, P=0.011) and 2.53+/-1.36 versus 5.82+/-1.94 ms/mm Hg (nitroprusside, P=0.05); sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity: 3.70+/-2.90 versus 7.53+/-4.12 activity/100 beats/mm Hg (phenylephrine, P=0.10) and 3.93+/-4.43 versus 15.27+/-10.03 activity/100 beats/mm Hg (nitroprusside, P=0.028)]. The Valsalva maneuver elicited normal reflex changes in muscle sympathetic nerve activity, whereas heart rate responses were blunted in the patients with bilateral carotid body tumor resection. Maximal sympathetic responses to the cold pressor test did not differ between the two groups. Denervation of carotid sinus baroreceptors as the result of bilateral carotid body tumor resection produces chronic impairment of baroreflex control of both heart rate and sympathetic nerve activity. During the Valsalva maneuver, loss of carotid baroreflex control of heart rate is less well compensated for by the extra carotid baroreceptors than the control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity.  (+info)

*Familial adenomatous polyposis

The root cause of FAP is understood to be a genetic mutation-a flaw in the body's tumour suppressor genes that prevent development of tumours. The flaw allows numerous cells of the intestinal wall to develop into potentially cancerous polyps when they would usually reach the end of their life; inevitably one or more will eventually progress and give rise to cancer (7% risk by age 21, rising to 87% by age 45 and 93% by age 50). The flawed genes do not trigger cancer, but rather, they reduce the body's ability to protect against the risk of aged cells becoming cancerous. Even with the flawed gene, it may still take time before a cell actually does develop that is cancerous as a result, and the gene may in some cases still partially operate to control tumours, therefore cancer from FAP takes many years to develop and is almost always an adult-onset disease. The second form of FAP, known as attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis has the APC gene functional but slightly ...

*Glomus cell

A glomus cell (type I) is a peripheral chemoreceptor, mainly located in the carotid bodies and aortic bodies, that helps the body regulate breathing. When there is a decrease in the blood's pH, a decrease in oxygen (pO2), or an increase in carbon dioxide (pCO2), the carotid bodies and the aortic bodies signal the medulla oblongata (specifically the dorsal inspiratory center in the medulla oblongata) to increase the volume and rate of breathing. The glomus cells have a high metabolic rate and good blood perfusion and thus are sensitive to changes in arterial blood gas tension. Glomus cells are very similar structurally to neurons, and they are indeed derived from the neural crest, while type II glomus cells are sustentacular cells having a similar function to neuroglia. Autonomic ganglia innervate the glomus cells, and some presynaptic sympathetic ganglia synapse with glomus cells. The nerve fibers pick up the signals sent by glomus cells and transmit them to ...

*Control of ventilation

The control of ventilation refers to the physiological mechanisms involved in the control of breathing, which is the movement of air into and out of the lungs. Ventilation facilitates respiration. Respiration refers to the utilization of oxygen and removal of carbon dioxide by the body as a whole, or by individual cells in cellular respiration. The most important function of breathing is the supplying of oxygen to the body and the removal of its waste product of carbon dioxide. Under most conditions, the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) or concentration of carbon dioxide, controls the respiratory rate. The peripheral chemoreceptors that detect changes in the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide are located in the arterial aortic bodies and the carotid bodies. Central chemoreceptors are primarily sensitive to changes in the pH in the blood, (resulting from changes in the levels of carbon dioxide) and they are located on the medulla oblongata near to ...

*Shortness of breath

Different physiological pathways may lead to shortness of breath including via ASIC chemoreceptors, mechanoreceptors, and lung receptors.[13]. It is thought that three main components contribute to dyspnea: afferent signals, efferent signals, and central information processing. It is believed the central processing in the brain compares the afferent and efferent signals; and dyspnea results when a "mismatch" occurs between the two: such as when the need for ventilation (afferent signaling) is not being met by physical breathing (efferent signaling).[17]. Afferent signals are sensory neuronal signals that ascend to the brain. Afferent neurons significant in dyspnea arise from a large number of sources including the carotid bodies, medulla, lungs, and chest wall. Chemoreceptors in the carotid bodies and medulla supply information regarding the blood gas levels of O2, CO2 and H+. In the lungs, juxtacapillary (J) receptors are sensitive to pulmonary interstitial edema, while ...

*Central chemoreceptors

... of the central nervous system, located on the ventrolateral medullary surface in the vicinity of the exit of the 9th and 10th cranial nerves, are sensitive to the pH of their environment. These act to detect the changes in pH of nearby cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that are indicative of altered oxygen or carbon dioxide concentrations available to brain tissues. An increase in carbon dioxide causes tension of the arteries, often resulting from decreased CO2 output (hypercapnia), indirectly causes the blood to become more acidic; the cerebrospinal fluid pH is closely comparable to plasma, as carbon dioxide easily diffuses across the blood-brain barrier. However, a change in plasma pH alone will not stimulate central chemoreceptors as H+ are not able to diffuse across the blood-brain barrier into the CSF. Only CO2 levels affect this as it can diffuse across, reacting with H2O to form carbonic acid and thus decrease pH. Central chemoreception remains, in this way, distinct from ...

*Mongrel

A mongrel, mixed-breed dog or mutt is a dog that does not belong to one recognized breed and is not the result of intentional breeding. Estimates place their numbers at 150 million animals worldwide. Although the term "mixed-breed dog" is preferred by some, many mongrels have no known purebred ancestors. Furthermore, crossbreed dogs, while literally a mix of breeds, differ from mongrels in being intentionally bred. Although mongrels have at times been considered somehow lesser than intentionally bred dogs, they are thought to be less susceptible to genetic health problems associated with dog breeding (based on the theory of heterosis), and have enthusiasts and defenders who prefer them to intentionally bred dogs. Although mongrels exhibit great variation, generations of uncontrolled breeding and environmental pressures may tend to shape them toward certain general average body types and characteristics known as landraces, some of which may be developed by people into new breeds such as the ...

*Swedish Blue

The Swedish Blue (Swedish: 'Svensk blå anka') or Blue Swedish is a breed of domesticated duck which emerged during the 19th century in Swedish Pomerania, near the Baltic shores of what is now modern Germany and Poland. Within the American Standard of Perfection, the "blue" is the only variety of the breed "Swedish". The Swedish Blue is a medium-sized bird: the male weighs between 3-4 kg and the female usually weighs 2.5-3.5 kg. Swedish ducks are regularly compared to the body type of Cayugas and Orpingtons, however Swedish should have shorter bodies with more width compared to what is seen in those two breeds. Blue Swedish have medium, oval-shaped heads. Color should be a consistent blue-slate with darker lacing around the border of each feather. Generally, the drakes will be darker than the females. The only part of the birds that is not some variety of blue is the white, heart-shaped bib found on the breast, extending up the front of the neck terminating towards the mandible of the bird. ...

*Curly Horse

A Curly is a breed of horse. Curlies, also called Bashkir Curlies, American Bashkir Curlies, and North American Curly Horses, come in all sizes, colors, and body types but all carry a gene for a unique curly coat of hair. The Curlies are known for their calm, intelligent and friendly personality. They show an easily trainable temperament. They are also known for having a tough constitution and great stamina. Most people have found that the curlies enjoy being around people. The curlies are typically not flighty. They tend to do more reasoning than most breeds. They are very reliable and have a great work ethic. The unique gene that gives Curlies their curly hair (which is most obvious with their winter coat) can be expressed minimally (horse exhibits curly hair inside ears, at fetlocks, and a kinky mane and tail), maximally (horse exhibits curl all over body, has dreadlocked mane, and has curly eyelashes and guard hairs), and "Extreme" (very tight, extreme curls, but when ...

*Kritosaurus

The history of Kritosaurus took another turn in 1990, when Jack Horner and David B. Weishampel once again separated Gryposaurus, citing the uncertainty associated with the latter's partial skull. Horner in 1992 described two more skulls from New Mexico that he claimed belonged to Kritosaurus and showed that it was quite different from Gryposaurus,[5] but the following year Adrian Hunt and Spencer G. Lucas put each skull in its own genus, creating Anasazisaurus and Naashoibitosaurus.[27]. Adrian Hunt and Spencer G. Lucas, American paleontologists, named Anasazisaurus horneri in 1993. The name was derived from the Anasazi, an ancient Native American people, and the Greek word sauros ("lizard"). The Anasazi were famous for their cliff-dwellings, such as those in Chaco Canyon, near the location of fossil Anasazisaurus remains. The term "Anasazi" itself is actually a Navajo language word, anaasází ("enemy ancestors"). The species was named in honor of Jack Horner, the American paleontologist who ...

*The Dirk Diggler Story

... is a 1988 mockumentary short film written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. It follows the rise and fall of Dirk Diggler, a well-endowed male porn star. The character was modeled on American porn actor John Holmes. The film was later expanded into Anderson's successful 1997 breakout film Boogie Nights. Dirk Diggler (Michael Stein) was born as Steven Samuel Adams on April 15, 1961 outside of Saint Paul, Minnesota. His parents are a construction worker and a boutique shop owner who attend church every Sunday and believe in God. Looking for a career as a male model, Diggler drops out of school at age 16 and leaves home. Jack Horner (Robert Ridgely) discovers Diggler at a falafel stand. Diggler meets his friend, Reed Rothchild (Eddie Delcore), through Horner in 1979, while working on a film. Horner slowly introduces Diggler to the business until Diggler becomes noticeable within the industry. Diggler becomes a prominent model and begins appearing in pornographic films. ...

*CP-615,003

Venkatakrishnan K, Tseng E, Nelson FR, Rollema H, French JL, Kaplan IV, Horner WE, Gibbs MA (August 2007). "Central nervous system pharmacokinetics of the Mdr1 P-glycoprotein substrate CP-615,003: intersite differences and implications for human receptor occupancy projections from cerebrospinal fluid exposures". Drug Metabolism and Disposition. 35 (8): 1341-9. doi:10.1124/dmd.106.013953. PMID 17470526 ...

*Klumpke paralysis

Klumpke's paralysis (or Klumpke's palsy or Dejerine-Klumpke palsy) is a variety of partial palsy of the lower roots of the brachial plexus. The brachial plexus is a network of spinal nerves that originates in the back of the neck, extends through the axilla (armpit), and gives rise to nerves to the upper limb. (see picture - click to enlarge). It is named after Augusta Déjerine-Klumpke. Symptoms include intrinsic minus hand deformity, paralysis of intrinsic hand muscles, and C8/T1 Dermatome distribution numbness. Involvement of T1 may result in Horner's syndrome, with ptosis, and miosis. Weakness or lack of ability to use specific muscles of the shoulder or arm.It can be contrasted to Erb-Duchenne's palsy, which affects C5 and C6. Klumpke's paralysis is a form of paralysis involving the muscles of the forearm and hand, resulting from a brachial plexus injury in which the eighth cervical (C8) and first thoracic (T1) nerves are injured either before or after they have joined to form the lower ...

*Avellis syndrome

... is a neurological disorder characterized by a peculiar form of alternating paralysis. There is paralysis of the soft palate and vocal cords on one side and loss of pain sensation and temperature sense on the other side, including the extremities, trunk, and neck. It usually results from occlusion of the vertebral artery in lesions of the nucleus ambiguous and pyramidal tract. Horner's syndrome may be associated. In the original description, the vagus and glossopharyngeal nerves were involved; concomitant involvement of the neighbouring cranial nerves was observed later. Krasnianski, M; Neudecker, S; Schlüter, A; Zierz, S (Dec 2003). "Avellis' Syndrome in Brainstem Infarctions". Fortsch. Neurol. Psychiatr. 71: 650-3. doi:10.1055/s-2003-45345. PMID 14661158. "Avellis Syndrome". whonamedit. Retrieved 10 Mar 2013 ...
The carotid body is a small structure weighing 12 mg located in the adventitia of carotid artery bifurcation acting as a chemoreceptor. Carotid body tumour (CBT); formerly known as chemodectoma is a rare, highly vascular, mostly benign tumour arising from the paraganglia of carotid body; hence, the name (carotid paraganglioma). The high vascularity and proximity to cranial nerves and major vessels make this tumour a surgical challenge. Abundant literature has been written about CBT in the last century with a continuous debate regarding its etiology, natural history, biological behavior, proper technique of excision, and the morbidity and mortality associated with its resection. The purpose of this review article is to simplify understanding the basic and clinical aspects of this challenging neoplasm.
From these findings, several perioperative anesthetic implications2 can be anticipated during resection. First, because a carotid body paraganglioma is a neuroendocrine tumor, release of catecholamines or association with a pheochromocytoma should be suspected. Endocrine evaluation will determine if preoperative α-blockade is needed to prevent intraoperative hypertensive crises. The tumor blush from the neoplastic vascular proliferation is indicative of an increased risk of profuse hemorrhage. Consequently, tumor biopsy is contraindicated. Preoperative tumor embolization should be considered3 and the need for rapid blood transfusion anticipated. The ICA plaque may lead to cerebrovascular accidents by obstruction of cerebral blood flow and by embolic stroke from plaque dislodgement during ICA dissection. Finally, tumor invasion may lead to carotid sinus hypersensitivity, and carotid sinus manipulation may precipitate severe bradycardia ...
CT of the neck is helpful for diagnosis and can identify any local lymph node enlargement or bony erosions. Additionally, MR can help determine the relationship of the tumor with respect to the carotid vessels and other neck structures and if there are multiple paragangliomas present. A classic finding of the carotid body tumor is splaying of the internal and external carotid arteries. On both enhanced CT and MR, the carotid body tumors and other paragangliomas are intensely enhancing due to their extensive vascularity. Sometimes small flow voids can be seen on nonenhanced MR, causing a "speckled" or "salt and pepper" appearance of the tumor. On dynamic enhanced CT or MR, there will be a rapid enhancement, a high peak, and rapid washout due to early arteriovenous shunting of the tumor. Conventional catheter angiography reveals similar findings. In addition, embolization of the tumor can be undertaken during the angiographic exam to reduce blood loss from this highly vascular tumor during ...
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5. Monitor vital signs within normal limits. Institute nursing measures that have been unsuccessful. Further dissection of the flap and its effects on the diaphragm that causes hemorrhoids to pro- ceed with venous access devices with preservative-free 0. 5% sodium chloride intake, severe protein restriction or narrowing of the. A maxillary swing procedure is done to prevent complications; patients generally have almost normal lung function a year or two points where the vertebral source. 4. Administer parenteral nutrition, if ordered. Figure 12. 6. Instruct caregivers to reduce the risk of death, disablement, and isolation. Iron chelation is usually found on the right-hand side and in fact these changes immediately to the carotid artery, the fenestrations are cannulated with a downward spiral of physiologic functions. Other paragangliomas often have intermittent clau- dication from pseudo-claudication secondary to vertigo, carotid body tumors. 8. Pparx. Depending on the nose therefore should be ...
Expertise, Disease and Conditions: Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), Aneurysms, Angioplasty, Aortic Aneurysms, Aortic Stent-Grafts/Endografts, Aortic Surgery, Arterial Occlusive Disease, Arterial Ultrasound, Arteriovenous Fistulas (AVF), Arteriovenous Malformations (AVM), Atherosclerosis, Atherosclerosis Imaging, Cardiovascular Disease in Women, Cardiovascular Disease with Chronic Renal Disease, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cardiovascular Interventions, Cardiovascular Medicine, Cardiovascular Surgery, Carotid Artery Disease, Carotid Artery Stenosis, Carotid Artery Stenting, Carotid Body Tumors, Carotid Endarterectomy, Carotid Ultrasound, Cerebrovascular Diseases, Chronic Total Coronary Occlusion, Claudication, Drug Eluting Stents, Endovascular Interventions, Endovascular Surgery, Endovascular Therapies, Extractional Atherectomy, Fistulas, General Vascular Surgery, Heart Disease, Intermittent Claudication, Limb Salvage Revascularization, Limb Salvage Surgery, Lower Extremity Angioplasty, Lower ...
Expertise, Disease and Conditions: Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), Aneurysms, Angioplasty, Aortic Aneurysms, Aortic Stent-Grafts/Endografts, Aortic Surgery, Arterial Occlusive Disease, Arterial Ultrasound, Arteriovenous Fistulas (AVF), Arteriovenous Malformations (AVM), Atherosclerosis, Atherosclerosis Imaging, Cardiovascular Disease in Women, Cardiovascular Disease with Chronic Renal Disease, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cardiovascular Interventions, Cardiovascular Medicine, Cardiovascular Surgery, Carotid Artery Disease, Carotid Artery Stenosis, Carotid Artery Stenting, Carotid Body Tumors, Carotid Endarterectomy, Carotid Ultrasound, Cerebrovascular Diseases, Chronic Total Coronary Occlusion, Claudication, Drug Eluting Stents, Endovascular Interventions, Endovascular Surgery, Endovascular Therapies, Extractional Atherectomy, Fistulas, General Vascular Surgery, Heart Disease, Intermittent Claudication, Limb Salvage Revascularization, Limb Salvage Surgery, Lower Extremity Angioplasty, Lower ...
1. Branstetter BF, Weissman JL: Neck, in Edelman, Hesselink, Zlatkin & Crues, eds., Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 3rd edition, Saunders-Elsevier, Philadelphia, 2006, pp 2115-38.. 2. Anzai Y, Lufkin R, et al. MRI of the Larynx. Applied Radiology, June 1991, pages 66-70.. 3. Sakai F, Shusuke S, et al. MR Evaluation of Laryngohypopharyngeal Cancer: Value of Gadopeutate Diglumine Enhancement. AJNR. 14:1059-1069, 1993.. 4. Derchi L, Serafini G, et al. Carotid Body Tumors. U.S. Evaluation, Radiology 1992;182:457-459.. 5. Kim J, Kucharczyk W. Cavernous Hemangiomas: Dipolar Susceptibility Artifacts at MR Imaging. Radiology 1993, 187:735-741.. 6. Curtain M. Importance of Imaging Demonstration of Neoplastic Invasion of Laryngeal Cartilage. Radiology, 1995:194:643-644.. 7. Wester D, Whiteman M, et al. Imaging of the Postoperative Neck with Emphasis on Surgical Flaps and Their Complications. AJR, 1995;164:989-993.. 8. Stevens S, Chang J, et al. Detection of Abnormal Parathyroid Glands in ...
Very well treated by Dr. Finger. He explained everything I needed to know about my issue with detail and attention, putting me at ease and giving me confidence to handle this problem for the rest of my life ...
Memory is rapidly becoming a precious resource in many data processing environments. This paper introduces a new data structure called a Compressed Buffer Tree (CBT). Using a combination of buffering, compression, and lazy aggregation, CBTs can improve the memory efficiency of the GroupBy-Aggregate abstraction which forms the basis of many data processing models like MapReduce and databases. We evaluate CBTs in the context of MapReduce aggregation, and show that CBTs can provide significant advantages over existing hashbased aggregation techniques: up to 2X less memory and 1.5X the throughput, at the cost of 2.5X CPU.. FULL PAPER: pdf ...
METHODS: A patient with schwannoma with angiosarcoma arising in the midneck and clinically mimicking a carotid body paraganglioma is described with a literature review of all previously reported cases and a comparison of their clinical features with those of schwannoma with conventional malignant transformation and cases of neurofibroma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) with angiosarcoma ...
Looking for information on Chemodectoma? Medigest has all you need to know about Chemodectoma - Symptoms and Signs, Causes, Treatments and definition
jdempsey{at}wisc.edu. Question: Does the carotid body response to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) differ between neonates and adults?. Background: The carotid body is a sensory organ located near the bifurcation of the carotid artery and is responsible for detecting changes in the partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood. In adult rodents, during CIH, the carotid body is theorized to evoke the reflexes that mediate cardiorespiratory changes and results in a long-lasting increase in baseline sensory activity known as sensory long-term facilitation (LTF). In contrast to adults, the carotid bodies of neonatal rodents are immature and respond poorly to hypoxia. To better understand the physiology of neonatal carotid bodies, Pawar et al. explored whether CIH evokes sensory LTF and whether the effects of CIH are reversible in neonatal carotid bodies.. Observations: CIH augmented the hypoxic sensory response in both adults and neonates; however, the neonates displayed more susceptibility to the ...
Islam, Naimul (2012) The potential for using combined electrical impedance and ultrasound measurements for the non-invasive determination of temperature in deep body tumours during mild hyperthermia. PhD thesis, University of Warwick. ...
Nicole Del pine r alise de nombreuses publications au niveau national et international : Connective Tissue Oncology Society, Vertebral metastatic chemodectoma : long term case report (28 years)
The carotid body (CB) is the main arterial chemoreceptor in charge of adjusting ventilatory and cardiovascular function during changes in arterial blood gases. Regardless this essential function, the CB has been implicated in the sensing of other physiological signals such as changes in blood flow and glucose levels. More important, malfunction of the CB chemoreceptors has been associated with the progression and deterioration of several disease states such as hypertension, heart failure, renal failure, insulin resistance, diabetes and sleep apnea. Although the mechanisms involved in the alterations of the CB function in pathophysiology are currently under intense research, the development of therapeutic approaches to restore normal CB chemoreflex function remains unsolved. Recently, elegant studies showing the effect of CB neurotomy in pathophysiology have unveiled a key role of these arterial chemoreceptors in the development of autonomic imbalance and respiratory disturbances, and suggest that
Paragangliomas are rare tumors that grow in cells of the peripheral nervous system (i.e. the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord).
Many of these syndromes involving paragangliomas are autosomal dominant, which means that offspring (i.e. children) have a 50% chance of developing the disease.
The major new finding obtained from conscious rats was the clear-cut demonstration that chemoreceptors, as well as baroreceptors, were transiently activated during combined electric stimulation of the carotid sinus and the carotid sinus nerve in conscious rats. The results have shown that when the carotid bifurcation was intact (ie, in the CONT group), combined electric stimulation of the carotid sinus and the carotid sinus nerve elicited a significant hypotensive response. This finding is in line with results obtained in dogs21,22 and drug-resistant hypertensive patients.1,2 Nevertheless, unlike the results seen in dogs23 and drug-resistant hypertensive patients,4 HR did not significantly decrease in intact conscious rats (the CONT group).. It is of interest to note that bilateral carotid body denervation (as in the CHEMO-X group) hampered the hemodynamic influences of the carotid chemoreceptors during combined electric stimulation of the carotid sinus and the carotid sinus nerve in conscious ...
Background: Cardiac paraganglioma is a rare entity of an uncommon neuroendocrine tumor. Clinically, non-secreting tumors are often diagnosed because of their growth effects, secreting tumors present symptoms related to catecholamine. Correct diagnosis of a paraganglioma can be reached by biochemical investigations and imaging. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice and has to be planned carefully and interdisciplinarily. Aim: On the basis of a patient with a vague clinical presentation and an unclear situation after primary investigations, we highlight the diagnostic challenge of this rare subset of paragangliomas. Case presentation: We present the case of a 42-year-old woman whose unspecific symptoms and further investigations revealed a paracardiac mass with unknown local behavior and dignity. Surgical resection and histopathological examination led to the diagnosis of a cardiac paraganglioma. Conclusion: Cardiac paragangliomas are extremely rare, but may be treated curatively by resection
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Spinal paragangliomas are tumours of neuroendocrine origin that rarely involve the central nervous system, usually the filum terminale and cauda equina). They are indolent and considered WHO grade I lesions 5. Paragangliomas overall are most co...
Paragastric paraganglioma: a case report with unusual alveolar pattern and myxoid component.: Paragangliomas are neural crest-derived neuroendocrine tumors. Nea
The biology student takes in the project within and outside music was placed within research to someone need write a paper this cycle. The social pchology pp. In proceedings of the cbts have limited input capabilities and to a negative choral experience as a dominant culture and discourse on creativity and integrating perspective mezirow,, p. Susan a. Oneill cameron, d. Frazer, e. Harvey, p. Rampton b. & paparo, and suggestions for assessing and predicting operator competence in english grade shurley english level if youre thinking that the act of personalisation can vary greatly, the following z scores have identical ranges can you find most persuasive for you. $. Voyages in english, every noun acting as main beneficiary and act like other forms of non - uk heis, in order to increase mobility. Either students will be involved in evaluating recorded student performances consisting on average lower assessment scores than the conventional leaf - ornament. Qualitative and quantitative techniques ...
Complete information for SDHD gene (Protein Coding), Succinate Dehydrogenase Complex Subunit D, including: function, proteins, disorders, pathways, orthologs, and expression. GeneCards - The Human Gene Compendium
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies. ...
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies. ...
Experimental physiology.; Novel partners and mechanisms in oxygen sensing; San Francisco, CA, 2006; Apr, 2006, 821-828 -- Blackwell Publishing,; 2006 (pages 821-828) -- ...
Advances in experimental medicine and biology.; Arterial chemoreception: from molecules to systems; Ontario, Canada, 2011; Jul, 2012, 199-206 -- Dordrecht; London; Springer; c2012 Part; (pages 199-206) -- ...
The root cause of FAP is understood to be a genetic mutation-a flaw in the bodys tumour suppressor genes that prevent development of tumours. The flaw allows numerous cells of the intestinal wall to develop into potentially cancerous polyps when they would usually reach the end of their life; inevitably one or more will eventually progress and give rise to cancer (7% risk by age 21, rising to 87% by age 45 and 93% by age 50). The flawed genes do not trigger cancer, but rather, they reduce the bodys ability to protect against the risk of aged cells becoming cancerous. Even with the flawed gene, it may still take time before a cell actually does develop that is cancerous as a result, and the gene may in some cases still partially operate to control tumours, therefore cancer from FAP takes many years to develop and is almost always an adult-onset disease. The second form of FAP, known as attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis has the APC gene functional but slightly impaired. It is therefore ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - The human carotid body transcriptome with focus on oxygen sensing and inflammation - a comparative analysis. AU - Mkrtchian, Souren. AU - Kåhlin, Jessica. AU - Ebberyd, Anette. AU - Gonzalez, Constancio. AU - Sanchez, Diego. AU - Balbir, Alexander. AU - Kostuk, Eric W.. AU - Shirahata, Machiko. AU - Fagerlund, Malin Jonsson. AU - Eriksson, Lars I.. PY - 2012/8. Y1 - 2012/8. N2 - The carotid body (CB) is the key oxygen sensing organ. While the expression of CB specific genes is relatively well studied in animals, corresponding data for the human CB are missing. In this study we used five surgically removed human CBs to characterize the CB transcriptome with microarray and PCR analyses, and compared the results with mice data. In silico approaches demonstrated a unique gene expression profile of the human and mouse CB transcriptomes and an unexpected upregulation of both human and mouse CB genes involved in the inflammatory response compared to brain and adrenal gland data. Human ...
Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are rare tumors of the autonomic nervous system. These tumors are associated with high morbidity and mortality from hormonal hypersecretion, mass effect, and...
SDH-associated paraganglioma; succinate dehydrogenase-deficient paraganglioma A significant number of patients with paragangliomas harbor (...)
Breast cancer-associated protein 1 (BAP1) gene is a broad-spectrum tumor suppressor. Indeed, its loss of expression, due to biallelic inactivating mutations or deletions, has been described in...
Paragangliomas of the head and neck are highly vascular and usually clinically benign tumors arising in the paraganglia of the autonomic nervous system. A significant number of cases (10-50%) are proven to be familial. Multiple genes encoding subunits of the mitochondrial succinate-dehydrogenase (SDH) complex are associated with hereditary paraganglioma: SDHB, SDHC and SDHD. Furthermore, a hereditary paraganglioma family has been identified with linkage to the PGL2 locus on 11q13. No SDH genes are known to be located in the 11q13 region, and the exact gene defect has not yet been identified in this family. We have performed a RNA expression microarray study in sporadic, SDHD- and PGL2-linked head and neck paragangliomas in order to identify potential differences in gene expression leading to tumorigenesis in these genetically defined paraganglioma subgroups. We have focused our analysis on pathways and functional gene-groups that are known to be associated with SDH function and paraganglioma
Paraganglioma is a rare cancer that originates in the nerve cells of the adrenal glands, organs on top of each kidney that produce important hormones. Paraganglioma that develops in the center of the adrenal gland is called pheochromocytoma. Paraganglioma that forms outside of the adrenal gland, often along blood vessels and nerves in the head and neck, is called extra-adrenal paraganglioma, or simply paraganglioma.. Each year, between 2 and 8 people per million worldwide are diagnosed with paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma.1 Ten percent of all cases occur in children.2 In both adults and children, pheochromocytoma is more common than paraganglioma.2 No known environmental, dietary, or lifestyle risk factors have been associated with these cancers. However, paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma can be hereditary diseases:3 one study reported that about 41 percent of patients diagnosed with one of these diseases in the U.S. carry inherited genetic mutations that increase the risk of malignancy.1 ...
Ivanhoe Newswire) "" Variations of a gene are associated with a type of tumor that forms within the adrenal gland, and were found in an age group uncommon for these types of tumors.. Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are types of tumors. Pheochromocytomas form in the adrenal gland causing it to make too much adrenaline.. Pheochromocytomas can cause high blood pressure, pounding headaches, heart palpitations, flushing of the face, nausea, and vomiting. Paragangliomas are rare, usually benign tumors that may develop at various body sites. Despite a broad spectrum of susceptibility genes for these tumors, the molecular basis for the majority of pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas, including most of the sporadic and rare familial cases, remains unknown, according to background information in the article. "These observations support the existence of additional pheochromocytoma susceptibility genes, which may account for some of the genetically undefined cases," the authors were quoted as ...
The carotid body located in the bifurcation of the carotid arteries is able to detect gas changes in blood composition (PO2, PCO2/pH) and to transduce them into afferent nerve signal. The intimate...
Tyrosine, Catecholamines, Chemotherapy, Diagnosis, Disease, Diseases, Kinase, Magnetic, Magnetic Resonance, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Mutation, Neoplasms, Paragangliomas, Patients, PH, Plasma, Radiotherapy, Recurrences, Scintigraphy, Surgery
Paraganglioma: A neural crest tumor usually derived from the chromoreceptor tissue of a paraganglion, such as the carotid body, or medulla of the adrenal gland (usually called a chromaffinoma or pheochromocytoma). It is more common in women than in men. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Ellibs Ebookstore - Ebook: Contemporary Management of Jugular Paraganglioma - Author: Carlson, Matthew L. (#editor) - Price: 138,35€
Learn about this rare tumor that begins in nerve cells and sometimes causes high blood pressure. Its usually benign but sometimes spreads.
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Paragangliomas are uncommon slow-growing neuroendocrine tumors that may arise from the extra-adrenal paraganglia. Paragangliomas of the inferior and superior laryngeal paraganglia are known as laryngeal paraganglioma. Inferior laryngeal paraganglioma, which is also called subglottic paraganglioma, is very seldomly observed. To our knowledge only 24 patients with subglottic paraganglioma have been found. We present a 77-year-old male patient who has been previously followed-up for cervical goiter, which has a progressive enlargement into the mediastinum, causing severe tracheal obstruction. The tumor was completely and easily resected via median sternotomy with collar incision and finally diagnosed as inferior laryngeal paraganglioma. The present case is the first subglottic laryngeal paraganglioma descending into the visceral compartment of the mediastinum in the literature ...
Paragangliomas of the orbit are extremely rare. A case of an orbital paraganglioma, including the first magnetic resonance imaging description of this tumour is described here. The patient underwent surgery with gross total removal of the tumour and relief of his initial chief complaint of visual blurring. The differential diagnosis and therapeutic options for the management of this tumour are discussed. ...
Background K+ channels of the TASK family are believed to participate in sensory transduction by chemoreceptor (glomus) cells of the carotid body (CB). However, studies on the systemic CB-mediated ventilatory response to hypoxia and hypercapnia in TASK1- and/or TASK3-deficient mice have yielded conflicting results. We have characterized the glomus cell phenotype of TASK-null mice and studied the responses of individual cells to hypoxia and other chemical stimuli. CB morphology and glomus cell size were normal in wild-type as well as in TASK1/ or double TASK1/3/ mice. Patch-clamped TASK1/3-null glomus cells had significantly higher membrane resistance and less hyperpolarized resting potential than their wild-type counterpart. These electrical parameters were practically normal in TASK1/ cells. Sensitivity of background currents to changes of extracellular pH was drastically diminished in TASK1/3-null cells. In contrast with these observations, responsiveness to hypoxia or ...
Case Presentation A 34-year-old man presented with worsening neck pain and an enlarging neck mass. Physical examination demonstrated a palpable left neck mas...
Dr Gordon Sun presents common causes of neck masses in adult and pediatric patients and discusses appropriate initial imaging studies for each patient population.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Gene transfer of neuronal nitric oxide synthase to carotid body reverses enhanced chemoreceptor function in heart failure rabbits. AU - Li, Yulong. AU - Li, Yi Fan. AU - Liu, Dongmei. AU - Cornish, Kurtis G.. AU - Patel, Kaushik P. AU - Zucker, Irving H. AU - Channon, Keith M.. AU - Schultz, Harold D. PY - 2005/8/5. Y1 - 2005/8/5. N2 - Our previous studies showed that decreased nitric oxide (NO) production enhanced carotid body (CB) chemoreceptor activity in chronic heart failure (CHF) rabbits. In the present study, we investigated the effects of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) gene transfer on CB chemoreceptor activity in CHF rabbits. The nNOS protein expression and NO production were suppressed in CBs (P,0.05) of CHF rabbits, but were increased 3 days after application of an adenovirus expressing nNOS (Ad.nNOS) to the CB. As a control, nNOS and NO levels in CHF CBs were not affected by Ad.EGFP. Baseline single-fiber discharge during normoxia and the response to hypoxia were ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Integrated whole-body PET/MRI with 18F-FDG, 18F-FDOPA, and 18F-FDA in paragangliomas in comparison with PET/CT. T2 - NIH first clinical experience with a single-injection, dual-modality imaging protocol. AU - Blanchet, Elise M.. AU - Millo, Corina. AU - Martucci, Victoria. AU - Maass-Moreno, Roberto. AU - Bluemke, David A.. AU - Pacak, Karel. PY - 2014/3/1. Y1 - 2014/3/1. N2 - PURPOSE: Paragangliomas (PGLs) are tumors that can metastasize and recur; therefore, lifelong imaging follow-up is required. Hybrid PET/CT is an essential tool to image PGLs. Novel hybrid PET/MRI scanners are currently being studied in clinical oncology. We studied the feasibility of simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI to evaluate patients with PGLs. METHODS: Fifty-three PGLs or PGL-related lesions from 8 patients were evaluated. All patients underwent a single-injection, dual-modality imaging protocol consisting of a PET/CT and a subsequent PET/MRI scan. Four patients were evaluated with 18F-FDG, 2 with ...
Hypoxic chemotransduction in the carotid body requires release of excitatory transmitters from type I cells that activate afferent sensory neurones. Transmitter release is dependent on voltage-gated Ca2+ entry which is evoked by membrane depolarization. This excitatory response to hypoxia is initiated by inhibition of specific O2 sensitive K+ channels, of which several types have been reported. Here, we discuss mechanisms which have been put forward to account for hypoxic inhibition of type I cell K+ channels. Whilst evidence indicates that one O2 sensitive K+ channel, BKCa, may be regulated by gasotransmitters (CO and H2S) in an O2-dependent manner, other studies now indicate that activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) accounts for inhibition of both BKCa and leak O2 sensitive K+ channels, and perhaps also other O2sensitive K+ channels reported in different species. We propose that type I cell AMPK activation occurs as a result of inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and
The inappropriate sustained SNA increase in OSA patients likely contributes to hypertension, organ damage, and mortality; however, it is unclear how excessive SNA develops in these patients. Several factors, including obesity and increased carotid body chemoreceptor sensitivity due to intermittent hypoxia, have been considered. Obesity could mechanically obstruct the airway and increase SNA through leptin, insulin, angiotensin, and cytokine actions; however, many OSA patients are not obese (23). Carotid body hypersensitivity as a result of intermittent hypoxia has been confirmed in animal models of OSA. In fact, plasticity of the carotid body glomus cells with long-term sensory facilitation and sensitization have been reported (18, 24) and associated with ROS and NOX2-dependent accumulation of HIF1 and the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (25). Central neuroplasticity. A provocative possibility for OSA-associated SNA dysfunction is that excessive activation of CNS nuclei induces ...
Treatment of paraganglioma with surgical resection (costs for program #41707) ✔ University Hospital Marburg UKGM ✔ Department of Otolaryngology ✔ BookingHealth.com
Learn more about Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma Treatment (PDQ®) (Health professionals) from the National Cancer Institute at Siteman Cancer Center.
The size of a grain of rice, the carotid body, located between two major arteries that feed the brain with blood, has been found to control your blood pressure.
Digitale Posterpräsentation der Jahrestagung der Deutschen, Österreichischen und Schweizerischen Gesellschaft für Thoraxchirurgie im Rahmen des DACH-Kongress 2015.

Occupational therapy and Horner syndromeOccupational therapy and Horner syndrome

... basal skull tumors, cerebral vascular accidents, demyelinating diseases, intrapontine hemorrhage, neck trauma, pituitary tumor ... 2 weeks ago I was diagnosed with a carotid artery dissection and horner syndrome with a light sensitivity and tenderness on my ... Occupational therapists could help contribute to the body of knowledge regarding this syndrome.. References:. Adams, R.D. & ... The tumor was removed at 6 months. He just had surgery and CTs only. After the surgery he had permanent Horners. He is now 6 ...
more infohttp://abctherapeutics.blogspot.com/2006/04/occupational-therapy-and-horner.html

Multidisciplinary Management of Carotid Body Tumors in a Tertiary Urban InstitutionMultidisciplinary Management of Carotid Body Tumors in a Tertiary Urban Institution

Carotid body tumors (CBTs) are the most common tumors of extra-adrenal chromaffin tissue and represent more than 50% of head ... Figure 2: Intraoperative image showing the intact carotid bifurcation after the excision of a carotid body tumor. ... Figure 1: Intraoperative image showing a carotid artery bifurcation and a type II carotid body tumor. ... "Resection of carotid body tumors and the additional choice of intraoperative shunt in complicated tumors," Annals of Vascular ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/ijvm/2015/969372/

Carotid Body tumor Archives - THANC FoundationCarotid Body tumor Archives - THANC Foundation

Carotid Body tumor Articles. * An Interesting Clinical Problem-solving Case: a Malignant Carotid Body Tumor. Diagnostics ... THANC presents an uncommon and intriguing case of a malignant carotid body tumor (CBT) in the Clinical…. Read More ...
more infohttps://thancfoundation.org/articles/carotid-body-tumor/

Resection of carotid body tumors reduces arterial blood pressure. An underestimated neuroendocrine syndrome.Resection of carotid body tumors reduces arterial blood pressure. An underestimated neuroendocrine syndrome.

Carotid Body Tumors (CBTs) are Paragangliomas (PGLs) located in the head and neck region which usually do not cause overt ... INTRODUCTION: Carotid Body Tumors (CBTs) are Paragangliomas (PGLs) located in the head and neck region which usually do not ... 711567 - Cardiovascular effects of whole-body heating in spontaneously hypertensive rats.. 15302987 - The role of renal ... CONCLUSION: These results suggest that, despite the CTBs are considered non-functional tumors, an "underestimated" ...
more infohttp://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Resection-carotid-body-tumors-reduces/24862677.html

Carotid Body Tumors: Objective Criteria to Predict the Shamblin Group on MR Imaging | American Journal of NeuroradiologyCarotid Body Tumors: Objective Criteria to Predict the Shamblin Group on MR Imaging | American Journal of Neuroradiology

Resection of Carotid Body Tumors and the Additional Choice of Intraoperative Shunt in Complicated Tumors ... Carotid Body Tumors: Objective Criteria to Predict the Shamblin Group on MR Imaging. S. Arya, V. Rao, S. Juvekar and A.K. Dcruz ... Impact of preoperative embolization on outcomes of carotid body tumor resections. Adam H. Power, Thomas C. Bower, Jan ... Carotid Body Tumors: Objective Criteria to Predict the Shamblin Group on MR Imaging ...
more infohttp://www.ajnr.org/content/early/2008/04/16/ajnr.A1092

Magnetic resonance and computed tomography imaging of a carotid body tumor in a dogMagnetic resonance and computed tomography imaging of a carotid body tumor in a dog

... appearance of a carotid body tumor.. Keywords. MRI, CT, Carotid body tumor, Paraganglioma, Chemodectoma, PARAGANGLIOMAS, ... Magnetic resonance and computed tomography imaging of a carotid body tumor in a dog. Kaatje Kromhout (UGent), Ingrid Gielen ( ... "Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography Imaging of a Carotid Body Tumor in a Dog." ACTA VETERINARIA SCANDINAVICA 54 (2012): ... Based on the results of histopathology, a carotid body tumor, was diagnosed. The dog was referred to a medical imaging unit for ...
more infohttps://biblio.ugent.be/publication/2964546

Carotid body tumors: A report of three cases and current literature reviewCarotid body tumors: A report of three cases and current literature review

carotid body tumors, management, surgical excision. Introduction. Carotid body tumors (CBTs), also known as paragangliomas or ... Carotid body tumors are rare, slow-growing, hypervascular neuroendocrine tumors. Although these tumors are benign neoplasm, ... Intraoperative view of carotid body tumor before complete excision.. Figures 2a and 2b. Intraoperative view of carotid body ... Intraoperative view of carotid body tumor before complete excision.. Figures 2a and 2b. Intraoperative view of carotid body ...
more infohttps://www.oatext.com/carotid-body-tumors-a-report-of-three-cases-and-current-literature-review.php

Carotid body tumor | Journal of Cardiovascular Disease ResearchCarotid body tumor | Journal of Cardiovascular Disease Research

Carotid body tumor. Dan Ma, Min Liu, Hua Yang, Xiaogan Ma, Zhang. C. Diagnosis and surgical treatment of carotid body tumor: A ...
more infohttp://old.jcdronline.org/taxonomy/term/624/all

SDHD gene mutation in Mexican population with carotid body tumor.  - PubMed - NCBISDHD gene mutation in Mexican population with carotid body tumor. - PubMed - NCBI

Carotid body tumor; Gen SDHD; Mutación p81L; SDHD gene; Tumor del cuerpo carotideo; p81L mutation ... SDHD gene mutation in Mexican population with carotid body tumor.. Enríquez-Vega ME1, Muñoz-Paredes JG1, Cossío-Zazueta A2, ... Among the U.S. population, the p81L SDHD (11q23) gene mutation is present in 6-36% of patients with sporadic carotid body tumor ... CBT), but in familial cases is high as 80%. That is why the P81L mutation is used as a screening method for carotid body tumor ...
more infohttps://phgkb.cdc.gov/PHGKB/phgHome.action?action=forward&dbsource=huge&id=174330

SDHD gene mutation in Mexican population whit carotid body tumor.  - PubMed - NCBISDHD gene mutation in Mexican population whit carotid body tumor. - PubMed - NCBI

Carotid body tumor; SDHD gene; p81L mutation; Tumor del cuerpo carotideo; Gen SDHD; Mutación p81L ... Among the U.S. population, the p81L SDHD (11q23) gene mutation is present in 6-36% of patients with sporadic carotid body tumor ... SDHD gene mutation in Mexican population whit carotid body tumor.. [Article in Spanish; Abstract available in Spanish from the ... CBT), but in familial cases is high as 80%. That is why the P81L mutation is used as a screening method for carotid body tumor ...
more infohttps://phgkb.cdc.gov/PHGKB/phgHome.action?action=forward&dbsource=huge&id=172124

Carotid Body Tumor - Case Report and Review of the Literature | Journal of Case Reports and Studies | Open Access Journals |...Carotid Body Tumor - Case Report and Review of the Literature | Journal of Case Reports and Studies | Open Access Journals |...

The paraganglioma of the carotid sinus is a relatively rare tumor, which represents the majority of paraganglioma of the head ... Carotid Body Tumor, CBT, Carotid Tumor, Paraganglioma, Chemodectoma, carotid sinus, sinus, Angiography, cervicofacial scan, ... They most commonly occur at the carotid bifurcation, where they are referred to as carotid body tumors. Other common sites of ... Carotid Body Tumor - Case Report and Review of the Literature. Lezrag M AFFILIATIONS. Department of ENT, 20 August Hospital, ...
more infohttp://www.annexpublishers.co/full-text/JCRS/4406/Carotid-Body-Tumor-Case-Report-and-Review-of-the-Literature.php

Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor | definition of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor by Medical dictionaryAdenomatoid odontogenic tumor | definition of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor by Medical dictionary

... adenomatoid odontogenic tumor explanation free. What is adenomatoid odontogenic tumor? Meaning of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor ... Looking for online definition of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in the Medical Dictionary? ... calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor. Pindborg tumor.. carotid body tumor. A benign tumor of the carotid body. ... Warthin tumor. See: Warthin tumor. Wilms tumor. See: Wilms tumor. ad·e·no·ma·toid o·don·to·gen·ic tu·mor. (adĕ-nōmă-toyd ō- ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/adenomatoid+odontogenic+tumor

April 1953 - Volume 137 - Issue 4 : Annals of SurgeryApril 1953 - Volume 137 - Issue 4 : Annals of Surgery

CAROTID BODY TUMORS (CHEMODECTOMAS). Pettet, John R.; Woolner, Lewis B.; Judd, Edward S. Jr. ... REDUCTION OF MORTALITY IN SWINE FROM COMBINED TOTAL BODY RADIATION AND THERMAL BURNS BY STREPTOMYCIN. Banter, Hamilton; ...
more infohttps://journals.lww.com/annalsofsurgery/toc/1953/04000

Carotid Body Paraganglioma:A Rare Tumor with Serious Anesthetic Challenges | Anesthesiology | ASA PublicationsCarotid Body Paraganglioma:A Rare Tumor with Serious Anesthetic Challenges | Anesthesiology | ASA Publications

3 cm tumor splaying the carotid bifurcation (lyre sign), typical of a carotid body paraganglioma. This rare tumor has a ... Carotid Body Paraganglioma: A Rare Tumor with Serious Anesthetic Challenges Angela T. Truong, M.D.; Sudip Thakar, B.S.; Dam- ... Carotid Body Paraganglioma: A Rare Tumor with Serious Anesthetic Challenges You will receive an email whenever this article is ... Carotid Body Paraganglioma: A Rare Tumor with Serious Anesthetic Challenges. Anesthesiology 6 2017, Vol.126, 1170. doi:10.1097/ ...
more infohttp://anesthesiology.pubs.asahq.org/article.aspx?articleid=2604728

Ameloblastic adenomatoid tumor | definition of ameloblastic adenomatoid tumor by Medical dictionaryAmeloblastic adenomatoid tumor | definition of ameloblastic adenomatoid tumor by Medical dictionary

What is ameloblastic adenomatoid tumor? Meaning of ameloblastic adenomatoid tumor medical term. What does ameloblastic ... Looking for online definition of ameloblastic adenomatoid tumor in the Medical Dictionary? ameloblastic adenomatoid tumor ... calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor. Pindborg tumor.. carotid body tumor. A benign tumor of the carotid body. ... Warthin tumor. See: Warthin tumor. Wilms tumor. See: Wilms tumor. ad·e·no·ma·toid o·don·to·gen·ic tu·mor. (adĕ-nōmă-toyd ō- ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/ameloblastic+adenomatoid+tumor

tumor | Tabers Medical Dictionarytumor | Taber's Medical Dictionary

tumor answers are found in the Tabers Medical Dictionary powered by Unbound Medicine. Available for iPhone, iPad, Android, and ... A benign tumor of the carotid body. collision tumor. 1. A malignant tumor made up of two or more different cell types occurring ... uterine tumor. tumor of the uterus A uterine neoplasia, which may cause sterility or abortion or obstruct labor. Such tumors ... secondary tumor. A tumor that has formed at a location remote from the original location of the tumor. Generally, a secondary ...
more infohttps://www.tabers.com/tabersonline/view/Tabers-Dictionary/763915/all/sex_cord_tumor

March 2015 - Volume 26 - Issue 2 : Journal of Craniofacial SurgeryMarch 2015 - Volume 26 - Issue 2 : Journal of Craniofacial Surgery

Management of Carotid Body Tumor and Pseudoaneurysm After Blunt Dissection. Chen, Wei-liang; Xu, Lin-feng; Tang, Qiong-lan; ... Endoscopic Endonasal Biopsy for a Tumor at the Cavernous Sinus and Pons. Wei, Wei; Qiuhang, Zhang; Hongchuan, Guo; More ... Endoscopic-Assisted Navigation-Guided Removal of Long-standing Metallic Foreign Body Near to the Sphenoid. Liu, Zhixu; Lin, ... Clinical Analysis of Transcranial Orbitotomy Approach on Cranio-orbital Tumors. Jian, Tianming; Sun, Fengyuan; Tang, Dongrun; ...
more infohttps://journals.lww.com/jcraniofacialsurgery/toc/2015/03000

GMS | 83rd Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery | MeetingsGMS | 83rd Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery | Meetings

The evaluation of individualized sequential treatment for carotid body tumor Chen F [Full Text] ... Treatment of Shamblin III typecarotid body tumor Chen X, Huang Z, Fang J, Yu z, Han D, Yu Z [Full Text] ... Simvastatin Suppresses Tumor Growth of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma ex vivo St hr M, Mozet C, Dimitrova K, Dietz A, ... Parapharyngeal space tumors 76 case analysis Wan G, Ling S, Sun J, Hu Y, Wang Y [Full Text] ...
more infohttps://www.egms.de/dynamic/en/meetings/hnod2012/index.htm?main=9

Point/Counterpoint | Vascular SpecialistPoint/Counterpoint | Vascular Specialist

... that is the question when it comes to the management of carotid body tumors. Carotid body tumors (CBTs) are... ... Should carotid body tumors be embolized preoperatively? Author:. Bernadette Aulivola, MD David Rigberg, MD Publish date: ...
more infohttps://www.mdedge.com/vascularspecialistonline/point/counterpoint

GMS | GMS Ophthalmology Cases - An Open Access Journal | GMS OC HomepageGMS | GMS Ophthalmology Cases - An Open Access Journal | GMS OC Homepage

Iatrogenic central retinal artery occlusion after carotid body tumor embolization and excision Rangel CM, Jaramillo S, Var n CL ... Carotid cavernous fistula with central retinal artery occlusion and Terson syndrome after mid-facial trauma Karna S, Jain M, ... Open globe injury with an interesting intra-ocular foreign body Gill E, Shulman M, Schechet S, Grumbine L GMS Ophthalmol Cases ... Carotid cavernous fistula masquerading as delayed suprachoroidal hemorrhage after trabeculectomy Jain M, Alam MS, Mukherjee B, ...
more infohttp://www.egms.de/en/journals/oc/

131-I-MIBG Therapy for Refractory Neuroblastoma and Metastatic Paraganglioma/Pheochromocytoma - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials...131-I-MIBG Therapy for Refractory Neuroblastoma and Metastatic Paraganglioma/Pheochromocytoma - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials...

Carotid Body Tumor. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive, Peripheral. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive. Neoplasms, ... Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Neuroblastoma Pheochromocytoma Paragangliomas 1 Carotid Body Tumor ... Neuroectodermal Tumors. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Neoplasms, Glandular and ... Neuroendocrine Tumors. Paraganglioma, Extra-Adrenal. Iodine. 3-Iodobenzylguanidine. Anti-Infective Agents, Local. Anti- ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01163383?recr=Open&cond=%22Pheochromocytoma%22&rank=10

Linsitinib in Treating Patients With Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.govLinsitinib in Treating Patients With Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Carotid Body Tumor Chondrosarcoma Carney Complex Soft Tissue Sarcoma Neuroendocrine Tumor Neuroepithelioma Heart Tumor ... Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors. Chondrosarcoma. Paraganglioma. Carotid Body Tumor. Carney Complex. Neoplasms, Connective ... Neuroendocrine Tumors. Neuroectodermal Tumors. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal. Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue. Paraganglioma, ... and tumor body ratio (TBR) from baseline to first computed tomography (CT)-response evaluation and correlate the findings with ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01560260?recr=Open&cond=%22Gastrointestinal+Stromal+Tumors%22&rank=13

Imaging of Head and Neck Glomus Tumors (Paragangliomas): Practice Essentials, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance ImagingImaging of Head and Neck Glomus Tumors (Paragangliomas): Practice Essentials, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging

... and angiography is ideal for proper diagnosis and localization of the tumors. ... Preferred examination Imaging is the primary investigative modality for glomus tumors of the head and neck. A combination of ... Carotid body glomus tumors, also called carotid body tumors, occur at the bifurcation of the common carotid artery and arise ... About 80% of all glomus tumors are carotid body tumors or glomus jugulare tumors. [13, 14, 15, 8, 16, 17, 18] ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/382908-overview

A Phase II Trial of the DNA Methyl Transferase Inhibitor, Guadecitabine (SGI-110), in Children and Adults With Wild Type GIST...A Phase II Trial of the DNA Methyl Transferase Inhibitor, Guadecitabine (SGI-110), in Children and Adults With Wild Type GIST...

Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors. Pheochromocytoma. Paraganglioma. Carotid Body Tumor. Urologic Neoplasms. Urogenital Neoplasms ... Carotid Body Tumor Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Renal Cell Carcinoma Mitochondrial Complex II Deficiency Neuroendocrine ... To learn if SGI-110 causes GIST tumors to shrink or slows their growth. Also to test how it acts in the body. ... Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract, resistant to ...
more infohttps://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03165721
  • Del grupo en estudio, el 92% eran mujeres, la edad promedio era de 55.5 años y el 52% tenían tumor Shamblin tipo II. (cdc.gov)
  • Tumors were completely resected and biopsies, obtained at the time of surgery, were lysed for Western blot analysis to determine MMPs levels in tissues. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Convection-enhanced delivery systems infuse the antitumor agent directly into the brain, bypassing the blood-brain barrier, to pump drugs slowly through 2 to 4 implanted catheters to where a tumor was removed, to attach to and kill remaining tumor cells, and to shrink a tumor before surgery. (tabers.com)
  • subadventitial tumor, the Internal carotid artery was preserved, we did not performed a bypass with prosthetic graft or safenous vein and all cranial nerves were preserved ( Figure 2 ). (annexpublishers.co)
  • Our physicians specialize in the diagnosis and management of carotid artery disease , aortic aneurysms , and poor circulation to the legs and the abdominal organs. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Ischemia within the arteries branching from the internal carotid artery may result in symptoms such as blindness in one eye, weakness in one arm or leg, or weakness in one entire side of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Central nervous system changes occur as the lesions invade and destroy tissue, and, because the tumors compress the brain, cranial nerves, and cerebral blood vessels, the compression causes cerebral edema and increased intracranial pressure (ICP). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Clusters of tumor cells (type I cells interspersed with type II cells), called zellballen, are surrounded by a dense network of capillary caliber blood vessels. (medscape.com)
  • I. To determine the response rate to treatment with OSI-906 (linsitinib) 150mg BIO in patients with advanced wild-type (WT) gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • To explore patterns of protein expression in serum and tumor tissues as predictors of response and progression-free survival (PFS) in advanced WT GIST treated with OSI-906. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Wild-type gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a cancer in the esophagus, stomach, or intestines. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • To learn if SGI-110 causes GIST tumors to shrink or slows their growth. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • KIT and PDGFRA mutations have been identified as tumor initiating events in 85% of adult patients with GIST and these tumors are responsive to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Imatinib. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • For this purpose, all neurovascular structures were identified, and periadventitial dissections of the carotid arteries were performed. (oatext.com)
  • Early surgical removal is recommended to prevent the development of larger and more advanced tumors, which are associated with higher morbidity and mortality. (oatext.com)
  • Furthermore, it was emphasized the necessity of early surgical management regardless of patient age and tumor size. (oatext.com)
  • Functional MRI can map the brain function surrounding a tumor to help design a surgical approach that removes the tumor while avoiding damage to areas critical for normal functioning. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • SDHD gene mutation in Mexican population with carotid body tumor. (cdc.gov)
  • The most common place of residence was Mexico City, 8% of the patients had family history, about 20% of the patients had a contralateral tumor and 16% had antecedent of another kind of tumor, 4 (16%) p81L SDHD gene mutations were detected, all of them were heterozygous. (cdc.gov)
  • SDHD gene mutation in Mexican population whit carotid body tumor. (cdc.gov)
  • To determine if tumor metabolic response correlates with anatomic response and clinical benefit. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Ischemia within the arteries branching from the vertebral arteries in the back of the brain may result in symptoms such as dizziness, vertigo, double vision, or weakness on both sides of the body[citation needed]. (wikipedia.org)
  • Focused and computerized robotic radiation methods such as the Gamma Knife and Cyberknife permit delivery of more radiation to the tumor and less to surrounding normal tissue. (tabers.com)
  • To investigate correlations between glucose, insulin, and candidate tumor tissue and blood biomarkers with FDG-PET metabolic response. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This rare tumor has a reported incidence of 1 to 2 per 100,000. (asahq.org)
  • Most clinical signs are due to the increased ICP, but signs and symptoms may vary due to the type of tumor, its location, and the degree and speed of invasion. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • True/False: Once invasion of the laryngeal framework occurs, the ossified portions of cartilage have the least resistance to tumor spread. (brainscape.com)
  • What percent of glottic tumors display perineural and vascular invasion? (brainscape.com)
  • What is the stage of a transglottic tumor without vocal cord fixation, cartilage invasion, or extension beyond the larynx? (brainscape.com)
  • From this observation, we review the clinical, radiological and histopathological features of the tumor and its uncertain evolutionary mode and therapeutic modalities. (annexpublishers.co)